Pro-ject Authorized & Certified VPI Dealer

VINYL. OUR WAY OF LIFE SINCE 2004

(877) 929-8729
Site Search
Menu Free shipping on domestic orders over $49.99! - We ship worldwide!
20% Off Vinyl - LP20
Home > Products for: '

Blue Grass

'
  • 1
Results per page:
  • Tomorrow The Green Grass Tomorrow The Green Grass Quick View

    $24.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Tomorrow The Green Grass

    On Tomorrow the Green Grass, the Jayhawks found themselves in the tricky situation of trying to match the quality of Hollywood Town Hall without simply repeating themselves, and they came remarkably close to achieving that daunting task. Rather than simply mimic the warm and unaffected sound of Hollywood Town Hall, the Jayhawks reached for a broader and more eclectic approach on Tomorrow the Green Grass; with the presence of new keyboard player Karen Grotberg and the addition of strings on several tracks, the album certainly sounded fuller and more artful, but Mark Olson and Gary Louris' harmonies were still the band's secret weapon, and were as pure and emotionally compelling as ever, while Louris' electric guitar solos gave the songs real rock & roll muscle without disturbing the essentially gentle nature of their music. And the best songs on Tomorrow the Green Grass are every bit as good as anything on Hollywood Town Hall, especially the opening hat trick of Blue, I'll Run Away, and Miss Williams' Guitar (the latter a joyous love letter to Olson's new bride, Victoria Williams). But while nearly every song on Hollywood Town Hall seemed like a classic in context, the greater stylistic variety of Tomorrow the Green Grass had the consequence of making a few of the songs in the second half of the album seem less than essential, most notably Ann Jane and Pray for Me, though they hardly counted as disappointments, and the album rallies to a rousing finale with Ten Little Kids. If Hollywood Town Hall is inarguably the Jayhawks' best album, Tomorrow the Green Grass runs a very close second, and though it was to be the group's last album with Mark Olson, the eclectic approach pointed the way to the sound and style of the fine records the Louris-led version of the band would go on to make.


    - Mark Deming (All Music Guide)

    1. Blue
    2. I'd Run Away
    3. Miss Williams' Guitar
    4. Two Hearts
    5. Real Light
    6. Over My Shoulder
    7. Bad Time
    8. See Him On the Street
    9. Nothing Left To Borrow
    10. Ann Jane
    11. Pray For Me
    12. Red's Song
    13. Ten Little Kids
    The Jayhawks
    $24.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Best Medicine Best Medicine Quick View

    $19.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Best Medicine

    The Stray Birds have been flying high since the 2012 release of their critically acclaimed self-titled album. Two years, hundreds of gigs, and thousands of highway miles later, the genre-melding acoustic trio prepares to make its Yep Roc Records debut. Known for their songwriting, instrumental virtuosity and gorgeous three-part harmony singing, their most cohesive and ambitious album to date, Best Medicine, is scheduled for release on October 21. The band-multi-instrumentalists and vocalists Maya de Vitry, Oliver Craven, and Charlie Muench-hails from Lancaster, Pennsylvania. All three are classically trained musicians who've been making music of all kinds since childhood (before they reconnected through the local music scene, de Vitry and Muench first met in middle school orchestra); however, they were also all raised with a steady diet of music ranging from pioneers like The Carter Family and Bill Monroe & His Blue Grass Boys to the joyous invention of The Beatles and The Band, to the groundbreaking artistry of Jimi Hendrix. Following the band's 2012 highly praised self-titled release, Best Medicine was recorded at Stonebridge Studios in Leesburg, VA and produced by the band and Stuart Martin.
    1. Best Medicine
    2. Adelaide
    3. Feathers & Bone
    4. San Antonio
    5. The Bells
    6. Never For Nothing
    7. Pallet
    8. Stolen Love
    9. Who's Gonna Shoe
    10. Black Hills
    11. Simple Man
    12. Might Rain
    The Stray Birds
    $19.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP + CD - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Midnight Special (Speakers Corner) The Midnight Special (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    The Midnight Special (Speakers Corner)

    No attempt has ever been made to compare Harry Belafonte with other singers of his own generation or generations following. Perhaps this is because there simply is no other singer in the American folk scene who possesses anything remotely comparable to his uniquely silky yet dusky voice, or his genial mix of calypso, blues, gospel and traditional songs. The present album provides a wonderful testimony to the Jamaican singer's flexibility and multifariousness, which he learned to perfection of New York's jazz clubs. It includes songs such as "Midnight Special", a prisoner's nocturnal prayer for freedom, and "On Top Of Old Smokey", which Belafonte instils with intricate rhythm and Caribbean flair. And the tailor-made arrangements are no less thrilling: whether possessing all the drive of a stomping big band, filled with the intimacy of a smoochy small ensemble (with Bob Dylan on the mouth organ!) or with an earthy, folksy, blue grass sound - there's all that and plenty more! To put it in a nutshell: a veritable feast of traditional music which doesn't sound the least 'traditional'.



    Musicians:



    • Harry Belafonte (vocal)

    • Jimmy Jones (conductor, arranger)

    • Bob Dylan (harmonica)

    • Joe Wilder (trumpet)

    • Jerome Richardson (saxophone)

    • Millard Thomas, Ernie Calabria (guitar)

    • Norman Keenan (bass)

    • Don Lamond, Percy Brice (drums)




    Recording: 1962 by Bob Simpson

    Production: Hugo Montenegro





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. The Midnight Special
    2. Crawdad Song
    3. Memphis Tennessee
    4. Gotta Travel On
    5. Did You Hear About Jerry?
    6. On Top Of Old Smokey
    7. Muleskinner
    8. Makes A Long Time Man Feel Bad
    9. Michael Row The Boat Ashore
    Harry Belafonte
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • A Date With Elvis (Mono) (Speakers Corner) A Date With Elvis (Mono) (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    A Date With Elvis (Mono) (Speakers Corner)

    Good products are worth their weight in gold when times are a little harsh - and this album was certainly a genially placed stopgap. In 1959, at the time when RCA launched this record on the market, the label's shining rock star was out of the country doing his military service in good old Germany. In order to comfort all his fans during his forced absence, the record bosses produced an album with a smartly uniformed Elvis on the cover, smiling widely to let his faithful followers know that he'd be back soon. There was a special calendar too, so that his fans could count off the days until his return. This marketing ploy was extremely successful. The record became a highly desirable collector's item and even years later illegal dollars still flowed from pirate copies.
    The RCA producers kept mum about when and where the tracks were recorded. But who cares about that when listening to Elvis giving the 'blue grass' classic Blue Moon Of Kentucky his unmistakable, rockabilly sound? The other titles, all of them performed by a well-proven ensemble of rock-'n'-roll musicians, are filled with the honest, powerful language of the young - or from today's viewpoint, old - Elvis. Which takes us back full circle to the date. What better way is there to celebrate the 50th birthday of rock-'n'-roll than with this early album by its 'King'?





    Musicians:



    • Elvis Presley (guitar, vocal)

    • Scotty Moore (guitar)

    • Bill Black (bass)

    • D.J. Fontana (drums)

    • The Jordanaires (vocal)




    Recording: July 1954 at Memphis Recording Service, Memphis, Tennessee (USA), and other venues till 1957

    Production: Sam Phillips




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. Blue Moon of Kentucky Monroe 2:05
    2. Young and Beautiful Schroeder, Silver 2:07
    3. (You're So Square) Baby I Don't Care
    4. Milk Cow Blues Arnold 2:38
    5. Baby Let's Play House Gunter 2:18
    6. Good Rockin' Tonight Brown 2:12
    7. Is It So Strange Young 2:32
    8. We're Gonna Move Matson, Presley 2:31
    9. I Want to Be Free Leiber, Stoller 2:16
    10. I Forgot to Remember to Forget 2:27
    Elvis Presley
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl Mono LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Holding All The Roses Holding All The Roses Quick View

    $25.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Holding All The Roses

    I think that this record does a really good job of conveying what we do and what we're about, Blackberry Smoke singer-guitarist-songwriter Charlie Starr says of Holding All the Roses, the band's fourth studio album and its first Rounder release. Indeed, Holding All the Roses compellingly captures the energy, attitude and honesty that have already helped to make Blackberry Smoke one of America's hottest live rock 'n' roll outfits, as well as a grass-roots phenomenon with a large and fiercely loyal fan base that reflects the band's tireless touring regimen and staunch blue-collar work ethic.


    The 12-song set-produced by Brendan O'Brien, whose previous production clients have included AC/DC, Aerosmith, Pearl Jam, Bruce Springsteen and Neil Young-showcases the Atlanta-based quintet's emotion-charged mix of bluesy rock, gospel soul, and country, with Starr's raspy twang matched by his and Paul Jackson's snarling guitars, Brandon Still's hauntingly expressive organ and piano, and the propulsive sibling rhythm section of Richard and Brit Turner. The songs' musical and emotional appeal is further elevated by the band's three-part vocal harmonies and expanded arrangements that make judicious use of fiddle and added percussion.


    The five musicians' instinctive musical rapport manifests itself equally strongly on such surging rockers as Let Me Help You (Find the Door), Living in the Song and Wish In One Hand, and on such intimate, introspective tunes as Woman in the Moon, Too High and the stirring, acoustic-textured No Way Back to Eden. The album's musical and emotional depth demonstrates how Blackberry Smoke continues to extend and expand the Southern rock tradition.

    1. Let Me Help You (Find the Door)
    2. Holding All the Roses
    3. Living in the Song
    4. Rock and Roll Again
    5. Woman in the Moon
    6. Too High
    7. Wish in One Hand
    8. Randolph County Farewell
    9. Payback's a Bitch
    10. Lay It All on Me
    11. No Way Back to Eden
    12. Fire in the Hole
    Blackberry Smoke
    $25.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Get Back Get Back Quick View

    $17.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Get Back

    It's doubtful that Stephen McBean set out to make The Great Rock 'N' Roll Primer when he started conjuring the
    songs that would come to be Pink Mountaintops' Get Back.


    The record's beginnings were reasonably straightforward: McBean had moved to Los Angeles, taken a long hiatus
    from Black Mountain and an even longer one from Pink Mountaintops when he met producer Joe Cardamone, lead
    singer of Icarus Line at Valley Recording Company in Burbank,CA.The two bonded quickly over Flying Nun bands,
    Television Personalities, Roxy Music, Johnny Thunders, and Born Against. Joe was excited to meet someone he
    actually liked. Stephen was excited to work with someone who said Sing it like you would've sung it when you were
    21. Simple enough,right?


    But ask him to set the scene and you'll hear about a motorcycle shop owned by Michael Barragan, former member
    of Los Angeles noise rock band Plexi. You'll hear about an endless supply of rock 'n' roll video documentation for
    last minute inspiration or de-evolution in the living room.Ask who's on the record and you'll get a constellation of
    greats:J Mascis(DinosaurJr &Witch),Rob Barbato (Darker My Love,The Fall & Cass McCombs), Steve Kille (Dead
    Meadow), Daniel Allaire (Brian Jonestown Massacre, Cass McCombs & Darker My Love), Annie Hardy (Giant
    Drag), Jon Wahl(Clawhammer), and Gregg Foreman (Cat Power & Delta 72).Randal Dunn (Sunn O))),Earth, Sun
    City Girls, Boris) mixed Get Back at Avast! Studios (Bikini Kill, Mudhoney, Christ On A Crutch, Soundgarden) in
    Seattle. Howie Weinburg (Nirvana, Beastie Boys, Danzig, Ramones, Slayer) mastered it in Laurel Canyon.


    Ask about the record itself and McBean will tell you about Alleys, curbs, walls, and cigarette stained gig flyers.An
    island on the Pacific coast. Fake British towns. Slayer posters.The beauty of youth.It's about listening to Driver's Seat
    and 'Guns of Brixton' and hotboxing The Duster. And suddenly it becomes clear: when the aliens do touch down
    and they don't know rock 'n'roll, you can play them Get Back start to finish, and that'll be all they need.


    Get Back comes out swinging with Ambulance City, a head-trip of a song with a chugging, insistent, oddly timeless
    guitar riff sitting front and center.The Second Summer of Love needs almost no explanation; it dives into 80s VHS
    saturation and never comes up for air. Sell Your Soul is a deep sigh and a motorcycle ride, a roll in the grass
    lamenting summertime blues with a little grit and a little harmony. And North Hollywood Microwaves is
    downright obscene. But what better way to start Side B than this? You can listen at hushed volumes so your parents
    don't hear, you can crank it in a dorm room, you can smirk to yourself from the safety of rock 'n'roll's old age.You
    start to wonder- why don't all Side Bs start with a song like this one


    The number of platitudes in music hit critical mass years ago, and among those tropes is that annoying, inescapable
    mantra:rock 'n'roll is undefinable.And yeah,sure, that's true. It's different things to different people. It starts with
    guitars, maybe, and ends with a stage-dive, or spit, or feedback. Rock 'n'roll is drugs, is rebellion, is youth, is sex, is
    cosmic. It's wanting more than you have.Rock 'n'roll is butts and cigarette butts.And Pink Mountaintops might not
    be the best-known band ever to make rock 'n' roll, but in Get Back they just might have written its scripture -- an
    exploration and celebration of what, exactly,rock 'n'roll can be.

    1. Ambulance City
    2. The Second Summer of Love
    3. Through All The Worry
    4. Wheels
    5. Sell Your Soul
    6. North Hollywood Microwaves
    7. Sixteen
    8. New Teenage Mutilation
    9. Shakedown
    10. The Last Dance
    Pink Mountaintops
    $17.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Porcupine Meat Porcupine Meat Quick View

    $25.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Porcupine Meat

    Naming one's album after a song titled "Porcupine Meat" may seem a little unusual - unless, of course, you're Bobby Rush, who earned his first gold record in 1971 with a hit entitled "Chicken Heads." He elaborates on his recent composition: "If a lady won't treat me right, but she doesn't want anyone else to have me, that is hard to digest." Hence the lyric, "too fat to eat, too lean to throw away."


    Porcupine Meat is Rush's debut release for Rounder Records, and one of the best recordings of his astonishing 60-plus year career. The album is due out September 16, 2016.
    Rush estimates that he has cut over 300 songs since he first began making music. He has been honored with three Grammy nominations, as well as ten Blues Music Awards and 41 nominations. He was inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame in 2006.


    Make no mistake: Rush is not your typical octogenarian. At age 82, he exudes the energy of a 20-year-old, on the road for more than 200 dates a year. His hectic tour schedule has earned him the affectionate title King of the Chitlin' Circuit. Rush has traveled the globe including Japan and Beirut. In 2007, he earned the distinction of being the first blues artist to play at the Great Wall of China. His renowned stage act features his famed shake dancers, who personify his funky blues and the ribald humor that he has cultivated during the course of his storied career.


    Born Emmet Ellis, Jr. in Homer, Louisiana, he adopted the stage name Bobby Rush out of respect for his father, a pastor. According to Rush, his parents never talked about the blues being the devil's music. "My daddy never told me to sing the blues, but he also didn't tell me to not sing the blues. I took that as a green light."


    Rush built his first guitar when he was a youngster. "I didn't know where to buy one, even if I had the money. I was a country boy," he says. After seeing a picture of a guitar in a magazine, he decided to make one by attaching the top wire of a broom to a wall and fretting it with a bottle. He also got some harmonica lessons from his father He eventually acquired a real guitar, and started playing in juke joints as a teenager, when his family briefly relocated to Little Rock, Arkansas. The fake moustache Rush wore made club owners believe he was old enough to gain entry into their establishments. While he was living in Little Rock, Rush's band, which featured Elmore James, had a residency at a nightspot called Jackrabbit.


    During the mid-1950s, Rush relocated to Chicago to pursue his musical career and make a better life for himself. It was there that he started to work with Earl Hooker, Luther Allison, and Freddie King, and sat in with many of his musical heroes, such as Howlin' Wolf, Muddy Waters, Jimmy Reed, Willie Dixon, and Little Walter. Rush eventually began leading his own band in the 1960s. He also started to craft his own distinct style of funky blues, and recorded a succession of singles for a various small labels. It wasn't until the early 1970s that Rush finally scored a hit with "Chicken Heads." More recordings followed, including an album for Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff's Philadelphia International Label.
    Rush relocated one final time, to Jackson, Miss. in the early 1980s. He was tired of the cold up north, and he realized that setting up his base of operations directly in the center of the South would make it easier to perform in nearby cities on weekends. More indie label recordings followed. Songs like "Sue, A Man Can Give (But He Sure Can't Take It)," "What's Good For The Goose Is Good For The Gander Too," and" I Ain't Studdin' You" became regional jukebox favorites in juke joints throughout the region, and many of those songs are still fan favorites that are an integral part of his live repertoire.


    Since 2003, Rush has self-released the majority of his work (including the critically acclaimed Folk Funk album) on his Deep Rush label, but recently, he came to the realization that having a bigger record company behind him would be beneficial. "I outgrew myself," he says. "I need someone to help in doing the things I can't do. When you are wearing all the hats, you can't be everywhere at once."


    Enter esteemed producer and two-time Grammy winner Scott Billington, Rounder Records' longtime VP of A&R. Billington first met Rush at a Recording Academy meeting 25 years ago, and they became fast friends. He has wanted to work with Rush ever since. "He is the most vital bluesman of his generation," says Billington. He continues, "There are many people who still don't know Bobby Rush, even though he is a hero in the parallel universe of the Chitlin' Circuit - fans stop him on the street in Memphis and Helena and Little Rock."


    Porcupine Meat will not only please Rush's older fans, but is likely to win over many new ones. Billington reflects, "We wanted to come up with something fresh, while staying 100% true to Bobby."


    The album was recorded in New Orleans, and Rush was pleased and proud to be given the opportunity to make an album in his home state for the very first time. His impassioned vocals and in-the-pocket harmonica playing are among the best performances of his career. Unlike most of his recent releases, these sessions only feature real instruments and no synthesizers. All of the rhythm tracks were cut live in the studio, often edited down from jams that on several occasions ran close to ten minutes.


    For the project, Billington assembled some of the best Louisiana musicians, including Shane Theriot, David Torkanowsky, Jeffrey "Jellybean" Alexander, Kirk Joseph, Cornell Williams, and others. Rush brought along his old friend and longtime collaborator, guitarist Vasti Jackson, who worked with Bobby and Scott on getting the songs ready for the studio. Guitar greats Dave Alvin, Keb' Mo', and Joe Bonamassa all make guest appearances on the album.


    Rush has always been a prolific and clever songwriter. The songs he penned for Porcupine Meat such as "Dress Too Short," "I Don't Want Nobody Hanging Around," "Me, Myself And I," "Nighttime Gardener," "It's Your Move," and the title selection, all equal or rival his best material. "Funk O' De Funk" delivers exactly what the title suggests and what Rush has always done the best, which is putting the funk into the blues. While "Got Me Accused" is inspired by events from Rush's own life, the lyrics tell an all-too-familiar tale about the rampant racial injustice that afflicts our society. Producer Billington and his wife Johnette Downing (the well known New Orleans songwriter and children's musician) co-wrote a couple of fine selections, "Catfish Stew" and "Snake In The Grass."


    Bobby Rush is the greatest bluesman currently performing. Porcupine Meat is a testament to his brilliance, which presents him at his very best, and doesn't try to be anything that he is not. "I just try to record good music and stories," he humbly states. With this recording, he has more than accomplished his goal, and has produced one of the finest contemporary blues albums in recent times.

    1. I Don't Want Nobody Hanging Around
    2. Porcupine Meat
    3. Got Me Accused
    4. Snake in the Grass
    5. Funk O' De Funk
    6. Me, Myself and I (feat. Joe Bonamassa)
    7. Catfish Stew
    8. It's Your Move (feat. Dave Alvin)
    9. Nighttime Gardener (feat. Keb Mo)
    10. I Think Your Dress Is Too Short
    11. Standing on Shaky Ground
    12. I'm Tired (Tangle Eye Mix)
    Bobby Rush
    $25.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Jerry Garcia And David Grisman Jerry Garcia And David Grisman Quick View

    $49.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Jerry Garcia And David Grisman


    Numbered Limited Edition 180g 2LP from Mobile Fidelity


    Contemporary Interest in Roots Music Kick-Started by Stellar Grammy-Nominated 1991 Collaboration


    Recording Now As Realistic, Natural, Close-Up, Intimate, and Enveloping as Any Acoustic Record Released: 1st Time-Ever on LP


    Garcia and Grisman Put on Virtuosic Performance, Make Way Through Pop Standards, Blues Classics, Folk Staples, Bluegrass Jaunts, and More


    Jerry Garcia achieved monumental accomplishments over a prolific career, yet the guitarist never sounded better than on his first official collaboration with longtime friend and fellow instrumental maestro David Grisman. Indeed, contemporary interest in roots music can be directly traced to this stellar Grammy-nominated 1991 collaboration. Putting distinctive rustic spins on pop standards, blues classics, and folk staples, the kindred musical spirits' earnest authenticity and relaxed intimacy are matched only by virtuosic playing and superb production. As realistic, warm, close-up, and immersive as any acoustic album, Mobile Fidelity's reissue raises the bar on the meaning of reference-standard.


    Mastered from the original master tapes, Mobile Fidelity's 180g 2LP of Garcia/Grisman takes a record forever renowned for breathtaking sonics to another level. Originally released on Grisman's fabled Acoustic Disc label and recorded at his plush studios, the album now sounds even more realistic-with distinctive tones, palpable air, smooth vocals, three-dimensional soundstaging, balanced imaging, and timbral extension that mirror the feeling and experience of hearing live music in a small space.


    Unadorned with any post-production tricks or overdubs, Garcia/Grisman breathes with naturalism and presence. You will effortlessly detect the full body of the instruments, witness the woody grain textures, and get lost in the surprisingly velvety qualities of Garcia's lullaby-like singing. Mobile Fidelity's meticulous pressing also marks the first time this delightfully joyous affair has been issued in analog form. You will never hear a better-sounding Americana-styled recording.


    Pals since the mid-1960s, Garcia and Grisman bonded over their love for traditional folk and bluegrass. The two teamed up amidst what became a gold rush of top-notch productivity and creativity for Garcia. Partnering with bassist Jim Kerwin and percussionist/fiddler Joe Craven, the pair approaches every passage with innate ease, as if either musician could finish the others sentence. The affable chemistry and soothing interplay wash over a selection of songs as notable for their diversity as the way Garcia and "Dawg" turn them into the equivalent of old friends you haven't seen in years.


    Exquisite melodies and jewel-shaped notes decorate the simple, convivial structures of tunes that hop, jump, skip, skitter, and bop. The atmosphere is reminiscent of the legendary gypsy-jazz exchanges between Django Reinhardt and Stephane Grappelli, and equally sharp. Swirling with Middle Eastern modality, the closing 16-minute-plus rendition of Grisman's rippling "Arabia"-complete with a section based on a Cuban fold theme-is alone enough worth the price of admission to this sensational session. But there's so much more.


    The quartet delves into Celtic themes ("Two Soldiers"), jazz-grass ("Grateful Dawg"), old-world ballads ("Russian Lullaby"), and Appalachian flavors ("Walkin' Boss") with nonpareil skill and soulfulness. Garcia and Grisman's tandem picking throughout epitomize sublime. And for many listeners, the duo's revised version of the Grateful Dead staple "Friend of the Devil" ranks as the finest-ever recorded, the pace patient, the narrative vocals heartfelt, and the synchronous solos tailor-made for the enveloping progression. Better yet, it's all captured in astonishing fidelity.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. The Thrill Is Gone
    2. Grateful Dawg
    3. Two Soldiers
    4. Friend of the Devil
    5. Russian Lullaby
    6. Dawg's Waltz
    7. Walkin' Boss
    8. Rockin' Chair
    9. Arabia
    Jerry Garcia And David Grisman
    $49.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Mockingbird Time Mockingbird Time Quick View

    $29.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Mockingbird Time

    During their heyday in the first half of the 1990's, The Jayhawks perfected a captivating sound that seamlessly blended the elegant folk-rock of The Byrds, the adventurousness of Buffalo Springfield, the hippiebilly soulfulness of The Flying Burrito Brothers, and the soaring harmonies of The Beach Boys. So it's richly ironic that their reappearance coincides with a dramatic resurgence of the musical approach they played such a central role in perpetuating. But this time around, The Jayhawks themselves are revered as icons by the young bands carrying on those same traditions, and it's their own legacy that they're advancing.


    On Mockingbird Time, their eighth album, and the first with the original lineup since 1995's Tomorrow The Green Grass, they're once again pushing the envelope on songs and performances of rarefied dynamism and grace. The album's shapes and textures range from the string-laden grandeur of Hide Your Colors and the widescreen vistas of Tiny Arrows to the streamlined 12-string jangle of She Walks in So Many Ways and the amphetamine frenzy of High Water Blues.

    1. Hide Your Colors
    2. Closer To Your Side
    3. Tiny Arrows
    4. She Walks In So Many Ways
    5. High Water Blues
    6. Mockingbird Time
    7. Stand Out In The Rain
    8. Cinnamon Love
    9. Guilder Annie
    10. Black-Eyed Susan
    11. The Pouring Rain At Dawn
    12. Hey Mr. Man
    The Jayhawks
    $29.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Mojo (Out Of Stock) Mojo (Out Of Stock) Quick View

    $24.99
    x

    Mojo (Out Of Stock)

    Some time in the last few years Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers took a left turn. Maybe it was when Petty woke up in the night with the idea of reuniting his first band, Mudcrutch, to cut the album they never got a chance to make back in the early 70s. Maybe it was when the Heartbreakers assembled the mammoth multi-disc The Live Anthology, which detailed thirty years of concerts. Maybe it was when they gave all their home movies, outtakes and live footage to director Peter Bogdanovich to create the Grammy-winning four-hour career documentary Runnin' Down A Dream. There have been side projects and experiments since the band last went into the studio to cut a new Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers album. With Mojo, they have taken their recent freedom and experimentation to heart. They have gone off the reservation and all signs indicate they aren't coming back.


    The first thing that hits you about Mojo is that the spirit of the Mudcrutch sessions has carried on with the Heartbreakers. This is the sound of a band playing together in a room, not a studio, facing each other, all singing and playing at the same time. The music is alive, with no overdubs or studio trickery. What you hear is what they created on the spot at that time.


    Tom Petty says, With this album, I want to show other people what I hear with the band. Mojo is where the band lives when it's playing for itself.


    As for the songs, Mojo showcases a wide variety of American music from rock n' roll to country and both electric and acoustic blues. And then there are the images in Petty's lyrics which slip in on the melodies and set up a home in your head: The barefoot girl in the high grass chewing on a stick of sugar cane, the run-in with the law that begins when a carload of buddies decide to party with the motel maids, and the hilariously audacious idea of opening an album with an electric blues rocker about Thomas Jefferson's love affair with Sally Hemings.


    Mojo has juice and guts but it also has some sweet balladry for the slow dancers and even a wacked-out reggae number that is unlike anything that the Heartbreakers have done before. It's the kind of album nobody's supposed to be able to make anymore. It got here just in time.

    LP 1
    1. Jefferson Jericho Blues
    2. First Flash of Freedom
    3. Running Man's Bible
    4. The Trip to Pirate's Cove
    5. Candy
    6. No Reason to Cry
    7. I Should Have Known It


    LP 2
    1. U.S. 41
    2. Takin' My Time
    3. Let Yourself Go
    4. Don't Pull Me Over
    5. Lover's Touch
    6. High In the Morning
    7. Something Good Coming
    8. Good Enough

    Tom Petty
    $24.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Temporarily out of stock
  • 1
Go to top