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A Change Is Gonna Come

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  • Otis Blue Otis Blue Quick View

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    Otis Blue

    Ranked 74/500 on Rolling Stone Magazine's 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.

    Remastered By Kevin Gray At Cohearent Audio From The Original Analog Tapes

    200-Gram 45 RPM Double LP Plated And Pressed At Quality Record Pressings!

    Tip-On Gatefold Jacket From Stoughton Printing

    Otis Redding's third album presents his talent unfettered, his direction clear and his confidence emboldened, with fully half the songs representing a reach that extended his musical grasp. More than a quarter of this album is given over to Redding's version of songs by Sam Cooke, his idol, who had died the previous December.

    Otis Redding Sings Soul is considered by many critics to be Redding's first great album. Recorded in April and July of 1965, it was released September 15th of that same year. The styles of Cooke and Redding couldn't have been more different; Cooke smooth and sure, Redding raw and pleading. But Redding's versions of Shake and A Change Is Gonna Come show how Cooke's sound and message helped shape Redding's Southern soul sound. Redding's singing reaches a new level of expressiveness with this as well as with covers of B.B. King's Rock Me Baby and the Motown hit My Girl.

    This great album receives the full Analogue Productions reissue treatment here, starting with Kevin Gray's remaster from the original analogue tapes. Then we back that up with 200-gram plating and pressing on super-silent vinyl by our own Quality Record Pressings. Finally it's all housed in a tip-on gatefold jacket from Stoughton Printing. Deluxe all the way; you'll be estatic with the results!

    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Ole Man Trouble

    2. Respect
    3. Change Gonna Come
    4. Down In The Valley
    5. I've Been Loving You Too Long
    6. Shake
    7. My Girl
    8. Wonderful World
    9. Rock Me Baby
    10. Satisfaction
    11. You Don't Miss Your Water
    Otis Redding
    200 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP 45 RPM - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Fresh Blood For Tired Vampyres Fresh Blood For Tired Vampyres Quick View

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    Fresh Blood For Tired Vampyres

    Eternal life can seem like an eternity. Ask any vampire. The continuous march of sun ups, sun downs, transformations of form, seductions, cape fittings & exsanguinations. Eventually it all just becomes an endless, tired routine. It all seems so exciting & so sexy to those of us who operate knowing we have limited time. But ask any vampire about the downside of eternal life, & you won't be surprised to hear tales of binge eating garlic bread just to feel the hurt, or of the occasional dangling of a wooden stake just over the center of the rib cage.

    Electric Six knows all about eternal life. Electric Six has been around forever & it can never die. That's lovely, but it's also very tiring. Fresh Blood For Tired Vampyres is the new release by Electric Six on Metropolis Records. One listen & you will immediately understand that the sexiest vampires are urban vampires. Where E6 has dabbled in dance, hip-hop & R&B in the past, Fresh Blood is the whole enchilada. It's thirteen songs designed to make the listener interested in smooth & nasty fuckin', the way they do it in the city. From the Grandmaster Flash-inspired Number Of The Beast to the super smooth tour of the NYC outer boroughs Mood Is Improving, the listener finds himself immediately deposited into an urban drop zone with hustlas & dickblockas coming from behind every corner.

    The radio-ready pop hits I'll Be In Touch & Dance With Dark Forces are the tracks that get the listener off the street & into the club. & it would not be an Electric Six album without an epic closer, that being the beautiful & haunting Spacewalkin', the ballad that assures the listener that the vampire has now fed & will live a thousand more years, albeit in outer space. Electric Six changes more frequently than change itself, but ultimately this just means they're never gonna put out the same album twice. Fresh Blood for Tired Vampires is poppy & smooth, nasty & raw...& oh so life affirming, especially if you are undead.

    1. Acid Reducer
    2. The Number of The...
    3. Mood Is Improving
    4. I'll Be In Touch
    5. Lottery Reptiles
    6. Dance With Dark...
    7. (Be My) Skin Caboose
    8. My Dreams
    9. I Got The Box
    10. Lee Did This To Me
    11. Greener Pastures
    12. The Lover's Pie
    13. Space Walkin'
    Electric Six
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • All Yours All Yours Quick View

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    All Yours

    Widowspeak has grown up in a lot of ways. The band's third album, All Yours, is one that could only come from Molly Hamilton and Robert Earl Thomas: a honed and elegant interweaving of dream-pop and slowcore rock and roll, easygoing melodies and dusty, snaking guitars. It's also their finest release to date: ten beautiful songs that are refreshingly straightforward yet built from the same well-chosen and deftly-used tools the band has always worked with. All Yours is ambitious without feeling labored-over, anchored in the strengths of Widowspeak's consistent influences. There are those familiar Morricone-come-Verlaine guitar passages, moody and country-tinged instrumentation, watery tremolo, velvety stacked vocals. You can hear Molly's affection for The Cranberries and The Sundays in the wavering melodies of 'Dead Love' or 'Girls', and Rob's adoration of George Harrison and Robbie Robertson in his brilliantly economical guitar playing. The result is an aesthetically diverse and profoundly nostalgic sound; indebted to past eras without feeling dated. After many line up changes, the band chose to work again with Jarvis Taveniere, who produced their self-titled debut in 2011. They also enlisted him and drummer Aaron Neveu (both of whom play in Woods) as the studio rhythm section. The presence of Taveniere and Neveu contributes a groove that wasnít there previously, and there's a few other new things: the swell of strings at critical moments, and for the first time, voices beyond Molly's own. We finally get to hear Rob sing in the earnestly laid-back 'Borrowed World.' Members of psych outfit Quilt contribute harmonies and keys throughout the record, most notably in 'My Baby's Gonna Carry On', and 'Cosmically Aligned'. Perhaps All Yours is so refreshing because it's a return to form. It's a record that feels as effortlessly unplanned as their debut, that serves to capture a moment rather than create one.
    1. All Yours
    2. Narrows
    3. Dead Love (So Still)
    4. Stoned
    5. Girls
    6. Borrowed World
    7. Cosmically Aligned
    8. My Baby's Gonna Carry On
    9. Coke Bottle Green
    10. Hands
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Southern Avenue Southern Avenue Quick View

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    Southern Avenue

    Southern Avenue is a Memphis street that runs from the easternmost part of the city limits all the way to Soulsville, the original home of Stax Records. Southern Avenue is also the name of a fiery young Memphis quintet that embodies its home city's soul, blues and gospel traditions, while adding a youthful spirit and dynamic energy all their own. "If Memphis is a genre, this is it!" proclaims American Blues Scene and Rock 103FM calls Southern Avenue "The most talked about band in Memphis."

    Their self-titled debut album is a breath of fresh air with its own unique blend of gospel- tinged R&B vocals, roots/blues-based guitar work and soul-inspired songwriting. And Southern Avenue's upcoming release on the fabled Stax label is a testament to the young combo's talent and vision.

    Southern Avenue features five young but seasoned musicians who came from diverse musical and personal backgrounds to create music that spans their wide-ranging musical interests, while showcasing the powerful chemistry that the group has honed through stage and studio experience.

    Southern Avenue encompasses Memphis-born, church-bred sisters Tierinii and Tikyra Jackson, respectively a soulful, charismatic singer and a subtle powerful drummer; guitarist Ori Naftaly, an Israeli-born blues disciple who first came to America as an acclaimed solo artist; versatile jazz-inspired bassist Daniel McKee; and the band's newest addition, keyboardist Jeremy Powell, an early alumnus of Stax's legendary music academy.

    The band members' diverse skills come together organically on Southern Avenue, scheduled for release on February 24, 2017 via Stax Records, a division of Concord Music Group. Produced by Kevin Houston (North Mississippi Allstars, Lucero, Patty Griffin), the 10-song album features guest appearances from Luther Dickinson of the North Mississippi Allstars and trumpeter Marc Franklin of the Bo-Keys. But it's Southern Avenue's own potent musical chemistry that drives such sublimely soulful originals as Don't Give Up, What Did I Do, It's Gonna Be Alright, Love Me Right and Wildflower. The band also pays tribute to its roots with an incandescent reading of Ann Peebles' Memphis soul classic Slipped, Tripped and Fell in Love.

    The seeds for Southern Avenue's birth were planted when Ori Naftaly, who'd grown up in Israel with a deep-rooted passion for American blues and funk, came to Memphis in 2013 to compete in the prestigious International Blues Challenge. That experience led to Naftaly moving permanently to Memphis and successfully touring the United States with his own band. Although his talents were embraced by American audiences, Naftaly felt constrained in his own band, feeling the need to include a more expansive, collaborative musical vision. That opportunity arrived when he met Memphis native Tierinii Jackson, who'd gotten her start singing in church, before performing in a series of cover bands and theatrical projects.

    According to Ori, When I saw Tierinii perform, I thought, 'This is why I came to America.' I met her and we clicked. At our first rehearsal, she told me that her sister was a drummer, and she thought it would be great to have her in the band. We had such a good vibe, and suddenly I didn't care so much about my solo thing.

    I initially clicked with Ori really well, but it was his project, Tierinii remembers. Then he came to me and said 'I want this band to be a collaboration, I want this to be our vision and our music.' So we started writing together, and that's when I realized that we were really the same musically.

    We started over, Naftaly continues. We threw out most of the songs I'd been playing in my solo band, and Tierinii and I wrote a whole new set, and we became Southern Avenue. The more we played together, the closer we got, and the more we became a family. We started getting a different kind of crowd, and from there things escalated quickly.

    Ori said, 'My band is done, this is y'all's band,' Tierinii recalls. We all quit our other gigs and started focusing on this, working and writing and living together in a way that you don't experience when you're playing somebody else's music. Now we're playing songs that we wrote ourselves and we're playing them from our hearts. That is when I realized that we had something special. Despite not having a record deal, Southern Avenue quickly found success touring in America and Europe. They won additional attention playing some prestigious festivals and competing in the International Blues Challenge, in which they represented Memphis. Less than a year after the band's formation, they were signed to the resurgent Stax label.

    I feel like being on Stax is a responsibility, says Tierinii. I grew up in Memphis, seeing the name Stax everywhere. It was a constant presence, and now it's up to us to live up that. I feel like this band can be a platform to do a lot of positive things for the city of Memphis. I want to change the world, but Memphis is home. Tierinii views Southern Avenue as a perfect soundtrack to our first year together. We wrote these songs in our first nine months of being a band. We'd all done so many things and come from so many different places, but the music represents all of us. It's been a real crash course, she continues. We've haven't been a band for very long, but what we have feels very special, and it's made us a strong unit. I think that we represent something that people need to see right now.

    This band has already made our dreams come true, Ori concludes. I've waited all my life to be in a band like this, and it's amazing to me that I get to play with these people every night. Our goal is to keep doing this for a long time and leave our mark. We're trying to build a legacy.

    1. Don't Give Up
    2. What Did I Do
    3. It's Gonna Be Alright
    4. Slipped, Tripped And Fell In Love
    5. Love Me Right
    6. 80 Miles From Memphis
    7. Wildflower
    8. No Time To Lose
    9. Rumble
    10. Peace Will Come
    Southern Avenue
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Sunday Dinner Sunday Dinner Quick View

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    Sunday Dinner

    Keath Mead would like to invite you to Sunday Dinner. The
    25-year-old South Carolina native's debut album is as pleasurable
    as a drive along the coast, as comforting as a day out with
    friends, and as sweet as pie after lunch. Steeped in the classic
    sounds of '60s and '70s pop singer-songwriters, Mead is just as
    influenced by contemporary artists such as The Shins' James
    Mercer and Jack White. "Waiting" opens the record with a warm
    bed of synths and Mead sings, "One day you're gonna land/ in a
    place that you never planned/ in your life to see." An optimistic
    song about potential? Maybe. But it's definitely a song about
    regret. Mead has that timeless ability to make songs that seem
    to say one thing, but move us to feel many things. With Sunday
    Dinner, Mead aspired to achieve a songwriting ideal: If a song
    doesn't hold up with one person singing and playing a single
    instrument, then it's probably not that good of a song, he says.

    The album was recorded in only eight days-over the span of
    nine months-with the help of Chaz Bundick (Toro Y Moi, Les
    Sins). Bundick hosted Mead in his Berkeley, Calif., home studio
    for the recording. Mead's guitar and vocal tracks came first,
    then Bundick on bass, before the pair took turns on drums and
    synthesizers. The collaborative process lent an improvisational
    aspect to the album, with the pair playing music until they found
    a passage they both liked. The live playing and "happy
    accidents" of the recording process add to the easy-going vibe
    of the LP.

    Though recording the album was relatively short, the songs
    were written over three years. The primary theme of the record is
    the anxiety induced by the rapid changes brought on by coming
    of age. Mead also contemplates isolation, loss of innocence,
    and angst associated with maturation.

    1. Waiting
    2. Grow Up
    3. She Had
    4. Change
    5. Setttle For Less
    6. Holiday
    7. Where I Wanna Be
    8. Quiet Room
    9. Navy
    10. Polite Refusal
    11. So Close
    Keath Mead
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Visuals Visuals Quick View

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    Mew frontman Jonas Bjerre has worked on the projections for the band's live shows since their early days. Usually, the Danish trio finish an album and Bjerre gets to work on the visuals. For their seventh record, though, the singer decided to turn things upside down, working on the visuals first and seeing if they informed the music. The resultant record feels like a culmination for one of rock's most ambitious and inventive groups: Visuals is where Bjerre and his bandmates, bassist Johan Wohlert and drummer Silas Utke Graae Jørgensen, join the dots of a career that has spanned over two decades. "We do everything on this album ourselves," says Bjerre. "We produced it ourselves, I did the artwork, I'm doing the visuals. Visuals felt like a fitting title. I like the idea that each song has a visual aspect to it somehow."

    Mew have a tradition of, as Bjerre puts it, hiding away in a cave for three or four years between albums. The tour that accompanied 2015's +- album found the band reaching a creative peak that they felt was too exhilarating to be dampened by a period of extended cave-dwelling. They arrived home with demos that had been written on the road and the spark was lit. They wanted to break the cycle and make an album quickly. "We just felt like, "if we do it the normal way, it's gonna be another three or four years before we get to do it again'," says Bjerre. "If you keep doing it like that, ultimately you make a handful of albums and then you're ready for retirement." The trio wanted to make an album spontaneously, keeping the energy they'd generated on the road going.

    They set to work in Copenhagen and started knocking the demos they'd written on tourbuses and in hotel rooms into shape. At the same time, new songs were emerging in reaction to what was going on around them. Mew aren't a political band but couldn't help but be affected by rolling news and the death of an icon. "It was pretty dark last year, so some of the darkness in the lyrics comes from that. You definitely get the feeling that things don't last forever when someone like David Bowie dies." Visuals was completed in just under a year - what Bjerre describes as an "incredible" feat for a band used to periods of prolonged tinkering. "Spending less time on it, you can still maintain the feeling you had when you first wrote it," says Bjerre.

    Bjerre doesn't know where Mew songs come from. He finds it hard to pin down his lyrics, his melodies, himself. It's what makes his band so special, that thrill that songs could go anywhere, that understated verses could suddenly rocket skyward, anthemic choruses could implode into beautiful soundscapes or sophisticated grooves could be crushed like a tincan. "I don't consciously know why the songs come out the way they do," says Bjerre. "It's a lot of trial and error for us. Even though a song is on an album, it keeps growing because we get to go out and perform it for an audience. I like the thought it can keep growing. It's never really finished."

    Visuals is Mew at their most compact, their chemistry at its most potent. With only one song over five minutes, it's their most concise album. Bjerre says there was no need for a grand, overarching concept. Each song on Visuals represents its own little chapter and story: nothing needed to be overly long. "Each album is like a collection of thoughts and ideas that fit the time we're in," he says. "They're like little diary entries, except they're a little bit more veiled perhaps. To me, albums are memories of times in my life."

    The song that led the way was the slow-building euphoria of Nothingness And No Regrets. Bjerre says that Mew lyrics often have two or three different meanings, and the opener is a reflection on life and death at the same time as "imagining this team of people trying to accomplish something and ultimately failing." The expansive 80s-style pop of The Wake Of Your Life is about legacy and what's left after you've gone. "These are things you think about more and more the older you get." It started out as a synth-pop track with lots of programming before taking on a different shape when the band added guitars over the top. "We try to change the method of how we reach the destination all the time cos if you do things the same way all the time, the results will often be very similar," says Bjerre.

    The discordant stomp of Candy Pieces All Smeared Out came about after Bjerre went back over some demos he'd made as a youngster on an Omega 500. "Some of them were interesting sonically so I kept some of the programming. We built the song on top of this really weird 8-bit computer track." The song sums up the emotional to and fro and ca

    ptivating contrariness at the heart of Visuals: it's an album that's both nostalgic and contemporary, that looks back whilst marching forward.

    The blissful glide of In A Better Place is a prime example of the impulsive environment that the songs were written in, a drumbeat by Jorgensen inspiring Bjerre to write a song immediately, whilst the atmospheric rock of Ay Ay Ay was based around a choir part that Bjerre had come up with a few years ago. All of the vocal parts were recorded in the booth that Bjerre had constructed in his apartment in Copenhagen. "I like waking up in the middle of the night and feeling inspired by something and being able to go in my booth and just sing it," he says.

    Bjerre says that the celebratory groove of Learn Our Crystals "is one of our weirdest songs." Poppy and fantastical, it had a familiar feeling to the singer as soon as he wrote it. The soulful sway of Shoulders has an R'n'B feel to it, whilst Bjerre had earmarked the mesmerising intricacy Carry Me To Safety as the album's closer as soon as it'd been written. "I just like how it twists and turns," he says. "It's a reflection on life and being in a band, what it means to be in a band, dedicating so many years of your life to this thing."

    Twenty years into their career, Mew have the irrepressible ebullience of a band on their debut album. Visuals feels like the beginning of a new chapter. "Mew is what I always come back to, it's a companion to my life. It's always been there, as long as I can remember. It's a big part of the footprint that we'll leave behind," says Bjerre. Mew march on: this is the sound of a band seizing the moment.

    1. Nothingness and No Regrets
    2. The Wake of Your Life
    3. Candy Pieces All Smeared Out
    4. In a Better Place
    5. Ay Ay Ay
    6. Learn Our Crystals
    7. Twist Quest
    8. Shoulders
    9. Videos
    10. Zanzibar
    11. Carry Me to Safety
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Carving Out The Eyes Of God Carving Out The Eyes Of God Quick View

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    Carving Out The Eyes Of God

    After the release of A Haunting Curse, Goatwhore stayed busy playing multiple tours across all over the world including a coveted spot on 2007's Sounds of the Underground and 2008's Ozzfest in Texas where metal juggernauts Metallica closed out the day of metal. Other tours and dates included Sunn O))), Hatebreed, All Shall Perish, Celtic Frost, Venom, Fear Factory, Suffocation, Cattle Decapitation, God Forbid, and Amon Amarth just to name a few. Obviously Goatwhore kept themselves busy throughout the course of the album cycle playing with a wide variety of bands proving just how multi faceted the group's reach is.

    Enter 2009: New Orleans, LA's sons of American no-frills black metal, GOATWHORE, have just announced that the title of their fourth full-length album, and second for Metal Blade, will be Carving Out the Eyes of God. For the follow up to 2006's A Haunting Curse, GOATWHORE headed back to St. Petersburg, FL to record with producer Erik Rutan at Manna Studios with mastering being handled by Alan Douches of West West Side.

    Vocalist Ben Falgoust comments on the direction of the new album; I don't really know how to explain this. I don't want to come off with the typical speech about how this record is our best yet and all of that. I will say that I am quite pleased how it has turned out and all parts relating to it. I feel every member put a great deal of effort into their part of the project. I even feel Erik Rutan busted his ass even more this time to make us feel that we didn't take any steps backwards in the recording and production of this release. I don't even really care what the critics say. I think the end result is basically coming up with something you have put a lot of work into and the satisfaction achieved in completing it. I will say that the new material is ripping metal and we still have that 'Goatwhore' sound, whatever that may mean for each individual that enjoys or hates what we do. Just look at it as another step in the evolution of this band. Each person that hears it will have his or her own perception of it. Like it or not, we don't have a say in it. The only thing we can do is just keep writing the way we do and accept the criticism. Doesn't mean we are gonna listen to the criticism and change. Just give it an honest listen and if you dig it, awesome! If you don't, then pass it on to a friend or use it as a new drink coaster.

    Guitarist Sammy Duet had this to add; Dark, heavy, evil. Erik Rutan did one hell of a job on it. If you don't like it... kiss my ass.

    1. Apocalyptic Havoc
    2. The All-Destroying
    3. Carving Out The Eyes Of God
    4. Shadow Of A Rising Knife
    5. Provoking The Ritual Of Death
    6. In Legions, I Am Wars Of Wrath
    7. Reckoning Of The Soul Made Godless
    8. This Passing Into The Power Of Demons
    9. Razor Flesh Devoured
    10. To Mourn And Forever Wander Through Forgotten Doorways
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Crooked Teeth Crooked Teeth Quick View

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    Crooked Teeth

    Papa Roach has never taken the easy way out and they aren't going to start now. Over the past two decades the group have established themselves as true trendsetters in heavy music: They've been nominated for two Grammys, toured the globe with everyone from Eminem to Marilyn Manson and crafted the nÜ metal anthem "Last Resort," which is still in heavy rotation on rock radio seventeen years after its release. However, the group's tenth full-length Crooked Teeth sees the band returning to their humble-and hungry-roots. The album was recorded in a cramped West Hollywood studio with up-and-coming producers Nicholas "RAS" Furlong and Colin Brittain, who grew up listening to Papa Roach and inspired them to revisit some of the traits that personally endeared the band to them, most notably frontman Jacoby Shaddix's remarkable rapping technique.

    "We've always kind of considered ourselves to be the bastard cousins of everything we've every been involved with so we wanted to be true to that and switch things up this time around," Shaddix says. "The first time we met up with RAS and Colin, they said that [2000's] Infest was on constant rotation when they were growing up and they wanted to bring back some of that fire." The connection between the artists and producers was immediate and the first song Papa Roach-which also features guitarist Jerry Horton, bassist Tobin Esperance, and drummer Tony Palermo-came up with for Crooked Teeth was "My Medication," an instantly catchy banger that sees Shaddix spitting verses in between massive choruses and ambient accents. "I really felt like we had a personal connection and the music was just there waiting to be written and once we nailed that song things really clicked and we knew exactly what we had to do" Furlong explains. "We really followed our instincts and tried something unproven with this record and because of that we ended up with a bold, courageous and more adventurous version of Papa Roach." It was in this studio that "old school" Papa Roach ways, morphed to create this "new school" Papa Roach sound.

    From the instantly infectious nature of the title track to the atmospheric sheen of the ballad "Periscope" (which features Skylar Grey) and the hip-hop rock mashup "Sunrise Trailer Park" (which features an impassioned verse from Machine Gun Kelly). Crooked Teeth displays the various sides of Papa Roach and illustrates why they've managed to remain relevant while musical trends ebb and flow. "We didn't go into this album with the intention of trying to write radio singles," Horton explains. "The collection of songs was really about bookending everything that we've done prior to this album and reintroducing Papa Roach to people who didn't realize the depth that we have," says Palermo. "The whole idea was to take the classic elements of Papa Roach that everyone loved and revamp them into a modern version of the sound through the creative process," adds Furlong. "We just wanted to flip everything on its head and see what would happen and it turned out more amazing than any of us could have expected."

    "The people who have wanted to hear me rap for years are gonna love some of the viscousness on this record," Shaddix explains adding that while he had his own initial reservations about some of the album's more unorthodox moments - such as the 808 bass drop into a metal breakdown on the album title track, "Crooked Teeth" - ultimately those adventurous decisions are what make the album such a refreshing change of pace in a rock climate that's grown increasingly sterile. "I'd like to personally thank all of the guys in the band for making this happen because all it takes is one person to give you a shot and this was definitely mine," Furlong adds. "I want to be one of the best producers in modern day music so I wanted to work as hard for these guys as they would for themselves because as a producer it was my job to push them to get the kind of quality work everyone has been expecting."

    Just as Papa Roach felt like they still had something to prove with this record, so did the production team who attempted to bring in elements of music from different genres and parts of the world while still staying true to Papa Roach's sound. "One of the big elements in my production is finding those pockets of rhythm that people associate more with rap or reggae," Furlong explains, a fact that came in especially handy when Shaddix was fine-tuning his freestyle skills. "I know rap rhythms because I grew up listening to hip-hop, so I was able to make sure that the delivery was on point and the beat was in the pocket so it didn't suffer from a lot of the stylistic pitfalls that can happen when you merge rock and rap."

    Crooked Teeth also sees Shaddix pulling no punches lyrically, as evidenced on intensely personal tracks like "Born For Greatness," produced by Jason Evigan (Jason Derulo, Demi Lovato, Kehlani, Madonna), which sees Shaddix getting sentimental about his three children, or "American Dream" where the lifelong pacifist begs the listener to ask, "have you ever thought war was a sickness?" "My father is a Vietnam veteran and a lot of those soldiers came back to a country where people weren't accepting them back into society or aware of the effects that war has on your psyche," Shaddix says of the song." "Post-traumatic stress disorder and the disintegration of the American family are things I've dealt with personally and I knew other people could relate to. I think that's what makes this record bold. Nothing was off limits when it came to what was on my mind."

    Never one to shy away from difficult topics, Papa Roach dug deep with Crooked Teeth and refused to censor themselves when it came to their opinion of the current political landscape and organized religion. For example, on "None Of The Above," every ounce of musical intensity on the album is mirrored by Shaddix's words whether he's screaming, singing or rhyming. "It took me a long time, but eventually I realized that in life we're all human and we all make mistakes whether you're the president or the preacher, you know?" Shaddix explains when asked about the latter song. "It's an example of how I can get lost in a storyline and explore so many different issues in one track and that's what I love about this record. Just the spark of an idea would instantly ignite and the next thing we knew we had another song that we all loved."

    In many ways making Crooked Teeth reminded Shaddix of the band's early days, well before they sold millions of albums and became a household name. "When we were in the rehearsal space I wasn't thinking about who I needed to impress, I was thinking about how much I love making music with the guys in this band," Shaddix admits. "It feels honest and it feels pure," adds Esperance. Fittingly, throughout the process, Shaddix gained inspiration from bands like Led Zeppelin and Faith No More, acts who constantly redefined themselves and were never content to rest on the merits of a hit single." This band encompasses some of my greatest victories, but it's also brought out some of my darkest character flaws," Shaddix summarizes, "so I have kind of a love-hate relationship with this music, but I can't stop because I've got too much of my life invested in it at this point. We are a purpose-driven band and I've got a responsibility to myself and our fans to continue to create."

    1. Break The Fall
    2. Crooked Teeth
    3. My Medication
    4. Born For Greatness
    5. American Dreams
    6. Periscope
    7. Help
    8. Sunrise Trailer Park
    9. Traumatic
    10. None Of The Above
    Papa Roach
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Grab The Next Train Grab The Next Train Quick View

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    Grab The Next Train

    Born near Detroit, Michigan, Marshall Crenshaw began playing guitar at age ten and he received his first break playing John Lennon in the off-Broadway company of Beatlemania. In 1987, he played Buddy Holly in the Richie Valens biopic "La Bamba." While living in NYC, he recorded the single "Something's Gonna Happen" for Alan Betrock's Shake Records, which led to a deal with Warner Bros. His debut album, Marshall Crenshaw was acclaimed as a pop masterpiece upon its release in 1982 and established him as a first-rate songwriter, singer and guitarist. The record spawned the Top 40 single "Someday, Someway," which rockabilly singer Robert Gordon covered and scored a hit with a year earlier, and other classics such as "(You're My) Favorite Waste of Time," "Whenever You're On My Mind" and "Cynical Girl." The great songs continued with the Life's Too Short album on MCA ("Fantastic Planet of Love"), three albums for Razor & Tie and the 2009 release Jaggedland ("Someone Told Me," "Passing Through," "Never Coming Down

    A quote from Trouser Press sums up Marshall Crenshaw's early career: "Although he was seen as a latter-day Buddy Holly at the outset, he soon proved too talented and original to be anyone but himself." All Music Guide captured Crenshaw's vibe perfectly: "He writes songs that are melodic, hooky and emotionally true, and he sings and plays them with an honesty and force that still finds room for humor without venom."

    "His intelligence, integrity, and passion for the great song always show up in his music," wrote Robert Christgau in his Consumer Guide of Marshall Crenshaw. Over a span of 30 years, Crenshaw has released 13 albums, all of which have received the highest marks from critics and have earned him a fiercely loyal fan base.

    "I wanted to think of a different way of working that would inspire me and keep me motivated," Marshall Crenshaw says of his newest endeavor: a subscription-only service that addresses the recent seismic changes in the music-industry landscape by cutting out the record-company middle man to distribute his new recordings directly to fans.

    The subscription service, which the veteran singer/guitarist/songwriter/producer recently launched via a successful Kickstarter funding campaign, will provide fans with a steady stream of new Marshall Crenshaw music via a series of exclusive three-song 10-inch, 45-rpm vinyl EPs on Addie-Ville Records, six of which the artist plans to release over a two-year period.

    Each EP will consist entirely of newly recorded, never-before-released material, encompassing a new original Crenshaw composition, a classic cover tune, and a new reworking of a time-honored favorite.

    "I really do think that vinyl sounds best, and that playing a vinyl record is still the optimum listening experience," Crenshaw asserts. "And with the sound quality that you get at 45 rpm, I think that these things are going to deliver the goods, sonically."

    All three tracks were mastered for maximum awesomeness by legendary engineer Greg Calbi, who will handle mastering duties on the entire EP series.

    1. Grab The Next Train
    2. Made My Bed Gonna Lie In It
    3. Something's Gonnna Happen
    Marshall Crenshaw
    10 Vinyl EP 45 RPM - Sealed Buy Now
  • Hug Of Thunder Hug Of Thunder Quick View

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    Hug Of Thunder

    "I don't want to go out there being presumptuous," Kevin Drew says, "because, I've worn those presumptuous shoes before, and you don't want it to feel like, 'Oh, what a let-down.'" That's the fear when you bring back one of music's most beloved names seven years after their last album. But with Hug of Thunder, the fifth Broken Social Scene album, Drew and his bandmates have a right to feel presumptuous.

    They have that right because they have created one of 2017's most sparkling, multi-faceted albums. On Hug of Thunder the 15 members of Broken Social Scene - well, the 15 who play on the record, including returnees Leslie Feist and Emily Haines - refract their varying emotions, methods, and techniques into something that doesn't just equal their other albums, but surpasses them. It is righteous but warm, angry but loving, melodic but uncompromising. The title track on its own might just be the best thing you will hear all year - a song that will become as beloved as "Anthems For a Seventeen-Year-Old Girl" from their breakthrough album, You Forgot It In People.

    Its title, Drew says, captured what he wanted people to feel about the group's comeback, and how they sound playing together again: "It's just such a wonderful sentiment about us, coming in like a hug of thunder."

    Broken Social Scene had reconvened, in varying forms, several times over the past four years - the odd festival show here and there, preferably ones that involved the least possible traveling. But the idea that they might turn their hand to something more than greatest-hits sets had been stirring since November 2014, when producer Joe Chiccarelli told Drew the group needed to make a new album.

    "He started showing up at our label, asking if we were going to make an album," Drew recalls. "He just didn't give up; he just kept saying, 'You've got to strike, you've got to do this, the time is now,' and so finally we agreed."

    As might be expected to be the case with a many-headed hydra of a group, getting all the principals to agree wasn't easy. Drew's co-founder Brendan Canning was keen, but Drew and fellow BSS lifer Charles Spearin took more persuading. A turning point for Drew came with the Paris terror attacks of November 2015, which made him feel the world needed an injection of positivity: "It just sort of made us want to go out there and play. Because I think we've always been a band that's been a celebration."

    Canning picks up the story: "By autumn of 2015 we had started getting together and trying some ideas out, just getting back in that jam space, in Charles' garage. Then we set up shop in my living room and we were starting to come together in a very familiar kind of way, jamming in the living room, eating meals in the kitchen together, because that's what the band is about: 'Hey, let's all get on the same page and get the energies flowing in the same direction.'"

    Recording finally began in April 2016 at The Bathouse studio on the shores of Lake Ontario, with later sessions in Toronto and Montreal, before the group went right back to basics. "It was very beautiful the way that it ended in Charlie's little rehearsal garage space," Drew says, "after going to all these studios. We just worked there, doing backup vocals and handclaps and all the shit we used to do when we were younger." And then it was to Los Angeles, where the album was mixed.

    The result is a panoramic, expansive album, 53 minutes that manages to be both epic and intimate. In troubled times it offers a serotonin rush of positivity: "Stay Happy" lives up to its title, with huge surges of brass that sound like sunshine bursting through clouds. "Gonna Get Better" makes a promise that the album is determined to deliver. That's not to say it's an escapist record: Broken Social Scene is completely engaged, wholly focussed, and not ignoring the darkness that lurks outside. But there is no hectoring, no lecturing, but a recognition of the confusion and ambiguity of the world. As the title track closes with Leslie Feist murmuring "There was a military base across the street," the listener is caught in the division between the national security provided by national defense, and the menace of the same thing.

    The gestation of Hug of Thunder was no idyll. When You Forgot It in People made their name, Broken Social Scene were young men and women. Fifteen years on, they were adults in or on the cusp of middle age, and - as Drew puts it - "all the adult problems in the world were happening around us individually, whether it was divorce or cancer". Three members of the band lost their fathers while the album was being recorded, "and it seemed like the days of going in the studio, getting stoned, drinking five beers and saying, 'Who gives a fuck?' were over".

    Then there's the fact of the size of the ensemble, and the number of competing voices. "You don't always get the final say with Broken Social Scene," Canning says, with a certain degree of understatement. He compares the process of getting everyone to agree on a song to party politics: "It's like you're trying to get a bill passed through the House - you have to be really committed to wanting to win."

    But, still, if they were to return, it had to be with everybody, no matter if that meant things might get unwieldy. "I'd like to believe that Broken Social Scene can be whatever it can be," Canning says, "but I think the fact we'd gone away for so long meant we really, we really couldn't have done the same thing without everyone involved, you know?" The story of Broken Social Scene, he insists, was built on the involvement of everyone, and so if the story was to be continued, those same people had to return.

    "The thing that has changed is that the relationships between us are established," Drew suggests. "And in a family, you ebb and flow and you come and you go and you're in love and then you're annoyed - but it's established now, the relationships aren't going anywhere, you know? And I think through time, because we've been through so much together, personally and professionally, when we're all on stage, everybody knows what they're doing, everybody has a melody to back up someone else, you feel supported, you're a crew, there's nothing but protection all around you."

    Canning picks up the theme: "Before we were making this record, I said to everyone: 'We all basically want the same thing, we might just have slightly different roadmaps on how to get there. So how do we stray off on certain country roads but get back onto the main thoroughfare?'"

    That Broken Social Scene was a family again, driving along the same main road, became apparent to UK fans in September 2016, when the group - with Ariel Engle the latest woman to assume the role of co-lead vocalist - came over for less than a handful of festival shows, to test the waters. Their Sunday teatime appearance at End Of The Road - an ecstatic hour of maximalist music, physically and emotionally overwhelming - ended up being one of the biggest hits of the festival. It achieved what Drew has always felt music needed to do: it created transcendence, a pocket of time where everyone present was living only in the moment.

    "My 11-year-old nephew asked me, 'Uncle Kev, why do adults get drunk?' and I looked at him and thought, 'OK, brilliant question, I'm going to give a brilliant answer,'" Drew recalls. "And I looked at him for about 10 seconds and I said, 'Because they want to feel like you. Because they want to feel like a kid again, they want to forget everything, they want to be innocent.' We are built in a way now where you can't do that because you're walking around with the anti-transcendence box in your pocket, and in your hand, and in your home, and on your bedside table: it's the anti-transcendence. It's called your phone! And we're getting killed, we're getting killed!"

    So what do Broken Social Scene want listeners to take from Hug of Thunder? Canning wants it to make them "pause for the cause and maybe just leave things in your life alone for 53 minutes". For Drew, it's about what it's always been about: making the connection. "I just hope they understand that there's others out there, that they're not alone," he says. "I know that's silly! But you'd be surprised how many times I've had to tell people, 'Hey, you're not alone on this, you're not alone thinking these things.' I mean, with the title Hug of Thunder, I want to hold people. I want to fucking hold them. And when we do shows, I'm not: 'Look at me, I'm elevated up on the stage,' It's: 'We're here with you, this is us together.' Broken Social Scene is about the people, and it's always been about the people."

    1. Sol Luna
    2. Halfway Home
    3. Protest Song
    4. Skyline
    5. Stay Happy
    6. Vanity Pail Kids
    7. Hug of Thunder
    8. Towers and Masons
    9. Victim Lover
    10. Please Take Me With You
    11. Gonna Get Better
    12. Mouth Guards of the Apocalypse
    Broken Social Scene
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
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