Anthony Braxton Vinyl Records & LP Albums

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Anthony Braxton Vinyl Records

  • Paris Concert Quick View

    Circle
    $35.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed
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Anthony Braxton (born June 4, 1945) is an American composer, player of multiple reed instruments, and pianist. He has created a large body of highly complex work. Much of Braxton's music is jazz oriented, but he has also been active in free improvisation and orchestral music, and has written operas. Among the vast array of instruments he utilizes
Anthony Braxton (born June 4, 1945) is an American composer, player of multiple reed instruments, and pianist. He has created a large body of highly complex work. Much of Braxton's music is jazz oriented, but he has also been active in free improvisation and orchestral music, and has written operas. Among the vast array of instruments he utilizes are the flute; the sopranino, soprano, C-Melody, F alto, E-flat alto, baritone, bass, and contrabass saxophones; and the E-flat, B-flat, and contrabass clarinets.

Braxton's music is highly theoretical and mystically influenced, and he is the author of multiple volumes explaining his theories and pieces—such as the philosophical three-volume Triaxium Writings and the five-volume Composition Notes, both published by Frog Peak Music. While his compositions and improvisations can be characterized as avant garde, many of his pieces have a swing feel and rhythmic angularity that are overtly indebted to Charlie Parker and the Bebop tradition. Braxton is notorious for naming his pieces as diagrams, typically labeled with cryptic numbers and letters. (The labels of long playing records were better suited than compact discs for the depiction of these diagram titles.) Sometimes these diagrams have an obvious relation to the music — for instance, on the album For Trio the diagram-title indicates the physical positions of the performers — but in many cases the diagram-titles remain inscrutable (and Braxton has pointedly refused to explain their significance, claiming that he himself is still discovering their meaning).

Braxton eventually settled on a system of opus-numbers to make referring to these pieces simpler (and earlier pieces have had opus-numbers retrospectively added to them).

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