Vinyl. Our way of life since 2004 (877) 929-8729

VPI Dealer Authorized & Certified
Site Search
Menu Free shipping on domestic orders over $49.99! - We ship worldwide!
15% Off Vinyl - LP15
Home > Products for: '

Bartok

'
  • 1
Results per page:
  • Bela Bartok: Concerto for Violin and Orchestra No. 2 (Speakers Corner) Bela Bartok: Concerto for Violin and Orchestra No. 2 (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Bela Bartok: Concerto for Violin and Orchestra No. 2 (Speakers Corner)

    Bartók's Second Violin Concerto combines a potent mixture of traditional concerto writing, compositional history and biographical upheavals. It was one of the last works he wrote before emigrating to the USA, and its classical three-movement form unites a mature feeling for form, sparkling musicality and exceptional violinistic sophistication.


    Bartók employs the inexhaustible sources of tonal writing with superb mastery to produce his own distinctive tonal language. In his dissonantly sharpened, expressive, even audacious music one can recognise peasant dance, cantilena, variation movement, rondo form, and twelve-tone themes, which however remain tonal.


    During his career spanning 60 years Isaac Stern recorded this major contemporary work several times and demonstrates once again his superb mastery of his instrument in this particular recording. With bravura he conjures up eruptive snatches of melody out of the rhapsodic depths, allows the slow movement to glow with pastoral sentiment, and tears through the vast variations finale with a perfect command of the score, his instrument and his creative prowess.


    Musicians:



    • Isaac Stern and the New York Philharmonic Orchestra

    • BÉla Bartók (composer)

    • Leonard Bernstein (conductor)




    Recording: January 1958 at Columbia 30th Street Studio, New York, by Jack Ashkinzy

    Production: Howard H. Scott



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Allegro Non Troppo
    2. Andante Tranquillo
    3. Allegro Molto
    Leonard Bernstein & Isaac Stern
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Bartok: Concerto For Orchestra Bartok: Concerto For Orchestra Quick View

    $39.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Bartok: Concerto For Orchestra

    RCA Living Stereo classical LPs - the gold standard for top quality orchestral performance and sound!


    Remastered and cut at 33 1/3 RPM by Ryan Smith at Sterling Sound


    Lacquers plated by Gary Salstrom and pressed on 200-gram vinyl at Quality Record Pressings!


    Since its original release on LP in the mid-1950s, Fritz Reiner's rendition of the Concerto for Orchestra has stood as the standard against which all other recordings of the work are measured. Reiner's superb control of his orchestra and of Bartók's rhythms and textures is still unsurpassed, even by dozens of subsequent conductors in the digital age. Likewise, the Music for Strings, Percussion, and Celesta shows just what an incredible ensemble the Chicago Symphony was under Reiner's direction. The original 2-track session tapes were used in mastering for this LP.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Introduzione: Andante non troppo: Allegro vivace
    2. Giuoco delle copple: Allegretto scherzando
    3. Elegia: Andante non troppe
    4. Intermezzo interrotto: Allegretto
    5. Pesante: Presto
    Fritz Reiner with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra
    $39.99
    200 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Bartok: Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No. 1 (Speakers Corner) Bartok: Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No. 1 (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Bartok: Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No. 1 (Speakers Corner)


    Between Bartók's Rhapsody for Piano and his First Piano Concerto lie 22 years of development, a struggle to find subject matter, form and his own musical language. While the Rhapsody from 1904 is dominated by a late-Romantic tone, which delights in a free, craggy and capricious feast of affable harmonies, the Piano Concerto reflects contemplation and a delving into the formal strictness of the classical three-movement concerto form. Rather less concerto-like and unconventional is, however, the use of the piano as a percussion instrument, which after just a few bars on the winds, hammers out an unrelenting staccato against the harsh and dissonant orchestra. In the slow movement too the piano is predominantly employed as a percussion instrument that, like the pendulum of a clock, rhythmically bulldozes on against the cheerless, bleak winds. Wild emotion predominates in the Finale. Stormy, insistent figures in the piano are answered by the orchestra with animated blows, but the quick flashes of melodies cannot establish themselves and are slashed to pieces as if caught in a storm.
    This uncompromising severity presents an enormous challenge that is mastered with aplomb by GÉza Anda and the RSO Berlin under Ferenc Fricsay.




    Musicians:



    • GÉza Anda and the Radio Symphonie Orchester Berlin

    • Ferenc Fricsay (conductor)





    Recording: October 1960 at Jesus-Christus-Kirche, Berlin, by GÜnter Hermanns

    Production: Otto Gerdes





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Allegro Moderato - Allegro
    2. Andante
    3. Allegro Molto
    Bela Bartok
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Debussy / Brahms / Bartok: Sonatas For Violin And Piano Debussy / Brahms / Bartok: Sonatas For Violin And Piano Quick View

    $39.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Debussy / Brahms / Bartok: Sonatas For Violin And Piano

    200-Gram Vinyl Plated And Pressed At Quality Record Pressings


    Mastered By Kevin Gray At Cohearent Audio


    This is perhaps the most exquisitely natural recording ever made. All in all, this Wilson record is a triumph of the analog recording art. - International Audio Review


    David Abel, violin. Julie Steinberg, piano. Perhaps the most transcendent of David Wilson's brilliant recordings, this remarkable album of solo violin accompanied by piano comes as close to putting the two performers in the listening room as any ever made, writes The Absolute Sound, of Sonatas for Violin & Piano.


    Recorded on Wilson's Ultramaster Recorder, built by John Curl, and using a spaced pair of Schoeps microphones driving vacuum tube electronics, the recording has a close perspective that heightens transparency and engagement as well as wonderfully capturing the beautiful tonality of Abel's Guarnerius violin and Steinberg's Hamburg Steinway without exaggerating their size.


    The duo performs these works as if they are one. - The Absolute Sound, July/August 2013


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Violin Sonata No. 1 in G Major, Op. 78_ I. Vivace ma non troppo play
    2. Violin Sonata No. 1 in G Major, Op. 78_ II. Adagio play
    3. Violin Sonata No. 1 in G Major, Op. 78_ III. Allegro molto moderato play
    4. Violin Sonata in G Minor_ I. Allegro vivo play
    5. Violin Sonata in G Minor_ II. Intermede_ Fantastique et leger play
    6. Violin Sonata in G Minor_ III. Finale play
    7. Roman nepi tancok (Romanian Folk Dances), BB 68 (arr. for violin and piano)
    David Abel & Julie Steinberg
    $39.99
    200 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Hero Brother Hero Brother Quick View

    $25.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Hero Brother

    Pressed On 180 Gram Virgin Vinyl At Optimal (Germany)


    Comes In Heavyweight Jacket With Black Poly-Lined Audiophile Dust Sleeve, Credit Insert, And Pull-Out Art Poster


    Sarah Neufeld is a violinist and composer based in MontrÉal, Canada. Best known as a member of Arcade Fire, she is also a founding member of the acclaimed contemporary instrumental ensemble Bell Orchestre and has performed and recorded with many other groups, including The Luyas, Esmerine and Little Scream.


    Neufeld began developing pieces for solo violin in a more formal and focused sense in 2011, though she has made improvisation and solo composition part of her process and practice since first picking up the instrument at a young age. Neufeld counts Bela Bartok, Steve Reich, Iva Bittova and Arthur Russell among the formative influences for her solo work, in tandem with an ear for the textures and sensibilities of contemporary electro-acoustic, avant-folk and indie rock music.


    Neufeld's debut solo album Hero Brother indeed channels all of the above, flowing through shifting atmospheres and oscillating between restrained, stately ambience, emotive Études, and raw kinetic energy. Small touches of wordless vocalisation, harmonium and piano supplant the violin in a few places. The album was recorded in Berlin by pianist and producer Nils Frahm, with Neufeld's performances captured in a number of locations with site-specific acoustics, including an abandoned geodesic dome, an underground parking garage, and the legendary Studio P4 orchestral recording hall at the broadcast complex of the former GDR.

    1. Tower
    2. Hero Brother
    3. Dirt
    4. You Are The Field
    5. Breathing Black Ground
    6. They Live On
    7. Wrong Thought
    8. Right Thought
    9. Sprinter Fire
    10. Forcelessness
    11. Below
    Sarah Neufeld
    $25.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Bartok: The Six String Quartets (Speakers Corner) Bartok: The Six String Quartets (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $95.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Bartok: The Six String Quartets (Speakers Corner)

    Throughout the ages, the string quartet with its usual forces has always been regarded as the crowning discipline among all forms of composition. Poetically described by Carl Maria von Weber as the »nude of musical art« and by Goethe as a cultured conversation among equals, the genre reflects the creative art of important composers from the Viennese Classicism right up to modern times.


    Bartók's six String Quartets, written over the span of roughly 30 years, demonstrate his development as a composer in the purest form. In the Quartets, stated Bartók, I condense to the extreme. In the very first quartet, which is orientated on traditional formal structures, Bartók travels down his own path by lending different weight to the various formal sections, rejecting repeats, and joining the movements together by means of bridging passages.


    The second quartet is exemplary for its intentional distance from the Romantic in favour of a composition based on simple folksongs, in which Bartók attempts to grasp the folk sound in his compositional structures, whereby he never quite disregards the tonal rules but certainly begins to free himself from them.


    The new richness in the third quartet with regard to counterpoint, melody and harmony as well as tone, is described by the sociologist and composer Theodor W. Adorno - with allusion to the musical creativity of the Hungarian peasants - as a »tent camp of improvisation«, which ventures here and there towards the avant-garde. As a contrast, the fourth quartet is almost relaxed in tone, the form and compositional technique is simple and uncomplicated in expression (Ludwig Finscher). For the first time, Bartók employs his idea of an 'arch' structure in which Hungarian folklore and the classical-romantic chamber-music forms are amalgamated. Like the fourth, the fifth quartet is also written in arch form, but in contrast to the fourth it is more cheerful and transparent. The sixth and final quartet was the last piece that Bartók wrote in Hungary before emigrating to the United States of America. All four movements have a mesto introduction, which induce a melancholy mood and seem to reflect the composer's personal circumstances.


    The Juilliard Quartet was the very first American ensemble to record the six quartets in roughly 1950, and they took up the challenge to record the works once again in the middle of the 60s, in order to give each of the unique works a conclusive performance. With firm bowing, and a dry and direct tone, the musicians dissect the substantial power of these works to reflect all the different aspects of the manuscripts.

    Musicians:



    • The Juilliard String Quartet


    Recording: between May and September 1963 at Columbia Recording Studios, New York City, by Fred Plaut

    Production: Paul Myers





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    This title is not eligible for discount.

    String Quartet No. 1
    I - Lento
    II - Allegretto
    III - Introduzione: Allegro; Allegro Vivace
    String Quartet No. 2
    I - Moderato
    II - Allegro Molto Capriccioso
    III - Lento
    String Quartet No. 3
    Prima Parte: Moderato
    Seconda Parte: Allegro
    Recapitulazione Della Prima Parte: Moderato
    Coda: Allegro Molto
    String Quartet No. 4
    I - Allegro
    II - Prestissimo, Con Sordino
    III - Non Troppo Lento
    IV - Allegretto Pizzicato
    V - Allegro Molto
    String Quartet No. 5
    I - Allegro
    II - Adagio Molto
    III - Scherzo: Alla Bulgarese
    IV - Andante
    V - Finale: Allegro Vivace
    String Quartet No. 6
    I - Mesto; Vivace
    II - Mesto; Marcia
    III - Mesto: Burletta: Moderato
    IV - Mesto
    Bela Bartok
    $95.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 3 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Bartok: Concerto for Piano and Orchestra Nos. 2 and 3 (Speakers Corner) Bartok: Concerto for Piano and Orchestra Nos. 2 and 3 (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Bartok: Concerto for Piano and Orchestra Nos. 2 and 3 (Speakers Corner)


    Bartók wanted his Second Piano Concerto to be understood as a contrast to his harsh and - for the orchestra - extremely difficult First Piano Concerto. But notwithstanding its more easily understandable theme, this work too was composed using strict classical sonata form. With a bright atmosphere, fired on by the sound of trumpets, the theme of the first movement forges ahead and sets the course for the whole work. Lively exuberance and a committed interplay between the soloist and orchestra result in a work that is wholly positive throughout and which remains full of energy yet bell-like and accessible right up to the final movement.


    Bartok composed his third and final piano concerto in the year of his death -1945. However, the work in no way possesses a mood of demise but breathes a worldly-wise, cheerful, and mellowed atmosphere. Delightfully audible melodies, with a chorale-like grandeur in the middle movement, are woven into a rhythmically lively but well-rounded and flowing movement structure.
    With these two piano concertos, GÉza Anda and the RSO Berlin led by the legendary Ferenc Fricsay, complete their great artistic achievement, which began with the recording of Bartók's Rhapsody op. 1 and his First Piano Concerto (DGG 138 708). For anyone who possesses just one of these two LPs, the other is absolutely essential.




    Musicians:



    • GÉza Anda and the Radio Symphonie Orchester Berlin

    • Ferenc Fricsay (conductor)





    Recording: September 1959 at Jesus-Christus-Kirche, Berlin, by Werner Wolf

    Production: Hans Weber & Otto Gerdes





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Piano Concerto No. 2 - Allegro
    2. Piano Concerto No. 2 - Adagio - Presto - Adagio
    3. Piano Concerto No. 2 - Allegro Molto
    4. Piano Concerto No. 3 - Allegretto
    5. Piano Concerto No. 3 - Allegro Religioso
    6. Piano Concerto No. 4 - Allegro Vivace
    Bela Bartok
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Tchaikovsky: Klavierkonzert Tchaikovsky: Klavierkonzert Quick View

    $44.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Tchaikovsky: Klavierkonzert

    A win at the International Chopin Piano Competition in 1965, at age 24, officially put Martha Argerich on the musical map. An exciting and mercurial artist, Argerich has recorded extensively throughout a career that has encompassed works by Bach through Beethoven, Schumann, Liszt, Debussy, Ravel and Bartók among others.



    Here, the multiple Grammy-winner and 2012 Gramophone Hall of Fame inducted Argentinian pianist performs Tchaikovsky's Concerto No. 1 In B Flat Minor For Piano & Orchestra, Op. 23 with accompaniment from the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra as conducted by Charles Dutoit. "The very fine sound of the horns right at the start augurs well and the wonderful weight and quality of Martha Argerich's opening if chords suggest that at any rate one need have no worries about the quality of this recording...The present record is really superb. So is Argerich, giving a performance of great range and of much subtlety...Praise must go, too, to the conductor, Dutoit who accompanies excellently and with notably good phrasing." - Gramophone/1971


    Musicians:


    Chaikovsky (composer)

    Charles Dutoit (conductor)

    Martha Argerich (piano)

    Royal Philharmonic Orchestra


    1. 1st Movement: Allegro Non Troppo E Molto Meastoso - Allegro Con Spirito
    2. 2nd Movement: Andantino Semplice - Prestissimo
    3. 3rd Movement: Allegro Con Fuoco
    Martha Argerich
    $44.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Brahms - Hungarian Dances (Speakers Corner) Brahms - Hungarian Dances (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Brahms - Hungarian Dances (Speakers Corner)

    Fritz Reiner dedicated himself to the interpretation of works by modern composers such as Richard Wagner, Richard Strauss and BÉla Bartók, and it suited him well to tackle works such as Brahms's Hungarian Dances and Dvorák's Slavonic Dances. These lively compositions require a conductor whose interaction with the orchestra is vivacious and animated. Reiner always demanded utmost concentration and perfection from his ensemble. Under his baton, the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra plays with enthusiasm and without restaint; no trace of a sterile concert atmosphere is found in this recording.



    Reiner's penchant for effects is not irritating, but rather adds highlights which support his highly musical interpretation, indeed one even forgets this trait when listening to the brilliant music.



    From a tonal point of view, the sound is beautifully balanced and reaches the highest standards despite its recording date of 1960 - or maybe just for that reason? The recording is characterized by its brilliance, warmth and vivacity with the result that listening becomes a true musical pleasure.





    Musicians:



    • Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra

    • Fritz Reiner (conductor)




    Recording: June 1960 at Sofiensaal, Vienna by James Brown

    Production: Erik Smith





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    This title is not eligible for discount.

    Johannes Brahms
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Echo In The Valley Echo In The Valley Quick View

    $24.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Echo In The Valley

    With one eye on using the banjo to showcase America's rich heritage and the other pulling the noble instrument from its most familiar arena into new and unique realms, Bela Fleck and Abigail Washburn's second album Echo in the Valley is simultaneously familiar and wildly innovative.


    "Some of the most interesting things in the world come together in strange and unique ways and show our diversity," reflects Bela, a fifteen-time Grammy award winner who is often considered the world's premier banjo player. "The banjo is just one of those things. It's a great example of how the world can combine things and create surprising hybrids," a reference to the ancestral African roots of the banjo combining with Scotch-Irish music in Appalachia.


    Echo in the Valley is the follow up to Bela and Abigail's acclaimed, self-titled debut that earned the 2016 Grammy for Best Folk Album. This time around, the mission was to take their double banjo combination of three finger and clawhammer styles "to the next level and find things to do together that we had not done before," says Bela. "We're expressing different emotions through past techniques and going to deeper places." The results are fascinating, especially considering their strict rules for recording: all sounds must be created by the two of them, the only instruments used are banjos (they have seven between them, ranging from a ukulele to an upright bass banjo), and they must be able to perform every recorded song live.


    Fleck and Washburn met at a square dance and began playing music together a dozen years ago, beginning with the Sparrow Quartet. They married shortly thereafter and became parents to a cute little tot. They've been touring the globe as a duo for years, almost nonstop but for each other's performances with various other musical iterations: Bela with the likes of Bela Fleck and the Flecktones, Chick Corea and Chris Thile, among many others, and Abigail with Wu Fei (a master of the ancient 21-string Chinese zither), The Wu-Force and Uncle Earl.


    With the exception of a few restyled traditional tunes, all tracks on Echo in the Valley are originals, and are largely co-written - a different creative approach from their first album, where songs were mostly his or hers.


    "This time, we really wanted to truly write together," Bela adds. "We spent a lot of our time on the lyrics, deciding what we want the songs to communicate, both literally and under the surface."


    Echo in the Valley reflects relevant issues while simultaneously connecting us to our past through wild re-imaginings of traditional pieces. New original tunes range from "Over the Divide," a song inspired by Hans Breuer, who worked to ferry Syrian refugees to safety, to "Blooming Rose," inspired by Native American voices and lamenting a continual distancing from nature, and "Don't Let It Bring You is an emphatic mantra for hard times.


    With I don't wanna cry, cry, cry, oh, "Let it Go" is ultimately about release from the pain of transition, surrendering to growth. The song acknowledges that we must let our children grow up; the concession that youthful innocence will one day give way to adult cares and worries.


    Clarence Ashley's "My Home's Across the Blue Ridge Mountains" has been turned into a rural blues, and Bela's well-known piece "Big Country" is framed by the traditional Appalachian tunes "Sally in the Garden" and "Molly Put the Kettle On," a medley Bela and Abigail performed hundreds of times on stage before recording. "'Big Country' is one of the most beauty melodies I have ever heard played on the banjo," says Abigail, who takes the lead on this version.


    "Come All You Coal Miners" is the point-of-view of coal-miner advocate Sarah Ogan Gunning, whose passages remain poignant and powerful today. "This song came from a very emotional, mother-driven, daughter-driven, wife-driven place, and there are not many songs throughout history from that perspective, so I am incredibly moved by her," says Washburn.


    As the story goes, Bela was struck by the sound of Mr. Earl Scruggs' banjo when hearing the Beverly Hillbillies theme song. He got hold of a banjo, took his musical namesakes (Bela for Bartok, Anton for Weburn, Leos for Yanecek) to heart, and has since continuously broken new musical ground with his instrument. Fleck has the distinction of being nominated in more categories than any other instrumentalist in Grammy history, and has brought his banjo through scorching hot newgrass, traditional bluegrass, otherworldly funk, modern jazz, African originals, transatlantic Celtic, and classical realms, with two self-composed banjo concertos to his name (The Impostor and Juno Concerto), with a third one in the works.


    Abigail was similarly jolted into life as a banjoist, but for her it was hearing Doc Watson.


    "I was proud to discover that I came from a country where you can hear that ancient sound - from Africa, from Scotland, from Ireland - all mixed up in this beautiful new sound, with those ancient tones in it," Abigail reflects. "The ancient sounds of our culture remind us who we are, and in them, we see a constellation of who we are becoming."


    Washburn has imbued this philosophy in all aspects of her work, from the string band Uncle Earl to her acclaimed solo albums, Song of the Traveling Daughter and City of Refuge, and her semi-autobiographical theatrical work, Post-American Girl, as well as in her musical ambassadorship with China, a country with which she has a long, profound history. Abigail is deftly following in the footsteps of the founding mothers of folk, and has become a prominent voice of old-time in our time while bringing to light those ancient sounds of American and Far East cultures in new and exciting ways.


    Bela and Abigail's creative process on Echo in the Valley is sonically made manifest in the record's major themes of harmony, empathy and surrender. As Abigail explains, the intense, intimate collaboration that Fleck and Washburn put forward on this project required "a spirit of staying strong, but also a willingness to release into the other's ideas to create something new," possibly something bigger and more beautiful than one could do on one's own.

    1. Over The Divide
    2. Take Me To Harlan
    3. Let It Go
    4. Don't Let It Bring You Down
    5. Sally In The Garden / Big Country / Molly Put The Kettle On
    6. My Home's Across The Blue Ridge Mountains
    7. Hello Friend
    8. If I Could Talk To A Younger Me
    9. On This Winding Road
    10. Come All You Coal Miners
    11. Bloomin' Rose
    Bela Fleck / Abigail Washburn
    $24.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Brahms: Violin Sonatas No. 1 & No. 3 (Out Of Stock) Brahms: Violin Sonatas No. 1 & No. 3 (Out Of Stock) Quick View

    $34.99
    x

    Brahms: Violin Sonatas No. 1 & No. 3 (Out Of Stock)


    Features Gioconda De Vito On Violin And Edwin Fischer On Piano


    Gioconda De Vito was an Italian violinist born on July 22, 1907. She began formal violin lessons with an uncle, who was a professional violinist, at the age of 8. Three years later, she entered the Pesaro Conservatory. She graduated two years after that and started her career as a soloist. By age 17, she was teaching at the Conservatory in Bari. At age 25, she won an international violin competition in Vienna. She was then hired (supposedly through the influence of Mussolini) to teach at the Academy of Santa Cecilia in Rome. Since the Second World War interrupted her solo career, her London debut, which was very successful, didn't happen until 1948. She subsequently performed frequently in the major European venues, sometimes appearing with other important artists, including Yehudi Menuhin, Isaac Stern, Rafael Kubelik, and Furtwangler. She also twice played for the Pope (Pius XII). De Vito was one of several famous female violinists of the early Twentieth Century who were quickly forgotten by the general public - Ginette Neveu and Janine Andrade were two others. In 1961, she retired from playing and virtually from the violin itself. She was then only 54 years old. Although she toured Europe and other countries (Australia, Russia, India, Israel), she never played in the U.S. A highly admired player, she was nevertheless, almost an anachronism during her career. Her repertoire was old fashioned and did not include the concertos of Stravinsky, Prokofiev, Sibelius, Elgar, Bartok, Barber, Shostakovich, Khachaturian, Korngold, Glazunov, Berg, Walton, or Szymanowski. It is said that she was such a meticulous player, that she worked on the Brahms concerto for fifteen years before she played it in public.


    - Prone To Violins

    Johannes Brahms (1833 - 1897): Violin Sonata No. 1 in G, Op. 78
    1. Vivace ma non troppo
    2. Adagio
    3. Allegro molto moderato
    Johannes Brahms (1833 - 1897): Violin Sonata No. 3 in d minor, Op. 108
    4. Allegro
    5. Adagio
    6. Un poco presto e con sentimento
    7. Presto agitato
    Gioconda De Vito
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Temporarily out of stock
  • 1
Go to top