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A Life Once Lost

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  • Ecstatic Trance Ecstatic Trance Quick View

    $16.99
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    Ecstatic Trance

    1. Something Awful
    2. Gnawing Lisp
    3. Madness Is God
    4. Miracle Worker
    5. Empty Form
    6. I Am
    7. The Blues
    8. People Stare
    9. I See, I Hear
    10. I Sit Ill
    A Life Once lost
    $16.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Chemical Wedding The Chemical Wedding Quick View

    $29.99
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    The Chemical Wedding

    Once again re-emerging
    with new material after little
    more than 12 months than his fourth album, Bruce's
    solo career clicked into yet another higher gear in
    1998 upon the release of the frankly monumental
    The Chemical Wedding. Boasting the same line up
    as Accident Of Birth - Bruce, Roy Z, Adrian Smith,
    bassist Eddie Casillas and drummer David Ingraham
    - it offered a vicious riposte to those cynics who
    thought that musicians of Bruce's generation had lost
    touch with the way heavy music sounded. Both the
    heaviest record that Bruce has ever made and the
    finest set of songs in his illustrious canon, the album
    received ecstatic reviews, and was widely embraced
    by fans of both Bruce's solo career and, of course,
    Maiden themselves. This was modern heavy metal
    with a traditional heart, but somehow heavier, smarter
    and more invigorating than anyone had expected.
    On top of that, Bruce's lyrics and the album's concept
    offered a depth of substance and intent that cheerfully
    made a mockery of the idea that metal is a genre
    with a questionable intellect. Variously inspired by the
    life and works of William Blake (whose own words
    formed part of the epic "Jerusalem"), the nefarious
    aspirations of 19th century alchemists, and an
    assortment of wild, emotional personal observations,
    The Chemical Wedding was widely hailed as a
    masterpiece, and deservedly so.
    LP 1
    1. King in Crimson (2017 - Remaster)
    2. Chemical Wedding (2017 - Remaster)
    3. The Tower (2017 - Remaster)
    4. Killing Floor (2017 - Remaster)
    5. Book of Thel (2017 - Remaster)


    LP 2
    1. Gates of Urizen (2017 - Remaster)
    2. Jerusalem (2017 - Remaster)
    3. Trumpets of Jericho (2017 - Remaster)
    4. Machine Men (2017 - Remaster)
    5. The Alchemist (2017 - Remaster)

    Bruce Dickinson
    $29.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Centipede Hz Centipede Hz Quick View

    $21.99
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    Centipede Hz

    Centipede Hz was co-produced by Animal Collective and Ben H. Allen III and recorded at Sonic Ranch studios in Tornillo TX (outside of El Paso) by Ben H. Allen III and mixed at Maze Studios in Atlanta, GA by Ben H. Allen III.



    Centipede Hz is the tenth full length Animal Collective album following the widely celebrated Merriweather Post Pavilion (2009) and also the first since Strawberry Jam (2007) to feature all four original band members: Avey Tare, Panda Bear, Geologist and Deakin. As the album's opening bars of drum crashes and radio interference on "Moonjock" immediately make clear, having returned as a four piece, Animal Collective have made their most widescreen and fully realized music to date.


    Once touring for Merriweather Post Pavilion was concluded at the end of 2009, Animal Collective released their visual album Oddsac on DVD. The film was also screened internationally at theaters and film festivals. The band created Transverse Temporal Gyrus, an installation for the Guggenheim Museum in New York City and subsequently released a 12" single of the performance and launched a website to distribute music from the event. The period between Merriweather Post Pavilion and Centipede Hz also saw the release of two solo albums: Avey Tare's Down There (2010) and Panda Bear's Tomboy (2011).


    Regrouping as a four piece with original member Deakin once more in the band, Animal Collective reconvened in their native Baltimore in January-March of 2011 to write material for Centipede Hz with a further session later in the year. Rather than swapping ideas over the internet and file-sharing Animal Collective were, for the first time in many years, exchanging ideas in the same room by playing live instruments.


    As a result Panda Bear returned to playing a sit-down drum kit for the first time since Here Comes The Indian (2003) and Geologist began playing live keyboards again. Along with using some of the samplers and sequencers with which they had previously been writing, the sound of Centipede Hz draws on the dynamics and energy of Animal Collective playing together as a band. The return of Deakin is at its most marked in "Wide Eyed," a song that he wrote, featuring his first ever lead-vocal performance and whose title captures the mood of Centipede Hz perfectly.


    Part of the inspiration for Centipede Hz included the band's memories of growing up listening to station announcements and commercials on the radio and imagining the after life of radio signals from the past, forgotten transmissions that are now lost in space and broadcasting music from other planets for other life forms. This is reflected in the sound of Centipede Hz, which features the white noise of radio interference and buried frequencies overlaid with the band's peerless melodic sensibilities and compositional methods. The result is a panoramic set of songs that shimmer with the confidence and wonder of Animal Collective's unique inner logic and the luminous warmth of their sound world.


    Animal Collective: Avey Tare (vocals, synthesizers, piano, guitar, sampler, sequencer, percussion); Panda Bear (vocals, drums, sampler, percussion); Deakin (vocals, baritone guitar, sampler, percussion); Geologist (sampler, synthesizers, piano, percussion) with: Dave Scher (Beachwood Sparks, All Night Radio) lap steel guitar on "Today's Supernatural," "New Town Burnout," "Pulleys," and "Gotham," and melodica on "Rosie Oh" and Riverside Middle School Choir, which sings on "Father Time" and "New Town Burnout."


    1. Moonjock
    2. Today's Supernatural
    3. Rosie Oh
    4. Applesauce
    5. Wide Eyed
    6. Father Time
    7. New Town Burnout
    8. Monkey Riches
    9. Mercury Man
    10. Pulleys
    11. Amanita
    Animal Collective
    $21.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Fables Fables Quick View

    $18.99
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    Fables

    "Dark, wrenching tales that are immediately identifiable to those who've loved and lost" - NPR Music


    "Brutally honest lyrics that bring new meaning to some of life's most difficult questions" - Paste Magazine


    FABLES' is a sparse, poignant set of songs crafted around Ramirez' starkly beautiful baritone,
    which the New York Times once described as full of "haggard loneliness." In a world
    full of singer-songwriters hawking their stories, Ramirez has managed to stand out from the
    noise, developing a fiercely loyal following of fans who are drawn to his intimately personal
    songwriting. The album's title, 'FABLES,' was inspired by the first single, "Harder to Lie,"
    which captures the moment Ramirez realized, as he puts it, "I couldn't bullsh*t with her [my
    girlfriend] anymore. She knew me completely. It got me thinking about how much I bullsh*t
    in my life - exaggerating stories, faking a smile, or whatever. Just telling fables. When you
    don't know who you really are you can end up hurting people."


    That newfound maturity and clarity translated into his approach in the studio, as Ramirez
    traveled to Seattle to work with his friend Noah Gundersen, who produced the album. "My
    previous albums were a bit less personal. I always went in with a certain idea of what I
    wanted them to turn out like. I had never just walked in and said 'let's just see what happens.'
    And that's what we did this time. From the writing to the recording, it was just based
    on instincts."

    1. Communion
    2. Harder To Lie
    3. New Way Of Living
    4. Rock And A Hard Place
    5. On Your Side
    6. How Do You Get Em Back
    7. Wild Bones
    8. That Ain't Love
    9. Hold On
    10. Ball And Chain
    David Ramirez
    $18.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Green River Green River Quick View

    $21.99
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    Green River

    If anything, CCR's third album Green River represents the full flower of their classic sound initially essayed on its predecessor, Bayou Country. One of the differences between the two albums is that Green River is tighter, with none of the five-minute-plus jams that filled out both their debut and Bayou Country, but the true key to its success is a peak in John Fogerty's creativity. Although CCR had at least one cover on each album, they relied on Fogerty to crank out new material every month. He was writing so frequently that the craft became second-nature and he laid his emotions and fears bare, perhaps unintentionally. Perhaps that's why Green River has fear, anger, dread, and weariness creeping on the edges of gleeful music. This was a band that played rock & roll so joyously that they masked the, well, sinister undercurrents in Fogerty's songs. Bad Moon Rising has the famous line Hope you've got your things together/Hope you're quite prepared to die, but that was only the most obvious indication of Fogerty's gloom. Consider all the other dark touches: the Sinister purpose knocking at your door; the chaos of Commotion; the threat of death in Tombstone Shadow; you only return to the idyllic Green River once you get lost and realize the world is smolderin'. Even the ballads have a strong melancholy undercurrent, highlighted by Lodi, where Fogerty imagines himself stuck playing in dead-end towns for the rest of his life. Not the typical thoughts of a newly famous rock & roller, but certainly an indication of Fogerty's inner tumult. For all its darkness, Green River is ultimately welcoming music, since the band rocks hard and bright and the melancholy feels comforting, not alienating.


    - Stephen Thomas Erlewine (All Music Guide)

    1. Green River
    2. Commotion
    3. Tombstone Shadow
    4. Wrote A Song for Everyone
    5. Bad Moon Rising
    6. Lodi
    7. Cross-Tie Walker
    8. Sinister Purpose
    9. The Night Time Is the Right Time
    Creedence Clearwater Revival
    $21.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Joy Division: Box Set Joy Division: Box Set Quick View

    $249.99
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    Joy Division: Box Set

    Released in a Limited Edition of only 3,000 copies worldwide, this 180-Gram virgin vinyl, four-disc JOY DIVISION BOX SET contains new pressings of the band's two seminal studio albums - UNKNOWN PLEASURES ('79) and CLOSER ('80) - and the 1981 two-disc rarities compilation STILL.


    JOY DIVISION: BOX SET allows you to experience these pioneering albums the way they were heard originally - on sonically rich vinyl LPs. The three titles - a total of four LPS - come housed in an elegant cloth-covered box designed by U.K. artist Peter Saville, who created the distinctive artwork and packaging on the original issues of these classic releases. Once the 3,000 copies sell out, the box will not be reproduced.


    Joy Division's 1979 debut UNKNOWN PLEASURES is a landmark album that established the band as principal architects and ultimate icons of the post-punk movement and the U.K. Manchester scene of the late '70s. UNKNOWN PLEASURES' ten classic songs resonate with the atmospheric textures and deep sonic spaces of Martin Hannett's production. Highlights include Insight, Disorder, New Dawn Fades and She's Lost Control. The latter song is the inspiration for the title of the 2007 film Control, the acclaimed Anton Corbijn-directed feature chronicling the life and times of Joy Division's lead singer and principal songwriter, the late Ian Curtis.


    Joy Division's 1980 follow-up CLOSER, another seminal post-punk masterpiece, ranks #157 on Rolling Stone's 500 Greatest Albums Of All Time. Musically and lyrically driven by the prevailing despair of Ian Curtis - who killed himself only months after the LP was released - CLOSER was also produced by Martin Hannett, who weaves sprawling emotional chaos and shifting atmospheres and textures together into an enormously powerful ten-song tour de force. Stand-outs include Heart And Soul, Isolation, Eternal, Decades and the wrenching Twenty Four Hours.


    The compilation STILL came out in late 1981, over a year after Curtis' death. Comprised of twenty studio outtakes, b-sides, live cuts and other rarities, all the tracks were previously unissued at the time of STILL's original release except for Glass and Dead Souls, both compelling studio recordings from 1978 and 1979, respectively. STILL also presents material from Joy Division's last-ever concert, recorded at Birmingham University in May 1980 including the only time they performed Ceremony live (the song would later become a New Order single). Another track captured at Birmingham is Shadowplay, a selection covered in 2007 by The Killers for the soundtrack for the film Control. Other highlights include a live cover of The Velvet Underground's Sister Ray and a 1979 studio recording of Something Must Break.


    Joy Division formed in Manchester, England in 1977, and had an immense and profound impact on contemporary music in a very brief time together. They recorded only two full-length studio albums, UNKNOWN PLEASURES and CLOSER, prior to lead singer Ian Curtis' 1980 suicide, just before the single Love Will Tear Us Apart became their breakthrough hit. The remaining members - guitarist Bernard Sumner, bassist Peter Hook and drummer Stephen Morris - disbanded Joy Division after Curtis' death, and re-formed as New Order.

    Unknown Pleasures Track Listing:


    1. Disorder
    2. Day Of The Lords
    3. Candidate
    4. Insight
    5. New Dawn Fades
    6. Shes Lost Control
    7. Shadowplay
    8. Wilderness
    9. Interzone
    10. I Remember Nothing


    Closer Track Listing:


    1. Atrocity Exhibition
    2. Isolation
    3. Passover
    4. Colony
    5. A Means To An End
    6. Heart & Soul
    7. Twenty Four Hours
    8. The Eternal
    9. Decades


    Still Track Listing:


    1. Exercise One
    2. Ice Age
    3. The Sound Of Music
    4. Glass
    5. The Only Mistake
    6. Walked In Line
    7. The Kill
    8. Something Must Break
    9. Dead Souls
    10. Sister Ray
    11. Ceremony
    12. Shadow Play
    13. Means To An End
    14. Passover
    15. New Dawn Fades
    16. Transmission
    17. Disorder
    18. Isolation
    19. Decades
    20. Digital

    Joy Division
    $249.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 4 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Like A Rose Like A Rose Quick View

    $15.99
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    Like A Rose

    Ashley Monroe, a member of the critically acclaimed trio Pistol Annies, presents her first Warner Nashville solo album, Like A Rose. Most folks, as soon as they hear Ashley Monroe, instantly recognize one thing: she's the real deal. Her songs resonate so profoundly because they reflect the experiences of an artist who, although she is just 26, has already seen both the best and worst that life has to offer.


    Like a Rose has been a long time coming. Monroe has been creating music for more than half of her life-attracting along the way kudos from such music world giants as Dolly Parton, Guy Clark, Vince Gill and Jack White. Her new, full-length album release serves both to fill in the back-story and impart to us who she is today. At times her songs are dead serious, at others utterly hilarious, but always Monroe is an original with a compelling story to share.


    Monroe spent her childhood in Knoxville, Tennessee, where she immersed herself in all varieties of music ranging from country-she's not-too-distantly related to members of the legendary Carter Family-to rock, pop, rap and even opera. When she was 11, Monroe won a talent contest singing "I Want To Be a Cowboy's Sweetheart" and two years later her father gave Ashley her first guitar. She developed a passion for writing songs, discovering that she could easily communicate her thoughts and sentiments through a six-string and her dynamic, exceptional voice.


    One of the most rewarding artistic adventures for Ashley to date has been the Pistol Annies, a trio she co-formed in 2011 with her friend Miranda Lambert, whose chart-topping hit "Heart Like Mine" Ashley co-penned, and newcomer Angaleena Presley. Pistol Annies have provided Monroe with yet another outlet for her music. Their album, Hell on Heels, garnered rave reviews. The All Music Guide called the trio "a remarkably democratic supergroup" while veteran music critic Robert Christgau gave the album an A grade, citing its "expertly executed tunes."


    Despite her list of previous accomplishments, everything she's done so far feels like it's been pointing the way toward Like a Rose. With songs that run the gamut from feel-good to controversial to contemplative, the album, produced by country music titan Vince Gill, offers the full range of Ashley Monroe's songwriting and performing skills. To maintain the honesty of Ashley's songs, Gill and the singer chose to record the album the way most of the greatest albums ever were made: sans gimmickry. "We just got the band in a circle and started playing the songs," Ashley says, "and once we felt like we had a feel for it, I'd do my vocal live-I never went back in to do a second vocal. Everyone put everything we had into the songs. There was a buzz in the room. We all had fun-it felt like a big old family, the way records used to be made."


    Some of the songs were newly written for the album; others date back several years and felt right to revisit. The semi-autobiographical title track, one of the uncontestable highlights of the set, was co-written about six years ago with another totem of the American song-crafting community, Texan legend Guy Clark.


    One song that is bound to raise some eyebrows refers to the same favored flower of the title tune, but in a much different sense: "Weed Instead of Roses" tells of a woman's desire to get a gift she actually desires from her beau, not just something that smells good.


    "You Got Me" was co-written by Monroe and Karen Fairchild. Says Ashley, "It's about an addiction to something-one thing or another, whether you're stuck in a bad relationship or alcohol or whatever it is-and you try to hide it and fight it but you're kind of saying, 'Alright, you got me.'


    On a more light-hearted note is "Monroe Suede," based on "a slick character that tries to get away all the time." Another is the self-explanatory "You Ain't Dolly (And You Ain't Porter)," a duet featuring Lambert's husband, CMA Entertainer of the Year Blake Shelton. "Morning After" confronts that uneasy feeling that often follows a too-good time and "She's Driving Me Out Of Your Mind," written with Jon Randall Stewart, comes straight from one of Ashley's many journals. "Two Weeks Late" was suggested by singer-songwriter Shane McAnally, who co-wrote it with Monroe. "He came in and said, 'I heard this phrase at the ATM: I'm a dollar short and two weeks late.' That was another one that just fell out. I grabbed the guitar and we started writing it up.


    "Used," another standout, is an update of a song that appeared on Monroe's Satisfied album. "It came to me when I was about 17 and my manager at the time had just bought me this old 1950s Gibson guitar," she says. It came into my mind that things are worth more used, and I thought about my mom, who had lost my dad when she was 38. I was thinking, she had two kids, she's been through a lot, and, bless her heart, it's all gonna be worth it. Vince and I worked up this new version, which made it fresh for me."


    And fresh it all is. Like a Rose avoids the trappings of too much contemporary music by sticking to the basics: memorable songs, incredible musicians, a superb voice, all of it captured honestly and without frills. As the saying goes, sometimes we need to stop and smell the roses. Take a whiff of Like a Rose and you'll find it smells pretty darn sweet.

    1. Like A Rose
    2. Two Weeks Late
    3. Used
    4. Weed Instead of Roses
    5. You Got Me
    6. The Morning After
    7. Monroe Suede
    8. She's Driving Me Out Of Your Mind
    9. You Ain't Dolly (And You Ain't Porter) ft. Blake Shelton
    Ashley Monroe
    $15.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • We The People We The People Quick View

    $26.99
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    We The People

    Hard rock icons Adrenaline Mob have had their fair share of challenges in the past but have risen to each & every one continuing to march forward yet again & again! Formed by guitarist Mike Orlando & vocalist Russell Allen they joined forces with drummer Mike Portnoy & bassist John Moyer to launch the band's debut. The band eventually parted ways with drummer Mike Portnoy due to scheduling conflicts & brought drum legend AJ Pero into the fold. Only two years after the debut was released, the group was involved in a major vehicle accident while on the road with Avenged Sevenfold and Hellyeah. Then, in 2015, Adrenaline Mob lost drummer and long-time friend drum legend A.J. Pero to a heart attack while on tour with Drowning Pool. In 2017, Adrenaline Mob have now replenished the ranks with newcomers David Zablidowsky on bass and Jordan Cannata on drums for work on their latest effort, 'We The People'.


    Recorded once again at Sonic Stomp Studios over a year-plus period, We the People sounds huge. Each riff is massive, every drum hit a chest-thumping pound, and each line Russell vocalizes exudes unbelievable power and heart. Life-changing events may've halted Adrenaline Mob, but the group's third full-length is proof positive they're stronger now than they've ever been. Tracks like the raging 'Blind Leading the Blind', the big-hitting 'King of the Ring', the rhythmically wicked 'What Do You Really Want', and the rock radio-tailored title track evince purpose and authority. In every way, We the People puts the hard in hard rock. And the metal in heavy. Orlando was responsible for composing the music, engineering, recording, co-producing, mixing, and mastering and that all says one thing: the dude's a beast. Along with the incredible talents & amazing voice of his co-producing partner Allen who is by far one of rocks greatest voices, the two seem unstoppable on We The People.


    As the title, We the People, indicates there's a political side to Adrenaline Mob. Throughout their years as a musicians and songwriters, they hadn't stayed silent on matters significant. Whether they were masked in metaphor or flatly conspicuous, they've always poured their feelings into song. It was, as Orlando puts it, a form of catharsis. So, as they were watching the presidential campaigns, feeling the negativity-the constant bickering and finger pointing-they knew Adrenaline Mob's next venture would be impacted. In fact, the first song Orlando began writing for We the People was the politically-charged rocker 'Blind Leading the Blind'. "The title track is very much inspired by the past election year," confirms Allen. "It touches on our society, here in America. The album title is a reflection of our times. The songs have certain particular stories that stand on their own. Many of them are also driven by the climate we live in today & some are about having a good time, being free & loving rock n roll. All the tracks have a personality and character to them."


    Undoubtedly, the re-energized Adrenaline Mob will face adversity with We the People. But the strong always rise. Adrenaline Mob have proven they have the fortitude and music to prevail over anything. We the People, folks. It's time to rise up with Adrenaline Mob!

    LP 1
    1. King Of The Ring
    2. We The People
    3. The Killer's Inside
    4. Bleeding Hands
    5. Chasing Dragons
    6. Til The Head Explodes
    7. What You're Made Of
    8. Raise Em Up


    LP 2
    1. Ignorance & Greed
    2. Blind Leading The Blind
    3. Violent State Of Mind
    4. Lords Of Thunder
    5. Rebel Yell
    6. Devil Went Down To Georgia
    7. Snortin' Whiskey
    8. Tie Your Mother Down

    Adrenaline Mob
    $26.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Island Intervals Island Intervals Quick View

    $15.99
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    Island Intervals

    That Joel Thibodeau's slender, winsome voice is at once so comforting
    and so unsettling might be the greatest of his many strengths. Reed-thin
    but sturdy, youthful but somehow ageless, its deep benevolence is also
    slightly eerie, and the way he gently walks the line between intense
    feeling and contemplative remove lets him sing from a timeless place
    where he evokes the beauty of vanished people and places, sweetness
    too profound for words, loss too great for tears.


    Like Nico's, Jimmy Scott's, or Phil Elverum's, Joel's is a voice that
    demands its own sonic and lyrical world, and with Island Intervals, his
    third record as Death Vessel (and second for Sub Pop), we're treated to
    the sound of him finding a rich and strange new home among new friends
    in Iceland who probably saw him as a long-lost relative. Joel's an inveterate
    and intuitive wanderer; when I met him years ago, he'd just spent a few
    months traveling the United States on Greyhound buses, sometimes
    sleeping rough, and making a record from found moments.


    Island Intervals springs from a more recent journey. For his first album
    since 2008's acclaimed Nothing Is Precious Enough for Us, Joel traveled
    to Reykjavík on an invitation from Sigur Rós singer Jónsi and producer
    Alex Somers, where they spent three months together conjuring an album
    that's both a song cycle and a window into a mysterious and singular
    landscape. Island Intervals wraps Joel's voice and furtive guitar in sounds
    that evoke not so much a band playing as elemental forces of earth and
    water; Pete Donnelly (The Figgs, NRBQ), Samuli Kosminen (Múm) and
    Thorvaldur Doddi Thorvaldsson assist Somers in creating a rich and
    multi-layered world that sounds, at times, like a well-tuned forest sighing
    and bending in a gale, or the deep cracks and booms of a glacier calving
    its way to the sea. Jónsi also joins Joel on vocals for the track "Ilsa
    Drown."


    Island Intervals lives in the spaces between running away and letting
    go, and finds its author embracing a life whose most solid, real moments
    loom and vanish, like a range of mountains that emerges from a bank
    of low clouds, and just as suddenly slips away.


    -Jonathan Meiburg (Shearwater), Nov. 2013

    1. Ejecta
    2. Velvet Antlers
    3. Triangulated Heart
    4. Mercury Dime
    5. Ilsa Drown
    6. Island Vapors
    7. We Agreed
    8. Loom
    Death Vessel
    $15.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Drunk Is The New Sober/Stupid Is The New Dumb Drunk Is The New Sober/Stupid Is The New Dumb Quick View

    $24.99
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    Drunk Is The New Sober/Stupid Is The New Dumb

    Drunk Is The New Sober and Stupid Is The New Dumb are the twin subtitles of Drunk & Stupid, Dots Will Echo's debut album on Asthmatic Kitty, but those aren't just arch witticisms, they encapsulate the apparent contradictions that power the New Jersey duo's music. The warmly weird world created by multi-instrumentalist Nick Berry and drummer Kurt Biroc seems simultaneously sacred and profane, edgy and accessible, sad and transcendently silly. What else would you expect from a group that describes itself as "dour moralizers and drunken assholes" and identifies its key influences as "A little bit The Incredible String Band, a little bit AC/DC?"



    "I can see the carnival lights from here," sings Berry in a half-crazed, half-elated tone at the beginning of the opening track, "I Like It," sounding like either a psychotic infatuated with his own attractive fantasy world or a genius inventor marveling at the luminous landscape he's created. It's up to the listener to decide which, but either way it's 100% Dots Will Echo.



    Everything on Drunk & Stupid was played by Berry and Biroc, with the basic tracks recorded in a single marathon, three-day session. "I meant this to be a very raw recording, capturing the way we sound live," says Berry, who plays everything from guitars and keyboards to Autoharp, glockenspiel, and Andean charango over the course of the album, as he and Biroc build their own beautifully ramshackle universe from the ground up before your very ears.



    "A poorly played violin can sound better than a well played piano," says Berry half-jokingly of the organic, offhand feel of the tracks. From the first moment, Drunk & Stupid makes the listener a fly on the wall for a day in the life of Dots Will Echo, with snatches of goofy studio chatter interspersed between tunes. The bit that leads into the crooked campfire singalong "I'm a Monkey" is particularly telling, as Berry spontaneously announces, "I want to try a song I dreamt the other night," Biroc disapprovingly asks, "In the studio?" and Berry blithely counters, "Yeah, why not?"



    In fact, Berry dreams a large percentage of his songs. "Some are stupid, but I let 'em fly anyway," he says self-deprecatingly, "but the really stupid ones, nobody's ever gonna hear." By the time they enter our waking world, Berry's tunes bear trace elements of psychedelia, power pop, field-recording folk, DIY post-punk, and tantalizingly trashy garage rock (the duo does in fact rehearse in Biroc's garage). "What You Tryin' To Do," for instance, comes off like Sister Lovers-era Big Star recording for Harry Smith's Anthology of American Folk Music, while the giddy blastoff of "Rocket Girl" evokes early XTC covered by Guided By Voices, and the fragile, almost-ominous beauty of the hushed, acoustic ballad "Gates of Eden" feels like the greatest song Neil Young never wrote for Galaxie 500.



    The black humor that inhabits an impressive amount of real estate in the Dots Will Echo neighborhood isn't the whistling-through-the-graveyard variety, but rather the kind that finds all of creation to be a bit of a knee-slapper. Like the great writers in every medium, Berry finds the human dilemma a source of endless hilarity, even though you can always hear the big, gently bruised heart beating at the core of every song on Drunk & Stupid. Berry sounds like an amphetamine-fueled tour guide as he walks us through a field of mankind's folly on "Seven Deadly Sins," his loopy lyrics punctuated by Captain Beefheart-esque bursts of six-string cubism.



    Even when things get apocalyptic, as on the minimalist stomp of the cautionary "Shitstorm," Berry exhibits so much obvious glee in announcing the impending arrival of the titular phenomenon that you can't help singing "there's a shitstorm coming" right along with him and bobbing your head randomly to the track's triumphantly spastic anti-groove. The deceptively mellow-sounding anthem of global dystopia "History's Grave" was written in early 2008, but Berry notes, "Since then many of the events mentioned or alluded to have come to pass. This made me feel a little bit like a character in a Stephen King novel."



    At the same time, Drunk & Stupid sports songs like "Be a Friend" and "So Deep the Night," lambent, low-key ballads that balance between bittersweet and unabashedly sentimental without ever turning mawkish. On these tracks, the Lennon-like undertone in Berry's voice rises to the top of the mix, tapping into an almost spiritual vibe and making for some of the most undeniably poignant moments on the album.



    Berry and Biroc, who also work together at the same day job (the drummer is Berry's boss), have been making music together since 2004, hashing out their ideas in Biroc's garage and documenting them in Berry's basement studio. Along the way, they've made unofficial micro-pressings of their work, mostly for passing around to friends and admirers in an ad hoc fashion, but Drunk & Stupid represents the first time the duo's freewheeling work has ever been properly presented to the public at large as a full-on album. With all the material the prolific pair has been stockpiling, they had a huge tally of tunes to haul along with them for this project, and hearing it is a little like stumbling for the first time into a lost world with a long legacy of its own rituals, relics, regalia, and history. But once you wander in, you can't imagine how you ever existed without it.



    Originally meant to be two separate discs (the vinyl version is a double LP with download codes for bonus tracks), Drunk & Stupid is a wild ride that clocks in at just under 80 minutes and boasts 19 songs overflowing with insanely catchy melodies, endearingly off-kilter arrangements, and a strangely satisfying blend of the divine and the absurd." As Berry says, "We try to allow for the will of the universe to have a large part in our music. There must be something sacred in mistakes. This is our explanation for being fuck-ups."


    1. Untitled
    2. I Like It
    3. Untitled II
    4. I'm a Monkey
    5. Shitstorm
    6. Be a Friend
    7. Whatcha Tryin to Do
    8. Rocket Girls
    9. Caroline
    10. Run Away Anna
    11. History's Grave
    12. Sweet Sweet Sanity
    13. Anime
    14. Who Left You Here
    15. The Future
    16. Untitled III
    17. Peace in Your Life
    18. Our Little Part of the World
    19. Untitled IV
    20. Gates of Eden
    21. Visions of Light
    22. Seven Deadly Sins
    23. So Deep the Night
    Dots Will Echo
    $24.99
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  • FREEMAN FREEMAN Quick View

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    FREEMAN

    Listening to Marvelous Clouds, Aaron Freeman's 2012 debut under his own name, fans might have felt that he was ignoring an elephant in his room-a drug-and-alcohol-related onstage flame-out that made viral headlines the year before. But Clouds, a deceptively chill Rod McKuen covers record, was just a warm-up for the artist once known as Gene Ween. In the opening minutes of FREEMAN, the self-titled debut from his new band, Freeman addresses addiction and its aftermath with the combination of merciless self-inventory and artful songcraft that earned Ween one of the most devoted fan bases in contemporary pop. This song, the unmistakably autobiographical Covert Discretion, is a quiet shocker. Save your judgments for someone else, Freeman sings. Be grateful I saved me from myself.


    As bitter as it sounds, the track clears the air. FREEMAN represents a new beginning- Aaron Freeman's first album of original material since disbanding Ween and getting sober-but it isn't a record mired in its maker's private struggles. It's simply a collection of gorgeous, subtly offbeat songs-in other words, a continuation of the thread that runs through the entire Ween catalog. The lush psychedelic pop of The English and Western Stallion; the melancholy plea of More Than the World; the unflappable, Plastic Ono Band-esque blues-rock of Gimmie One More-these are songs that bear the unmistakable Aaron Freeman stamp.


    And to hear Freeman tell it, they wouldn't have been possible if he'd stayed in his old band. There was so much of 'Aaron had to break up Ween because of addiction' and 'Aaron broke up Ween in order to pursue his solo work,' he says. But I broke up Ween because we were at a creative dead end way before our last record, La Cucaracha. Basically we were going through the motions, becoming a showcase band.


    Freeman stresses that FREEMAN is more about renewal than turning his back on the past. I want this record to pay homage to Ween, he says. These are the same songs I would've written in Ween-except without [ex-bandmate] Mickey. Several tracks hark back to the role-playing that was a hallmark of Freeman's back-catalog: (For a While) I Couldn't Play My Guitar Like a Man, a badass blues-rock meditation on lost mojo; or Black Bush, a trippy, heavily stylized ode to the natural beauty of Freeman's recently adopted hometown of Woodstock.


    But there's also a fresh perspective here, the sound of a shadow lifting. Delicate Green, which savors life's everyday blessings, is one of the sweetest, most sincere songs Freeman has written. And All the Way to China and El Shaddai reference Jewish texts-Kabbalah readings and James A. Michener's The Source, respectively-that guided him through his darkest times. There's a lot of spiritual stuff on here because that really helped me, Freeman says. I listened to a lot of reggae-'Jah gonna help me through Babylon,' you know? I listened to a lot of Paul McCartney too, and I thought, if he can do this, break up the fucking Beatles, I can certainly break up Ween and be okay.


    Aaron Freeman has also turned his back on substance abuse, a fact that might concern fans who mistake intoxication for inspiration. I wrote the songs I wrote in Ween despite all the drugs and alcohol I was doing, not because, Freeman says. Most people don't get sobriety at all. They assume you're this better-than-thou monk sitting on a mountain, judging everybody. It's not that way: You have to let everybody do their thing, and you get weirder. A song like FREEMAN's Golden Monkey, which rivals Ween's underrated Quebec for sheer mind-warping brilliance, proves Freeman's point.


    In order to get to FREEMAN, Aaron Freeman had to make a clean break. If I hadn't left my partnership, there wouldn't be anything, he explains. I'd probably be dead too. I know that at the end of the day, this is the best thing I could've done for me and for every Ween fan. FREEMAN, an album that distills the Aaron Freeman aesthetic-built on equal parts wonder and malaise, frankness and mysticism, defiance and vulnerability-to its headiest essence, proves his point. This man, known for so long by another name, is finally free.

    1. Covert Discretion
    2. The English And Western Stallion
    3. (For A While) I Couldn't Play My Guitar Like a Man
    4. El Shaddai
    5. Black Bush
    6. Gimme One More
    7. More Than the World
    8. All The Way To China
    9. Golden Monkey
    10. Delicate Green
    11. There Is A Form
    12. I Know A Girl
    FREEMAN
    $16.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Crooked Teeth Crooked Teeth Quick View

    $19.99
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    Crooked Teeth

    Papa Roach has never taken the easy way out and they aren't going to start now. Over the past two decades the group have established themselves as true trendsetters in heavy music: They've been nominated for two Grammys, toured the globe with everyone from Eminem to Marilyn Manson and crafted the nÜ metal anthem "Last Resort," which is still in heavy rotation on rock radio seventeen years after its release. However, the group's tenth full-length Crooked Teeth sees the band returning to their humble-and hungry-roots. The album was recorded in a cramped West Hollywood studio with up-and-coming producers Nicholas "RAS" Furlong and Colin Brittain, who grew up listening to Papa Roach and inspired them to revisit some of the traits that personally endeared the band to them, most notably frontman Jacoby Shaddix's remarkable rapping technique.


    "We've always kind of considered ourselves to be the bastard cousins of everything we've every been involved with so we wanted to be true to that and switch things up this time around," Shaddix says. "The first time we met up with RAS and Colin, they said that [2000's] Infest was on constant rotation when they were growing up and they wanted to bring back some of that fire." The connection between the artists and producers was immediate and the first song Papa Roach-which also features guitarist Jerry Horton, bassist Tobin Esperance, and drummer Tony Palermo-came up with for Crooked Teeth was "My Medication," an instantly catchy banger that sees Shaddix spitting verses in between massive choruses and ambient accents. "I really felt like we had a personal connection and the music was just there waiting to be written and once we nailed that song things really clicked and we knew exactly what we had to do" Furlong explains. "We really followed our instincts and tried something unproven with this record and because of that we ended up with a bold, courageous and more adventurous version of Papa Roach." It was in this studio that "old school" Papa Roach ways, morphed to create this "new school" Papa Roach sound.


    From the instantly infectious nature of the title track to the atmospheric sheen of the ballad "Periscope" (which features Skylar Grey) and the hip-hop rock mashup "Sunrise Trailer Park" (which features an impassioned verse from Machine Gun Kelly). Crooked Teeth displays the various sides of Papa Roach and illustrates why they've managed to remain relevant while musical trends ebb and flow. "We didn't go into this album with the intention of trying to write radio singles," Horton explains. "The collection of songs was really about bookending everything that we've done prior to this album and reintroducing Papa Roach to people who didn't realize the depth that we have," says Palermo. "The whole idea was to take the classic elements of Papa Roach that everyone loved and revamp them into a modern version of the sound through the creative process," adds Furlong. "We just wanted to flip everything on its head and see what would happen and it turned out more amazing than any of us could have expected."


    "The people who have wanted to hear me rap for years are gonna love some of the viscousness on this record," Shaddix explains adding that while he had his own initial reservations about some of the album's more unorthodox moments - such as the 808 bass drop into a metal breakdown on the album title track, "Crooked Teeth" - ultimately those adventurous decisions are what make the album such a refreshing change of pace in a rock climate that's grown increasingly sterile. "I'd like to personally thank all of the guys in the band for making this happen because all it takes is one person to give you a shot and this was definitely mine," Furlong adds. "I want to be one of the best producers in modern day music so I wanted to work as hard for these guys as they would for themselves because as a producer it was my job to push them to get the kind of quality work everyone has been expecting."


    Just as Papa Roach felt like they still had something to prove with this record, so did the production team who attempted to bring in elements of music from different genres and parts of the world while still staying true to Papa Roach's sound. "One of the big elements in my production is finding those pockets of rhythm that people associate more with rap or reggae," Furlong explains, a fact that came in especially handy when Shaddix was fine-tuning his freestyle skills. "I know rap rhythms because I grew up listening to hip-hop, so I was able to make sure that the delivery was on point and the beat was in the pocket so it didn't suffer from a lot of the stylistic pitfalls that can happen when you merge rock and rap."


    Crooked Teeth also sees Shaddix pulling no punches lyrically, as evidenced on intensely personal tracks like "Born For Greatness," produced by Jason Evigan (Jason Derulo, Demi Lovato, Kehlani, Madonna), which sees Shaddix getting sentimental about his three children, or "American Dream" where the lifelong pacifist begs the listener to ask, "have you ever thought war was a sickness?" "My father is a Vietnam veteran and a lot of those soldiers came back to a country where people weren't accepting them back into society or aware of the effects that war has on your psyche," Shaddix says of the song." "Post-traumatic stress disorder and the disintegration of the American family are things I've dealt with personally and I knew other people could relate to. I think that's what makes this record bold. Nothing was off limits when it came to what was on my mind."


    Never one to shy away from difficult topics, Papa Roach dug deep with Crooked Teeth and refused to censor themselves when it came to their opinion of the current political landscape and organized religion. For example, on "None Of The Above," every ounce of musical intensity on the album is mirrored by Shaddix's words whether he's screaming, singing or rhyming. "It took me a long time, but eventually I realized that in life we're all human and we all make mistakes whether you're the president or the preacher, you know?" Shaddix explains when asked about the latter song. "It's an example of how I can get lost in a storyline and explore so many different issues in one track and that's what I love about this record. Just the spark of an idea would instantly ignite and the next thing we knew we had another song that we all loved."


    In many ways making Crooked Teeth reminded Shaddix of the band's early days, well before they sold millions of albums and became a household name. "When we were in the rehearsal space I wasn't thinking about who I needed to impress, I was thinking about how much I love making music with the guys in this band," Shaddix admits. "It feels honest and it feels pure," adds Esperance. Fittingly, throughout the process, Shaddix gained inspiration from bands like Led Zeppelin and Faith No More, acts who constantly redefined themselves and were never content to rest on the merits of a hit single." This band encompasses some of my greatest victories, but it's also brought out some of my darkest character flaws," Shaddix summarizes, "so I have kind of a love-hate relationship with this music, but I can't stop because I've got too much of my life invested in it at this point. We are a purpose-driven band and I've got a responsibility to myself and our fans to continue to create."

    1. Break The Fall
    2. Crooked Teeth
    3. My Medication
    4. Born For Greatness
    5. American Dreams
    6. Periscope
    7. Help
    8. Sunrise Trailer Park
    9. Traumatic
    10. None Of The Above
    Papa Roach
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • In Roses In Roses Quick View

    $16.99
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    In Roses


    Second Full-length Release For Hardly Art


    Recorded In Analog At Tiny Telephone In San Francisco



    There are times when beauty and sadness are inextricably linked. Massachusetts-based Gem Club understands this fragile symmetry. The band-singer/pianist Christopher Barnes and his collaborators, cellist Kristen Drymala and vocalist Ieva Berberian-create music that is intimate, graceful, and filled with melancholy.


    In 2009, Gem Club's primary songwriter Christopher Barnes began playing local solo shows. The enthusiastic reception led him to bring Drymala and Berberian into the fold, and the six-song Acid and Everything EP was self-released the following year. Breakers, their subsequent full-length, paired plaintive piano melodies with impressionistic lyrics. Made primarily in Barnes's bedroom, the album displayed how music, even at its most minimal and hushed, could be cathartic, even transcendent.


    For the new In Roses, Gem Club have ventured beyond the isolation of the bedroom to record in San Francisco at John Vanderslice's analog studio Tiny Telephone. Barnes worked closely with arranger and conductor Minna Choi of The Magik*Magik Orchestra, who, Barnes says, "helped reshape the new songs in fresh and unimagined ways," The resulting album is more expansive, more majestic, than prior Gem Club releases. There are spacious, grand flourishes-the church-choir voices on "Idea for Strings"; the reverberating drumbeats that propel the melody of "Braid"-yet the music retains the intimacy of previous works.


    Because In Roses is an album of haunting piano songs, it might seem felicitous to the listener that Christopher Barnes once lived in a disused Boston piano factory. Nights, from behind neighboring doors, he could hear strangers fighting, throwing loud parties, even shooting scenes for porn films. While life exploded around him, Barnes retreated, "trying to re-create these landscapes with music." But he is quick to note that In Roses takes a different approach to the landscapes of the world than before. "Whereas Breakers was more about the body and inward-gazing, the new album is about me looking out on relationships I've had or wish I've had." Many lyrics address "the crashing realization that lives are no longer happening the way we want." Other songs are elegies for those Barnes has idolized or loved, but has lost: "Soft Season" is inspired by the life and death of early-90s gay adult film actor Joey Stefano ("I'm a boy on my back," Barnes sings, "and I'm more of a man"); the harrowing closer "Polly" is a song he wrote about his relationship with his late aunt.


    Beauty and Sadness is the title of a 1964 novel by the late Japanese writer Yasunari Kawabata, but the name could also serve to describe the music of Gem Club. During one scene of the book, Kawabata writes, "He heard a sound that only a magnificent old bell could produce, a sound that seemed to roar forth with all the latent power of a distant world." With In Roses, the beautiful and sad sounds of Gem Club come roaring forth with increasing power.


    --Scott Heim

    1. [Nowhere]
    2. First Weeks
    3. Michael
    4. Hypericum
    5. Idea for Strings
    6. Soft Season
    7. QY2
    8. Speech of Foxes
    9. Braid
    10. Marathon (In Roses)
    11. Polly
    Gem Club
    $16.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Cover Me (Remixes) Cover Me (Remixes) Quick View

    $20.99
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    Cover Me (Remixes)

    Dave Gahan wrote the song together with Peter Gordeno and Christian Eigner. Depeche Mode have said in interviews (like during the 2016 press conference) that producer James Ford taught himself to play Martin's pedal steel guitar within one day while in the studio, and thus this guitar was used in some songs including 'Cover Me'.


    Dave talked about this song extensively to Phil Marriott:


    I wanted ['Cover Me'] to be very cinematic, and I had this sort of idea of us finally destroying this beautiful planet that we live on. Hence the northern lights: it's just one in many millions of beautiful things... the oceans, just things that we take for granted. And the Northern lights was just a metaphor that I wanted to use, because I did once experience actually being there while that was happening, way up north in Scandinavia. Yeah [it's quite an emotional experience], and it's also out of the world somehow, quite spiritual, and moving, moving to the point of tears, the beauty of something happening in our universe. And so I had this idea at that time, a little lyrical idea, not really a melody. But anyway, I came back to that, and that became that song. And I also saw the song in two halves, where the second half was where we are finally leaving or something. This person or whoever it is, who I live vicariously through, leaves the planet, only to find another planet that is exactly the same as ours, and he has this horrible feeling of like, Oh wow, it's not the planet, it's me, I am doing this. I'm destroying this beautiful world that I live in. And that can be just an emotional relationship that you have with another person, or trying to be having a relationship with another person that you can't quite get to because you just can't. And that, for me, is quite often where I find myself with music and songs: I am quite often this other person. Of course it's me, but I can live vicariously through this performer, this guy that I've created, which is me, but a character. And throughout songs and films and books and stuff like that, that's where I get lost. [...] With 'Cover Me', the song that was coming to mind a lot, the feeling of the song that I wanted to get on this, and it's a totally different kind of song, but the feeling that I wanted to get was like Bowie's song 'Life On Mars', where the second half of the song seems to go to another place, or 'Space Odyssey', that kind of feeling. It opens up for you, the listener, to just be able to go off in their own dreams and ideas.

    LP 1
    1. Cover Me (Ellen Allien Remix)
    2. Cover Me (I Hate Models Cold Lights Remix)
    3. Cover Me (Nicole Moudaber Remix)
    4. So Much Love (Kalli Remix)


    LP 2
    1. Cover Me (Erol Alkan V1.2)
    2. Cover Me (Texas Gentlemen Remix)
    3. Cover Me (Warpaint Steez Remix)
    4. Cover Me (Josh T. Pearson Choose Hellth Remix)

    Depeche Mode
    $20.99
    12 Vinyl Single - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • 13 13 Quick View

    $24.99
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    13


    Limited Edition Picture Disc LP Version


    Judging from their name, Suicidal Tendencies were never afraid of a little controversy. Formed in Venice, CA, during the early '80s, the group's leader from the beginning was outspoken vocalist Mike Muir. The outfit specialized in vicious hardcore early on -- building a huge following among skateboarders, lending a major hand in the creation of skatepunk -- before turning their focus eventually to thrash metal. Early on, the group (whose original lineup included Muir, guitarist Grant Estes, bassist Louiche Mayorga, and drummer Amery Smith) found it increasingly difficult to book shows, due to rumors of its members' affiliation with local gangs and consistent violence at their performances. The underground buzz regarding Suicidal Tendencies grew too loud for labels to ignore though, as the quartet signed on with the indie label Frontier; issuing Muir and company's classic self-titled debut in 1983. The album quickly became the best-selling hardcore album up to that point; its best-known track, Institutionalized, was one of the first hardcore punk videos to receive substantial airplay on MTV, and was eventually used in the Emilio Estevez cult classic movie Repo Man, as well as in an episode for the hit TV show Miami Vice (for which the group made a cameo appearance).


    Suicidal Tendencies proved influential for future speed/thrash metal bands, but despite its early success, the quartet's reputation preceded them, as no other record label was willing to take them on (in addition, Los Angeles banned the group from playing around this time, lasting until the early '90s). Not much was heard from the group for several years afterward (leading many to believe that Suicidal had broken up), but Muir and company eventually found a home with Caroline Records. By this time, half of the original lineup had left; Muir and Mayorga were the only holdovers, while guitarist Rocky George and drummer R.J. Herrera rounded out the group. 1987 saw the release of Suicidal's sophomore release, Join the Army, which spawned another popular skatepunk anthem, Possessed to Skate, as more and more metal heads began to be spotted in Suicidal's audience. Soon after, Suicidal was finally offered a major-label contract (with Epic), as another lineup change occurred: Mayorga exited the band, while newcomer Bob Heathcote took his spot; and a second guitarist, Mike Clark, was added as well. This Suicidal lineup's first album together, 1988's How Will I Laugh Tomorrow When I Can't Even Smile Today, showed that their transformation from hardcore to heavy metal was now complete, as did a compilation of two earlier EPs, 1989's Controlled by Hatred/Feel Like Shit...DÉjà Vu.


    Suicidal's first release of the new decade, 1990's Lights, Camera, Revolution, was another success; its video for the explosive You Can't Bring Me Down received repeated airings on MTV's Headbanger's Ball program, while the album (in addition to the Controlled by Hatred comp) would be certified gold in the U.S. a few years later. The release also signaled the arrival of new bassist Robert Trujillo, whose penchant for funk added a new element to the group's sound. The group tried to broaden their audience even further by opening a string of arena shows for prog-metallists Queensrÿche during the summer of 1991. Their next release, 1992's The Art of Rebellion, proved to be one of Suicidal's most musically experimental albums of their career. Muir and Trujillo also teamed up around this time for a funk metal side project, Infectious Grooves (including several other participants, such as Jane's Addiction drummer Stephen Perkins) and issued a debut release, The Plague That Makes Your Booty Move. Upset that the group's classic debut had been out of print for several years by this point, Muir decided to re-record the entire record with Suicidal's '90s lineup under the title of Still Cyco After All These Years.


    But after one more release, 1994's Suicidal for Life, Suicidal Tendencies decided to hang it up. A pair of compilations were issued in 1997: a best-of set, Prime Cuts, plus Friends & Family. Muir and Trujillo continued to issue further Infectious Grooves releases (Sarsippius' Ark and Groove Family Cyco), in addition to Muir pursuing a solo career under the alias of Cyco Miko (Lost My Brain Once Again) and Trujillo touring and recording as part of Ozzy Osbourne's solo band (appearing on Osbourne's 2001 release, Down to Earth). Muir formed a new version of Suicidal Tendencies in the late '90s (with Clark being the only other familiar face), resulting in such further studio releases as 1999's Freedumb and 2000's Free Your Soul and Save My Mind. Muir and Trujillo joined forces once more for a fourth Infectious Grooves studio release in 2000, Mas Borracho; while another Cyco Miko release surfaced, Schizophrenic Born Again Problem Child, along with a follow-up up to their earlier compilation, Friends & Family, Vol. 2. After releasing the compilation 'Year Of The Cycos' in 2009 that included a selection of all brand new songs from Suicidal Tendencies and side bands Infectious Grooves, NoMercyFool and Cyco Miko, the band released in 2010 the first record in 10 years 'No Mercy Fool!/The Suicidal Family' that included re-recordings of classic jems off the 'Join The Army records' and infamous recording 'Widespread Bloodshed' for Mike Muir and Mike Clark side band No Mercy back in early eighties.


    Now the band will be back with their brand new album in 13 years Story has yet to be written!


    1. Shake It Out
    2. Smash It!
    3. This Ain't A Celebration
    4. Who's Afraid?
    5. Show Some Love...Tear It Down
    6. Cyco Style
    7. Slam City
    8. Till My Last Breath
    9. Life...(Can't Live With It, Can't Live Without It)
    10. This World

    Suicidal Tendencies
    $24.99
    Vinyl LP Picture Disc - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Journey Man The Journey Man Quick View

    $35.99
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    The Journey Man

    "In my music," says Goldie, "is everything I've learned, everyone I've met, everything I've experienced." And it's been an incredible trip. The maverick innovator - who rewrote the future of the jungle scene with landmark releases that still sound like they were kidnapped from tomorrow - has a unique story to tell. From children's homes in the West Midlands through stints in New York and Miami as one of the UK's most celebrated exponents of graffiti art to rubbing shoulders with an exceptional list of musical collaborators including David Bowie, Noel Gallagher and KRS-One, Goldie has defiantly, definitively, done it his own way. "I'm an alchemist," he likes to insist. "I practice the dark arts of messing with the form of something solid."


    Though marriage and his passion for bikram yoga have, he says, proved a calming influence, these days he's just as full of inspired, out-there ideas as he was back in 1993 when he did his first cover interview for the rave magazine Generator. "My music is about fallout," he said then, "about the damage that has been done to the system." Today, in the office of one of his London-based contacts, the ideas are still sparking. "Drum'n'bass has done to electronic music what graffiti has done to the art world," he muses, before launching into a rapid-fire synthesis of art history, dancefloor evolution and his own hyperactive brand of self-actualization, which loosely translates as: "Why do something ordinary when you can do something extraordinary?"


    It sums up the reason why, in 1994, music critic Simon Reynolds famously observed: "Goldie revolutionized jungle not once but three times. First, there was Terminator (pioneering the use of time stretching), then Angel (fusing Diane Charlemagne's live vocal with David Byrne/Brian Eno samples to prove that hardcore could be more conventionally musical), now there's Timeless, a 22-minute hardcore symphony." Each of these were moments that shaped the musical fabric of the decade and beyond, presaging Goldie's transition from the underground rave scene into the world of bona fide A- list superstars.


    But it didn't start out like that. The boy who would become Goldie was born Clifford Price on 19 September 1965, just as The Rolling Stones hit the top of the charts with Satisfaction. His dad Clement, originally from Jamaica, had been plying his trade as a foundryman in Leeds. His mum Margaret, who had been born in Glasgow, was a popular singer in the pubs and clubs of the West Midlands. Barely more than a toddler, Goldie was just three when she placed him into foster care (though she kept his younger brother Melvin). He still remembers, he says, the day the social workers came to take him away.


    Over the next 15 years, he bounced between a series of foster homes and local government institutions around the Walsall area. His eclectic musical taste was forged, he reckons, in those same local authority homes listening to the sonic tangle of other teenagers' record collections. "In one room," he says, "a kid would be playing Steel Pulse while through the wall someone else had a Japan record on and another guy would be spinning Human League." On rare visits to see his dad, he'd lie sprawled over the living room couch, listening to Jazz FM, marveling at the lavishly-tooled '80s productions of Miles Davis, Pat Metheny, David Sanborn and Michael Franks, adding further layers to his complex musicography.


    Already developing the irresistible urge to excel that has marked his inimitable musical career, Goldie's first love was roller-hockey. He earned a place as goalkeeper in England's national squad before the lure of music overtook the lure of sport. After discovering electro and hip hop, he grew his hair - the "goldilocks" that won him his nickname - and joined a breakdance crew called the B-Boys in nearby Wolverhampton. He also discovered graffiti. "They called me 'the spray can king of the Midlands'," he says proudly. His talent was undeniable, bringing him to the attention not only of Britain's Arts Council but to Dick Fontaine, producer of a Channel 4 TV documentary on graffiti. Fontaine's 1987 film Bombin' captured a visit to the UK by New York artist Brim Fuentes. Brim met Goldie and his B-Boys crew in Wolverhampton's Heathtown before heading a dozen miles away to Birmingham's Handsworth, where the producer filmed the aftermath of rioting that had left four dead, 35 injured and dozens of stores burned out. Several months later, Fontaine reversed the process and took Goldie to New York, introducing him to hip-hop pioneer Afrika Bambaataa. For Goldie, on his first trip abroad, never mind his first trip over the Atlantic, the Big Apple was love at first sight. Back in Britain, he begged, borrowed and saved until he had enough to fund a return trip to the Bronx.


    "I started painting the trains and getting involved on the streets," he says, remembering his total immersion in what was still, at that point, an emerging culture. Art and music as symbiotic technologies. Rubbing shoulders with the Big Apple's best graffiti artists, his own distinctive style was accelerated and enriched. A move to Miami followed. He worked in the flea markets, he says, "painting trucks for drug dealers" and developing a sideline in gold jewelry that included the distinctive grills that became a trademark on his return to the UK. The magical properties of shaping, working and bending precious metals to his will - as close to alchemy as the modern world gets - became an analogue for the way he prefers to operate in the studio, chasing quicksilver dreams, mercury-fast rivulets of imagination into impossibly lush, breakbeat concertos. Back in Britain, Goldie found himself seduced by the sweetheart of the rave. Though it took him eight attempts to get entry into the club, at London's Rage in 1991 he marveled at the alternate sonic worlds being forged by Fabio and Grooverider behind the decks. "It really flipped me out," he remembers. Soon he found himself in the orbit of Dego McFarlane and Mark Clair. Their label Reinforced was in the vanguard of breakbeat, issuing astonishing records that stripped out boundaries and limits while setting the tone for the scene's sense of adventure. At first, he helped out doing artwork and a bit of A&R. But soon he was in Reinforced's Internal Affairs studio watching intently as Mark and Dego recorded tracks like Cookin' Up Ya Brain and Journey From The Light. "I was watching what they could do," says Goldie, "trying to gauge the possibilities of the technology." Soon he was getting involved. "I remember one session we did that lasted over three days," he says, "just experimenting, pushing the technology to its limits. We'd come up with mad ideas and then try to create them. We were sampling from ourselves and then resampling, twisting sounds around and pushing them into all sorts of places."


    What followed was a series of inspired break-driven releases such as Killa Muffin, Dark Rider and Menace. Then Terminator, with its writhing drum loop, dropped and suddenly Goldie's name was on everyone's lips. He followed up with the equally revolutionary Angel, tilting the axis towards the lush, trippy textures that made 1995's debut album Timeless the drum'n'bass scene's first platinum album. Incredibly, given what was happening elsewhere in the scene at the time, the recording of the album's epic title track began as far back as 1993, when most other producers were still focused on the original sonic tropes of hardcore rave.


    Timeless was a masterpiece - of production, of songwriting, of sonic perfection and breakbeat futurism. Even today, it still sounds as astonishingly new and inspired as it did back on those early pre-release cassettes circulated by London Records in the early months of 1995 when Goldie was still living on the 18th floor of a North London tower block.


    By then, Goldie had already set up his own record label - Metalheadz - with his friends the DJ duo Kemistry and Storm. Along with studio collaborator, Rob Playford's Moving Shadow and LTJ Bukem's Looking Good imprint, Metalheadz helped to define drum'n'bass as a distinct musical format with singles by J Majik, Asylum and Goldie himself. Still bursting with energy, he then launched a legendary club night, Metalheadz Sunday Sessions, at London's Blue Note. The scene's best producers - among them revolutionary artists like Photek, Source Direct, Peshay and Dillinja - would compete to have their latest recordings debuted at the club and the scene's faithful came from far and wide to hear the best tunes before anyone else. "Those nights at the Blue Note were magical," he recalls. "It was an underground phenomenon that became an institution." David Bowie, who was making the drum'n'bass-influenced album Earthling at the time, fell in love with the place. "I remember popping out to take a break from all the madness inside the club," says Goldie. "He was outside having a cigarette, a bit of a breather. We chatted for a bit, looked at each other, grinned and then plunged back into it all. It was just that kind of place."


    Goldie is one of only a handful of artists ever to co-write with Bowie - on the track Truth from the drum'n'bass pioneer's second album Saturnz Return. Released in 1998, the album also saw his vision become more expansive (the opening track, Mother, clocked in at just over an hour). The album's collaborative approach included guest spots from rap legend KRS-One, Sex Pistols manager and all-around provocateur Malcolm McLaren, super-producer Trevor Horn and Oasis main man Noel Gallagher (on the single Temper Temper).


    Fuelled by the limitless creativity that has been the hallmark of his career to date, Goldie next turned to acting. He reunited with Bowie in Andrew Goth's 1999 thriller Everybody Loves Sunshine then took the part of Bullion in the 1999 James Bond movie The World Is Not Enough. Other box office smashes - including Guy Ritchie's crime heist caper Snatch - followed before he joined the cast of BBC1 soap opera EastEnders, playing the gangster Angel Hudson.


    A series of blockbuster TV appearances - on shows such as Maestro (where he learned to conduct an orchestra), Classic Goldie (which saw him perform his own orchestral composition at the Royal Albert Hall in the summer of 2009) and Goldie's Band: By Royal Appointment.


    The orchestral training proved useful. In 2014, he translated his original vision for Timeless into the stunning Timeless (Sine Tempore). Performed live with the Heritage Orchestra at the Wilderness Festival to suitably rapturous acclaim, the performance was repeated the following year as part of the Meltdown Festival at London's Royal Festival Hall. In between, he found time to unveil Fragments Of Gold, a piece inspired by medieval chants that he performed live in Glasgow Cathedral.


    Drum'n'bass, of course, has remained a consistent passion, both through his Metalheadz label and his releases under the Rufige Kru moniker (2007's Malice In Wonderland and 2009's Memoirs Of An Afterlife). "Technologically," he says, "breakbeat has managed to surpass all other forms of music to date. There isn't a recording engineer alive who can tell me there's any other form of music that is more complex than the music we make." Goldie has also recently announced he will be releasing a brand new double album 'The Journey Man' this year. The album comprises two parts, 16 brand new tracks in total, all written and produced by Goldie. It also features a host of collaborators handpicked by Goldie to help realize his vision for the album.


    "I often look at music not so much as a producer but like a director. You're drawing together engineers, performers and arrangers to create something special, something magical. It's like alchemy. The notes, the music, the lyrics, they're all in my head and each element has to be communicated and brought to life to create the finished track. I'm always inspired by great movie directors - people like Stanley Kubrick and PT Anderson - and, if you think about it, it's quite a similar approach. They start off with a vision and then they use that vision to deploy the actors and the cameramen and the editors in order to create the finished film."


    Collaborators on 'The Journey Man' album include vocalist and songwriter Natalie Duncan, who was discovered when chosen in the three-part BBC series 'Goldie's Band By Royal Appointment' and later provided the vocals for Goldie's 2012 single 'Freedom'. Other featured vocalists on the album include Terri Walker, Tyler Lee Daly, Natalie Williams, JosÉ James, Naomi Pryor as well as Goldie's wife, Mika Wassenaar Price.


    'The Journey Man' will be released through Cooking Vinyl and Goldie's own record label, Metalheadz.


    Goldie's love affair with painting has remained consistent too and he continues to exhibit visual work that's just as dazzling as his sonic output. Beginning with Night Writers, the 1986 exhibition at Wolverhampton's art gallery that introduced Goldie and his Supreme Graffiti Team to the British Arts Council, his shows have defined a unique aesthetic that's all his own. And through them all, from 1987's Rockin' The City in Birmingham (where he exhibited alongside Massive Attack's Robert Del Naja) and the 1988 Crucial Creators exhibition in Walsall to more recent gallery events like 2007's Love Over Gold and 2012's Athleticizm collection (including portraits of London Olympics stars such as Victoria Pendleton, Tom Daley and Jessica Ennis), runs a consistent thread of energy, experimentalism and boundary-pushing. His 2013 collection, Lost Tribes, an innovative series of pieces fusing Goldie's style with the artistic expression of the ancient peoples of Africa, Asia and America was, he says, "my most important breakthrough".


    And for the kid who lay awake, gazing at the stars, through the window of a children's home, growing up has brought some surprises. In 2012, he was selected as one of the BBC's New Elizabethans, 60 people - ranging from David Hockney to Roald Dahl, David Bowie and Tim Berners-Lee - who have helped shape British culture during the reign of Elizabeth II. Four years later, he was awarded the MBE in the Queen's New Year Honours. It's acceptance, of course, on a grand scale. But at heart, he's still the gatecrasher, amped-up on ideas, buzzing on nothing but love, hope and the certainty that, while his way might not be the easy way, it's very definitely the path of a true artist.


    - Tim Barr, 2017

    LP 1
    1. Horizons (feat. Terri Walker & Swindle)
    2. Prism
    3. Mountains
    4. Castaway
    5. The Mirrored River


    LP 2
    1. I Adore You (w/ Ulterior Motive)
    2. I Think of You
    3. Truth (feat. Jose James)
    4. Redemption


    LP 3
    1. Tu Viens Avec Moi?
    2. The Ballad Celeste
    3. This Is Not A Love Song
    4. The River Mirrored (feat. Terri Walker)
    5. Triangle
    6. Tomorrow's Not Today
    7. Run Run Run

    Goldie
    $35.99
    Vinyl LP - 3 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Absolute Zero Absolute Zero Quick View

    $19.99
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    Absolute Zero

    Absolute Zero is the debut album by Irish quintet, Little Green Cars. Absolute Zero's 48 minutes, crafted in unabashed earnestness with the aid of seasoned epic-producer Markus Dravs (Mumford and Sons' Sigh No More and Babel, Arcade Fire's Neon Bible and The Suburbs, Coldplay's Mylo Xyloto), acts as a soul-bearing report, as guileless as the young five-piece themselves, on the act of simply growing up; a process that requires, at once, so little and so much effort it could explode you from the inside at any moment.


    "This record constantly jumps between two contrasting perspectives: the beauty of a reckless youth and the fear and confusion caused by our ever-pending adulthood," Appleby explains. "It's a hopeful and naïve look at love and life in general, which gives the album its bright days - but also deals with isolation, unrequited love and madness. We wanted to express both a feeling of strength and vulnerability, so the work had to encompass both the light and dark."


    "These are all feelings we've had, as a group or as individuals. We hope this is something people can relate to. That's always been why music has been written; it's a voice for people who don't have a voice. Hopefully someone can find some sort of comfort or solace in this. "


    The band -a group of 20-year-old friends with a habit of waxing deadly serious about their ever-expanding ambitions - convened in 2008 in a bungalow in Stevie Appleby's parents' backyard for as ordinary a reason as any: as the frontman admits sheepishly, they wanted to win a battle of the bands competition. With guitarist Adam O'Regan and bassist Donagh O'Leary friends since primary school, and the rest having met in secondary, the five rehearsed for the gig, at which they promptly lost out to another local band.


    The defeat, however, was surprisingly fuel enough. It inspired them to work harder, to work through their remaining two years of school, during which they produced a massive catalog of demo recordings, blending acoustic and electronic, classical and punk, djembe drums and synth strings. Then, in 2010, not long before graduation, then-rising manager Daniel Ryan found them at one of their sparse live gigs. With just one client already under his wing, he approached the young band with a terrifying, yet exhilarating ultimatum: Do you want to go to university, or do you want to really be in a band?


    "That was the first time we considered looking that far ahead," says guitarist/vocalist/primary songwriter Faye O'Rourke. "We were trying to avoid thinking about the future because of the prospect of college, but " The choice became obvious. And like that, they dove in. For two years they redoubled their efforts, crafting a wide-eyed musical narrative that mirrored their evolution as an ensemble until, inevitably, label suitors began to knock. Since 2011 they've been quietly boiling down those demos into an album - the first they've ever recorded.


    "The main thing I want to hear out of an artist I admire is the truth," says Appleby. "How they really felt. If I'm going to say something, it may as well be the truth." The lengths to which Appleby, O'Rourke and the rest of the band will go to tell that truth have yet to reveal their depth, but a full-steam-ahead debut record is a good place to start. Finally, five years' worth of backyard Garage Band tracks have a name: Absolute Zero.


    The songs of Absolute Zero have only begun to see the light of day, because, as Appleby puts it, "we've always been more interested in recording and writing and experimenting with everything than in touring. [The past five years] was time spent finding our sound, finding ourselves. We've gone through everything, from acoustic guitars to electronic music. We needed the time to grow up as people and as musicians."


    In other words, this is a debut that is a sum total of its creators' ascent to this moment. It is a desperate, under-pillow diary; a painstakingly lettered love note dropped in a locker; a collective, yet very personal, dissertation. On the record's debut single The John Wayne, a fierce paean to the ones who so easily break our hearts, the lot of them proclaim, "It's easy to fall in love with you/It's easy to be alone/It's easy to hate yourself when all your love is inside someone else." On "My Love Took Me Down To The River To Silence Me," O'Rourke is torn between the heartbreak and the healing that comes from being heartbroken, "But my heart burned out til it was no more/still I wait on the ground, I don't know what for/There is a heart in you/where is the heart in me?/This love's killing me, but I want it to." And by its early-morning close, when Appleby asks, "And who will write and who will fight for this man/I know I am?/And if you're running out of space/Please don't erase your time with me," it becomes clear that it's not just love Little Green Cars are grasping at: even amidst an ex-lover's plea for acknowledgement, the search has grown far beyond that.

    1. Harper Lee
    2. Angel Owl
    3. My Love Took Me Down to The River to Silence Me
    4. The Consequences of Not Sleeping
    5. Big Red Dragon
    6. Red and Blue
    7. The Kitchen Floor
    8. The John Wayne
    9. Please
    10. Them
    11. Goodbye Blue Monday
    Little Green Cars
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
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