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  • The Angry Young Them The Angry Young Them Quick View

    $22.99
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    The Angry Young Them

    The Angry Young Them is the first album from the Northern Irish rock and roll group. The album was originally released in the UK in June 1965. The band's lead singer and songwriter was Van Morrison.
    1. Mystic Eyes
    2. If You And I Could Be As Two
    3. Little Girl
    4. Just A Little Bit
    5. I Gave My Love A Diamond
    6. Gloria
    7. You Just Can't Win
    8. Go On Home Baby
    9. Don't Look Back
    10. I Like It Like That
    11. I'm Gonna Dress In Black
    12. Bright Lights, Big City
    13. My Little Baby
    14. (Get Your Kicks On) Route 66
    Them
    $22.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Day Of The Dog Day Of The Dog Quick View

    $15.99
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    Day Of The Dog

    " his songs come off as intelligent, angry, funny and ferocious. Furman sings every song like it's going to be his last."

    - American Songwriter Magazine


    Ezra Furman has always positioned himself as a singer-songwriter with or without the Harpoons. His acoustic based music would sometimes rock or burst forth with technicolor pop flourishes. On 2012's The Year of No Returning the production was especially
    sophisticated but now like Dylan in '65 he is ready to harness the electricity and delve a little deeper into life as a rock and roller with punk panache.


    On Day of the Dog Ezra re-invents himself as an angry young man ready to throw himself on the pyre for the redemption that will follow. With a tight rockin' combo he re-works '50s grooves through primal-Lennon outbursts, glam hissing, right up and full circle into Pixies-style/Buddy Holly rave-ups. It's an instant classic that could have fit on Stiff between Costello's debut and the Damned.

    1. I Wanna Destroy Myself
    2. Tell 'Em All to Go to Hell
    3. My Zero
    4. Day of the Dog
    5. Walk On In Darkness
    6. Cold Hands
    7. Anything Can Happen
    8. And Maybe God is a Train
    9. Been So Strange
    10. The Mall
    11. At the Bottom of the Ocean
    12. Slacker / Adria
    13. Cherry Lane
    Ezra Furman
    $15.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Blood And Chocolate Blood And Chocolate Quick View

    $24.99
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    Blood And Chocolate

    180 Gram Vinyl


    Now on 180 gram vinyl and re-mastered from the original master tapes this 1986 release finds Costello at his rawest with furious rockers like "I Hope You're Happy Now" and "Tokyo Storm Warning." Even the ballad "I Want You" is menacing.


    Known in his youth as the angry young man, Elvis Costello waited until 1986 to create the most vicious record of his career. Stripped to the studs and produced by Nick Lowe, Blood and Chocolate seethes with vindictiveness, spite, and rancor. The 11-track effort clatters with raw rock n' roll menace and clangs with darkly humorous intent. Venomous, acerbic, and aggressive, it values rhythm and attack over harmony and melody. A volatile rite of passage on which harsh Telecaster riffs cut like razor blades and Costello spits words as if they were Molotov cocktails tossed at enemies, this is the satisfying sound of emotional catharsis.

    1. Uncomplicated
    2. I Hope You're Happy Now
    3. Tokyo Storm Warning
    4. Home Is Anywhere You Hang Your Head
    5. I Want You
    6. Honey Are You Straight Or Are You Blind
    7. Blue Chair

    8. Battered Old Bird
    9. Crimes Of Paris
    10. Poor Napoleon
    11. Next Time Round
    Elvis Costello
    $24.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Lost Tapes The Lost Tapes Quick View

    $37.99
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    The Lost Tapes

    The discovery of WITCHFYNDE's Lost Tapes illuminates a fascinating missing link in the history of British heavy metal. In the lull between the Purple/Zeppelin/Sabbath revolution and the angry charge of punk rock and NWOBHM, in the East Midlands county town of Derby, four lads came together to create a tentatively progressive and intriguing new sound, and get heads banging in boozers all over the Peak District. Recording a 40-minute demo of original material in 1975, WITCHFYNDE were the unwitting spearhead of the movement that was still a long way off being dubbed the New Wave Of British Heavy Metal, and from the plaintive, spacey opening of Grimoire, this earliest of artefacts is rather more nuanced and versatile than the hallowed acronym NWOBHM traditionally suggests.


    Even though they raised many tavern roofs in the mid-late 70s, this isn't your standard thick-eared pub metal. On this recording you can hear these young musicians enjoying playing their first songs together, sharing varied influences and building mystical atmospheres out of extended jams with quirky interplay and a relaxed delivery. Behind the odd forgivable bum note, missed beat or overstretched solo you sense the exploratory zeal of four music-obsessed friends casting their net wide: from the sprightly power-pop groove of Madam Noname to the creepy proto-doom of Halfway, with Pastiche somehow English gothic country rock and Slow Down having the feel of an epic melancholy folk ballad.


    WITCHFYNDE released four albums from 1980-84, but split up due to line-up and label instability. Reactivated for the millennium, they continue to record and gig sporadically. Andro formed ZXY in 2010, and has announced that he'll be back on the road in 2014 on the Andro Coulton Gives 'Em Hell: Witchfynde Revisited 1975-1980 And Beyond! Tour.

    LP 1
    1. Grimoire
    2. Madam Noname'
    3. Halfway
    4. Pastiche
    5. Slow Down


    LP 2
    1. Valkyrian Ride
    2. Tetelestai

    Witchfynde
    $37.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Skin & Earth Skin & Earth Quick View

    $18.99
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    Skin & Earth

    Throughout a year long process, she began secretly working on an unprecedented idea writing and drawing her own comic book based around this alter ego of sorts. And on top of that, just to make things more difficult - an album to coincide with the whole thing.


    Thus came Skin&Earth, the Canadian singer's fourth record and her most open and vulnerable to date. In the past, Lights wouldn't write about being angry or Lights wouldn't write a song about fighting or Lights wouldn't write about sex, she says. So En is me in another dimension, and I was able to write about all the things that I never wrote about before.


    The album form of Skin&Earth also brings help from some of music's brightest including Corin Roddick of Purity Ring, Big Data and Josh Dun of Twenty One Pilots. Everything that happened on this record was really fun and natural and felt like we were all working towards the same goal, she says. It was this organic mutual fan-ship kind of thing that brought it all together. She continues, This is the most fun I've had doing a record. I've never felt that I understood a record more and I've never felt like I understood a reason for a record more.


    Ultimately for Lights, the most important takeaway from the story of Skin&Earth is of a young woman entranced by a spirit that she and she alone must overcome. This is based on internal, emotional stress and turmoil - stuff that I've dealt with and stuff that a lot of people have dealt with. I've always believed that all those battles can be fought and you come out of this stronger. And that was the foundation of the story, she says. At the end of the day, if nothing else, I want people, especially young women, to see in this character a little bit of themselves - see that an ordinary person can do amazing things and fight battles nobody else can see, and there's no shame in that. In fact, there's a lot of beauty in it.

    1. Intro
    2. Skydiving
    3. Until the Light
    4. Savage (feat. Josh Dun)
    5. New Fears
    6. Morphine
    7. We Were Here
    8. Kicks
    9. Giants
    10. Moonshine
    11. Interlude
    12. Magnetic Field
    13. Fight Club
    14. Almost Had Me
    Lights
    $18.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Mountain The Mountain Quick View

    $16.99
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    The Mountain

    The Heartless Bastards' story starts in Dayton, Ohio, where Erika Wennerstrom found the name on a multiple choice video trivia game at a bar. As a songwriting teenager during a time when GBV and Brainiac were packing local bars and three of the Breeders were still in town, Wennerstrom used to sneak into clubs to check out the scene. I would just see those people, my music heroes, hanging out at the bar like everyone else, she remembers. I could see myself in them. It gave me inspiration to do my own thing. After doing the usual business of playing local shows, the trio set out the following year on a regional tour. One of the first gigs of the trip took them to a bar in Akron, where Black Keys' drummer Patrick Carney just happened to be one of only a handful of people in the audience. This chance encounter led Wennerstrom and the Heartless Bastards to Fat Possum Records, with whom they released their debut, Stairs and Elevators, in early 2005.


    The band moved on with critical praise in their back pocket, including a four-and-a-half star review from Rolling Stone, which took note that, when Wennerstrom opens her throat on Stairs and Elevators she sounds like shes wailing on the shoulders of giants; her sad and angry vocals channeling all the swagger and spit of a young Robert Plant. All This Time, was released during the summer of 2006, it received even more widespread critical acclaim than Stairs and Elevators. The Bastards played hundreds of shows to support the record. They played huge festivals and toured with Wilco and Lucinda Williams. Wennerstroms songs appeared often on TV shows and in films, this would be measured by most as a huge success. Though in Wennerstroms mind her sound and band were still evolving, and she knew it was time for a change.


    In true ascetic discipline, she moved to Austin, Texas in 2007 for a change of inspirational scenery and a new recording project. With the help of producer Mike McCarthy (Spoon, Trail of Dead), she assembled a group of musicians with whom she gave the songs life and uncovered yet another layer of herself and the Heartless Bastards. The two new Bastards arent Texas ringers, but fellow Dayton brethren Dave Colvin on drums, and Jesse Ebaugh on bass, who actually played on the original demo that hooked Fat Possum. The album, entitled The Mountain, delivers the powerful howl that fans expect from the Heartless Bastards, but also weaves in adventure with mandolins, banjos, strings and Erikas transcendent voice.

    1. The Mountain
    2. Be So Happy
    3. Early in the Morning
    4. Hold Your Head High
    5. Out At Sea
    6. Nothing Seems the Same
    7. Wide Awake
    8. So Quiet
    9. Had To Go
    10. Witchy Poo
    11. Sway
    Heartless Bastards
    $16.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP + 7 - Sealed Buy Now
  • Turnstiles (Awaiting Repress) Turnstiles (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Turnstiles (Awaiting Repress)

    By 1976, Billy Joel had proven his merit as an auteur of California-based singer-songwriter pop-rock. On Turnstiles, the legend focuses his attention on more ambitious matters: Making an album whose scope and range dwarf that of his previous work, and shot his star into the stratosphere. Encompassing everything from urgent rock to soft pop and saloon fare, Turnstiles is a classic of major proportions.



    Mobile Fidelity has gone back to the original master tapes to present Joels encompassing music the way it was always intended to be experienced: Intimate, detailed, expressive, warm. The records widescreen sonics are at last properly cinematic, flush with colors, textures, and atmosphere.



    Progressing away from sensitivity, Joel casts his eye towards broader horizons. For him, that meant moving from the West Coast back to his native New York and embracing the citys doo-wop, Broadway, and R&B heritage. Joels diversity comes through in a spectacle of memorable tunes, including the infectious All You Wanna Do Is Dance, acerbic Angry Young Man, and gorgeous Ive Loved These Days.



    Still, no song better illustrates the allureand breadthof Turnstiles more than Say Goodbye to Hollywood, bathed in the sort of fabulous Phil Spector sound, huge drum echoes, and Brill Building orchestral sweep that Joel grew up on. Similarly, the sprawling ballad New York State of Mind clearly states the singers vision and mood. On the definitive track, Joel luxuriates in full string accompaniment and soulful saxophone playing that gives the pop standard its foundation. Not for nothing did Joel insist on keeping his touring band for the album, a decision that resulted in the firing of the records original producer.



    Supported by talents such as arranger Kenny Ascher, guitarist James Herb Smith, and percussionist Mingo Lewis, Joel succeeds in wrapping his head around a rich swath of American pop music, stopping by way of New Orleans, Kansas City, Memphis, Chicago, and other cities on his way from California back to the Garden State. While lacking the fame of the subsequent The Stranger and 52nd Street, Turnstiles is in every way their equal.



    Finally, the delicate nuances of Joels phrasing, pregnant pauses, and introspective emotion can be experienced in three-dimensional fidelity. In addition, the spectrum of the orchestras power and finesse, ravishing poignancy of the lyrics, and bittersweet qualities of the melodies bloom with unforced immediacy. The previous veiled sonic character and stultifying dryness have been corrected, presenting Joel and his crack band with illuminating precision and feeling.



    Turnstiles has never sounded betterand it never will.



    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Say Goodbye to Hollywood
    2. Summer, Highland Falls
    3. All You Wanna Do Is Dance
    4. New York State of Mind
    5. James
    6. Prelude/Angry Young Man
    7. I've Loved These Days

    8. Miami 2017 (Seen the Lights Go Out on Broadway)
    Billy Joel
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • Death Certificate Death Certificate Quick View

    $35.99
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    Death Certificate

    If Ice Cube's debut was a shocking attack that proved the N.W.A legacy would be stronger divided, his sophomore effort was a new kind of superstar pulling off the miraculous, a follow-up that equals its classic predecessor and tops it in some people's books. With a million copies of Death Certificate preordered, Cube was no longer the rock critics' darling. A million people listening was dangerous, especially since he was now slithering his influence into the suburbs. If the black rage didn't get you, the misogyny of I'm gonna do my thing, with your daughter probably would. Here, one of rap's greatest storytellers is able to draw hatred in under a minute with the short and direct Black Korea, an angry protest song concerning Korean grocers that got him dubbed racist and Ice KKKube by some. The track is an extreme representation of how a much sharper and cutting this album is when compared with his debut, and even though the intro announces the full-length is divided into a Death Side and Life Side, both are equally bleak. With the CD format, the two sides are indistinguishable and run over the listener with fast tales of drug dealing, drive-by shootings, and women who go from Ms. Thing to Ms. Gonorrhea. This would be numbing if it weren't for the rapper's amazing lyrics, ground-shaking delivery, and insight like when A Bird in the Hand deals with the irony of selling crap to buy diapers (Gotta serve you food that might give you cancer/Cuz my son doesn't take no for answer). A bit of sweet relief comes with the brightness of the great single Steady Mobbin' and with the nostalgia and slow tempo of Doing Dumb Shit. True to the Game (Ain't that a bitch/They hate to see a young nigga rich) is arguably the quintessential Cube track and if all this weren't enough already, the N.W.A diss No Vaseline hangs off the album like a crowd-pleasing, Brick-sampling encore. Although next year's Predator would be a bigger hit, Death Certificate brings to a close the man's trilogy of perfect albums that began with N.W.A's Compton and explodes into a supernova right here.

    - David Jeffries (All Music)
    1. The Funeral

    2. The Wrong Nigga to Fuck Wit
    3. My Summer Vacation
    4. Steady Mobbin'
    5. Robin Lench
    6. Givin' Up the Nappy Dug Out
    7. Look Who's Burnin'
    8. A Bird in the Hand
    9. Man's Best Friend
    10. Alive on Arrival
    11. Death
    12. The Birth
    13. I Wanna Kill Sam
    14. Horny Lil' Devil
    15. Black Korea
    16. True to the Game
    17. Color Blind
    18. Doing Dumb Shit

    19. Us
    20. No Vaseline
    Ice Cube
    $35.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Blood And Chocolate Blood And Chocolate Quick View

    $34.99
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    Blood And Chocolate


    Elvis Costello Blood and Chocolate on Numbered Limited Edition 180g LP from Mobile Fidelity


    Emotionally Cathartic Nick Lowe-Produced Set Includes I Want You, I Hope You're Happy Now, and Uncomplicated


    Mastered from the Original Master Tapes and Pressed at RTI: Guitar-Driven, Stripped-Down 1986 Album Teems With Stacked Rhythms, Tonalities, Punch, and Tension


    Costello at His Most Vicious: Songs Rumble and Storm, Dark Humor and Biting Lyrics Address Tumult, Jealousy, Vindictiveness


    Part of Mobile Fidelity's Elvis Costello Reissue Series: Singer-Songwriter's First Eleven Studio Albums Available on Sumptuously Sounding 180g LP


    Known in his youth as the angry young man, Elvis Costello waited until 1986 to create the most vicious record of his career. Stripped to the studs and produced by Nick Lowe, Blood and Chocolate seethes with vindictiveness, spite, and rancor. The 11-track effort clatters with raw rock n' roll menace and clangs with darkly humorous intent. Venomous, acerbic, and aggressive, it values rhythm and attack over harmony and melody. A volatile rite of passage on which harsh Telecaster riffs cut like razor blades and Costello spits words as if they were Molotov cocktails tossed at enemies, this is the satisfying sound of emotional catharsis.


    Mastered from the original master tapes and pressed at RTI, this collectable edition of Blood and Chocolate joins Mobile Fidelity's acclaimed Costello reissues series in presenting the icon's vital records in rich, dynamic, three-dimensional analog sound. That's never been truer than it is here. Costello and Co. recorded the songs in a large room at London's Olympic Studios while playing at stage volumes, an unconventional approach that nonetheless suited the music's raw feel. Nearly every track was done in three takes or less, with minimal vocal fixes and overdubs added immediately afterward. Such energy, spark, force, and pace thrive on this reissue.


    Capturing the decibel-laden atmosphere that heightens the rhythmic pace and elevates the urgency of the deliveries, Mobile Fidelity's 180g LP delivers the band's performances with wall-of-sound hugeness and booming authority. And while this isn't a record where subtlety reigns, listeners can now discern the acoustic guitar strummed by Lowe for the foundation of the savage Uncomplicated as well as the nuanced final bars of the inimitable I Want You on which each member's instrumental track is switched off to bleed into Costello's vocal microphone. Indeed, for all the apparent chaos, Steve Nieve's keyboards even get accurate placement and imaging on this incredible pressing. Then there's the temperament of the songs themselves-perhaps best described by Costello.


    The album title and Eamon Singer's crude cover painting reflected some intense and uncertain situations. The record might have well been a blurred polaroid: a smashed-up room, a squashed box of chocolates, some broken glass and a little blood smeared on the wall, wrote the singer in 2002. The album [is] a pissed-off 32-year-old divorce's version of the musical blueprint with which I had begun my recording career with the Attractions. Indeed, the band-on the verge of fraying at the seams and at each other's throats in close confines-pummels twanging chords, beats up on notes, turns up amplifiers, and eyes everything with great suspicion.


    Lyrically, Costello has seldom been wittier, sharper, or more malicious. The snarling, tables-turning I Hope You're Happy Now joins Bob Dylan's Positively Fourth Street as among the most lacerating kiss-off tunes ever penned. Similarly sarcastic, Next Time Round lends a pop rave-up air to the album's otherwise dark assault. The bloodletting Crimes of Paris and Poor Napoleon (featuring Pogues singer Cait O'Riordan playing the role of the voice of pity) confront the consequences of traumatic relationships and lustful choices with a savvy intellect. Given the mood and mindset of everyone and everything involved, it's no surprise that Costello and the Attractions wouldn't again work together until eight years later. Saying that Blood and Chocolate was worth the sacrifice is an understatement.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Uncomplicated
    2. I Hope You're Happy Now
    3. Tokyo Storm Warning
    4. Home Is Anywhere You Hang Your Head
    5. I Want You
    6. Honey, Are You Straight or Are You Blind?
    7. Blue Chair
    8. Battered Old Bird
    9. Crimes of Paris
    10. Poor Napoleon
    11. Next Time Round
    Elvis Costello
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Hug Of Thunder Hug Of Thunder Quick View

    $25.99
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    Hug Of Thunder

    "I don't want to go out there being presumptuous," Kevin Drew says, "because, I've worn those presumptuous shoes before, and you don't want it to feel like, 'Oh, what a let-down.'" That's the fear when you bring back one of music's most beloved names seven years after their last album. But with Hug of Thunder, the fifth Broken Social Scene album, Drew and his bandmates have a right to feel presumptuous.

    They have that right because they have created one of 2017's most sparkling, multi-faceted albums. On Hug of Thunder the 15 members of Broken Social Scene - well, the 15 who play on the record, including returnees Leslie Feist and Emily Haines - refract their varying emotions, methods, and techniques into something that doesn't just equal their other albums, but surpasses them. It is righteous but warm, angry but loving, melodic but uncompromising. The title track on its own might just be the best thing you will hear all year - a song that will become as beloved as "Anthems For a Seventeen-Year-Old Girl" from their breakthrough album, You Forgot It In People.

    Its title, Drew says, captured what he wanted people to feel about the group's comeback, and how they sound playing together again: "It's just such a wonderful sentiment about us, coming in like a hug of thunder."

    Broken Social Scene had reconvened, in varying forms, several times over the past four years - the odd festival show here and there, preferably ones that involved the least possible traveling. But the idea that they might turn their hand to something more than greatest-hits sets had been stirring since November 2014, when producer Joe Chiccarelli told Drew the group needed to make a new album.

    "He started showing up at our label, asking if we were going to make an album," Drew recalls. "He just didn't give up; he just kept saying, 'You've got to strike, you've got to do this, the time is now,' and so finally we agreed."

    As might be expected to be the case with a many-headed hydra of a group, getting all the principals to agree wasn't easy. Drew's co-founder Brendan Canning was keen, but Drew and fellow BSS lifer Charles Spearin took more persuading. A turning point for Drew came with the Paris terror attacks of November 2015, which made him feel the world needed an injection of positivity: "It just sort of made us want to go out there and play. Because I think we've always been a band that's been a celebration."

    Canning picks up the story: "By autumn of 2015 we had started getting together and trying some ideas out, just getting back in that jam space, in Charles' garage. Then we set up shop in my living room and we were starting to come together in a very familiar kind of way, jamming in the living room, eating meals in the kitchen together, because that's what the band is about: 'Hey, let's all get on the same page and get the energies flowing in the same direction.'"

    Recording finally began in April 2016 at The Bathouse studio on the shores of Lake Ontario, with later sessions in Toronto and Montreal, before the group went right back to basics. "It was very beautiful the way that it ended in Charlie's little rehearsal garage space," Drew says, "after going to all these studios. We just worked there, doing backup vocals and handclaps and all the shit we used to do when we were younger." And then it was to Los Angeles, where the album was mixed.

    The result is a panoramic, expansive album, 53 minutes that manages to be both epic and intimate. In troubled times it offers a serotonin rush of positivity: "Stay Happy" lives up to its title, with huge surges of brass that sound like sunshine bursting through clouds. "Gonna Get Better" makes a promise that the album is determined to deliver. That's not to say it's an escapist record: Broken Social Scene is completely engaged, wholly focussed, and not ignoring the darkness that lurks outside. But there is no hectoring, no lecturing, but a recognition of the confusion and ambiguity of the world. As the title track closes with Leslie Feist murmuring "There was a military base across the street," the listener is caught in the division between the national security provided by national defense, and the menace of the same thing.

    The gestation of Hug of Thunder was no idyll. When You Forgot It in People made their name, Broken Social Scene were young men and women. Fifteen years on, they were adults in or on the cusp of middle age, and - as Drew puts it - "all the adult problems in the world were happening around us individually, whether it was divorce or cancer". Three members of the band lost their fathers while the album was being recorded, "and it seemed like the days of going in the studio, getting stoned, drinking five beers and saying, 'Who gives a fuck?' were over".

    Then there's the fact of the size of the ensemble, and the number of competing voices. "You don't always get the final say with Broken Social Scene," Canning says, with a certain degree of understatement. He compares the process of getting everyone to agree on a song to party politics: "It's like you're trying to get a bill passed through the House - you have to be really committed to wanting to win."

    But, still, if they were to return, it had to be with everybody, no matter if that meant things might get unwieldy. "I'd like to believe that Broken Social Scene can be whatever it can be," Canning says, "but I think the fact we'd gone away for so long meant we really, we really couldn't have done the same thing without everyone involved, you know?" The story of Broken Social Scene, he insists, was built on the involvement of everyone, and so if the story was to be continued, those same people had to return.

    "The thing that has changed is that the relationships between us are established," Drew suggests. "And in a family, you ebb and flow and you come and you go and you're in love and then you're annoyed - but it's established now, the relationships aren't going anywhere, you know? And I think through time, because we've been through so much together, personally and professionally, when we're all on stage, everybody knows what they're doing, everybody has a melody to back up someone else, you feel supported, you're a crew, there's nothing but protection all around you."

    Canning picks up the theme: "Before we were making this record, I said to everyone: 'We all basically want the same thing, we might just have slightly different roadmaps on how to get there. So how do we stray off on certain country roads but get back onto the main thoroughfare?'"

    That Broken Social Scene was a family again, driving along the same main road, became apparent to UK fans in September 2016, when the group - with Ariel Engle the latest woman to assume the role of co-lead vocalist - came over for less than a handful of festival shows, to test the waters. Their Sunday teatime appearance at End Of The Road - an ecstatic hour of maximalist music, physically and emotionally overwhelming - ended up being one of the biggest hits of the festival. It achieved what Drew has always felt music needed to do: it created transcendence, a pocket of time where everyone present was living only in the moment.

    "My 11-year-old nephew asked me, 'Uncle Kev, why do adults get drunk?' and I looked at him and thought, 'OK, brilliant question, I'm going to give a brilliant answer,'" Drew recalls. "And I looked at him for about 10 seconds and I said, 'Because they want to feel like you. Because they want to feel like a kid again, they want to forget everything, they want to be innocent.' We are built in a way now where you can't do that because you're walking around with the anti-transcendence box in your pocket, and in your hand, and in your home, and on your bedside table: it's the anti-transcendence. It's called your phone! And we're getting killed, we're getting killed!"

    So what do Broken Social Scene want listeners to take from Hug of Thunder? Canning wants it to make them "pause for the cause and maybe just leave things in your life alone for 53 minutes". For Drew, it's about what it's always been about: making the connection. "I just hope they understand that there's others out there, that they're not alone," he says. "I know that's silly! But you'd be surprised how many times I've had to tell people, 'Hey, you're not alone on this, you're not alone thinking these things.' I mean, with the title Hug of Thunder, I want to hold people. I want to fucking hold them. And when we do shows, I'm not: 'Look at me, I'm elevated up on the stage,' It's: 'We're here with you, this is us together.' Broken Social Scene is about the people, and it's always been about the people."

    1. Sol Luna
    2. Halfway Home
    3. Protest Song
    4. Skyline
    5. Stay Happy
    6. Vanity Pail Kids
    7. Hug of Thunder
    8. Towers and Masons
    9. Victim Lover
    10. Please Take Me With You
    11. Gonna Get Better
    12. Mouth Guards of the Apocalypse
    Broken Social Scene
    $25.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Feeling The Space Feeling The Space Quick View

    $23.99
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    Feeling The Space

    If you've listened to Feeling the Space, Yoko Ono's personal-is-political 1973 album, it should come as no surprise that the once-reviled artist is inspiring a new generation of activists in 2017.On such songs as the righteous chant "Woman Power," the empathetic ballad "Angry Young Woman," the hilarious proto-grrrl "Potbelly Rocker," and the satirical "Men Men Men," Yoko sings in surprisingly straightforward fashion about the burdens carried by women and the mandate for feminism. Supported by such skilled studio vets as guitarist David Spinozza, sax player Michael Brecker, and drummer Jim Keltner, this is perhaps Yoko's most accessible album,and her most intimate.

    Feeling the Space was recorded during the time when the avant-garde visionary artist became estranged from her rock-star husband John Lennon. He plays only briefly on the album (billed as Johnny O'cean); she produced and wrote all the songs. The result is a definitive soundtrack/document of the era of consciousness raising and of radical critique of the family structure. Yoko and company deliver this hard message soft rock style, or as soft as Yoko could get. Yoko was on the front lines of the women's liberation movement. Dedicated "to the sisters who died in pain and sorrow and those who are now in prisons and in mental hospitals for being unable to survive in the male society," it's an emotional exploration of the psychological toll of oppression.

    1. Growing Pain
    2. Yellow Girl (Stand By For Life)
    3. Coffin Car
    4. Woman Of Salem
    5. Run, Run, Run
    6. If Only
    7. A Thousand Times Yes
    8. Straight Talk
    9. Angry Young Woman
    10. She Hits Back
    11. Woman Power
    12. Men, Men, Men
    Yoko Ono
    $23.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Ballads Ballads Quick View

    $24.99
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    Ballads

    Before this ballad album was released, John Coltrane's critics and jazz fans classed him as an 'avant-gardist', a modernist, an angry, wild young man who made his tenor saxophone scream out. Tongues wagged that free jazz could be made by just anyone who hung a horn around his neck.


    These eight ballads made people stop and listen with real pleasure. "Have you heard him? He can blow the notes properly, the pianist knows all the harmonies, and the drummer does far more than just bash!" These words were to be heard and read everywhere, in the specialist magazines, and in the jazz clubs from New York to Tokyo. All the themes are taken from the American Songbook, from musicals, and well-known numbers performed by Frank Sinatra, Johnny Mathis, Ella Fitzgerald and Peggy Lee among others. All of them have been performed time and time again and although the musicians played the themes for the very first time at the recording session, their interpretation was well structured while at the same time fresh and intense. With the exception of just one number, all the titles were a complete success at the very first take; but that is not merely that which underlines the high musical standard of the quartet. Fans and critics alike have continued to hold this early Impulse production in high esteem to this very day, which is certainly due to the producer Bob Thiele. But a great part of the album's success is also due to the excellent work of the recording engineer Rudy Van Gelder, who has captured the intimate atmosphere with his microphones.


    Musicians:



    • John Coltrane (tenor saxophone)

    • McCoy Tyner (piano)

    • Jimmy Garrison (bass)

    • Elvin Jones (drums)


    Recording: December 1961, September and November 1962 at Englewood Cliffs, NJ, by Rudy Van Gelder

    Production: Bob Thiele

    1. Say It (Over And Over Again)

    2. You Don't Know What Love Is

    3. Too Young To Go Steady

    4. All Or Nothing At All

    5. I Wish I Knew

    6. What's New

    7. It's Easy To Remember

    John Coltrane
    $24.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Glass Houses Glass Houses Quick View

    $49.99
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    Glass Houses

    Still Rock and Roll to Him: Joel Toughens Up and Increases the Animosity, Sarcasm, Confidence, and Rock on 1980 Set


    Accessible and Angry: Phil Ramone's Stalwart Production Bristles With Boldness, Raucousness, and Directness on Definitive Mobile Fidelity Reissue


    Chart-Topper Certified Seven-Times Platinum: Includes "You May Be Right" "It's Still Rock and Roll to Me," "Don't Ask Me Why"


    Elvis Costello long had a reputation for being the "angry young man." With apologies to the former Declan McManus, he had nothing on Billy Joel's Glass Houses. Fed up with inexcusable critical backlash and believing he'd still not been regarded as a serious artist, Joel ratcheted up the angst on the 1980 set that, oh, by the way, happened to sell another seven-million-plus copies and top the Billboard charts. Revenge is sweet.


    An integral part of Mobile Fidelity's Billy Joel catalog restoration series, Glass Houses is mastered from the original master tapes and pressed on 180g LP at RTI. Honing in on producer Phil Ramone's radio-tailored albeit looser, straightforward production, this edition opens up the previously veiled soundstages, spotlights the clean yet raucous arrangements, and decongests the imaging so that every note comes to the fore. Thanks to the extra-wide grooves and meticulous remastering, Joel's urgency and temperament have never sounded so vibrant.


    In addition to firing shots at detractors, Joel further solidifies his reputation as a pop maestro on the hit "Don't Ask Me Why" and mellow classic "C'etait Toi (You Were the One)," each replete with sparkling structures and shimmering melodies. Throughout, he dials down the grand gestures, focusing more on an attitude and directness. At the time, Joel was conscious of the punk movement, and seems inspired to follow that genre's preference for simplicity, frankness, and irritability. The album's legendary artwork-the singer preparing to toss a brick through the windows of his house-is a metaphor for Joel shattering his image as a cocktail-lounge pop crooner.


    Such changes are evident in the now-signature "You May Be Right," a hard-rocking and scathing rebuttal to a romantic partner on which Joel embraces the identity of a tough-skinned madman that won't stop at anything. He inhabits the role with convincing theatrics, his voice mixing pushiness, smugness, self-evident humor, and cool that fits the resistive tone of the record's songs. Glass Houses is Joel's megaphone for stubborn independence, dogged assertiveness, and blustery confidence.


    It's also an announcement of artistic intent, a statement that's simultaneously catchy and barbed, well-crafted and rowdy. And it succeeds on all levels, bringing to commercial pop-rock a brashness and grit often absent from fare that sticks in your head for days. Joel would never be seen the same way again.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. You May Be Right
    2. Sometimes a Fantasy
    3. Don't Ask Me Why
    4. It's Still Rock and Roll to Me
    5. All for Lenya
    6. I Don't Want to Be Alone
    7. Sleeping With the Television On
    8. C'etait Toi (You Were the One)
    9. Close to the Borderline
    10. Through the Long Night
    Billy Joel
    $49.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP 45RPM - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
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