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  • Alive 1997 + Alive 2007 (Box Set) Alive 1997 + Alive 2007 (Box Set) Quick View

    $129.99
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    Alive 1997 + Alive 2007 (Box Set)

    The limited deluxe collection will include Alive 2007 on two solid white vinyl records along with a bonus vinyl with the show's encore on one side and an etched pyramid logo on the other. This box comes with a 52-page book of photos taken during the 2007 tour, replica VIP pass, and a slipmat, as well as a silver vinyl edition of the Alive 1997 album.
    Daft Punk
    $129.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP Box Set - 4 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Alive 1997 Alive 1997 Quick View

    $24.99
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    Alive 1997

    Alive 1997 reveals the French duo Daft Punk as one of the brightest entertainers in the occasionally stale world of album-based electronic dance. True, techno and house DJs can light up a crowd like few others, but the increasing artist slant of electronica often results in push-button programming and straight-from-DAT live performances, with most of the heavy lifting relegated to the lighting supervisor and effects computers. This brief glimpse at Daft Punk's live show circa 1997 (their major breakout year) is a tour de force of high-energy theatrics and flair. Aside from the pair of WDPK interludes, Alive 1997 includes only three tracks, but they're so radically different from their album versions that they're only barely familiar. The duo's biggest hit so far, Da Funk, is stretched out to 16 minutes with a start-and-stop improvisation section that brings the crowd to a peak, while Rollin' & Scratchin' never looks back after breaking right on through the red-line. An energizing document, Alive 1997 is one of the few live records to approximate the excitement of the original live show.


    - John Bush (All Music Guide)

    Daft Punk
    $24.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Alive 2007 Alive 2007 Quick View

    $44.99
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    Alive 2007

    Timed to perfection, Daft Punk's second live album landed exactly ten years after the first, and provides a fitting complement to Alive 1997, easily the best live non-DJ electronica record ever released. While the original featured only a handful of tracks (but found them transformed and tweaked ad infinitum), Alive 2007 is packed with productions, most of them short and many of them getting a big crowd response (all recorded at one show in Paris in June of 2007). As on their first two classic full-lengths, Thomas Bangalter and Guy-Manuel de Homem-Christo display excellent crowd control, pacing the record well, spacing the hits, and building the mood like the good crowd-pleasers they are. It has the feel of a greatest-hits-live concert, but energized by Daft Punk's talents at weaving songs in and out of each other. Even songs from the comparatively desultory Human After All sound rejuvenated in context, with Robot Rock getting the show off to a rousing start. It may not be better or stronger than the original Alive 1997, but it's definitely harder and faster.


    - John Bush (All Music Guide)

    1. Robot Rock / Oh Yeah
    2. Touch It / Technologic
    3. Television Rules the Nation / Crescendolls
    4. Too Long / Steam Machine
    5. Around the World / Harder, Better, Faster, Stronger
    6. Burnin' / Too Long
    7. Face to Face / Short Circuit
    8. One More Time / Aerodynamic
    9. Aerodynamic Beats / Forget About the World
    10. The Prime Time of Your Life / The Brainwasher / Rollin' & Scratchin' / Alive
    11. Da Funk / Daftendirekt
    12. Superheroes / Human After All / Rock'n Roll

    Daft Punk
    $44.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • So Much Staying Alive And Lovelessness So Much Staying Alive And Lovelessness Quick View

    $21.99
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    So Much Staying Alive And Lovelessness

    Chicago's Joan of Arc blend post-rock's atmospherics and punk's volume and dynamics. Three members came from the emocore band Cap'n Jazz; when that band broke up, the trio wanted to change their musical direction, removing the boundaries and structures of punk and including more experimental elements like tape loops and electronics. Calling themselves Joan of Arc, the group went on tour with their friends the Promise Ring (who also featured ex-Cap'n Jazz members) in August 1996. After spending the fall of that year writing and recording, the band re-emerged in 1997 with A Portable Model of Joan of Arc, their full-length debut. The album continued Joan of Arc's evolution into an equally hard-hitting and progressive outfit that appealed to emo and post-rock fans alike. The following year they returned with How Memory Works, a more clearly stated version of their ambitious style. Joan of Arc rang in 1999 with the release of Live in Chicago 1999. In February 2003, the band returned with So Much Staying Alive and Lovelessness.
    1. On A Bedsheet In The Breeze On The Roof
    2. The Infinite Blessed Yes
    3. Perfect Need And Perfect Completion
    4. Olivia Lost
    5. Diane Cool And Beautiful
    6. Mr. Participation Billy
    7. Mean To March
    8. Hello Goodnight Good Morning Goodbye
    9. Dead Together
    10. Madelleine Laughing
    11. Staying Alive and Lovelessness
    Joan of Arc
    $21.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • A Portable Model Of A Portable Model Of Quick View

    $21.99
    Buy Now
    x

    A Portable Model Of

    Chicago's Joan of Arc blend post-rock's atmospherics and punk's volume and dynamics. Three members came from the emocore band Cap'n Jazz; when that band broke up, the trio wanted to change their musical direction, removing the boundaries and structures of punk and including more experimental elements like tape loops and electronics. Calling themselves Joan of Arc, the group went on tour with their friends the Promise Ring (who also featured ex-Cap'n Jazz members) in August 1996. After spending the fall of that year writing and recording, the band re-emerged in 1997 with A Portable Model of Joan of Arc, their full-length debut. The album continued Joan of Arc's evolution into an equally hard-hitting and progressive outfit that appealed to emo and post-rock fans alike. The following year they returned with How Memory Works, a more clearly stated version of their ambitious style. Joan of Arc rang in 1999 with the release of Live in Chicago 1999. In February 2003, the band returned with So Much Staying Alive and Lovelessness.
    1. I Love A Woman (Who Loves Me)
    2. The Hands
    3. Anne Aviary
    4. Let's Wrestle
    5. Romulans! Romulans!
    6. Post-Coitus Rock
    7. Count To A Thousand
    8. How Wheeling Feels
    9. In Pompeii
    10. Caliban
    11. In Pamplona
    12. I Was Born
    13. (I Love A Woman) Who Loves Me
    Joan of Arc
    $21.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • How Memory Works How Memory Works Quick View

    $21.99
    Buy Now
    x

    How Memory Works

    Chicago's Joan of Arc blend post-rock's atmospherics and punk's volume and dynamics. Three members came from the emocore band Cap'n Jazz; when that band broke up, the trio wanted to change their musical direction, removing the boundaries and structures of punk and including more experimental elements like tape loops and electronics. Calling themselves Joan of Arc, the group went on tour with their friends the Promise Ring (who also featured ex-Cap'n Jazz members) in August 1996. After spending the fall of that year writing and recording, the band re-emerged in 1997 with A Portable Model of Joan of Arc, their full-length debut. The album continued Joan of Arc's evolution into an equally hard-hitting and progressive outfit that appealed to emo and post-rock fans alike. The following year they returned with How Memory Works, a more clearly stated version of their ambitious style. Joan of Arc rang in 1999 with the release of Live in Chicago 1999. In February 2003, the band returned with So Much Staying Alive and Lovelessness.
    1. Honestly Now
    2. Gin & Platonic
    3. To've Had Two Of
    4. This Life Cummulative
    5. A Pale Orange
    6. White Out
    7. So Open: Hooray!
    8. A Name
    9. Osmosis Doesn't Work
    10. God Bless America
    11. A Party Able Model Of
    Joan of Arc
    $21.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Live In Chicago, 1999 Live In Chicago, 1999 Quick View

    $24.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Live In Chicago, 1999

    Chicago's Joan of Arc blend post-rock's atmospherics and punk's volume and dynamics. Three members came from the emocore band Cap'n Jazz; when that band broke up, the trio wanted to change their musical direction, removing the boundaries and structures of punk and including more experimental elements like tape loops and electronics. Calling themselves Joan of Arc, the group went on tour with their friends the Promise Ring (who also featured ex-Cap'n Jazz members) in August 1996. After spending the fall of that year writing and recording, the band re-emerged in 1997 with A Portable Model of Joan of Arc, their full-length debut. The album continued Joan of Arc's evolution into an equally hard-hitting and progressive outfit that appealed to emo and post-rock fans alike. The following year they returned with How Memory Works, a more clearly stated version of their ambitious style. Joan of Arc rang in 1999 with the release of Live in Chicago 1999. In February 2003, the band returned with So Much Staying Alive and Lovelessness.
    LP 1
    1. It's Easier To Drink On An Empty Stomach Than Eat On A Broken Heart
    2. Who's Afraid Of Elizabeth Taylor?
    3. If It Feels / Good, Do It
    4. Live In Chicago, 1999
    5. (I'm 5 Senses) None Of Them Common
    6. Me (Plural)


    LP 2
    1. I'm Certainly Not Pleased With My Options For The Future
    2. When The Parish School Dismisses And The Children Running Sing
    3. Thanks For Chicago, Mr. James
    4. (In Fact I'm) Pioneering New Emotions
    5. Better De'd Than Read
    6. Sympathy For The Rolling Stones
    7. All Until The Greens Reveal Themselves At Dawn

    Joan of Arc
    $24.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Gratitude Gratitude Quick View

    $44.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Gratitude

    180 Gram Translucent Blue Colored Vinyl With Gatefold Cover


    Mastered Impeccably By Joe Reagoso


    Manufactured At R.T.I.


    During the 1970s, a new brand of pop music was born - one that was steeped in African and African-American styles - particularly jazz and R&B but appealed to a broader cross-section of the listening public. As founder and leader of the band Earth, Wind & Fire, Maurice White not only embraced but also helped bring about this evolution of pop, which bridged the gap that has often separated the musical tastes of black and white America. It certainly was successful, as EWF combined high-caliber musicianship, wide-ranging musical genre eclecticism, and '70s multicultural spiritualism. "I wanted to do something that hadn't been done before," Maurice explains. "Although we were basically jazz musicians, we played soul, funk, gospel, blues, jazz, rock and dance music which somehow ended up becoming pop. We were coming out of a decade of experimentation, mind expansion and cosmic awareness. I wanted our music to convey messages of universal love and harmony without force-feeding listeners' spiritual content."Maurice was born December 19, 1941, in Memphis, TN. He was immersed in a rich musical culture that spanned the boundaries between jazz, gospel, R&B, blues and early rock. All of these styles played a role in the development of Maurice's musical identity. At age six, he began singing in his church's gospel choir but soon his interest turned to percussion. He began working gigs as a drummer while still in high school. His first professional performance was with Booker T. Jones, who eventually achieved stardom as Booker T and the MGs.After graduating high school, Maurice moved to the Windy City to continue his musical education at the prestigious Chicago Conservatory Of Music. He continued picking up drumming jobs on the side, which eventually lead to a steady spot as a studio percussionist with the legendary Chicago label, Chess Records. At Chess, Maurice had the privilege of playing with such greats as Etta James, Fontella Bass, Billy Stewart, Willie Dixon, Sonny Stitt and Ramsey Lewis, whose trio he joined in 1967. He spent nearly three years as part of the Ramsey Lewis Trio. "Ramsey helped shape my musical vision beyond just the music," Maurice explains. "I learned about performance and staging." Maurice also learned about the African thumb piano, or Kalimba, an instrument whose sound would become central to much of his work over the years.In 1969, Maurice left the Ramsey Lewis Trio and joined two friends in Chicago, Wade Flemons and Don Whitehead, as a songwriting team composing songs and commercials in the Chicago area. The three friends got a recording contract with Capitol and called themselves the "Salty Peppers," and had a marginal hit in the Mid-western area called "La La Time." That band featured Maurice on vocals, percussion and Kalimba along with keyboardists/vocalists Wade Flemons and Don Whitehead.


    After relocating to Los Angeles and signing a new contract with Warner Bros., Maurice simultaneously made what may have been the smartest move of his young career. He changed the band's name to Earth, Wind & Fire (after the three elements in his astrological chart). The new name also captured Maurice's spiritual approach to music - one that transcended categories and appealed to multiple artistic principals, including composition, musicianship, production, and performance. In addition to White, Flemons and Whitehead, Maurice recruited Michael Beal on guitar, Leslie Drayton, Chester Washington and Alex Thomas on horns, Sherry Scott on vocals, percussionist Phillard Williams and his younger brother Verdine on bass.


    Earth, Wind & Fire recorded two albums for Warner Brothers: the self-titled 1970 album Earth, Wind And Fire and the 1971 album The Need Of Love. A single from this album, "I Think About Lovin' You," provided EWF with their first Top 40 R&B hit. Also in 1971, the group performed the soundtrack to the Melvin Van Peebles film 'Sweet Sweetback's Baadasssss Song'.


    In 1972, White dissolved the line-up (except he and brother Verdine White) and added Jessica Cleaves (vocals - formerly of the R&B group The Friends of Distinction), Ronnie Laws (flute, saxophone), Roland Bautista (guitar), Larry Dunn (keyboard), Ralph Johnson (percussion) and Philip Bailey (vocals, formerly of Friends & Love). Maurice became disillusioned with Warner Brothers, which had signed the group primarily as a jazz act. Maurice, in contrast, was more interested in combining elements of jazz, rock, and soul into an evolving form of fusion, a truly universal sound.


    A performance at New York's Rockefeller Center introduced EWF to Clive Davis, then President of Columbia Records. Davis loved what he saw and bought their contract from Warner Bros. With Columbia Records, debuting with the 1972 album Last Days And Time, the group slowly began to build a reputation for innovative recordings and exciting, live shows, complete with feats of magic (floating pianos, spinning drum kits, vanishing artists) engineered by Doug Henning and his then-unknown assistant David Copperfield. Their first gold album, Head To The Sky, peaked at number 27 pop in the summer of 1973, yielding a smooth tangy cover of "Evil" and the title track single. The first platinum EWF album, Open Our Eyes, whose title track was a remake of the classic originally recorded by Savoy Records group the Gospel Clefs, included "Mighty Mighty" (number four R&B) and "Kalimba Story" (number six R&B).


    Maurice once again shared a label roster with Ramsey Lewis, whose Columbia debut Sun Goddess, was issued in December 1974. The radio-aired title track was released as a single under the name Ramsey Lewis and Earth, Wind & Fire. It went to number 20 R&B in early 1975. The Sun Goddess album went gold, hitting number 12 pop in early 1975. Maurice had also played on Lewis' other high-charting album, Wade In The Water; the title track single peaked at number three R&B in the summer of 1966.


    The inspiration for "Shining Star" (one of EW&F's most beloved singles) was gleaned from thoughts Maurice had during a walk under the star-filled skies that surrounded the mountains around Caribou Ranch, CO a popular recording site and retreat during the '70s. The track was originally included in the 'That's The Way Of The World' movie that starred Harvey Keitel and was produced by Sig Shore (Superfly). "Shining Star" glittered at number one R&B for two weeks and hit number one pop in early 1975. It was included on their 1975 multi-platinum album That's The Way Of The World that held the number one pop spot for three weeks in Spring 1975 and earned them their first Grammy Award. The title track single made it to number five R&B in summer of 1975. It also yielded the classic ballad "Reasons," an extremely popular radio-aired album track.


    The multi-platinum album Gratitude held the number one pop album spot for three weeks in late 1975. On the album was "Singasong" (gold, number one R&B for two weeks, number five pop), the Skip Scarborough ballad "Can't Hide Love" (number 11 R&B), and the popular radio-aired album tracks "Celebrate," "Gratitude," and the live version of "Reasons." In 1976, Maurice decided he wanted to record a spiritual album. The multi-platinum album Spirit parked at number two pop for two weeks in fall of 1976 and boasted the gold, number one R&B single "Getaway" and "Saturday Nite." Spirit is remembered as one of EWF's best albums and sadly for also being the last project of Producer Charles Stepney. He died May 17, 1976, in Chicago, IL, at the age of 45. Charles was a former Chess Records arranger/producer/session musician/multi-instrumentalist/songwriter and Maurice's main collaborator on his EWF projects. The multi-platinum album All 'N All peaked at number three pop in late 1977, won three Grammy's, and had arrangements by Chicago soul mainstay Tom Tom Washington and Eumir Deodato. The singles were "Serpentine Fire" (number one R&B for seven weeks) and "Fantasy." The group's horn section, the legendary Phenix Horns (Don Myrick on saxophone, Louis Satterfield on trombone, Rahmlee Michael Davis and Michael Harris on trumpets) became an integral part of the Earth, Wind & Fire sound.


    During this time, Maurice produced several artists such as The Emotions (1976's Flowers and 1977's Rejoice which included the number one R&B/pop hit "Best Of My Love") and Deniece Williams (1976's This Is Niecy which included the Top Ten R&B hit "Free"). In the late seventies, in association with Columbia Records, Maurice also launched a record label, ARC.


    The multi-platinum greatest-hits set The Best Of Earth, Wind & Fire, Vol. I included a cover of the Beatles' "Got To Get You Into My Life" went to number one R&B and number nine pop in Summer 1978. The group performed the song in the 1978 Bee Gees/Peter Frampton movie 'Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band'. Another single, "September," made it to number one R&B, number eight pop in early 1978. On the flip side was the enchanting popular radio-aired album track "Love's Holiday" from All 'N All.


    Their live performances were stellar as well. Sellout crowds were spellbound by the band's bombastic performances. Their performances blasted a cosmic wave of peace, love and other happy vibrations to audiences using a combination of eye-popping costumes, lights, pyrotechnics and plain old good music. Sometimes they even threw in magic illusions. Earth, Wind & Fire's message was one of universal harmony, in both musical and cultural senses. "We live in a negative society," Maurice told Newsweek. "Most people can't see beauty and love. I see our music as medicine."


    The multi-platinum album I Am hit number three pop in Summer 1979 on the strength of the million-selling single "Boogie Wonderland" with The Emotions (number two R&B for four weeks, number six pop) and the phenomenal gold ballad "After The Love Has Gone," written by David Foster, Jay Graydon and Bill Champlin that stayed at number two R&B/pop for two weeks. Their Faces album peaked at number ten pop in late 1980 and was boosted to gold by the singles "Let Me Talk" (number eight R&B), "You" (number ten R&B), and "And Love Goes On."


    The million-selling funked-up "Let's Groove," co-written by The Emotions' Wanda Vaughn and her husband Wayne Vaughn, was the track that re-energized EWF's career, parking at number one R&B for eight weeks and number three pop, causing their Raise! album to go platinum (hitting number five pop in late 1981). Their next gold album Powerlight made it to number 12 pop in spring 1983 and included the Top Ten R&B single and Grammy-nominated "Fall In Love With Me." Their 1983 Electric Universe album stalled at number 40 pop, breaking the band's string of gold, platinum and multi-platinum albums.


    In 1983, Maurice decided he and the band needed a break. During this hiatus, Maurice recorded his self-titled solo album Maurice White and produced various artists including Neal Diamond, Barbra Streisand and Jennifer Holliday. Reuniting with the band in 1987, EWF released the album Touch The World and scored yet another number one R&B single, "System of Survival" and embarked on a corresponding nine-month world tour. This was followed by the 1988 release The Best Of Earth, Wind & Fire Vol. II.


    In 1990 the group released the album Heritage. Two years later, Earth, Wind & Fire released The Eternal Dance; a 55-track boxed set retrospective of the band's entire history. The appearance of such a project after a prolonged period of relative inactivity signaled to many listeners that the band was calling it quits but that did not turn out to be case. In 1993, EWF released the album, Millennium that included the Grammy-nominated "Sunday Morning" and "Spend The Night."


    Earth, Wind & Fire kept recording and in 1996 released Avatar and Greatest Hits Live; followed by 1997's In The Name Of Love; 2002's That's The Way Of The World: Alive In '75; Live In Rio which was recorded during their 1979 "I Am World Tour;" 2003's The Promise, which included the Grammy-nominated "Hold Me" and 2005's Illumination, which included the Grammy-nominated "Show Me The Way."


    In 2000, the nine-piece '70s edition of Earth, Wind & Fire reunited for one night only in honor of their induction into The Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame. In 2001, Eagle Rock Entertainment released the documentary 'Earth, Wind & Fire: Shining Stars', which contains rarely seen historic video footage along with in-depth interviews with the band members.


    Even though Maurice is no longer a part of the touring group, he remains the band's heart and soul from behind the scenes as composer and producer. Maurice reflects, "I wanted to create a library of music that would stand the test of time. 'Cosmic Consciousness' is the key component of our work. Expanding awareness and uplifting spirits is so important in this day. People are looking for more. I hope our music can give them some encouragement and peace."

    LP 1
    1. Introduction

    2. Africano/ Power Medley

    3. Yearnin' Learnin'

    4. Devotion

    5. Sun Goddess
    6. Reasons

    7. Sing A Message To You


    LP 2
    1. Shining Star

    2. New World Symphony
    3. Sunshine

    4. Singasong

    5. Gratitude

    6. Celebrate

    7. Can't Hide Love

    Earth, Wind & Fire
    $44.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Buy Now
  • Greatest Hits (Out Of Stock) Greatest Hits (Out Of Stock) Quick View

    $42.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Greatest Hits (Out Of Stock)

    180 Gram Translucent Gold Colored Vinyl With Gatefold Cover


    During the 1970s, a new brand of pop music was born - one that was steeped in African and African-American styles - particularly jazz and R&B but appealed to a broader cross-section of the listening public. As founder and leader of the band Earth, Wind & Fire, Maurice White not only embraced but also helped bring about this evolution of pop, which bridged the gap that has often separated the musical tastes of black and white America. It certainly was successful, as EWF combined high-caliber musicianship, wide-ranging musical genre eclecticism, and '70s multicultural spiritualism. "I wanted to do something that hadn't been done before," Maurice explains. "Although we were basically jazz musicians, we played soul, funk, gospel, blues, jazz, rock and dance music which somehow ended up becoming pop. We were coming out of a decade of experimentation, mind expansion and cosmic awareness. I wanted our music to convey messages of universal love and harmony without force-feeding listeners' spiritual content."Maurice was born December 19, 1941, in Memphis, TN. He was immersed in a rich musical culture that spanned the boundaries between jazz, gospel, R&B, blues and early rock. All of these styles played a role in the development of Maurice's musical identity. At age six, he began singing in his church's gospel choir but soon his interest turned to percussion. He began working gigs as a drummer while still in high school. His first professional performance was with Booker T. Jones, who eventually achieved stardom as Booker T and the MGs.After graduating high school, Maurice moved to the Windy City to continue his musical education at the prestigious Chicago Conservatory Of Music. He continued picking up drumming jobs on the side, which eventually lead to a steady spot as a studio percussionist with the legendary Chicago label, Chess Records. At Chess, Maurice had the privilege of playing with such greats as Etta James, Fontella Bass, Billy Stewart, Willie Dixon, Sonny Stitt and Ramsey Lewis, whose trio he joined in 1967. He spent nearly three years as part of the Ramsey Lewis Trio. "Ramsey helped shape my musical vision beyond just the music," Maurice explains. "I learned about performance and staging." Maurice also learned about the African thumb piano, or Kalimba, an instrument whose sound would become central to much of his work over the years.In 1969, Maurice left the Ramsey Lewis Trio and joined two friends in Chicago, Wade Flemons and Don Whitehead, as a songwriting team composing songs and commercials in the Chicago area. The three friends got a recording contract with Capitol and called themselves the "Salty Peppers," and had a marginal hit in the Midwestern area called "La La Time." That band featured Maurice on vocals, percussion and Kalimba along with keyboardists/vocalists Wade Flemons and Don Whitehead.


    After relocating to Los Angeles and signing a new contract with Warner Bros., Maurice simultaneously made what may have been the smartest move of his young career. He changed the band's name to Earth, Wind & Fire (after the three elements in his astrological chart). The new name also captured Maurice's spiritual approach to music - one that transcended categories and appealed to multiple artistic principals, including composition, musicianship, production, and performance. In addition to White, Flemons and Whitehead, Maurice recruited Michael Beal on guitar, Leslie Drayton, Chester Washington and Alex Thomas on horns, Sherry Scott on vocals, percussionist Phillard Williams and his younger brother Verdine on bass.


    Earth, Wind & Fire recorded two albums for Warner Brothers: the self-titled 1970 album Earth, Wind And Fire and the 1971 album The Need Of Love. A single from this album, "I Think About Lovin' You," provided EWF with their first Top 40 R&B hit. Also in 1971, the group performed the soundtrack to the Melvin Van Peebles film 'Sweet Sweetback's Baadasssss Song'.


    In 1972, White dissolved the line-up (except he and brother Verdine White) and added Jessica Cleaves (vocals - formerly of the R&B group The Friends of Distinction), Ronnie Laws (flute, saxophone), Roland Bautista (guitar), Larry Dunn (keyboard), Ralph Johnson (percussion) and Philip Bailey (vocals, formerly of Friends & Love). Maurice became disillusioned with Warner Brothers, which had signed the group primarily as a jazz act. Maurice, in contrast, was more interested in combining elements of jazz, rock, and soul into an evolving form of fusion, a truly universal sound.


    A performance at New York's Rockefeller Center introduced EWF to Clive Davis, then President of Columbia Records. Davis loved what he saw and bought their contract from Warner Bros. With Columbia Records, debuting with the 1972 album Last Days And Time, the group slowly began to build a reputation for innovative recordings and exciting, live shows, complete with feats of magic (floating pianos, spinning drum kits, vanishing artists) engineered by Doug Henning and his then-unknown assistant David Copperfield. Their first gold album, Head To The Sky, peaked at number 27 pop in the summer of 1973, yielding a smooth tangy cover of "Evil" and the title track single. The first platinum EWF album, Open Our Eyes, whose title track was a remake of the classic originally recorded by Savoy Records group the Gospel Clefs, included "Mighty Mighty" (number four R&B) and "Kalimba Story" (number six R&B).


    Maurice once again shared a label roster with Ramsey Lewis, whose Columbia debut Sun Goddess, was issued in December 1974. The radio-aired title track was released as a single under the name Ramsey Lewis and Earth, Wind & Fire. It went to number 20 R&B in early 1975. The Sun Goddess album went gold, hitting number 12 pop in early 1975. Maurice had also played on Lewis' other high-charting album, Wade In The Water; the title track single peaked at number three R&B in the summer of 1966.


    The inspiration for "Shining Star" (one of EW&F's most beloved singles) was gleaned from thoughts Maurice had during a walk under the star-filled skies that surrounded the mountains around Caribou Ranch, CO a popular recording site and retreat during the '70s. The track was originally included in the 'That's The Way Of The World' movie that starred Harvey Keitel and was produced by Sig Shore (Superfly). "Shining Star" glittered at number one R&B for two weeks and hit number one pop in early 1975. It was included on their 1975 multi-platinum album That's The Way Of The World that held the number one pop spot for three weeks in Spring 1975 and earned them their first Grammy Award. The title track single made it to number five R&B in summer of 1975. It also yielded the classic ballad "Reasons," an extremely popular radio-aired album track.


    The multi-platinum album Gratitude held the number one pop album spot for three weeks in late 1975. On the album was "Singasong" (gold, number one R&B for two weeks, number five pop), the Skip Scarborough ballad "Can't Hide Love" (number 11 R&B), and the popular radio-aired album tracks "Celebrate," "Gratitude," and the live version of "Reasons." In 1976, Maurice decided he wanted to record a spiritual album. The multi-platinum album Spirit parked at number two pop for two weeks in fall of 1976 and boasted the gold, number one R&B single "Getaway" and "Saturday Nite." Spirit is remembered as one of EWF's best albums and sadly for also being the last project of Producer Charles Stepney. He died May 17, 1976, in Chicago, IL, at the age of 45. Charles was a former Chess Records arranger/producer/session musician/multi-instrumentalist/songwriter and Maurice's main collaborator on his EWF projects. The multi-platinum album All 'N All peaked at number three pop in late 1977, won three Grammy's, and had arrangements by Chicago soul mainstay Tom Tom Washington and Eumir Deodato. The singles were "Serpentine Fire" (number one R&B for seven weeks) and "Fantasy." The group's horn section, the legendary Phenix Horns (Don Myrick on saxophone, Louis Satterfield on trombone, Rahmlee Michael Davis and Michael Harris on trumpets) became an integral part of the Earth, Wind & Fire sound.


    During this time, Maurice produced several artists such as The Emotions (1976's Flowers and 1977's Rejoice which included the number one R&B/pop hit "Best Of My Love") and Deniece Williams (1976's This Is Niecy which included the Top Ten R&B hit "Free"). In the late seventies, in association with Columbia Records, Maurice also launched a record label, ARC.


    The multi-platinum greatest-hits set The Best Of Earth, Wind & Fire, Vol. I included a cover of the Beatles' "Got To Get You Into My Life" went to number one R&B and number nine pop in Summer 1978. The group performed the song in the 1978 Bee Gees/Peter Frampton movie 'Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band'. Another single, "September," made it to number one R&B, number eight pop in early 1978. On the flip side was the enchanting popular radio-aired album track "Love's Holiday" from All 'N All.


    Their live performances were stellar as well. Sellout crowds were spellbound by the band's bombastic performances. Their performances blasted a cosmic wave of peace, love and other happy vibrations to audiences using a combination of eye-popping costumes, lights, pyrotechnics and plain old good music. Sometimes they even threw in magic illusions. Earth, Wind & Fire's message was one of universal harmony, in both musical and cultural senses. "We live in a negative society," Maurice told Newsweek. "Most people can't see beauty and love. I see our music as medicine."


    The multi-platinum album I Am hit number three pop in Summer 1979 on the strength of the million-selling single "Boogie Wonderland" with The Emotions (number two R&B for four weeks, number six pop) and the phenomenal gold ballad "After The Love Has Gone," written by David Foster, Jay Graydon and Bill Champlin that stayed at number two R&B/pop for two weeks. Their Faces album peaked at number ten pop in late 1980 and was boosted to gold by the singles "Let Me Talk" (number eight R&B), "You" (number ten R&B), and "And Love Goes On."


    The million-selling funked-up "Let's Groove," co-written by The Emotions' Wanda Vaughn and her husband Wayne Vaughn, was the track that re-energized EWF's career, parking at number one R&B for eight weeks and number three pop, causing their Raise! album to go platinum (hitting number five pop in late 1981). Their next gold album Powerlight made it to number 12 pop in spring 1983 and included the Top Ten R&B single and Grammy-nominated "Fall In Love With Me." Their 1983 Electric Universe album stalled at number 40 pop, breaking the band's string of gold, platinum and multi-platinum albums.


    In 1983, Maurice decided he and the band needed a break. During this hiatus, Maurice recorded his self-titled solo album Maurice White and produced various artists including Neal Diamond, Barbra Streisand and Jennifer Holliday. Reuniting with the band in 1987, EWF released the album Touch The World and scored yet another number one R&B single, "System of Survival" and embarked on a corresponding nine-month world tour. This was followed by the 1988 release The Best Of Earth, Wind & Fire Vol. II.


    In 1990 the group released the album Heritage. Two years later, Earth, Wind & Fire released The Eternal Dance; a 55-track boxed set retrospective of the band's entire history. The appearance of such a project after a prolonged period of relative inactivity signaled to many listeners that the band was calling it quits but that did not turn out to be case. In 1993, EWF released the album, Millennium that included the Grammy-nominated "Sunday Morning" and "Spend The Night."


    Earth, Wind & Fire kept recording and in 1996 released Avatar and Greatest Hits Live; followed by 1997's In The Name Of Love; 2002's That's The Way Of The World: Alive In '75; Live In Rio which was recorded during their 1979 "I Am World Tour;" 2003's The Promise, which included the Grammy-nominated "Hold Me" and 2005's Illumination, which included the Grammy-nominated "Show Me The Way."


    In 2000, the nine-piece '70s edition of Earth, Wind & Fire reunited for one night only in honor of their induction into The Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame. In 2001, Eagle Rock Entertainment released the documentary 'Earth, Wind & Fire: Shining Stars', which contains rarely seen historic video footage along with in-depth interviews with the band members.


    Even though Maurice is no longer a part of the touring group, he remains the band's heart and soul from behind the scenes as composer and producer. Maurice reflects, "I wanted to create a library of music that would stand the test of time. 'Cosmic Consciousness' is the key component of our work. Expanding awareness and uplifting spirits is so important in this day. People are looking for more. I hope our music can give them some encouragement and peace."

    LP 1
    1. Shining Star

    2. That's The Way Of The World
    3. September

    4. Can't Hide Love

    5. Got To Get You Into My Life
    6. Sing A Song

    7. Gratitude

    8. Serpentine Fire

    9. Fantasy


    LP 2
    1. Kalimba Story
    2. Mighty Mighty

    3. Reasons

    4. Saturday Nite

    5. Let's Groove

    6. Boogie Wonderland ( with The Emotions)
    7. After The Love Has Gone

    8. Getaway

    Earth, Wind & Fire
    $42.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Buy Now
  • The Ugly Organ (Deluxe) The Ugly Organ (Deluxe) Quick View

    $27.99
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    The Ugly Organ (Deluxe)


    Remastered Deluxe 180g Vinyl Limited To 3000 2 LP


    Extensive Booklet With Photos From The Band's Archives, Alternate Album Art Sketches, A List Of All Tour Dates From The Era, Show Posters, And New Liner Notes Written By The A.V. Club's Kyle Ryan


    8 Bonus Tracks From The Era, Including 4 Tracks From The 8 Teeth To Eat You Split EP Previously Unreleased On Vinyl


    "A brilliant leap forward" -Rolling Stone


    "The best punk record you'll hear all year" -Magnet


    The Ugly Organ made landfall on March 4, 2003, the same day as Evanescence's Fallen and roughly two weeks
    before the start of the Iraq War. The darkest days of the Bush Era were settling in like a dense fog over the
    entire country, and the outlook was bleak. That made The Ugly Organ especially potent, its gloomy inward
    focus a natural re action of the era. The press accolades came quickly, from the mainstream (Rolling Stone
    called it "a brilliant leap forward," and Entertainment Weekly said it "raised the Saddle Creek bar") to the niche
    (The A.V. Club called it "a potent piece of rock art," Alternative Press gave it a perfect score).


    With The Ugly Organ, Cursive made a landmark album for itself and Saddle Creek. It was the label's 51st release
    and the second in what my colleague Marc Hawthorne called "Saddle Creek's holy trinity" in his liner notes for
    The Faint's Danse Macabre reissue: Danse Macabre, The Ugly Organ, and Bright Eyes' I'm Wide Awake, It's
    Morning. (I'd argue more for LIFTED or the Story is in the Soil, Keep Your Ear to the Ground on that count, but I'll
    save that for the next time I see Marc.)


    Just prior to The Ugly Organ, Saddle Creek had released the celebratory compilation Saddle Creek 50, which
    included Cursive's gleefully self-referential "Nonsense" ("I really don't want to write another 'I'm a dick' song
    again"), which is included on this reissue. The label's 49th release had been another Cursive joint, the "Art is
    Hard" single, which featured the explosive six-minute B-side "Sinner's Serenade," also included here. Rounding
    it out are four songs from Cursive's split EP with Eastern Youth, 8 Teeth to Eat You-check out the ferocious
    playing by cellist Gretta Cohn on "Excerpts from Various Notes Strewn Around the Bedroom of April Connolly,
    Feb 24, 1997"-and two songs from the single for "The Recluse." It's an exhaustive-and exhausting-snapshot of a band realizing its power and wielding it for maximum impact.


    And then Cursive was gone. Again. Taking another of its intermittent hiatuses. An unease has accompanied
    every album after The Ugly Organ that it could be the last one-no, for real this time. Maybe because The Ugly
    Organ capped an unprecedented productive streak, ending a three-record, three-year run with an album that
    can't help but re ect the e ort that went into it. The exhaustion, the ambivalence, the doubt, it all bleeds out
    of those 12 tracks. At the end of "Staying Alive," the "ghost chorus" referenced in the liner notes sings, "The
    worst is over, Doo do Doo do Doo do Doo doo." On second thought, maybe it's neither hope nor resignation,
    but simple relief. The storm has passed. And it was a motherfucker.


    -Kyle Ryan, The A.V. Club

    1. The Ugly Organist
    2. Some Red Handed Sleight of Hand
    3. Art Is Hard
    4. The Recluse
    5. Herald! Frankenstein
    6. Butcher the Song
    7. Driftwood: A Fairy Tale
    8. A Gentleman Caller
    9. Harold Weathervein
    10. Bloody Murder
    11. Sierra
    12. Staying Alive
    13. Excerpts from Various Notes Strewn Around the Bedroom of April Connolly Feb 24, 1997*
    14. Am I Not Yours?*
    15. Escape Artist*
    16. May Flowers*
    17. Sinner's Serenade*
    18. Nonsense*
    19. Once*
    20. Adapt*


    *Bonus Tracks

    Cursive
    $27.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • The Heist (Deluxe Box Set) (Out Of Stock) The Heist (Deluxe Box Set) (Out Of Stock) Quick View

    $42.99
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    The Heist (Deluxe Box Set) (Out Of Stock)


    Gold Embossed Gator Skin Deluxe Box Set


    180-Gram Double Vinyl


    Custom Gator Skin Textured LP Dust Sleeves


    Nineteen 12" x 12" Song Artwork Inserts


    Art By 13 Unique Collaborators / Visual Artists


    When Macklemore declares his music is David Bowie meets Kanye sh*t, it's a bit of an oversell on the Bowie side, but then again, Jean-Michel Basquiat and Keith Haring are also honored as influences during Ten Thousand Hours, the biographical highlight that opens the Seattle rapper's vibrant sophomore release.


    These arty name-drops threaten to paint the album as more obscure than it is, but even as glitch electronica and Mad Rad member Buffalo Madonna strange up the breakup number Thin Line, The Heist comes off as instant, alive, and oh so welcoming. Chalk it up to Macklemore's playful and open lyrics (When I was in the third grade/I thought I was gay/Because I could draw, my uncle was, and I kept my room straight) or the album's not so secret weapon, Ryan Lewis, the producer who earns his co-billing with a George Martin or Dave Fridmann-sized sense of purpose and an Internet kid's sense of utilizing anything and/or everything. For the music industry takeover Jimmy Iovine with Ab-Soul as guest, Lewis' production is a mix of G-Unit gangster music and a Houston hip-hop trunk rumbler, while the pro-gay marriage highlight Same Love with Mary Lambert is supported by full-bodied piano and the sound of a bittersweet marching band, all of it familiar yet twisted through a laptop with hypnotic loops and catchy hooks coming out. Gold (feeling like 500,000 sold) is joyous and bright mini-electro that feeds the positive side of the soul, while Can't Hold Us comes with an irresistible bounce, both tracks being light, lovely, and in contrast to the numbers that deal with Macklemore's addiction issues and other obstacles.


    These two talented young bucks can't be contained, and hearing them offer one memorable, meaty number after another makes for an exciting listen, but this is unfiltered freshness released on Macklemore's own label, so the concepts of restraint and focus take a slight hit, leaving the is-he-Eminem, is-he-Childish Gambino, or is-he-Grieves question with no clear winner. Here, he's a mix of all of the above with some distinctive qualities, and with Lewis putting that kaleidoscope style underneath, The Heist winds up a rich combination of fresh and familiar.


    - David Jeffries (All Music Guide)

    1. Ten Thousand Hours
    2. Can't Hold Us
    3. Thrift Shop
    4. Thin Line
    5. Same Love
    6. Make the Money
    7. Neon Cathedral
    8. BomBom
    9. White Walls
    10. Jimmy Iovine
    11. Wing$
    12. A Wake
    13. Gold
    14. Starting Over
    15. Cowboy Boots
    16. Castle
    17. My Oh My
    18. Victory Lap
    Macklemore & Ryan Lewis
    $42.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP Box Set - 2 LPs Sealed Temporarily out of stock
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