Authorized & Certified VPI Dealer

A World of Vinyl

Site Search
Menu Free shipping on domestic orders over $49.99! - We ship worldwide!
10% Off Vinyl - LP10
Home > Products for: '

Black Sabbath The End

'
  • 1
Results per page:
  • The End The End Quick View

    $59.99
    Buy Now
    x

    The End

    Live From The Genting Arena, Birmingham, 2017


    Almost 50 years ago, the toll of a bell and rolling thunder marked the conception of an ear-splittingly monolithic riff. The End is a celebration of Black Sabbath's final hometown concert in Birmingham in Feb 2017. This unforgettable farewell show from one of the biggest bands in the world is a hit-packed set list including Iron Man, Paranoid, War Pigs, and many more.

    LP 1
    1. Black Sabbath
    2. Fairies Wear Boots
    3. Under the Sun / Every Day Comes and Goes
    4. After Forever
    5. Into the Void
    6. Snowblind


    LP 2
    1. Band Introductions
    2. War Pigs
    3. Behind the Wall of Sleep
    4. Bassically / N.I.B.
    5. Hand of Doom
    6. Supernaut / Sabbath Bloody Sabbath / Megalomania
    7. Ra Salad / Drum Solo


    LP 3
    1. Iron Man
    2. Dirty Women
    3. Children of The Grave
    4. Paranoid

    Black Sabbath
    $59.99
    Vinyl LP - 3 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • The Grinding Wheel (Yellow And Black Vinyl) The Grinding Wheel (Yellow And Black Vinyl) Quick View

    $31.99
    Buy Now
    x

    The Grinding Wheel (Yellow And Black Vinyl)

    Pressed On Yellow And Black Vinyl

    Armed with pioneering pure metal proposals like Death Rider, The Beast Within, and Raise The Dead already in 1982, New Jersey's Overkill were a rock-solid part of the first clutch of bands forging in fire this music known as thrash metal. Along with Metallica, Exodus, Slayer and cross-town doppelgangers Anthrax, D.D. Verni and Bobby Blitz Ellsworth were helping to create a new form of metal that is still as vibrant today as when the band's first album, Feel the Fire was issued by Jonny Zazula's Megaforce Records back in the spring of '85.

    Witness Overkill's 18th album of blistering yet precise and thought-provoking thrash magic, The Grinding Wheel, a record on which thrash's ultimate team of five machined parts shows up and executes to perfection with a little punk thrown in for bad measure.

    But a life dedicated to metal can be a grind, hence the title of this sparks-a-flyin' record. It just makes sense for us, reflects D.D. If you've been making metal for almost 40 years like we have, it can be a grind. But we also liked the old school metal idea of referencing Grinder, the Judas Priest song, which suits the album because it has classic metal parts on it as well as the thrash parts. There's a blue collar feel to that title too, and that's how we approach Overkill. The guitar case is basically a lunchbox and we go to work.

    One of the principles-if not characteristics-of the band is that it's been grinding through for long, long periods of time, seconds Blitz. Decades to this point. And not necessarily with huge gains with regards to popularity, but for sure, with huge gains in as much as we can earn a living while doing the kind of music that we want. And so the idea of grinding it out over the decades became a device for writing the album, whether it would be riffs or lyrics.

    Despite, as D.D. says, the album's classic metal references (such as Black Sabbath in Come Heavy and Iron Maiden in The Long Road and the epic and cinematic title track), when the band gets up a full head of thrash steam, they bring to the party a trademark punk aesthetic, forged from trips on the train to CBGB and Max's Kansas City to witness original punk legends such as The Damned and The Dead Boys.

    Punk is huge for Overkill, confirms Verni. And it's something we very specifically brought back to the band in a sort of second wave, beginning with Ironbound in 2010 and then The Electric Age and White Devil Armory. I know from my end, it came from talking to the band and talking to fans. We had some of those metal records in the middle of our career where I wasn't paying enough attention to the punk rock vibe of the band. But just before we started writing Ironbound, I was very specific about getting back into that mentality, picking up on that energy again. You're not going to hear any Green Day or Ramones in us, but the energy and the attitude of punk mixed with the New York vibe that's what Overkill is, compared to other bands. You don't hear any of that in Megadeth; you don't hear any of that in Slayer. It's more specific to what we brought to the thrash world.

    Central to that premise is the incendiary Let's All Go to Hades which is sure to become a pit favourite. This one was a hell of a lot of fun, says Blitz. You know, I've always written abstractly. I'm not the guy who says, 'I'm going to crush your skull into dust.' I like writing more so from an abstract point of view, putting a slew of thoughts together that create one idea, like a puzzle more than a specific black or white. And when I looked at all these lyrics when I was done, I said, oh my God, I'm 57 and I finally matured (laughs). Oh, this is gross! (laughs). But I do like tongue-in-cheek songs like 'Hades,' where it says, sort of let's all go to the Bataclan, you know, stand arm in arm and sing 'Killed by Death.' I kind of tied in not long ago events, specifically what happened in Paris, with losing Lemmy. After that, I'm on a train from Paris to Istanbul on the Orient express, which actually existed (laughs)-it actually went from Paris to Istanbul. So that one is mapped out a bit more.

    Adds D.D., It's not a 'smash your face into the wall' kind of song. It got a little bit of fun in it. I know any time you talk to the really heavy thrash guys, they go, 'Oh, no, no, no-no fun allowed. It's got to be heavy and brutal every second.' But that song definitely has a bit of fun in it. And we've done that before, with things like 'Old School' and 'Fuck You.' We're not afraid to do a bit of that sometimes.

    Another favorite lyric of Blitz', which is set to a non-nonsense old school thrash track, is Our Finest Hour. It's about the recognition of sameness, explains Ellsworth. I think people are comfortable when they recognize themselves in someone else. And 'Our Finest Hour' is kind of a detailed journey through that concept. It's like, 'Come on over here; I recognize you.' I've always been a firm believer in the fact that it's great to accomplish things on your own, but people are always stronger as a group-that's the basic outline of that tune.

    At the other end of the spectrum from punk is a song like The Long Road. D.D. readily agrees that there was a Maiden influence as part of this one's crafting. Oh yeah, for sure. The opening, along with a little section in there with the vocals, definitely feels like New Wave of British Heavy Metal.

    More evident in the band's panoramic classic metal passages, but even articulated here on Our Finest Hour, is another storied Overkill trademark, the definition one gets in the band's bass parts. Combine this with the Mensa-like percussive wizardry of Ron Lipnicki (laid bare for all to hear at headphone levels through the smack of his gravity-defying double bass work), and The Grinding Wheel emerges as a record with a remarkable rhythm section foundation from which to rise.

    I've had that kind of sound now for a long time, says Verni. There are a lot of bass players that say, 'I want to feel the bass.' And it's like, I just couldn't give a shit about feeling the bass. To me that's low-end. Guitars have low-end, kick drums have low-end, bass has low-end-I want to hear the bass, not feel it. So from a long time ago, that's what I would be doing on my EQ. I would be tweaking and turning knobs until not only could I feel it, but I can hear it separate from the guitars. And as a result, the bass just got more and more aggressive. I'm not a finesse player at all, on a bass. I bang the shit out of it, and I kind of do that to get away from the guitars and give it its own identity, its own sound, its own thing, so the bass has its own personality, not just serving as a foundation for the guitars.

    This affects the writing as well, says Blitz. Don't forget, D.D. is a guitarist. He's been playing guitar probably more so than bass in his spare time since the late '80s. This is a guy who has two-and-a-half decades of six strings under his belt. So we get more of a unique perspective; it gives this band its unique qualities when it comes to songwriting. Because it's a guy holding six strings who's got plenty of experience playing those six strings, but thinking from the other perspective. So you get a punchier thing; you don't get a lot of fluff. When you compare Overkill to some of our contemporaries, there you get a guitar player writing guitar-based songs. D.D. is writing, first and foremost, from a rhythm perspective, and that's what drives the songs. Add Dave Linsk to the picture, once there's a ten-note riff written, then you have the best of both worlds.

    Which brings us back to the aforementioned machine-like efficiency of the five guys that comprise Overkill, this idea that there are no weak links within this particular classic five-piece with two guitars lineup of metal warriors.

    That's the strength of the band, explains Blitz. Dave is really the one that holds the guitar reigns in this band. He's a writer at his core. You know, he's one of these guys who brushes his teeth and hears a rhythm the way the bristles are hitting the enamel (laughs). He's that dude. 'Oh wait a second, I have another idea.' He has an idea a minute, and if that's the case, some of them are going to be great. So he holds the reins. When it comes to Derek, he's more the opinionated thought later on. And so when it runs through the machine, being D.D. and myself, then Dave, Derek comes in and can change that song. It's always kind of good to have, let's say, a chief and some Indians. And it depends who's wearing the chief hat at any particular time. But I think at the end of the day, when you're looking for a clean perspective, it goes through Derek-that's usually what his contribution is, more of a finalization.

    And Ron? He's one-of-a-kind, says Verni. He's a great drummer. I've worked with him for a bunch of records now. This is our fifth record together and so I really understand how he plays at this point. Working with him in the studio is just a pleasure, because he's so right on it.

    After heaping all manner of praise on legendary producer Andy Sneap (brought on only for mix given Verni's proven acumen at the task), D.D. further clarifies the reason Overkill can be at the top of their game 18 records into their distinguished run.

    I have a studio and I did most of it at my place; I've been doing it that way for a while now. And now the group of guys we have in the band has been pretty consistent for a while. So we have a nice mix; everybody kind of knows their role, and is good at their role. Everybody brings a little something to the party. And I think that's why these last couple of records people ask, 'How is it that your records get better after 25 years?' And I think part of it is that everybody has a role in the band, everybody is comfortable with their role, and they're really good at the part they have. So the records actually get better. It's like having a team, instead of having a whole bunch of chiefs and no Indians.

    But a proven people's band like Overkill-a more personable bunch you'll never meet-fully recognizes that part of the band's success in being able to survive and thrive with the grind is due to the allegiance of the band's considerable worldwide fan base.

    For sure, says Blitz. One of the things with regard to grind, with regard to four decades of Overkill, it's good to be here, but it's obviously earned, not just by us but by the people that support this in general. The fact is that it's not just us grinding it out. I mean, maybe it is when it comes to the studio and writing and recording songs, from that selfish perspective. But the reason something exists for decades is based on group effort. Like we had talked about earlier with 'Our Finest Hour,' people are stronger together. In that light, this band is, let's say, not just our project, but it's a project by and for all those who hold it dear.

    1. Mean, Green, Killing Machine
    2. Goddamn Trouble
    3. Our Finest Hour
    4. Shine On
    5. The Long Road
    6. Let's All Go To Hades
    7. Come Heavy
    8. Red, White And Blue
    9. The Wheel
    10. The Grinding Wheel
    11. Emerald
    Overkill
    $31.99
    Colored Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Black Mountain (10th Anniversary Deluxe Edition) Black Mountain (10th Anniversary Deluxe Edition) Quick View

    $24.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Black Mountain (10th Anniversary Deluxe Edition)

    Limited Edition Grey Vinyl


    It's only a clichÉ because it's true, but the greatest records are timeless. Black Mountain's self-titled debut
    album is just such a record. It is a new classic rock, with reference points arcane and clear, its sound fresh,
    unfamiliar and irresistible. The work of a small collective of musicians operating from Vancouver, Canada,
    far from any industry buzz but firmly in the eye of their own storm of creativity, Black Mountain's debut
    album was, of course, a beginning, but it also marked an ending.


    Begun as the fourth album for Jerk With A Bomb, the 4-track bedroom project turned non-rock band led
    by Stephen McBean that preceded Black Mountain, the songs grew from skeletal sessions cut by McBean
    and Josh Wells and honed on the road in empty North American clubs along with Amber Webber. "We'd lay
    down the bed tracks, the guitars and drums," remembers McBean. "Matt [Camirand, bass] joined, and we
    changed the band name after a dream of how life could be different in the B section between Black Flag and
    Black Sabbath. Josh's roommate Jeremy [Schmidt, keys] was lurking about. We asked him if he wanted to
    add some synth bleeps or whatever. He came back with all these orchestrated keyboard parts, and we said,
    'Oh, you should probably join the band now.'"


    They cut the album at the Hive and their jam space in Vancouver, recording in "a big cement room with a
    tall ceiling, nice boomy acoustics, lots of natural reverb, on an 8-track reel-to-reel tape recorder." During the
    sessions, these elemental first tracks found their true shape: wry & giddy, hypnotic & gracefully heavy, the
    dark and powerful blues, and mysterious chugging murk.


    The album's initial success saw the band take to the road, leaving their Vancouver enclave for stages across
    the world. "It felt like there was a real explosion of excitement at shows," remembers McBean. "We wouldn't
    write setlists, we'd just feel the energy in the room and call things out, jamming on songs like 'No Hits' and
    'Druganaut.' It was a good time for live rock'n'roll: DJ booths were being transformed back to drum risers,
    people were digging 20 minute heady jams and there were bands like Comets On Fire and Oneida out there
    who we felt kinship with. I was into Faust and Amon Duul but had no idea of the scene of modern bands
    doing that stuff. And then we met those bands, and it was cool. And then we went on tour with
    Coldplay and the adventures continued.


    Their jaunt across the world as guests of perhaps the biggest band in the world is a tale for another time,
    perhaps: the start of Black Mountain's next chapter, and all that followed. For now, savor the compact,
    spacey brilliance of that cosmic, heavy and subtle debut album, expanded now with a raft of delicious bonus
    tracks scavenged from the Black Mountain Army archives.

    Modern Music
    Don't Run Our Hearts Around
    Druganaut
    No Satisfaction
    Set Us Free
    No Hits
    Heart Of Snow
    Faulty Times
    Druganaut (Extended Remix)
    Buffalo Swan
    Bicycle Man
    Behind The Fall
    Set Us Free (Demo)
    Black Mountain (Demo)
    No Satisfaction (UK Radio)
    It Wasn't Arson
    Black Mountain
    $24.99
    Colored Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Sorceress (Black Vinyl) Sorceress (Black Vinyl) Quick View

    $29.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Sorceress (Black Vinyl)

    Pressed On Black Vinyl


    There are few bands that can or will match Sweden's Opeth. Since forming in the tiny Stockholm suburb of Bandhagen in 1990, the Swedes have eclipsed convention, defiantly crushed the odds, and, most importantly, crafted 12 stunningly beautiful, become one of the best bands on the planet; on album or on stage. Ask any Opeth fan. Enquire with any band that's shared the proverbial pine with the Swedes. Or, get a label representative to talk Opeth. They'll all tell you the same thing: Opeth are peerless. And they're only getting better.


    Opeth's new album, Sorceress, their first for Nuclear Blast via the band's imprint label Moderbolaget Records, is proof chief architect Mikael Åkerfeldt has a near-endless well of greatness inside. From the album's opener "Persephone" to "The Wilde Flowers" and "Strange Brew" to the album's counterpart title tracks "Sorceress" and "Sorceress II", Opeth's twelfth full-length is an unparalleled adventure, where visions cleverly and secretly change, colours mute as if weathered by time, and sounds challenge profoundly. Sorceress is, by definition, moored in Åkerfeldt's impressive record collection-his one true vice-but, as always, there's more invention than appropriation at play.


    "This time around I didn't think about what I wanted to do," Åkerfeldt reveals. "I was forced to write. But once I started, it was easy. This record, like the last record, didn't take long to write. Like five or six months. The thoughts behind this record developed as I was writing. The only thing I was thinking about with this record was to write that songs didn't musically connect. I made sure if I had a song that was new sounding for this record, I'd make the next song completely different. I think the songs are very different from one another. It's very diverse."


    Certainly, every Opeth record has had diversity. In 1995, Orchid reset the rules of death metal. Six years later, Blackwater Park hit the high note for musicality in a genre generally devoid of it. Damnation, in 2003, was the work of a band determined to upend the norm. Five years after that, Watershed closed Opeth's chapter on death metal by visiting its darkest corners and holding its native brutality aloft. And in 2014, Pale Communion officially bridged the progressive music gap by twisting the intrepid sounds of '60s, '70s, and '80s into contemporary brilliance. So, really, what's so different about Sorceress?


    "My music taste got a little wider," grins Åkerfeldt. "I started listening to jazz. I bought a lot of Coltrane records. I never really thought Coltrane would be for me because I like 'dinner jazz.' I like comfortable, soft, nice, and lovely jazz. Like Miles Davis' '50s stuff. Porgy and Bess, for example. I guess Dave Brubeck fits in there, too. So, that's the only new influx of musical inspiration for me. Other than that, I've been buying the same type of records I always have. Prog, symphonic rock, singer/songwriter, metal, hard rock But there wasn't anything that set me off like The Zombies or Scott Walker. Nothing got me going this time."


    Actually, that's not entirely true. Åkerfeldt's always mining for progressive gold. Good, rare music is particularly good at getting his motor running. He found double-gold in one-off Italian outfit Il Paese dei Balocchi and Bobak, Jons, Malone's ultra-obscure Motherlight album. To wit, get Åkerfeldt talking about either and he's all too pleased to discuss the finer points of Il Paese dei Balocchi's string-based darkness or how he fan-boyed Malone via email to get the famed British orchestrator and one-time Iron Maiden producer to contribute to Sorceress.


    "I absolutely love Il Paese dei Balocchi," Åkerfeldt professes. "They did one album. It's insanely good. It has everything I love about progressive rock in it. This album is so orchestrated and epic. It's got lots of string sections. It's very moody, dark, and sad. It's a mystery they didn't do any more. As for Will Malone, he did the strings and stuff for the Sabbath records-Sabotage and Never Say Die! But now he does strings for pop artists like Joss Stone, The Verve, Depeche Mode. I looked him up, mostly because he was the house engineer for Morgan Studios in the '60s. He was also in a few bands. Like Orange Bicycle and played on the Motherlight album. He also had a solo record, which is also amazing and superbly rare. It's orchestral. The bulk of it is strings. It's kind of like Nick Drake."


    Åkerfeldt's quick to point out, however, his newfound progressive music loves didn't directly inspire him to write Sorceress. The majority of the album was penned in Opeth's rehearsal space, where, nestled comfortably in a corner, a computer, a keyboard, and a microphone sit ready for the next Opeth epic. It isn't plush, but it's exactly the type of environment the frontman needs to focus his creative self into song.


    "When I'm in a writing mode, I have tunnel vision," says Åkerfeldt. "I have a really good work ethic. I go down to the studio everyday early in the morning and I work. I absolutely love it. It's so much fun. It's much easier now, too. I write complete demos. I sequence the songs in the order I want them to be on the record. I do mixing. I do overdubs. Once I'm done, I give copies to the guys so they can listen to the album. They practice to it on their own. When it's time to go into the studio, everybody does their own thing. It obviously works."


    For Sorceress, Opeth returned to Rockfield Studios in Wales, where the Swedes had tracked Pale Communion in 2014 with Tom Dalgety. The experience was so positive and historical-the countryside studio was also home to pivotal Budgie, Queen, Rush, Judas Priest, and Mike Oldfield recordings-there really was no other option for Opeth and crew. Rockfield Studios or bust! The studio, with Dalgety yet again in tow, provided the necessary isolation, the right bucolic atmosphere, the best gear, and three square meals a day for Sorceress to come out the other end spitting fire. All in 12 bittersweet days, too.


    "There was a time when I came out of our recordings a wreck," Åkerfeldt bemoans. "But now I come out with a wish. I wish it wouldn't have gone so quickly. There's emptiness after I leave the studio. I love writing and recording in the studio. It's lovely at Rockfield. It's in the sticks. It's got horses and cows. There's lots of sheep in Wales. But the studio is just a studio. It's so beautiful there. So quiet. It's a residential studio as well, so we live there while we're recording. We have chefs for us, too. So, we can just be there, playing, recording, and hanging out."


    If life is like a Peter Max poster, the lyrics to Sorceress aren't. There's color, but they've been treated, corrupted, and befouled. That is to say, they're much darker. Some of bleak lyrical tones stem from Åkerfeldt's personal life-and are thusly contorted beyond recognition-while others touch grimly on topics like love and what happens to people on the other side of it. In fact, some of the lyrical ideas are similar to what was happening on Blackwater Park.


    "I made sure to write good lyrics," Åkerfeldt laughs. "This sounds very old-fashioned black metal to say, but the lyrics are misanthropic. It's not a concept record, so there's no theme running through the record. Most of the record deals with love. The negative aspects of love. The jealously, the bitterness, the paranoia, and the mind games of love. So, it's a love record. Love songs. Love can be like a disease or a spell."


    Luckily, for Åkerfeldt and crew-bassist Martín MÉndez, drummer Martin Axenrot, guitarist Fredrik Åkesson, and keyboardist Joakim Svalberg-the lineup doesn't have to deal with Sorceress' main theme. They've been together since Heritage was completed, and according to Åkerfeldt he's not been in a better band situation before. Not since Orchid. Not since Still Life. Not since Ghost Reveries.


    "It's the best band situation I've ever had. Fans will look at our eras and have their favorite lineup, but this is the best. Even the happiest days of the first and second lineups aren't comparable to what I have now. We never fight. It's like a good work team. We know each other professionally and personally. As much as we're a band, we're also friends. We hang out when we're not doing Opeth."


    A core team is a good thing, when Opeth's credibility is in full view of fans and critics. Åkerfeldt's very aware of what the masses have had to say about Opeth since Watershed. While some disliked the musical shift on Heritage, most have applauded it. They've come to expect something new from Opeth. True to form, Sorceress will give long-time fans and weary critics reason to re-think Opeth and what it takes to be musically fearless.


    "I hope they'll like the record," posits Åkerfeldt. "I can only talk from my perspective and taste here, but we offer diversity that's not really present in the scene today. Whatever genre. We've always been a special band. We've gotten a lot of shit for being different. We still do. Our time will come, I think. It comes down to perseverance. It comes down to not giving up or giving in to public opinion. Music is about doing your own thing or going your own way."

    1. Persephone
    2. Sorceress
    3. The Wilde Flowers
    4. Will O The Wisp
    5. Chrysalis
    6. Sorceress 2
    7. The Seventh Sojourn
    8. Strange Brew
    9. A Fleeting Glance
    10. Era
    11. Persephone (Slight Return)
    12. The Ward
    13. Spring MCMLXXIV
    Opeth
    $29.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Vessel Vessel Quick View

    $18.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Vessel

    The first track of Vessels, "Fear the Followers", comes in with tight frantic riffing coupled by a stark immediate thrash part. The song, bordering on hardcore underneath, is screamed in two separate distinct voices; one being a screechier version of the lower growls. A strict delivery of sharp metalcore is prevalent. But then the middle dips into some Sabbath swings before further slowing with cymbals crashing and synths.


    Track two, "Buried in the City", however exploits the notion of the riff and just goes full throttle doom metal. The tidal journey is engrossing, barbaric! Without rehashing any hacked riff, Cokegoat comes in with snarling bit of doom metal. It carries significant weight as a tribute to classic sounds while approaching them differently. The layered vocal and galloping metal guitars spark the energy of the finish.


    "Dogs" contrasts that with a cosmic synth aura and a taut minimalist riff approach for a tense 3 minutes. Then the explosion of a sinister 1970's free-wheeling riff takes center stage. All of which are to be manipulated into an Unsane, Faith No More ("Malpractice, "Caffeine") ugly place. Eventually, among static shorelines, we get a dreamy recoil into a bluesy meandering.


    Cokegoat begs you to pinpoint them, not by album but by the minute.


    There are continuous bounces from Strife type hardcore intros (I swear) to scathing black metal nods. Usually bands that boast that spectrum of influence are raw and crusty and loose in the production. This is tight as sutures. Andy Nelson of Weekend Nachos engineered this and Carl Saff (Unsane, Red Fang, Earthless) mastered the final sound for this. Not surprising. Heavy is a key factor in Vessels.


    Vessels is one hell of a debut. This bitch has balls. But quickly flashes some groove. "The End of Your Life Pt 2" is controlled chaos. It also is one of two 2-part songs. Yeah. This is foresight, ambition, ardor and grit in this album. Here we have "three guitarists, three voices, synths, bass and drums," kept on a production leash that adds an urgency to the manic time changes. Which crush. The atmospheric layers are just touches. They add mood but never take center stage. This is about riffs, but Cokegoat know where to accent their talents as well.


    FFO: Sons of Otis, Type O Negative, Monster Magnet, Electric Wizard, early Baroness, Mastodon, Black Tusk, Moss, ASG, The Gates of Slumber, Earthride (Hutch)


    - New Noise Magazine

    1. Fear the Followers
    2. Buried In The City
    3. Dogs
    4. End of Your Life, Pt. 1
    5. End of Your Life, Pt. 2
    6. Fly by Night, Pt. 2
    7. Fly by Daylight
    8. Glorious Dead
    Cokegoat
    $18.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Human Ceremony Human Ceremony Quick View

    $17.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Human Ceremony

    Included in top 45 most anticipated albums of 2016 from Rolling Stone


    Sunflower Bean find magic within friction. The New York trio's full-length debut album, Human Ceremony [Fat Possum Records], emerges at the intersection of dreamy modern psychedelica and urgent fuzzed-out bliss. That push-and-pull colors the aural tapestry of these three musicians-Jacob Faber [drums], Julia Cumming [vocals/bass], and Nick Kivlen [vocals/guitars].


    "Everything comes from a conflicting interest," affirms Nick. "We love dream pop, but we also really love rock 'n' roll. It's those two spectrums."


    "You're allowed to obsess over Black Sabbath as well as The Cure," adds Julia. "It'd be boring if everything was just one way or the other."


    That diversity defined the group's approach since Nick and Jacob started jamming back in high school. They would hole up in Jacob's Long Island basement for hours on end, channeling this vast cadre of influences. Julia's addition would only expand that creative palette further in 2013.


    Through constant gigging around New York, Sunflower Bean sprouted into a sonic enigma, boasting a fiery musical call-and-response that serves as a centerpiece, giving the music what Jacob refers to as a "lyrical aspect" between the guitars, drums, and bass.


    They transferred this multi-headed energy into their 2015 Independent EP, Show Me Your Seven Secrets. At the same time, this distinct alchemy enchanted ever-growing audiences live. By the time, they entered the studio for Human Ceremony, Sunflower Bean had a lively aural cauldron from which to draw.


    They took the summer of 2015 off and retreated to Jacob's basement to write together. Taking the ideas out of the basement, they hit a Brooklyn studio with producer Matt Molnar [Friends] and tracked eleven tunes in just seven days. Whereas the EP was recorded after Sunflower Bean played 100 shows in one year, Human Ceremony showed the band's studio side with richer soundscapes, overdubs, and music that had yet to be debuted live.


    On the lead track "Easier Said," Julia's delicate vocals glide over a lilting clean guitar that spirals off into a vibrant hum.


    Sunflower Bean's spell is cast on Human Ceremony.


    "When you're in a band, you always dream about the first record," Julia concludes. "It's that moment where you explore everything that's been inspiring you."

    1. Human Ceremony
    2. Come On
    3. 2013
    4. Easier Said
    5. This Kind of Feeling
    6. I Was Home
    7. Creation Myth
    8. Wall Watcher
    9. I Want You To Give Me Enough Time
    10. Oh, I Just Don't Know
    11. Space Exploration Disaster
    Sunflower Bean
    $17.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Manipulator Manipulator Quick View

    $24.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Manipulator

    THE SEGALL HAS LANDED. And it's fully loaded, with
    everything that TY SEGALL (and you and me) are gonna
    need in the world to come. Heads up! It's coming down fast.


    Sticking his hand deeper into the machines all around
    him, TY is reaching ever further to the outer limits of inner
    space orbited throughout TWINS and SLEEPER. And
    now more than ever, the chunks of the world that came
    before are like asteroids formed in his image . . . picking up
    speed . . . .


    Still fighting the power with all the energy that a determined
    mind-patriot can conjure, Ty's a fighter who loves, a
    surfer, a spaceman, and yeah, a casualty - like you, he'll
    never be free. But unlike you, he knows it - and when
    he goes down and his head cracks in two, out pour the
    multi-colored manias that make up MANIPULATOR. Soursweet
    declarations featuring freaks and creeps alike: "The
    Singer," "The Faker," "Mister Main," "Susie Thumb," the
    "Connection Man," and "The Crawler," to name but a mutant
    fistful.


    To see these peeps, to realize their dreams and visions,
    TY kept working, kept writing, laying down more
    tracks than ever. New musical expressions pop and surprise
    relentlessly throughout all the knockout tunes of
    MANIPULATOR with many sounds in the mix - but most
    of all, SO many guitars! So
    many. And different kinds of
    strings - the strangled-neck
    solo of "The Singer," recalling
    the good old days down by
    the river with Neil. Numbedand-
    unplugged discursions spiraling away from the funk
    on "Mister Main." Three-quarter quartets raising their din
    in a few key places. Waves of sparkling acoustics with
    ominous, Love-ly undertones - and then, torrents of filthy
    git-grunge, exploding into the chorus, washing everything
    away, fusing the blackness of SABBATH with the grime and
    grab-ass of the STOOGES and the sweet swinging tones of
    the STONES. All in the name of getting higher on the music.
    Why have one guitar solo when you can have a few in the
    same space? There's so little time, and a LOT to say.


    In order to ensure that he got it all out, TY called a few
    friends to fill in special parts on certain MANIPULATOR
    songs. He got great touches from CHRIS WOODHOUSE (piano,
    synth & percussion), SEAN PAUL PRESLEY (vocals), BRIT
    LAUREN MANOR (vocals), STEVE NUTTING (drums), IRENE
    SALZER (violin), JESSICA IVRY (cello), MATTHIAS MCENTIRE
    (viola) and the TY SEGALL band (MIKAL CRONIN, CHARLES
    MOOTHEART, EMILY ROSE EPSTEIN). Plus, MIKAL arranged
    the strings - and everyone played awesomely.


    The clarion call / siren song of his guitar . . . . clouds of
    guitar billowing, blood rushing to the head, the temperature
    going from blue to red . . . . TY's on a mission, working
    to change chemistry through music with the steam-lined
    pop and helium-cooled vocals of MANIPULATOR. These
    seventeen songs take many forms, as if TY is finally releasing
    all the thoughts that have been holding him down,
    that made him pick up the ax to begin with. By the end of
    MANIPULATOR, you'll feel that he must have chased all the
    demons - but it's a big world, and MANIPULATOR has only
    begun to fight.

    1. Manipulator
    2. Tall Man, Skinny Lady
    3. The Singer
    4. It's Over
    5. Feel
    6. The Faker
    7. The Clock
    8. Green Belly
    9. Connection Man
    10. Mister Main
    11. The Hand
    12. Susie Thumb
    13. Don't You Want To Know? (Sue)
    14. The Crawler
    15. Who's Producing You?
    16. The Feels
    17. Stick Around
    Ty Segall
    $24.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Jessie Jones Jessie Jones Quick View

    $17.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Jessie Jones

    In 2013, Jessie Jones gave up her possessions, vanished into the nothingness of farm country, and found herself on interstellar overdrive - far away from her Disneyfied home in Orange County. For three years, she had fronted Burger Records' Feeding People, OC's answer to Black Sabbath. The teenage byproduct of gloomy acid trips and gospel choirs, Feeding People released two albums, got signed to Innovative Leisure in 2011, and played Low End Theory with Radiohead's Thom Yorke . The 19-year-old Jones, with her bluesy growl and whimsical melodies, was being compared to Jefferson Airplane's Grace Slick, Janis Joplin, and Screaming Females' Marissa Paternoster. In 2014, her voice returned to her with primal intent - like the caterwauling echoes of coyotes deep in the Hollywood hills. Earlier this year, Jones began singing with paranormal proto-punk outfit Death Valley Girls, which allowed her to release her demons and find salvation during what Jones describes as the most cosmically ordained project of her life. Reveling in the quantum wobble of her own alternative reality, Jones is now releasing her self-titled debut on Burger Records by channeling the voices in her head; not quite the sanitarium blues of Roky Erickson, but a mÉlange of Jim Morrison mysticism; a more stripped-down MGMT meets early-Grouplove; and Syd Barrett reverie. Under the guidance of producer Bobby Harlow (The Go) and Burger's Studio B, Jones' debut this summer will include guest appearances by drummer Duke Mushroom, violinist Hannah Glass, and Studio B regular King Tuff.
    1. Sugar Coated
    2. Butterfly Knives
    3. Make It Spin
    4. Prisoner's Cinema
    5. Lady La De Da
    6. Quicksilver Screen
    7. La Loba
    8. Nightingale
    9. Twelve Hour Man
    10. Mental Illness
    Jessie Jones
    $17.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Grinding Wheel The Grinding Wheel Quick View

    $31.99
    Buy Now
    x

    The Grinding Wheel

    Armed with pioneering pure metal proposals like "Death Rider," "The Beast Within," and "Raise The Dead" already in 1982, New Jersey's Overkill were a rock-solid part of the first clutch of bands forging in fire this music known as thrash metal. Along with Metallica, Exodus, Slayer and cross-town doppelgangers Anthrax, D.D. Verni and Bobby "Blitz" Ellsworth were helping to create a new form of metal that is still as vibrant today as when the band's first album, Feel the Fire was issued by Jonny Zazula's Megaforce Records back in the spring of '85.


    Witness Overkill's 18th album of blistering yet precise and thought-provoking thrash magic, The Grinding Wheel, a record on which thrash's ultimate team of five machined parts shows up and executes to perfection with a little punk thrown in for bad measure.


    But a life dedicated to metal can be a grind, hence the title of this sparks-a-flyin' record. "It just makes sense for us," reflects D.D. "If you've been making metal for almost 40 years like we have, it can be a grind. But we also liked the old school metal idea of referencing "Grinder," the Judas Priest song, which suits the album because it has classic metal parts on it as well as the thrash parts. There's a blue collar feel to that title too, and that's how we approach Overkill. The guitar case is basically a lunchbox and we go to work."


    "One of the principles-if not characteristics-of the band is that it's been grinding through for long, long periods of time," seconds Blitz. "Decades to this point. And not necessarily with huge gains with regards to popularity, but for sure, with huge gains in as much as we can earn a living while doing the kind of music that we want. And so the idea of grinding it out over the decades became a device for writing the album, whether it would be riffs or lyrics."


    Despite, as D.D. says, the album's classic metal references (such as Black Sabbath in "Come Heavy" and Iron Maiden in "The Long Road" and the epic and cinematic title track), when the band gets up a full head of thrash steam, they bring to the party a trademark punk aesthetic, forged from trips on the train to CBGB and Max's Kansas City to witness original punk legends such as The Damned and The Dead Boys.


    "Punk is huge for Overkill," confirms Verni. "And it's something we very specifically brought back to the band in a sort of second wave, beginning with Ironbound in 2010 and then The Electric Age and White Devil Armory. I know from my end, it came from talking to the band and talking to fans. We had some of those metal records in the middle of our career where I wasn't paying enough attention to the punk rock vibe of the band. But just before we started writing Ironbound, I was very specific about getting back into that mentality, picking up on that energy again. You're not going to hear any Green Day or Ramones in us, but the energy and the attitude of punk mixed with the New York vibe that's what Overkill is, compared to other bands. You don't hear any of that in Megadeth; you don't hear any of that in Slayer. It's more specific to what we brought to the thrash world."


    Central to that premise is the incendiary "Let's All Go to Hades" which is sure to become a pit favourite. "This one was a hell of a lot of fun," says Blitz. "You know, I've always written abstractly. I'm not the guy who says, 'I'm going to crush your skull into dust.' I like writing more so from an abstract point of view, putting a slew of thoughts together that create one idea, like a puzzle more than a specific black or white. And when I looked at all these lyrics when I was done, I said, oh my God, I'm 57 and I finally matured (laughs). Oh, this is gross! (laughs). But I do like tongue-in-cheek songs like 'Hades,' where it says, sort of let's all go to the Bataclan, you know, stand arm in arm and sing 'Killed by Death.' I kind of tied in not long ago events, specifically what happened in Paris, with losing Lemmy. After that, I'm on a train from Paris to Istanbul on the Orient express, which actually existed (laughs)-it actually went from Paris to Istanbul. So that one is mapped out a bit more."


    Adds D.D., "It's not a 'smash your face into the wall' kind of song. It got a little bit of fun in it. I know any time you talk to the really heavy thrash guys, they go, 'Oh, no, no, no-no fun allowed. It's got to be heavy and brutal every second.' But that song definitely has a bit of fun in it. And we've done that before, with things like 'Old School' and 'Fuck You.' We're not afraid to do a bit of that sometimes."


    Another favorite lyric of Blitz', which is set to a non-nonsense old school thrash track, is "Our Finest Hour." "It's about the recognition of sameness," explains Ellsworth. "I think people are comfortable when they recognize themselves in someone else. And 'Our Finest Hour' is kind of a detailed journey through that concept. It's like, 'Come on over here; I recognize you.' I've always been a firm believer in the fact that it's great to accomplish things on your own, but people are always stronger as a group-that's the basic outline of that tune."


    At the other end of the spectrum from punk is a song like "The Long Road." D.D. readily agrees that there was a Maiden influence as part of this one's crafting. "Oh yeah, for sure. The opening, along with a little section in there with the vocals, definitely feels like New Wave of British Heavy Metal.


    More evident in the band's panoramic classic metal passages, but even articulated here on "Our Finest Hour," is another storied Overkill trademark, the definition one gets in the band's bass parts. Combine this with the Mensa-like percussive wizardry of Ron Lipnicki (laid bare for all to hear at headphone levels through the smack of his gravity-defying double bass work), and The Grinding Wheel emerges as a record with a remarkable rhythm section foundation from which to rise.


    "I've had that kind of sound now for a long time," says Verni. "There are a lot of bass players that say, 'I want to feel the bass.' And it's like, I just couldn't give a shit about feeling the bass. To me that's low-end. Guitars have low-end, kick drums have low-end, bass has low-end-I want to hear the bass, not feel it. So from a long time ago, that's what I would be doing on my EQ. I would be tweaking and turning knobs until not only could I feel it, but I can hear it separate from the guitars. And as a result, the bass just got more and more aggressive. I'm not a finesse player at all, on a bass. I bang the shit out of it, and I kind of do that to get away from the guitars and give it its own identity, its own sound, its own thing, so the bass has its own personality, not just serving as a foundation for the guitars."


    This affects the writing as well, says Blitz. "Don't forget, D.D. is a guitarist. He's been playing guitar probably more so than bass in his spare time since the late '80s. This is a guy who has two-and-a-half decades of six strings under his belt. So we get more of a unique perspective; it gives this band its unique qualities when it comes to songwriting. Because it's a guy holding six strings who's got plenty of experience playing those six strings, but thinking from the other perspective. So you get a punchier thing; you don't get a lot of fluff. When you compare Overkill to some of our contemporaries, there you get a guitar player writing guitar-based songs. D.D. is writing, first and foremost, from a rhythm perspective, and that's what drives the songs. Add Dave Linsk to the picture, once there's a ten-note riff written, then you have the best of both worlds."


    Which brings us back to the aforementioned machine-like efficiency of the five guys that comprise Overkill, this idea that there are no weak links within this particular classic five-piece with two guitars lineup of metal warriors.


    "That's the strength of the band," explains Blitz. "Dave is really the one that holds the guitar reigns in this band. He's a writer at his core. You know, he's one of these guys who brushes his teeth and hears a rhythm the way the bristles are hitting the enamel (laughs). He's that dude. 'Oh wait a second, I have another idea.' He has an idea a minute, and if that's the case, some of them are going to be great. So he holds the reins. When it comes to Derek, he's more the opinionated thought later on. And so when it runs through the machine, being D.D. and myself, then Dave, Derek comes in and can change that song. It's always kind of good to have, let's say, a chief and some Indians. And it depends who's wearing the chief hat at any particular time. But I think at the end of the day, when you're looking for a clean perspective, it goes through Derek-that's usually what his contribution is, more of a finalization."


    And Ron? "He's one-of-a-kind," says Verni. "He's a great drummer. I've worked with him for a bunch of records now. This is our fifth record together and so I really understand how he plays at this point. Working with him in the studio is just a pleasure, because he's so right on it."


    After heaping all manner of praise on legendary producer Andy Sneap (brought on only for mix given Verni's proven acumen at the task), D.D. further clarifies the reason Overkill can be at the top of their game 18 records into their distinguished run.


    "I have a studio and I did most of it at my place; I've been doing it that way for a while now. And now the group of guys we have in the band has been pretty consistent for a while. So we have a nice mix; everybody kind of knows their role, and is good at their role. Everybody brings a little something to the party. And I think that's why these last couple of records people ask, 'How is it that your records get better after 25 years?' And I think part of it is that everybody has a role in the band, everybody is comfortable with their role, and they're really good at the part they have. So the records actually get better. It's like having a team, instead of having a whole bunch of chiefs and no Indians.


    But a proven people's band like Overkill-a more personable bunch you'll never meet-fully recognizes that part of the band's success in being able to survive and thrive with the grind is due to the allegiance of the band's considerable worldwide fan base.


    "For sure," says Blitz. "One of the things with regard to grind, with regard to four decades of Overkill, it's good to be here, but it's obviously earned, not just by us but by the people that support this in general. The fact is that it's not just us grinding it out. I mean, maybe it is when it comes to the studio and writing and recording songs, from that selfish perspective. But the reason something exists for decades is based on group effort. Like we had talked about earlier with 'Our Finest Hour,' people are stronger together. In that light, this band is, let's say, not just our project, but it's a project by and for all those who hold it dear."

    1. Mean, Green, Killing Machine
    2. Goddamn Trouble
    3. Our Finest Hour
    4. Shine On
    5. The Long Road
    6. Let's All Go To Hades
    7. Come Heavy
    8. Red, White And Blue
    9. The Wheel
    10. The Grinding Wheel
    11. Emerald
    Overkill
    $31.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Beulah Beulah Quick View

    $18.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Beulah

    Beulah. It's a small, complicated word with a tangle of meanings.


    It's the title of John Paul White's new album, his first in nearly a decade, a remarkably and assuredly diverse collection spanning plaintive folk balladry, swampy southern rock, lonesome campfire songs, and dark acoustic pop. Gothic and ambitious, with a rustic, lived-in sound, it's a meditation on love curdling into its opposite, on recrimination defining relationships, on hope finally filtering through doubt.


    Beulah is also a White family nickname. "It's a term of endearment around our house," White explains, "like you would call someone 'Honey.' My dad used to call my little sister Beulah, and I call my daughter Beulah. It's something I've always been around."


    Beulah is also something much loftier. For the poet and painter William Blake, Beulah was a place deep in the collective spiritual unconscious. "I won't pretend to be the smartest guy in the world," says White, "but I dig a lot of what he's written. Beulah was a place you could go in your dreams. You could go there in meditation, to relax and heal and center B photo credit: Allister Ann 119 west 57th street, penthouse north, new york, ny 10019 t 212.741.1000 www.sacksco.com SACKS A CO. N D yourself. It wasn't a place you could stay, but you came back to the world in a better state."


    And perhaps the music on this album originated in that "pleasant lovely Shadow where no dispute can come." According to White, the songs came to him unbidden-and not entirely welcome. "When these songs started popping into my head, I had been home for a while and I was perfectly happy. I wasn't looking for songs. I didn't know whether any would pop back in my head again, and I was honestly okay with that. I'm a very happy father and husband, and I love where I live. I love working with artists for a label that I think is doing good work."


    Far from the grind and glamour of Nashville-where he worked for years as a working songwriter before stepping into the spotlight himself-White settled in his hometown of Muscle Shoals, Alabama, a wellspring of gritty Southern rock and soul since the 1960s. Together with Alabama Shakes keyboard player Ben Tanner and Shoals native Will Trapp, he founded and runs Single Lock Records, a local indie label that has released records by some of the Yellowhammer State's finest, including Dylan LeBlanc, St. Paul & the Broken Bones, and legendary songwriter and keyboard player Donnie Fritts. The label is based in a small ranch house a stone's throw from White's own home, which would come in handy when those songs started invading his head.


    "Honestly, I tried to avoid them, but then I realized the only way I was going to get rid of them was if I wrote them down. I got my phone out and I'd sing these little bits of melody, then put it away and move on. But eventually I got to a place where it was a roar in my head, and that pissed me off." Due to his experiences as a gun-for-hire in Nashville, White was reluctant to romanticize the creative process, to turn it into a spiritual pursuit. "Then one day I told my wife I think I'm going to go write a song. She was as surprised as I was. I went and wrote probably eight songs in three days. It was like turning on a faucet."


    Most artists would kill for such a downpour, but White was wary of the consequences. He knew that writing songs would lead to recording them, which would result in releasing them, and that means touring and leaving home for weeks at a time. "As soon as I write a song, I start thinking what other people might think of it. I've talked to friends about this: What is it about us that makes us do that? Why can't I just sit on my back porch and sing these songs out into the ether? I don't have an answer for it yet, but I think it's just part of who I am. I need that reaction. I need to feel like I'm moving someone in a good way or in a bad way. I need to feel like there's a connection."


    White threw himself into the project, no longer the reluctant songwriter but a craftsman determined to make the best album possible-to do these songs justice. He cut several songs at the renowned FAME Studios in his hometown, where Aretha Franklin, Wilson Pickett, the Allmans, the Osmonds, Bobbie Gentry, Arthur Conley, and Clarence Carter recorded some of their most popular hits.


    One product of those sessions is "What's So," which introduces itself by way of a fire-andbrimstone riff, as heavy as a guilty conscience-the kind of riff you wouldn't be surprised to hear on a Sabbath album. But White's vocals are gritty and soulful, a product of the Shoals, almost preacherly as he sings about earthly and eternal damnation: "Sell your damn soul or get 119 west 57th street, penthouse north, new york, ny 10019 t 212.741.1000 www.sacksco.com SACKS A CO. N D right with the man, keep treading water as long as you can," he exhorts the listener. "But before you do, you must understand that you don't get above your raisin'." It's the heaviest moment on the record, perhaps the darkest in White's career.


    At the other end of the spectrum is "The Martyr," one of the catchiest tunes White has ever penned. The spryness of the melody imagines Elliott Smith wandering the banks of the Tennessee River, yet the song is shot through with a pervasive melancholy as White wrestles with his own demons. "Keep falling on your sword, sink down a little more," he sings over a dexterous acoustic guitar theme. This is not, however, a song about some unnamed person, but rather a pained self-diagnosis: "These are the wounds that I will not let heal, the ones that I deserve and seem so real." White knows he's playing the martyr, but he leaves the song hauntingly open-ended, as though he isn't sure what to do with this epiphany beyond putting it in a song.


    The rest of Beulah was recorded in the Single Lock offices/studio near White's home. "I can be more relaxed about the process. We can all just sit there and talk about records or baseball without feeling like someone's standing over our shoulders. That's a big deal to me, not to feel pressured. And I'm only about twenty yards away from home, so I can walk over and throw a baseball with my kids or make dinner with my wife."


    Some of the quieter-but no less intense-songs on Beulah were created in that environment, including the ominously erotic opener "Black Leaf" and the Southern gothic love song "Make You Cry." As he worked, a distinctive and intriguing aesthetic began to grow clearer and clearer, one based in austere arrangements and plaintive moods. These are songs with empty spaces in them, dark corners that could hold ghosts or worse. "There were certain moments when Ben and I would finish up a song, listen back to it, and think how in the world did we get here. But that's just what the songs ask for. These are the sounds in my head. This is the sound of me thinking and living and breathing and doing."


    Once White had everything assembled and sequenced, it was time to give the album a title, to wrap everything up for the listener. Beulah stuck-not only because of family history or Blake, but because White realized that making music was his own trip to Beulah. "If you had to sum up what music is for most people in this world, it's that. It's that escape. It's that refuge. You go there and you come back and you use that to help you with your life. You always have that as a place to go."

    1. Black Leaf
    2. What's So
    3. The Once And Future Queen
    4. Make You Cry
    5. Fight For You
    6. Hope I Die
    7. I've Been Over This Before (Feat. The Secret Sisters)
    8. The Martyr
    9. Hate The Way You Love Me
    10. I'll Get Even
    John Paul White
    $18.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Land Land Quick View

    $24.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Land

    Novella's formation was the result of an instant spark-guitarist Hollie Warren,
    guitarist Sophy Hollington, and bassist Suki Sou met through mutual friends in
    Brighton in 2010, where they quickly realized that they shared a common
    love for '60s counterculture and bands like Black Sabbath, the Brian Jonestown
    Massacre, and Pale Saints. The addition of drummer Iain Laws in 2011
    and keyboardist Isabel Spurgeon in 2014 solidified the group into a propulsive
    engine, capable of welding woozy, cosmic psychedelia to sustained
    squalls of flanged-out, far-out dream pop. Novella's debut album, Land, is a
    controlled blast of mainlined electricity, a tempest of relentless groove and
    crystalline vocals that is at once the vicious edge and the calm eye of the
    storm.


    Recorded during one ice-cold week in January of 2014 by Jonas Verijnen
    (Moon Duo, Ballet School) and Joshua Third (The Horrors) in an abandoned
    clothing factory-turned-studio in Dalston, East London, Land perfectly absorbs
    the band's vast array of influences and transforms them into songs
    that Fact Magazine described as "equal parts effete jangle and ferocious
    riffage." Combining London gloom and cosmic escapism, Sou and Laws
    channel Can and the 13th Floor Elevators on the krautrock-inspired jams like
    "Follow" and "Something Must Change," while Warren and Hollington stomp
    their homemade flanger and phaser pedals to create dueling arcs of electric
    guitars. As the band churns and riffs, the girls' voices soar brilliantly, their
    glassy clarity recalling the Lynchian shoegaze of Lush or Stereolab. During
    quieter, more reflective songs like "Sentences" and "Younger Than Yesterday,"
    there are echoes of eerie psychedelia like Broadcast, evident in the myriad
    of flutes, synths, and Fender Electric XII guitars.


    On Land, Novella captures the wild spirit of creating something new from
    pieces of the past. They ward off the overcast London melancholy with
    evocative tales of weightless meandering, of drifting over the pavement of
    familiar streets while dreaming about exploring fantastical alien landscapes.
    These are the yarns of twenty-somethings in limbo, a collection of late night
    tales that more often end in avoided glances than locked eyes

    1. Follow
    2. Something Must Change
    3. Sentences
    4. Two Ships
    5. Land Gone
    6. Phrases
    7. Blue Swallows
    8. Younger Than Yesterday
    9. Again You Try Your Luck
    10. Skies Open
    Novella
    $24.99
    Vinyl LP + 7 Vinyl Single - Sealed Buy Now
  • A Place Where There's No More Pain A Place Where There's No More Pain Quick View

    $19.99
    Buy Now
    x

    A Place Where There's No More Pain

    Life Of Agony emerged from the New York music scene in the early ‚90s with one of the most distinctive
    sounds in its genre. Best known for its 1993 metal/crossover debut River Runs Red, the band instantly
    built a die-hard, cult following. For over two decades, the group toured relentlessly all over the world,
    sharing stages with the biggest names in rock, including Metallica, Black Sabbath, Ozzy Osbourne, Foo
    Fighters, and The Red Hot Chili Peppers. After the much-praised Ugly (1995), LOA opted for a highly
    energetic alternative rock approach on Soul Searching Sun (1997) and Broken Valley (2005) - the latter
    produced by Greg Fidelman (Slipknot, Metallica). Life of Agony has sold over one million albums to date.
    In 2016, LOA signed a deal with Napalm Records to record the group's 5th studio album, titled A Place
    Where There's No More Pain. Rolling Stone hailed it as „One of the Most Anticipated Albums of the Year".
    The album is produced by Matt Brown & Life Of Agony and mastered by Ted Jensen (Alice in Chains,
    Machine Head, Deftones). The drive and intensity these ten blistering new tracks possess, surpass all
    expectations that built up in the past 12 years - a cathartic Sturm & Drang experience for the listener that
    matches the ferocity of River Runs Red with gut wrenching rock melodies. Raging guitar riffs, heartfelt
    lyrics and killer grooves mark the return of LOA's signature sound and turn A Place Where There's No
    More Pain into a passionate, soul-searching affair.


    The highly emotional lyrics by singer Mina Caputo link all songs by the four-piece together, then and
    now: born as Keith Caputo, she had her Transgender coming out in 2011, changed her name, but kept
    her inimitable style of writing deeply from the heart. „And I just want to disappear and hide," she sings
    and shines a light on the path of all lost souls - while steadily walking her own. „Many of our fans have
    told us over the years that sharing our personal struggles has been cathartic for them in healing the pain
    in their own lives. That uplifting energy we share at the shows, gives us hope that there's light at the end
    of the tunnel. And for us and hopefully our fans, that short time when we're all together is a place where
    there's no more pain."

    1. Meet My Maker
    2. Right This Wrong
    3. A Place Where There's No More Pain
    4. Dead Speak Kindly
    5. A New Low
    6. World Gone Mad
    7. Bag Of Bones
    8. Walking Catastrophe
    9. Song For The Abused
    10. Little Spots Of You
    Life Of Agony
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Unquiet Sky The Unquiet Sky Quick View

    $24.99
    Buy Now
    x

    The Unquiet Sky

    Since the early 80's when bands like Cathedral and Saint Vitus pioneered the doom genre of metal, the style has continuously evolved and spread, despite being far less recognized and appreciated than most other forms of more traditional heavy metal. Bands like Eyehategod and Crowbar melded elements of doom into sludge and stoner metal, gaining modest success in the more mainstream metal community, but doom is beginning to enjoy a new wave of popularity, thanks largely to the more progressive experimental work of artists like Stephen O'Malley (Sunn0))), Burning Witch). Indian is a Chicago-based trio whose brand of doom is more akin to that of Eyehategod than the earliest or latest incarnations of the genre, and their distinctively black metal vocals immediately set them apart from the pack.


    First things first: The Unquiet Sky is everything a doom record should be. The bass tone is so perfect and intense that it could shake your body through a pair of headphones. The guitars bring Black Sabbath-esque fuzz down enough notches to kill a horse. The percussion is sparse when it needs to be (Ration) and energetic when it's allowed (Tied and Gagged). Dylan O'Toole's vocals give Indian the extra edge over many of the other bands who have perfected this formula by complementing the melancholy created by the music with a demonic voice of evil. There is even an extended track of terrifyingly psychedelic feedback, perfectly placed to scare the crap out of you when you're high. In fact, the only thing that fails to be suitably doom-y and evil about this record is the cover illustration of a Christ-like baboon which, despite being evil enough in spirit, looks a bit too much like it was drawn in a junior high art class.


    This record is an easy recommend for fans of the doom genre, but what about anyone unacquainted with the genre I personally don't consider myself a huge aficionado of the style, but loved this record. The only things required to enjoy The Unquiet Sky are an attention span and a love of all things metal. This record generally moves slowly, as does most doom, but it is far less droning and repetitive than many recent examples of the genre. As the name of the style suggests, doom is, by its very nature, dark, oppressive music. As such, Indian is definitely better suited to being digested over an extended period of time at high volumes, rather than short bursts in your car or through headphones.


    Bottom Line: If you're searching for the latest, greatest doom record to add to your collection, look no further than Indian's The Unquiet Sky. Fans of Neurosis, Eyehategod and Godflesh should also definitely pick this up. It's a solid record from beginning to end from an up-and-coming trio of doom virtuosos.


    - Cory (Lambgoat)

    1. No Able Fires
    2. Ration
    3. Dead Weight
    4. Los Nietos
    5. Queen
    6. Tied and Gagged
    7. God of Panic, Lord of Decay
    8. Loophole Noose
    9. Shill
    10. We Can Build You
    11. Worshiper of Sores
    Indian
    $24.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Killing Machine Killing Machine Quick View

    $24.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Killing Machine

    Killing Machine on Numbered Limited Edition LP from Mobile Fidelity Silver Label


    Smoking-Hot 1978 Set Released as Hell Bent For Leather in the United States


    Produced by Pink Floyd The Wall Engineer James Guthrie: Uncompromising Album and Exacting Performances Remain Hard Rock and Metal Bedrocks


    Marries Streetwise Aggression to Commercial Accessibility, Overflows With Confidence, Boldness, and Diversity


    Includes Metal Standards Hell Bent for Leather, Evening Star, and Delivering the Goods


    Mastered on Mobile Fidelity's World-Renowned Mastering System and Pressed at RTI


    Released the same year as the equally pivotal Stained Class, Killing Machine cemented Judas Priest's standing and reputation as the world's foremost metal band of the late 1970s. Further diversifying its music and sporting increased confidence, boldness, and full-bodied songwriting, the album managed a then-unprecedented task of appealing to mainstream tastes via its impeccably solid production, creative prowess, and staggering melodies. Known in the United States as Hell Bent for Leather, Killing Machine remains a titanic release no matter the name.


    Mastered on Mobile Fidelity's world-renowned mastering system and pressed at RTI, this Silver Series numbered limited edition LP broadens the scope of the original production, helmed by none other than Pink Floyd The Wall producer James Guthrie. Besting those on all previous editions, the low-end thrust, high-frequency dynamics, and all-important midrange now come alive with unsurpassed detail and accuracy. Soundstaging and imaging positively explode before your eyes and ears, and instrumental separation allows insight into band's tight-fisted interplay.


    Recognizing the era's potential and pushing to expand metal's horizons, Priest created music that at the time hadn't any peer. With proto-metal luminaries Black Sabbath, Deep Purple, and Led Zeppelin experiencing career low points, and campy hard rockers following a softer path, the English quintet married street-bruising intensity to commercial accessibility without compromising any aggression, volatility, rawness, or ruggedness. Part of the success owes to Guthrie's expert hand. A majority, however, lies with the group's unrelenting ambition and variety-not to mention masterful performances.


    Exemplified in the breakthrough "Hell Bent for Leather," as tough-as-nails resilient as any metal song and delivered by vocalist Rob Halford with a pronounced ruffian attitude as guitars blaze behind him, Killing Machine sparks with high-powered muscle and concise, exact rhythmic structures. Halford comes into his own throughout, sending his falsetto into another universe on the wide-open highway-driving anthem "Evening Star," evoking deep loss on the ballad "Before the Dawn," and attacking "Delivering the Goods" as if he's a mercenary. There's not a wasted note or moment of doubt on the album.


    To author and metal expert Martin Popoff, music doesn't get any better. "To my mind, Killing Machine was the apex, the hallowed halls of heavy metal which Priest summarily occupied alone at this particular juncture in time," writes Popoff in his The Top 500 Heavy Metal Albums of All Time. "The songs on this record sweat the corners and creases of all of metal's characteristics, Priest firing on and off all speeds, from quick and note-dense to positively glacial."


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Delivering the Goods
    2. Rock Forever
    3. Evening Star
    4. Hell Bent for Leather
    5. Take on the World
    6. Burnin' Up
    7. Killing Machine
    8. Running Wild
    9. Before the Dawn
    10. Evil Fantasies
    Judas Priest
    $24.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Kill Devil Hill (Out of Stock) Kill Devil Hill (Out of Stock) Quick View

    $22.99
    x

    Kill Devil Hill (Out of Stock)

    Kill Devil Hill is a new all-star band featuring members of Black Sabbath, Dio and Pantera. Their eagerly anticipated self-titled debut was produced by Warren Riker (COC, Sublime, Cathedral) and is presented here on double vinyl with an exclusive bonus track plus a CD courtesy of SPV/Steamhammer.


    One of the baddest metal bassist around, Rex Brown is most famous for his role as the longtime bassist for the Grammy nominated, platinum selling band Pantera. He provided the bottom end thunder to the band, live and on record. Since the 1990 release of Panteras Cowboys From Hell, Rex has had a hand in multiple gold, platinum, and #1 records. In 2002, Rex joined Down for the release of Down II. In 2003, Rex joined Crowbar in the studio to record and help produce Lifesblood for the Downtrodden. He also went into the studio in 2006 to record Down III.


    Vinyy Appice has powered the rhythm live and in the studio with the bands Dio, Black Sabbath, Heaven and Hell, Ozzy Osbourne, WWIII, Axis, Rick Derringer and at the age of 16 even performed with John Lennon. Vinny has recorded and co-written songs on over 25 albums, many of which are multi-platinum records. His drumming can also be heard on numerous movie soundtracks and DVDs including Waynes World 2, Heavy Metal, Iron Eagle and Bedazzled. Vinny, the author of the drum instruction book Rock Steady and DVD Hard Rock Drumming Techniques has performed drum clinics around the globe.


    Mark Zavon has appeared in Guitar Player Magazines Spotlight column and has received acclaim far and wide from other players for a unique style and approach. In the 90s Mark recorded with the band Scream Parade for Shrapnel Records. He also went on to record and tour with vocalist Stephen Pearcy of Ratt and metal band WWIII featuring Mandy Lion.


    Dewey Braggs vocals combine an eerie resemblance to the late Alice in Chains vocalist Layne Staley, but it's his own melodic style that truly steers this supergroup with powerful conviction.

    LP1
    1. War machine
    2. Hangman
    3. We`re All gonna die
    4. Time & time Again
    5. Old Man
    6. Mysterious Ways
    7. Revenge


    LP2
    1. Rise From The Shadows
    2. Up In Flames
    3. Voodoo doll
    4. Gates of hell
    5. Drawbridge (LP Exclusive bonus track)

    Kill Devil Hill
    $22.99
    Vinyl LP + CD - 2 LPs Sealed Temporarily out of stock
  • Die Healing (Out Of Stock) Die Healing (Out Of Stock) Quick View

    $21.99
    x

    Die Healing (Out Of Stock)

    "Die Healing" featuring original SAINT VITUS vocalist Scott Reagers! This is essential doom!!!!


    Recommended if You Like: BLACK SABBATH, TROUBLE, COUNT RAVEN, CANDLEMASS, THE OBSESSED, HIGH ON FIRE, SLEEP, BARONESS, MASTODON, SIR LORD BALTIMORE


    Die Healing is a pivotal point in Vitus' discog; not only their very last before they temporarily ended their relentlessly classic doom metal album releases with a thirteen year hiatus, but their third recording with Scott Reagers, who helped make the eponymous debut, Hallow's Victim and EP The Walking Dead such milestones of doom. And what a way to go out. Many will tell you this is actually Saint Vitus' finest moment, and although I favour the debut and Wino's career zenith Born Too Late above it, there is no doubt it deserves as solid a place in the pantheon of doom as Nightfall or Master Of Reality or In The Rectory Of The Bizarre Reverend.


    The band's sound and instrumentation is class without question. The guitar tone saw a slight departure from the fuzz prevalent on Wino-albums (including the 2012 opus Lillie: F-65), with something more of an electric edge familiar to C.O.D. Fret not, the tone is still plenty burly, and of course massively appropriate for the toking of vaporous substances.


    The guitar solos are likewise a little clearer - though of course solos like on 'One Mind' and 'Return Of The Zombie' have that inimitable Chandler scaling chaos in spades, squeaking like a dozen metal detectors malfunctioning. In general though the album's sound gives the feeling of the band moving forward with the sound established on the underappreciated, Chritus Linderson-assisted C.O.D., while welcoming their original singer back into the fold as easily as if he'd never left. It comes together brilliantly.


    What cements the album's place atop the pile of '90s Vitus releases is that it's a lot more solid than V and C.O.D. in terms of songs, chock full of highlights with nary a skippable track. 'Dark World' heralds absolutely no messing about, a timeless slow burn Saint Vitus classic to get you going. Reagers unlocks his trademark moon-touched howls, boosted here with a gruffness and depth that must have come with age. He can still hit the unnerving highs that made the debut such a unique piece. Not to mention his more aghast and tragic-heroic style is accompanied by a lyrical shift toward tales of horror and myth, adding further colours of yore to the band's solidified musical approach (although 'In The Asylum' is as brilliantly witty a tale of human disintegration as anything Wino has written for Vitus).


    Some of the great knells peeling off Chandler's guitar in the main riff of 'Let The End Begin' are highlights for Vitus' entire career. It climaxes with a great rocking section, splashed with sumptuous guitar and bass solos, in a move actually quite uncharacteristic for the band, who tended to steer between leadweight trawling songs and more rambunctious cuts. The eerie build on 'Sloth' is another of the band's best moments. The entire song, with its off-kilter structure and wailing chorus, is an example of just how muscular the band's creative fibers were at the time. 'Return of the Zombie', a quasi-sequel to the classic, shifty song off the debut of course, makes its mark with a crazed vocal performance and some spooky effects. And of course there's more, I've just listed a few real standouts but the album is too generous in its blessings for them to be exhaustively listed.


    It's just a really solid album that builds on all the best things the band had done to date while keeping the songwriting fresh. What a swansong this was. This album is the reason Lillie: F-65 had such vast expectations from me. A must have.


    - joncheetham88 (Metal Archives)

    1. Dark World
    2. One Mind
    3. Let The End Begin
    4. Trail Of Pestilence
    5. Sloth
    6. Return Of The Zombie
    7. In The Asylum
    8. Just Another Notch
    Saint Vitus
    $21.99
    Vinyl LP Reissue - Sealed Temporarily out of stock
  • The Oath (Out Of Stock) The Oath (Out Of Stock) Quick View

    $16.99
    x

    The Oath (Out Of Stock)

    To master the dark and wring compelling creativity from its densest shadows requires vision, belief and, perhaps most importantly, a dash of synchronicity. These are all qualities that ooze from every pore of the debut album by The Oath. A band forged around the fizzing, feral chemistry between Swedish guitarist Linnea Olsson and German vocalist Johanna Sadonis, The Oath represent the wild magic that erupts when two blazing souls collide and fate is sent veering off course by sheer strength of the human will. This is heavy metal at its most mercurial and intuitive.


    "I had grown tired with the metal scene in Stockholm, and I wanted to experience something new and get out of my comfort zone," Linnea Olson recalls. "This resulted in me going to Berlin, a city where I had no friends, and just exploring everything that makes it so magical the creative energy, the sense of freedom, and the notoriously dark and debauched nightlife. I played my guitar as usual at home, and riffs started to pile up. By the time summer came, I felt the time was right to start a new band. My best friend Henke put me in touch with Johanna. On her end, she had been looking for a guitarist for a band that she wanted to call The Oath. We had an instant connection. And we looked almost identical."


    Having found each other and discovered that their obsessions, desires and musical urges were utterly compatible and swiftly and irrevocably interwoven, Linnea and Johanna set about devising an artistic masterplan. The results of that plan are now primed to emerge, fully-formed and thrumming with primal energy and pristine passion, in the shape of The Oath: a nine-song clarion call that simultaneously recalls the hallowed greats of heavy rock, punk and metal - from Sabbath, Trouble and Angel Witch through to the Stooges and Poison Idea, and further to Mercyful Fate and Danzig - while revelling in new ways to express the spirit of those revered archetypes. Recorded in ten days at Studio Cobra in Stockholm with producer Konie Ehrencrona at the controls and the raging rhythm section of Simon Bouteloup (bass, Kadavar/ex-Aqua Nebula Oscillator) and Andrew Prestidge (Angel Witch/Winters) underpinning Linnea and Johanna's otherworldly hymns to the black, The Oath is a triumph for soul and sonic ceremony, with conviction and integrity bursting from every artfully-crafted riff and ethereal melodic motif.


    "We had a die-hard dedication right from the beginning - if not, what's the point?" states Linnea. "As for the master plan, there was none. If things fall into place naturally, you don't need one. We felt that this was our shot, and we needed to go for it. We wanted this album to be primitive and minimalistic in the sense that the sound is fairly raw, and we kept overdubs to a minimal - most of what you hear on the album are live takes. But we also wanted to bring out the melody and richness that is within the songs. And these are all strong songs, which is very important to us."


    Veering from the strident grooves and shimmering menace of opener All Must Die to the breakneck, Luciferian clatter of Black Rainbow and on to the spine-tingling grandeur and grime of epic closer Psalm 7, The Oath is anything but just another addition to the modern pseudo-occult rock canon. Instead, it is an extraordinary glimpse into its creators' overpowering charisma and chemistry and a thrillingly, hyper-nourishing dose of authentic, 21st century heavy metal sorcery. With input from In Solitude's Henke Palm - who contributes some "improvised Voivod-style solos", according to Linnea - and logo designed courtesy of Watain's Erik Danielson, this is an album that exudes ageless style and irresistible substance: a potent antidote to the flimsy fripperies of the modern age.


    "This album represents Johanna and me and our dedication to our music," Linnea avows. "Everything about this band is about me and her - our relationship to each other, our differences as people and musicians, and the unity that we are in The Oath. She possesses strengths that I lack and the other way around. Musically, my riffs are the dirt and her vocals, the diamonds. I have a friend who cleverly put that the world is made up by two kinds of people: the werewolves and the vampires. By that standard, I am a werewolf and Johanna is a vampire. You can interpret that as you like."


    And now, this new ritual begins. The Oath has been sworn, the dice have been thrown. All that remains is the propagation of the divine but unholy art that these sisters-in-sound have wrenched from the depths of their harmonised psyches. The future belongs to those who believe


    "There are a lot of hopes, plans and ambitions," Linnea concludes. "But what's even more important is that there is only now and that now is forever."


    - Dom Lawson, January 2014

    1. All Must Die
    2. Silk Road
    3. Night Child
    4. Leaving Together
    5. Black Rainbow
    6. Silver and Dust
    7. Death Delight
    8. In Dream
    9. Psalm 7
    The Oath
    $16.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Temporarily out of stock
  • 1
Go to top