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Andre Popp Vinyl Records

  • Presenting Popp! (Discontinued) Quick View

    Andre Popp
    $7.99
    Vinyl LP Reissue - Sealed
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André Charles Jean Popp (born 19 February 1924) is a French composer, arranger and screenwriter.

Born in Fontenay-le-Comte, Vendée, he started his career as a church organist, filling the place of his father who had been called up to serve in World War II in 1939. Popp studied music at the Saint Joseph Institute. In the 1960s, he co-wrote

André Charles Jean Popp (born 19 February 1924) is a French composer, arranger and screenwriter.

Born in Fontenay-le-Comte, Vendée, he started his career as a church organist, filling the place of his father who had been called up to serve in World War II in 1939. Popp studied music at the Saint Joseph Institute. In the 1960s, he co-wrote (with Pierre Cour) two songs for the Eurovision Song Contest — Tom Pillibi, which won the competition for France in 1960, and L'amour est bleu (Love is Blue) which came fourth for Luxembourg in 1967, but which later became a Number one hit in the US for Paul Mauriat. During this time he was the arranger for many top French singers such as Juliette Greco. He worked for many years for French radio. Popp is the composer of Piccolo, Sax and Co, a musical tale for children intended as a guide to the instruments of the orchestra and the rudiments of harmony. In 1957, Popp released Delirium in Hi-Fi (originally titled Elsa Popping et sa musique sidérante), a collaboration with Pierre Fatosme, an experiment in the recording techniques of the time.

André Popp has been an inspiration for newer French composers such as Fred Pallem. Popp is the author of the pop song "Manchester et Liverpool" sung by Marie Laforêt. Its melody of the latter song gained fame in the former Soviet Union as the background music to the Vremya television news programme's weather forecast since the early 1970s.

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