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Brahms Piano Concerto

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  • Brahms: Piano Concerto No.1 In D Minor Brahms: Piano Concerto No.1 In D Minor Quick View

    $22.99
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    Brahms: Piano Concerto No.1 In D Minor

    180 Gram Vinyl


    Newly presented on 180 gram heavyweight vinyl pressings, Decca are proud to present iconic albums from the
    analogue era back on vinyl. Presented with original artwork and pressed at optimal GmbH, each release has been
    carefully mastered from the original Decca analogue tapes at Abbey Road Studios. In this classic recording, pianist Clifford Curzon records Brahms' Piano Concerto no. 1 with George Szell leading the London Symphony.

    1. Maestoso - Poco più moderato
    2. Adagio
    3. Rondo (Allegro non troppo)
    Clifford Curzon
    $22.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Brahms: Piano Concerto No. 1 Brahms: Piano Concerto No. 1 Quick View

    $24.99
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    Brahms: Piano Concerto No. 1

    Recorded With Sir Simon Rattle & The Berliner Philharmoniker


    DG celebrates Krystian Zimerman's 60th birthday in December with 3 releases new release to vinyl. Original tapes remastered by EBS and pressed on 180g heavyweight vinyl.

    1. Maestoso - Poco più moderato
    2. Adagio
    3. Rondo (Allegro non troppo)
    Krystian Zimerman
    $24.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Brahms - Piano Concerto 1 (Speakers Corner) Brahms - Piano Concerto 1 (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Brahms - Piano Concerto 1 (Speakers Corner)

    Brahms originally intended his Piano Concerto No. 1 as a symphony and he extensively reworked his ideas before setting down the work in the form as we know it today. The composer's original intentions still shimmer through however, for the work goes far beyond mere concertante playing and a display of virtuoso brilliance by the soloist. The first movement in particular, with its relentless, threatening main theme, embodies Brahms's dramatic symphonic writing and even a conciliatory secondary theme offers no relief for it too must give way to the heavy, fateful initial theme.



    The passionate and grandiose opening movement is followed by an Adagio full of tranquillity and quiet devotion; the solemn atmosphere is taken to exalted heights by the soloist and orchestra only to fade out pianissimo.
    Although the forceful, belligerent Finale occasionally conjures up the dark powers of the first movement, the work ends in a confident and cheerful vein.
    It is amazing how the sheer presence of the emotions in this composition have been captured on the present DECCA recording from 1962. This is not only true of the gripping interpretation but also of the recording itself which remains transparent and brilliant throughout.



    Musicians:



    • Sir Clifford Curzon (piano)

    • London Symphony Orchestra

    • George Szell (conductor)




    Recording: May/ June 1962 at Kingsway Hall, London by Kenneth E. Wilkinson
    Production: John Culshaw





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. Brahms: Piano Concerto No. 1 in D minor Op. 15

    2. Maestoso

    3. Adagio

    4. Rondo: Allegro non troppo

    Johannes Brahms
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Brahms: 10 Intermezzi For Piano (Speakers Corner) Brahms: 10 Intermezzi For Piano (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Brahms: 10 Intermezzi For Piano (Speakers Corner)

    Johannes Brahms: Intermezzi op. 76 no. 6 in A major, no. 7 in A minor; op. 116 No. 4 in E major; op. 117 no. 1 in B-flat major, no. 2 in B-flat minor, no. 3 in C-sharp minor; op. 118 no. 1 in A minor, no. 2 in A major, no. 6 in E-flat minor; op. 119 no. 1 in B minor


    If you mainly connect the name Brahms with opulent symphonies, passionate concertos and weighty piano music, you will be in for a big surprise when you listen to the Intermezzi op. 117. The music critic Eduard Hanslick talks of a more restrained, detached style and clearly means the calm, simple and immensely expressive flowing melodies, which characterize the late piano music of this Romantic composer. Just how sensitively the performer must tackle these precious miniatures is described by Clara Schumann with the words » the intellectual technique in them demands a fine comprehension and one must be very familiar with Brahms to play them as Brahms had imagined them«.


    When it comes to Brahms, Glenn Gould - famous for his analytically strict and emphatic interpretation of Bach's keyboard works - proves himself to be a true poet and thinker at the keyboard. Driven by the melancholy force, his thoughts find their way, sometimes hesitantly, then moving on with a deep breath, as it were, to the next deceleration.
    In op. 118 no. 1 the Canadian pianist begins with a passion that wrests expansive cascades of sound from the keyboard, then finds his way back to introvert mellifluous tones (op. 118 no. 2) and increases the drama in the will-o'-the-wispish and futile attempts to come to a redemptory final cadence (op. 118 no. 6). It would be hard to find a more closely-knit and intense rendering than on the present recording.


    Musicians:


    • Glenn Gould (piano)


    Recording: September and November 1960 at Columbia's 30th Street Studio, New York

    Production: J. Scianni


    About Speakers Corner


    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. Intermezzo In E-Flat Major, Op. 117, No. 1
    2. Intermezzo In B-Flat Minor, Op. 117, No. 2
    3. Intermezzo In C-Sharp Minor, Op. 117, No. 3
    4. Intermezzo In E-Flat Minor, Op. 118, No. 6
    5. Intermezzo In E Major, Op. 116, No. 4
    6. Intermezzo In A Minor, Op. 76, No. 7
    7. Intermezzo In A Major, Op. 76, No. 6
    8. Intermezzo In B Minor, Op. 119, No. 1
    9. Intermezzo In A Minor, Op. 118, No. 1
    10. Intermezzo In A Major, Op. 118, No. 2
    Glenn Gould
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Brahms: Violin Sonatas No. 1 & No. 3 (Out Of Stock) Brahms: Violin Sonatas No. 1 & No. 3 (Out Of Stock) Quick View

    $34.99
    x

    Brahms: Violin Sonatas No. 1 & No. 3 (Out Of Stock)


    Features Gioconda De Vito On Violin And Edwin Fischer On Piano


    Gioconda De Vito was an Italian violinist born on July 22, 1907. She began formal violin lessons with an uncle, who was a professional violinist, at the age of 8. Three years later, she entered the Pesaro Conservatory. She graduated two years after that and started her career as a soloist. By age 17, she was teaching at the Conservatory in Bari. At age 25, she won an international violin competition in Vienna. She was then hired (supposedly through the influence of Mussolini) to teach at the Academy of Santa Cecilia in Rome. Since the Second World War interrupted her solo career, her London debut, which was very successful, didn't happen until 1948. She subsequently performed frequently in the major European venues, sometimes appearing with other important artists, including Yehudi Menuhin, Isaac Stern, Rafael Kubelik, and Furtwangler. She also twice played for the Pope (Pius XII). De Vito was one of several famous female violinists of the early Twentieth Century who were quickly forgotten by the general public - Ginette Neveu and Janine Andrade were two others. In 1961, she retired from playing and virtually from the violin itself. She was then only 54 years old. Although she toured Europe and other countries (Australia, Russia, India, Israel), she never played in the U.S. A highly admired player, she was nevertheless, almost an anachronism during her career. Her repertoire was old fashioned and did not include the concertos of Stravinsky, Prokofiev, Sibelius, Elgar, Bartok, Barber, Shostakovich, Khachaturian, Korngold, Glazunov, Berg, Walton, or Szymanowski. It is said that she was such a meticulous player, that she worked on the Brahms concerto for fifteen years before she played it in public.


    - Prone To Violins

    Johannes Brahms (1833 - 1897): Violin Sonata No. 1 in G, Op. 78
    1. Vivace ma non troppo
    2. Adagio
    3. Allegro molto moderato
    Johannes Brahms (1833 - 1897): Violin Sonata No. 3 in d minor, Op. 108
    4. Allegro
    5. Adagio
    6. Un poco presto e con sentimento
    7. Presto agitato
    Gioconda De Vito
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Temporarily out of stock
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