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  • The Best Of Kansas (Red Vinyl) The Best Of Kansas (Red Vinyl) Quick View

    $32.99
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    The Best Of Kansas (Red Vinyl)


    180 Gram Translucent Red Colored Vinyl


    In 1984, superstars Kansas were rewarded by their label Kirshner Records with
    their first greatest hits album simply titled The Best Of Kansas. Featuring the classic
    line-up of Steve Walsh on keys and lead vocals, Phil Ehart on drums, Kerry Livgren
    playing the lead guitar, Robby Steinhardt on violin and lead vocals, Dave Hope
    on bass, plus vocals from John Elefante, The Best Of Kansas album has become
    one of their most loved works in their stunning four decades.


    With hard rock Kansas standards like Carry On Wayward Son and Point Of
    Know Return and the brilliant prog-rock classics Dust In The Wind and The Wall,
    The Best Of Kansas album would go on to become one of the best-selling greatest
    hits albums of all time. The long out of print original version of this greatest hits
    masterpiece also includes the appearance of 1984's Perfect Lover


    Dig deeper into the grooves and there you find even more prog-rock champions
    like the masterful Song For America and the powerful rocker Fight Fire With Fire,
    and the power ballad Hold On, making The Best Of Kansas the multi-platinum
    smash it is and will forever be!

    1. Carry On Wayward Son
    2. Point Of Know Return
    3. Fight Fire With Fire
    4. Dust In The Wind
    5. Song For America
    6. Perfect Lover
    7. Hold On
    8. No One Together
    9. Play The Game Tonight
    10. The Wall
    Kansas
    $32.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP Buy Now
  • Elgar & Vaughan Williams/Enigma Variations, Wasps & Greensleeves Elgar & Vaughan Williams/Enigma Variations, Wasps & Greensleeves Quick View

    $49.99
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    Elgar & Vaughan Williams/Enigma Variations, Wasps & Greensleeves

    Grammy®-winning engineer Keith O. Johnson has captured this colorful, beloved English music in brilliant HD sound. The Kansas City Symphony garnered tremendous critical acclaim for their first project on Reference Recordings, incidental music for The Tempest by Sullivan and Sibelius. Their second release on RR, Britten s Orchestra, received a Grammy® for Best Surround Sound for both the engineer and producer, as well as rave reviews everywhere, although the title is now unfortunately out of print.


    This release again features Michael Stern, the son of famed violinist Isaac Stern. He is also the founder of the Iris Chamber Orchestra in Memphis, TN and, in addition to RR, has recorded for Sony, Hyperion, Denon, Arabesque, and Naxos. Producer David Frost won Grammy® Awards in 2005, 2009, and 2011 for Classical Producer of the Year. He has produced a large roster of stars and Grammy®-winning titles.

    Ralph Vaughan Williams (1872-1958) - The Wasps - Aristophanic Suite
    1. Overture
    2. Entra'acte, molto moderato
    3. March Past of the Kitchen Utensils
    4. Entr'acte, andante
    5. Ballet and Final Tableau
    6. Fantasia on Greensleeves


    Sir Edward Elgar (1857-1934)
    7-20. Variations on an Original Theme Enigma, Op. 36

    Michael Stern & The Kansas City Symphony
    $49.99
    200 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl 45 RPM LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • GrooveWasher Record Cleaning Kit 3 COLORS AVAILABLE GrooveWasher Record Cleaning Kit Quick View

    $32.99
    Buy Now
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    GrooveWasher Record Cleaning Kit

    Have a question about this product? Please email our audio advisor or call 1-877-929-8729 with any questions or concerns regarding your equipment purchase.


    I have been using this cleaner since it was released...the results are amazing! This is a must for any record collector and would recommend this to anyone looking for the best way to clean their vinyl records! GrooveWasher...or nothing for me! Christopher Burns


    Hands down, the best record cleaner on the market. Levi E.


    The GrooveWasher Record Cleaning Kit includes:



    • Hand painted poplar wood handle in Red Hot Red or South Beach Green -OR- Solid Milled American Black Walnut handle* with hand rubbed oil polyurethane finish
    • One All Purpose Cleaning Pad (Red Base)--with velcro on the base to secure the pad to the handle and allow easy removal for cleaning or replacement.
    • One 2 oz bottle of G2 Fluid with mist spray applicator.
    • Record label protector mask
    • GrooveWasher Record Cleaning Booklet

    *The GrooveWasher Starter Kit handle is milled from a single piece of American poplar wood, hand painted with oil enamel. We designed the handle shape to be easy to grip while cleaning your records. Hand crafted in our plant in North Kansas City, MO, USA.


    G2 Fluid--Science


    The GrooveWasher G2 Fluid is the result of years of research and testing. The selection of ingredients was guided by the formulations of the D series fluids of the 1970s. G2 Fluid is designed for maximum cleaning effectiveness of the delicate vinyl surface and microgroove. Anti-static action on contact. Honest cleaning to release the honest sound of the recording.


    G2 does not fix scratches or scuffs. Once the analog signal in the microgroove is lost, nothing will recover it.


    A two ounce spray bottle has more than 300 fine mist sprays. Enough to clean both sides of 50 records! (YMMV). 2 oz-4 oz Combo Fluid Packs and 8 ounce refill bottles are available for separate purchase.


    Some vinyl record cleaning fluids on the market today are plain distilled water. Or worse, have a high level of alcohol which is an ineffective cleaner and can harm vinyl records. Some can leave a layer in the microgroove that reduces sound fidelity.


    G2 Fluid Contains:


    • Surfactants: State of the art surfactants, designed to dissolve the oils from fingerprints and effectively clean the vinyl record's delicate surface.
    • Super wetting agents:A specialty chemical combined with a blending agent that reduces the fluid's viscosity so it can penetrate to the bottom of the microgroove and spread the G2 Fluid across the record evenly.
    • Emulsifiers: Holds the oils, dirt, mildew and microdust particles in suspension until the microfiber fabric cleaning pad absorbs and pulls the contaminants from the record surface. The emulsifiers restore the record's natural shiny surface.
    • Purified, deionized water: Deionized water is the best carrier for the active cleaning ingredients and eliminates static electric charges on the record's surface on contact.

    Cleaning Pad Design & Science


    The GrooveWasher cleaning pads feature the highest quality split microfiber and other absorbent fabrics. These fabrics are effective in removing the contaminants borne in the G2 Fluid from the record's microgroove. The velcro backed pad design allows the pad to be washed or replaced. The cleaning pads are hand made in our plant in North Kansas City, MO, USA.


    Record Cleaning Instruction Booklet


    Each GrooveWasher Starter Kit includes an Instruction Booklet with helpful information on record cleaning and using the GrooveWasher System.


    GrooveWasher is the best manual record cleaner on Earth. And likely Mars and Jupiter too. Nate Goyer, The Vinyl Guide Podcast


    Designed and hand crafted by GrooveWasher in North Kansas City, MO, USA

    GrooveWasher
    $32.99
    Record Cleaning Kit - 3 Colors Available
    Buy Now
  • The Boss Of The Blues (Pure Pleasure) The Boss Of The Blues (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
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    The Boss Of The Blues (Pure Pleasure)

    Besides helping to invent rock 'n roll with his hit Shake, Rattle and Roll, Big Joe Turner was one of the most soulful blues shouters of all time. His best albums married the boogie-woogie piano stylings of the great Pete Johnson with a jazzy jumpin' horn section. Boss Of The Blues is arguably Joe's best recording, in part because he sang with particular gusto during these 1956 sessions. At the time, Boss Of The Blues marked a nostalgic return to the jump-blues style that Turner helped pioneer in the '40s. Besides Johnson, Boss featured some of Kansas City's finest ever jazzmen and various members of Count Basie's band, including Joe Newman (trumpet), Pete Brown (alto sax), Lawrence Brown (trombone), Frank Wess (tenor sax) and Freddie Green (guitar). The bawdy Cherry Red and the rollicking Roll 'Em Pete are my favorite Turner-Johnson collaborations. Both feature some incredible playing by the piano master. Turner's versions of I Want A Little Girl, Low Down Dog, You're Driving Me Crazy, and Morning Glories are definitive. If I had to compile a list of my 10 favorite albums, Boss Of The Blues would be there.



    Musicians:



    • Joe Turner (vocal)

    • Joe Newman (trumpet)

    • Lawrence Brown (trombone)

    • Pete Brown (alto saxophone)

    • Frank Wess (tenor saxophone)

    • Pete Johnson (piano)

    • Freddie Green (guitar)

    • Walter Page (bass)

    • Cliff Leeman (drums)




    Recording:1956 in New York by Len Frank

    Production: Nesuhi Ertegun & Jerry Wexler




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    1. Cherry Red
    2. Roll 'Em Pete
    3. I Want a Little Girl
    4. Low Down Dog
    5. Wee Baby Blues
    6. You're Driving Me Crazy (What Did I Do?)
    7. How Long Blues
    8. Morning Glories
    9. St. Louis Blues
    10. Piney Brown Blues
    Big Joe Turner
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • GrooveWasher G2 Record Cleaning Fluid Kit GrooveWasher G2 Record Cleaning Fluid Kit Quick View

    $19.99
    Buy Now
    x

    GrooveWasher G2 Record Cleaning Fluid Kit

    Have a question about this product? Please email our audio advisor or call 1-877-929-8729 with any questions or concerns regarding your equipment purchase.


    The G2 Record Cleaning Fluid Kit includes:


    • One 2 ounce bottle of G2 Fluid, with mist spray top.
    • One 4 ounce bottle of G2 Fluid with spout top. Use to refill the 2 oz mist spray bottle. 900+ mist sprays in this kit.
    • Label protector mask. Use to keep your record label dry when using the mist spray.
    • Record Cleaning Instruction Booklet.


    GrooveWasher G2 Fluid is the result of years of research and testing. The formula was guided by the D series fluids of the 1970s. G2 is perfectly safe for vinyl records. The ingredients are balanced for effective cleaning without rinsing. Evaporates quickly after cleaning per instructions. Anti-static action on contact. Honest cleaning to release the honest sound of the recording.


    Designed for use with the GrooveWasher cleaning pads. But you can use G2 Fluid with your preferred absorbent brush or fabric. NOTE: Carbon fiber brushes are non-absorbent and not designed for wet cleaning. Use of G2 Fluid with a carbon fiber brush is not recommended.


    RCM owners tell us they prefer G2 Fluid for the cleaning cycle.


    G2 does not fix scratches or scuffs. Once the signal in the microgroove is lost, nothing will recover it.


    The two ounce mist spray bottle has more than 300 fine mist sprays. With the 4 ounce refill bottle this kit provides 900+ fine mist sprays. Enough to clean both sides of more than 100 records! (YMMV)


    Some vinyl cleaning fluids on the market are plain distilled water with limited cleaning action. Others have a high level of alcohol which can harm vinyl records. Some leave a layer in the microgroove that reduces sound fidelity.


    High Tech G2 Fluid Contains:


    • Surfactants: State of the art detergents dissolve and suspend fingerprints and other oily grime.
    • Super wetting agent: A specialty chemical that reduces the G2 Fluid's surface tension to reach the bottom of the groove. When you spray G2 Fluid on a record you can see it spread down the grooves.
    • Emulsifiers: Holds the oils, dirt, mildew and microdust particles in suspension. Then the microfiber fabric cleaning pad wipes and pulls the dirt-filled solution from the record surface.
    • Purified, deionized water: Powerful carrier for the active cleaning ingredients. Eliminates static electric charges on the record's surface on contact.

    I haven't realized how dirty my record grooves have been. I used the Groovewasher on a 1979 copy of JJ Cale's 5 record. This is a quiet, laid back, nice, record and I heard parts of JJ Cale's voice that I have not noticed before. This out shines all the competition. I hope this flies off of the shelves as people discover it. Keep up the good work. Thomas Lee


    This is simply the best cleaning fluid available today. I highly recommend this product and this company. Dan B


    G2 Record Cleaning Fluid is formulated and made by GrooveWasher in North Kansas City, MO, USA.

    GrooveWasher
    $19.99
    Record Cleaning Fluid Kit Buy Now
  • The Grinding Wheel The Grinding Wheel Quick View

    $31.99
    Buy Now
    x

    The Grinding Wheel

    Armed with pioneering pure metal proposals like "Death Rider," "The Beast Within," and "Raise The Dead" already in 1982, New Jersey's Overkill were a rock-solid part of the first clutch of bands forging in fire this music known as thrash metal. Along with Metallica, Exodus, Slayer and cross-town doppelgangers Anthrax, D.D. Verni and Bobby "Blitz" Ellsworth were helping to create a new form of metal that is still as vibrant today as when the band's first album, Feel the Fire was issued by Jonny Zazula's Megaforce Records back in the spring of '85.


    Witness Overkill's 18th album of blistering yet precise and thought-provoking thrash magic, The Grinding Wheel, a record on which thrash's ultimate team of five machined parts shows up and executes to perfection with a little punk thrown in for bad measure.


    But a life dedicated to metal can be a grind, hence the title of this sparks-a-flyin' record. "It just makes sense for us," reflects D.D. "If you've been making metal for almost 40 years like we have, it can be a grind. But we also liked the old school metal idea of referencing "Grinder," the Judas Priest song, which suits the album because it has classic metal parts on it as well as the thrash parts. There's a blue collar feel to that title too, and that's how we approach Overkill. The guitar case is basically a lunchbox and we go to work."


    "One of the principles-if not characteristics-of the band is that it's been grinding through for long, long periods of time," seconds Blitz. "Decades to this point. And not necessarily with huge gains with regards to popularity, but for sure, with huge gains in as much as we can earn a living while doing the kind of music that we want. And so the idea of grinding it out over the decades became a device for writing the album, whether it would be riffs or lyrics."


    Despite, as D.D. says, the album's classic metal references (such as Black Sabbath in "Come Heavy" and Iron Maiden in "The Long Road" and the epic and cinematic title track), when the band gets up a full head of thrash steam, they bring to the party a trademark punk aesthetic, forged from trips on the train to CBGB and Max's Kansas City to witness original punk legends such as The Damned and The Dead Boys.


    "Punk is huge for Overkill," confirms Verni. "And it's something we very specifically brought back to the band in a sort of second wave, beginning with Ironbound in 2010 and then The Electric Age and White Devil Armory. I know from my end, it came from talking to the band and talking to fans. We had some of those metal records in the middle of our career where I wasn't paying enough attention to the punk rock vibe of the band. But just before we started writing Ironbound, I was very specific about getting back into that mentality, picking up on that energy again. You're not going to hear any Green Day or Ramones in us, but the energy and the attitude of punk mixed with the New York vibe that's what Overkill is, compared to other bands. You don't hear any of that in Megadeth; you don't hear any of that in Slayer. It's more specific to what we brought to the thrash world."


    Central to that premise is the incendiary "Let's All Go to Hades" which is sure to become a pit favourite. "This one was a hell of a lot of fun," says Blitz. "You know, I've always written abstractly. I'm not the guy who says, 'I'm going to crush your skull into dust.' I like writing more so from an abstract point of view, putting a slew of thoughts together that create one idea, like a puzzle more than a specific black or white. And when I looked at all these lyrics when I was done, I said, oh my God, I'm 57 and I finally matured (laughs). Oh, this is gross! (laughs). But I do like tongue-in-cheek songs like 'Hades,' where it says, sort of let's all go to the Bataclan, you know, stand arm in arm and sing 'Killed by Death.' I kind of tied in not long ago events, specifically what happened in Paris, with losing Lemmy. After that, I'm on a train from Paris to Istanbul on the Orient express, which actually existed (laughs)-it actually went from Paris to Istanbul. So that one is mapped out a bit more."


    Adds D.D., "It's not a 'smash your face into the wall' kind of song. It got a little bit of fun in it. I know any time you talk to the really heavy thrash guys, they go, 'Oh, no, no, no-no fun allowed. It's got to be heavy and brutal every second.' But that song definitely has a bit of fun in it. And we've done that before, with things like 'Old School' and 'Fuck You.' We're not afraid to do a bit of that sometimes."


    Another favorite lyric of Blitz', which is set to a non-nonsense old school thrash track, is "Our Finest Hour." "It's about the recognition of sameness," explains Ellsworth. "I think people are comfortable when they recognize themselves in someone else. And 'Our Finest Hour' is kind of a detailed journey through that concept. It's like, 'Come on over here; I recognize you.' I've always been a firm believer in the fact that it's great to accomplish things on your own, but people are always stronger as a group-that's the basic outline of that tune."


    At the other end of the spectrum from punk is a song like "The Long Road." D.D. readily agrees that there was a Maiden influence as part of this one's crafting. "Oh yeah, for sure. The opening, along with a little section in there with the vocals, definitely feels like New Wave of British Heavy Metal.


    More evident in the band's panoramic classic metal passages, but even articulated here on "Our Finest Hour," is another storied Overkill trademark, the definition one gets in the band's bass parts. Combine this with the Mensa-like percussive wizardry of Ron Lipnicki (laid bare for all to hear at headphone levels through the smack of his gravity-defying double bass work), and The Grinding Wheel emerges as a record with a remarkable rhythm section foundation from which to rise.


    "I've had that kind of sound now for a long time," says Verni. "There are a lot of bass players that say, 'I want to feel the bass.' And it's like, I just couldn't give a shit about feeling the bass. To me that's low-end. Guitars have low-end, kick drums have low-end, bass has low-end-I want to hear the bass, not feel it. So from a long time ago, that's what I would be doing on my EQ. I would be tweaking and turning knobs until not only could I feel it, but I can hear it separate from the guitars. And as a result, the bass just got more and more aggressive. I'm not a finesse player at all, on a bass. I bang the shit out of it, and I kind of do that to get away from the guitars and give it its own identity, its own sound, its own thing, so the bass has its own personality, not just serving as a foundation for the guitars."


    This affects the writing as well, says Blitz. "Don't forget, D.D. is a guitarist. He's been playing guitar probably more so than bass in his spare time since the late '80s. This is a guy who has two-and-a-half decades of six strings under his belt. So we get more of a unique perspective; it gives this band its unique qualities when it comes to songwriting. Because it's a guy holding six strings who's got plenty of experience playing those six strings, but thinking from the other perspective. So you get a punchier thing; you don't get a lot of fluff. When you compare Overkill to some of our contemporaries, there you get a guitar player writing guitar-based songs. D.D. is writing, first and foremost, from a rhythm perspective, and that's what drives the songs. Add Dave Linsk to the picture, once there's a ten-note riff written, then you have the best of both worlds."


    Which brings us back to the aforementioned machine-like efficiency of the five guys that comprise Overkill, this idea that there are no weak links within this particular classic five-piece with two guitars lineup of metal warriors.


    "That's the strength of the band," explains Blitz. "Dave is really the one that holds the guitar reigns in this band. He's a writer at his core. You know, he's one of these guys who brushes his teeth and hears a rhythm the way the bristles are hitting the enamel (laughs). He's that dude. 'Oh wait a second, I have another idea.' He has an idea a minute, and if that's the case, some of them are going to be great. So he holds the reins. When it comes to Derek, he's more the opinionated thought later on. And so when it runs through the machine, being D.D. and myself, then Dave, Derek comes in and can change that song. It's always kind of good to have, let's say, a chief and some Indians. And it depends who's wearing the chief hat at any particular time. But I think at the end of the day, when you're looking for a clean perspective, it goes through Derek-that's usually what his contribution is, more of a finalization."


    And Ron? "He's one-of-a-kind," says Verni. "He's a great drummer. I've worked with him for a bunch of records now. This is our fifth record together and so I really understand how he plays at this point. Working with him in the studio is just a pleasure, because he's so right on it."


    After heaping all manner of praise on legendary producer Andy Sneap (brought on only for mix given Verni's proven acumen at the task), D.D. further clarifies the reason Overkill can be at the top of their game 18 records into their distinguished run.


    "I have a studio and I did most of it at my place; I've been doing it that way for a while now. And now the group of guys we have in the band has been pretty consistent for a while. So we have a nice mix; everybody kind of knows their role, and is good at their role. Everybody brings a little something to the party. And I think that's why these last couple of records people ask, 'How is it that your records get better after 25 years?' And I think part of it is that everybody has a role in the band, everybody is comfortable with their role, and they're really good at the part they have. So the records actually get better. It's like having a team, instead of having a whole bunch of chiefs and no Indians.


    But a proven people's band like Overkill-a more personable bunch you'll never meet-fully recognizes that part of the band's success in being able to survive and thrive with the grind is due to the allegiance of the band's considerable worldwide fan base.


    "For sure," says Blitz. "One of the things with regard to grind, with regard to four decades of Overkill, it's good to be here, but it's obviously earned, not just by us but by the people that support this in general. The fact is that it's not just us grinding it out. I mean, maybe it is when it comes to the studio and writing and recording songs, from that selfish perspective. But the reason something exists for decades is based on group effort. Like we had talked about earlier with 'Our Finest Hour,' people are stronger together. In that light, this band is, let's say, not just our project, but it's a project by and for all those who hold it dear."

    1. Mean, Green, Killing Machine
    2. Goddamn Trouble
    3. Our Finest Hour
    4. Shine On
    5. The Long Road
    6. Let's All Go To Hades
    7. Come Heavy
    8. Red, White And Blue
    9. The Wheel
    10. The Grinding Wheel
    11. Emerald
    Overkill
    $31.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Grinding Wheel (Yellow And Black Vinyl) The Grinding Wheel (Yellow And Black Vinyl) Quick View

    $31.99
    Buy Now
    x

    The Grinding Wheel (Yellow And Black Vinyl)

    Pressed On Yellow And Black Vinyl

    Armed with pioneering pure metal proposals like Death Rider, The Beast Within, and Raise The Dead already in 1982, New Jersey's Overkill were a rock-solid part of the first clutch of bands forging in fire this music known as thrash metal. Along with Metallica, Exodus, Slayer and cross-town doppelgangers Anthrax, D.D. Verni and Bobby Blitz Ellsworth were helping to create a new form of metal that is still as vibrant today as when the band's first album, Feel the Fire was issued by Jonny Zazula's Megaforce Records back in the spring of '85.

    Witness Overkill's 18th album of blistering yet precise and thought-provoking thrash magic, The Grinding Wheel, a record on which thrash's ultimate team of five machined parts shows up and executes to perfection with a little punk thrown in for bad measure.

    But a life dedicated to metal can be a grind, hence the title of this sparks-a-flyin' record. It just makes sense for us, reflects D.D. If you've been making metal for almost 40 years like we have, it can be a grind. But we also liked the old school metal idea of referencing Grinder, the Judas Priest song, which suits the album because it has classic metal parts on it as well as the thrash parts. There's a blue collar feel to that title too, and that's how we approach Overkill. The guitar case is basically a lunchbox and we go to work.

    One of the principles-if not characteristics-of the band is that it's been grinding through for long, long periods of time, seconds Blitz. Decades to this point. And not necessarily with huge gains with regards to popularity, but for sure, with huge gains in as much as we can earn a living while doing the kind of music that we want. And so the idea of grinding it out over the decades became a device for writing the album, whether it would be riffs or lyrics.

    Despite, as D.D. says, the album's classic metal references (such as Black Sabbath in Come Heavy and Iron Maiden in The Long Road and the epic and cinematic title track), when the band gets up a full head of thrash steam, they bring to the party a trademark punk aesthetic, forged from trips on the train to CBGB and Max's Kansas City to witness original punk legends such as The Damned and The Dead Boys.

    Punk is huge for Overkill, confirms Verni. And it's something we very specifically brought back to the band in a sort of second wave, beginning with Ironbound in 2010 and then The Electric Age and White Devil Armory. I know from my end, it came from talking to the band and talking to fans. We had some of those metal records in the middle of our career where I wasn't paying enough attention to the punk rock vibe of the band. But just before we started writing Ironbound, I was very specific about getting back into that mentality, picking up on that energy again. You're not going to hear any Green Day or Ramones in us, but the energy and the attitude of punk mixed with the New York vibe that's what Overkill is, compared to other bands. You don't hear any of that in Megadeth; you don't hear any of that in Slayer. It's more specific to what we brought to the thrash world.

    Central to that premise is the incendiary Let's All Go to Hades which is sure to become a pit favourite. This one was a hell of a lot of fun, says Blitz. You know, I've always written abstractly. I'm not the guy who says, 'I'm going to crush your skull into dust.' I like writing more so from an abstract point of view, putting a slew of thoughts together that create one idea, like a puzzle more than a specific black or white. And when I looked at all these lyrics when I was done, I said, oh my God, I'm 57 and I finally matured (laughs). Oh, this is gross! (laughs). But I do like tongue-in-cheek songs like 'Hades,' where it says, sort of let's all go to the Bataclan, you know, stand arm in arm and sing 'Killed by Death.' I kind of tied in not long ago events, specifically what happened in Paris, with losing Lemmy. After that, I'm on a train from Paris to Istanbul on the Orient express, which actually existed (laughs)-it actually went from Paris to Istanbul. So that one is mapped out a bit more.

    Adds D.D., It's not a 'smash your face into the wall' kind of song. It got a little bit of fun in it. I know any time you talk to the really heavy thrash guys, they go, 'Oh, no, no, no-no fun allowed. It's got to be heavy and brutal every second.' But that song definitely has a bit of fun in it. And we've done that before, with things like 'Old School' and 'Fuck You.' We're not afraid to do a bit of that sometimes.

    Another favorite lyric of Blitz', which is set to a non-nonsense old school thrash track, is Our Finest Hour. It's about the recognition of sameness, explains Ellsworth. I think people are comfortable when they recognize themselves in someone else. And 'Our Finest Hour' is kind of a detailed journey through that concept. It's like, 'Come on over here; I recognize you.' I've always been a firm believer in the fact that it's great to accomplish things on your own, but people are always stronger as a group-that's the basic outline of that tune.

    At the other end of the spectrum from punk is a song like The Long Road. D.D. readily agrees that there was a Maiden influence as part of this one's crafting. Oh yeah, for sure. The opening, along with a little section in there with the vocals, definitely feels like New Wave of British Heavy Metal.

    More evident in the band's panoramic classic metal passages, but even articulated here on Our Finest Hour, is another storied Overkill trademark, the definition one gets in the band's bass parts. Combine this with the Mensa-like percussive wizardry of Ron Lipnicki (laid bare for all to hear at headphone levels through the smack of his gravity-defying double bass work), and The Grinding Wheel emerges as a record with a remarkable rhythm section foundation from which to rise.

    I've had that kind of sound now for a long time, says Verni. There are a lot of bass players that say, 'I want to feel the bass.' And it's like, I just couldn't give a shit about feeling the bass. To me that's low-end. Guitars have low-end, kick drums have low-end, bass has low-end-I want to hear the bass, not feel it. So from a long time ago, that's what I would be doing on my EQ. I would be tweaking and turning knobs until not only could I feel it, but I can hear it separate from the guitars. And as a result, the bass just got more and more aggressive. I'm not a finesse player at all, on a bass. I bang the shit out of it, and I kind of do that to get away from the guitars and give it its own identity, its own sound, its own thing, so the bass has its own personality, not just serving as a foundation for the guitars.

    This affects the writing as well, says Blitz. Don't forget, D.D. is a guitarist. He's been playing guitar probably more so than bass in his spare time since the late '80s. This is a guy who has two-and-a-half decades of six strings under his belt. So we get more of a unique perspective; it gives this band its unique qualities when it comes to songwriting. Because it's a guy holding six strings who's got plenty of experience playing those six strings, but thinking from the other perspective. So you get a punchier thing; you don't get a lot of fluff. When you compare Overkill to some of our contemporaries, there you get a guitar player writing guitar-based songs. D.D. is writing, first and foremost, from a rhythm perspective, and that's what drives the songs. Add Dave Linsk to the picture, once there's a ten-note riff written, then you have the best of both worlds.

    Which brings us back to the aforementioned machine-like efficiency of the five guys that comprise Overkill, this idea that there are no weak links within this particular classic five-piece with two guitars lineup of metal warriors.

    That's the strength of the band, explains Blitz. Dave is really the one that holds the guitar reigns in this band. He's a writer at his core. You know, he's one of these guys who brushes his teeth and hears a rhythm the way the bristles are hitting the enamel (laughs). He's that dude. 'Oh wait a second, I have another idea.' He has an idea a minute, and if that's the case, some of them are going to be great. So he holds the reins. When it comes to Derek, he's more the opinionated thought later on. And so when it runs through the machine, being D.D. and myself, then Dave, Derek comes in and can change that song. It's always kind of good to have, let's say, a chief and some Indians. And it depends who's wearing the chief hat at any particular time. But I think at the end of the day, when you're looking for a clean perspective, it goes through Derek-that's usually what his contribution is, more of a finalization.

    And Ron? He's one-of-a-kind, says Verni. He's a great drummer. I've worked with him for a bunch of records now. This is our fifth record together and so I really understand how he plays at this point. Working with him in the studio is just a pleasure, because he's so right on it.

    After heaping all manner of praise on legendary producer Andy Sneap (brought on only for mix given Verni's proven acumen at the task), D.D. further clarifies the reason Overkill can be at the top of their game 18 records into their distinguished run.

    I have a studio and I did most of it at my place; I've been doing it that way for a while now. And now the group of guys we have in the band has been pretty consistent for a while. So we have a nice mix; everybody kind of knows their role, and is good at their role. Everybody brings a little something to the party. And I think that's why these last couple of records people ask, 'How is it that your records get better after 25 years?' And I think part of it is that everybody has a role in the band, everybody is comfortable with their role, and they're really good at the part they have. So the records actually get better. It's like having a team, instead of having a whole bunch of chiefs and no Indians.

    But a proven people's band like Overkill-a more personable bunch you'll never meet-fully recognizes that part of the band's success in being able to survive and thrive with the grind is due to the allegiance of the band's considerable worldwide fan base.

    For sure, says Blitz. One of the things with regard to grind, with regard to four decades of Overkill, it's good to be here, but it's obviously earned, not just by us but by the people that support this in general. The fact is that it's not just us grinding it out. I mean, maybe it is when it comes to the studio and writing and recording songs, from that selfish perspective. But the reason something exists for decades is based on group effort. Like we had talked about earlier with 'Our Finest Hour,' people are stronger together. In that light, this band is, let's say, not just our project, but it's a project by and for all those who hold it dear.

    1. Mean, Green, Killing Machine
    2. Goddamn Trouble
    3. Our Finest Hour
    4. Shine On
    5. The Long Road
    6. Let's All Go To Hades
    7. Come Heavy
    8. Red, White And Blue
    9. The Wheel
    10. The Grinding Wheel
    11. Emerald
    Overkill
    $31.99
    Colored Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Evenin' Blues Evenin' Blues Quick View

    $34.99
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    Evenin' Blues

    Part of the ultimate audiophile Prestige stereo reissues from Analogue Productions - 25 of the most collectible, rarest, most audiophile-sounding Rudy Van Gelder recordings ever made. All cut at 33 1/3.


    All mastered from the original analog master tapes by mastering maestro Kevin Gray. 200-gram LPs pressed at Acoustic Sounds' state-of-the-art pressing plant, Quality Record Pressings, plated by Gary Salstrom


    Deep groove label pressings, tip-on jackets on thick cardboard stock


    This relaxed, rather informal August 15, 1963, session is one of Jimmy Witherspoon's rarest and was the only time that the great Arkansas shouter recorded with T-Bone Walker, the Texas-born father of electric blues guitar. In an unusual appearance as a sideman, Walker contributed his trademark brittle-toned solos, obbligatos, and "from the five" intros to a set of tunes that included such standards as "Money's Gettin' Cheaper" (a 'Spoon favorite since he borrowed it from Charles Brown in the late Forties), "How Long Blues," "Good Rockin' Tonight," "Kansas City," and "Don't Let Go." And adding further Texas seasoning was San Antonio saxophonist Clifford Scott, best known for his distinctive solos on "Honky Tonk" and other Bill Doggett hits, who not only played tenor (as the original credits indicate), but blew searing alto on "Grab Me a Freight" and flute on 'Spoon's reading of the haunting title track, a blues ballad previously associated with both Jimmy Rushing and Walker. With Clifford Scott, Bert Kendrix, T-Bone Walker, Clarence Jones and Wayne Robertson.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Money's Gettin' Cheaper
    2. Grab Me a Freight
    3. Don't Let Go
    4. I've Been Treated Wrong
    5. Evenin'
    6. Cane River
    7. How Long Blues
    8. Good Rockin' Tonight
    9. Kansas City
    10. Drinking Beer
    Jimmy Witherspoon
    $34.99
    200 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Prelude Implicit (Out Of Stock) The Prelude Implicit (Out Of Stock) Quick View

    $22.99
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    The Prelude Implicit (Out Of Stock)

    First Kansas Album In 16 Years


    2xLP Gatefold With Etching On Side D


    With a legendary career spanning more than four decades, KANSAS has firmly established itself as one of America's iconic of classic rock bands. This "garage band" from Topeka released their debut album in 1974 after being discovered by Wally Gold, who worked for Don Kirshner, and have gone on to sell more than 30 million albums worldwide. KANSAS has produced eight gold albums, three sextuple-Platinum albums (Leftoverture, Point of Know Return, Best of KANSAS), one platinum live album (Two for the Show), and two one million-selling gold singles, 'Carry On Wayward Son' and 'Dust in the Wind.'


    2016 marks the release of "The Prelude Implicit," KANSAS's fifteenth studio album. The wide-ranging progressive rock album is released on InsideOut Music, and marks the band's first studio album release in 16 years. The band, which is currently comprised of original drummer Phil Ehart, bassist/vocalist Billy Greer, keyboardist David Manion, vocalist/keyboardist Ronnie Platt, violinist/guitarist David Ragsdale, guitarist Zak Rizvi, and original guitarist Richard Williams, continues to perform in front of large and enthusiastic audiences around the world.

    1. With This Heart
    2. Visibility Zero
    3. The Unsung Heroes
    4. Rhythm in the Spirit
    5. Refugee
    6. The Voyage of Eight Eighteen
    7. Camouflage
    8. Summer
    9. Crowded Isolation
    10. Section 60
    Kansas
    $22.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Temporarily out of stock
  • Sugar (Out of Stock) Sugar (Out of Stock) Quick View

    $19.99
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    Sugar (Out of Stock)

    Bebe Buell's first studio offering in 10 years takes the listener back to the days of Max's Kansas City and there's even a nod to Joey Ramone ("Black Angel") and a Johnny Thunders tune here. Best known as a jet setting playmate, Buell became a prodigy of punk rock who was fortune enough to play with some of the most influential bands of the era.

    1.  When We Were Godhead       

    2.  Love Is  

    3.  Black Angel  

    4.  Sugar  

    5.  Untouchable

    6.  Grey Girl  

    7.  Timeline

    8.  Happy Now  

    9.  Trunk of Dreams  

    10. Air Kisses for the Masses  

    11. I Will Wait  

    12. Fall and Rise
    Bebe Buell
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Temporarily out of stock
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