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Don't Explain

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  • Don't Explain Don't Explain Quick View

    $32.99
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    Don't Explain

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    Los Angeles based singer-songwriter Beth Hart, known for her raw and powerful blues-rock sound, wraps her expressive vocals around classic soul cover album Dont Explainan album that grew out of her friendship with blues-rock guitarist Joe Bonamassa. Produced by Kevin Shirley (Joe Bonamassa, Led Zeppelin, Black Crowes), the album features Harts interpretations of ten soulful blues songs, with Bonamassa on guitar and his ace band filling out the tracks.


    Dont Explain is scheduled for release on September 27 on J&R Adventuresthe independent label founded by Bonamassa and his longtime manager and business partner, Roy Weisman.

    1. Sinners Prayer
    2. Chocolate Jesus
    3. Your Heart Is As Black As Night
    4. For My Friend
    5. Dont Explain
    6. Id Rather Go Blind
    7. Somethings Got A Hold On Me
    8. Ill Take Care Of You
    9. Well, well
    10. Aint No Way
    Beth Hart & Joe Bonamassa
    $32.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Teacher Don't Teach Me Nonsense Teacher Don't Teach Me Nonsense Quick View

    $19.99
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    Teacher Don't Teach Me Nonsense

    Teacher Don't Teach Me Nonsense: Fela explains the role of the teacher in any society with the concept that: all the things we consider as problems, and all the good things we accept from life as good, begin with what we are taught. The individual teaching begins with when we are children - our mother is our teacher. When we come of school age, our teacher is the school-teacher. At the university, the lecturers and professors are our teachers. After university-when we start to work, government becomes the individual's teacher. When then is government's teacher? 'Culture and Tradition' says Fela. This is the order of things everywhere in the world. However, it is the problem side of teacher and student that interests Fela in this song. Because every country in this world except in Africa, it is the respective culture and tradition of that country that guides the government on how to rule their people. Going for specifics, Fela mentions France, Germany, England, Korea, Japan, Syria, Jordan, Iran, Etc., it is the culture of these countries that shapes and guides their respective government's decisions. The culture and traditions of these countries serve as a teacher to their respective governments. Turing his attention to Africa and her problems. Problems which he had sang about: corruption, inflation, mismanagement, authority stealing, electoral fraud, the latest addition which even makes him laugh is -austerity. Fela says if you ask him why 'austerity makes him laugh? The answer is that it is beyond crying. The government steals money from the country, the same government is introducing austerity measures-forcing the poor people to pay for their own greed and calling it 'austerity measures'. How funny if to say the least. Who taught African 'leaders' to rule the way they do today? 'Na the oyinbo' (meaning in Yoruba language: 'it is them white folks') referring to ex-colonial ruler of each country. Take electoral fraud, which is a true test of our democracy. Many African leaders rig elections with impunity and their respective ex-colonial rulers say nothing against this form of 'democracy'. While the same 'white folks' are quick to claim credit for Africa's 'civilization'-which Fela disputes in this song. Is this democracy? , he asks. Turning to other problems like the ever-growing gap between the rich and the poor. Particularly, since the rich are the rules, and also the people stealing the country into poverty. Is this democracy? Or dem-all-crazy? In conclusion, as an African personality, Fela says he is not in the same league as those who believe in dem-all-crazy, so he calls on the Western powers who claim to be Africa's teachers not to teach him nonsense-Teacher Don't Teach Me Nonsense.


    Look and Laugh: By 1981 when Fela wrote and started to perform live the song Look And Laugh, he was living a life that could be described as a recluse. Fela, who loved to go out in public places, clubs, etc. Suddenly, was always found sleeping or playing sax at home with women around him, or performing at the Africa Shrine. His old attitude of keeping abreast of events, giving lectures at universities and institutions of higher learning stopped. He rarely gave press conferences or press releases, like he used to do. Finally he wrote the song to explain what was going-on with him. He sang: ' many of you go dey wonder why your man never write new song! wetin I dey do be say I dey look and laugh.' Meaning: many of you must have been wondering why, your man has not written new songs! what I am doing is just look and laugh! Fela went on to explain his contributions and sacrifices for the cause of black emancipation, the countless beatings and arrests from the Nigerian police and army, his trials and tribulations, his ultimate sacrifice being the burning down of Kalakuta by the Nigeria army. But despite his sacrifices and sufferings like millions of other Africans, it was obvious that things were not getting better for the average man on the street. There is still injustice everywhere, no freedom, no happiness. All these made him feel disillusioned and all he could do about the situation is to Look and Laugh.


    Just Like That: This song is a call to arms from Fela to all Africans to rise up and do something about the political, economic, social and cultural retrogression that has plagued Africa since independence. For more than three decades of independence, there is glaring mismanagement of people's lives, corruption in the highest echelon of government-all these carried out with impunity-'Just Like That' he sings. Using the Nigerian experience as an example of the 'lack of maintenance culture', in Africa's present day neo-colonial administrations, he says: 'White man ruled us for many years, we had electricity constantly, our leaders take over! No electricity in town-Just like that!' Fela explains that the attempt to transplant 'Western style democracy' in an African society is the cause of all the problems. Despite calls for African Unity from leaders like Kwame Nkrumah, who said: '..Until all foreign institutions and culture are removed from the African land, that is when the African genius will be born and African personality will find its fulfillment..'. Instead of heeding Nkrumah's call, Nigeria's political founding fathers, like most African leaders at independence, chose the option of fashioning the constitutions of their respective countries after those of the departing colonial 'masters'-Just Like That. The ambiguity of such decisions can be seen in the poor imitation we make of our attempt at 'Western style democracy'. Persistent political gangsterism, military coups, and sometimes wars, are means used to enforce the already compromised constitutions. As another example of enforcing a fragile constitution, Fela stresses the face that in 1966, Nigeria for a civil war to keep the country ONE. General Gowon, the military head of state, divided Nigeria into twelve administrative regions, subsequent administrations divided the regions into more-Just Like That. He adds that if the idea of the civil war was to keep the country ONE, sub-dividing Nigeria into more regions would separate rather than unite the country. Turning to the position of traditional rulers in the mess called government, Fela sings: ' nothing good for town to give the youths good examples, how our traditional ruler they do, them come make youths look-up to Europe and USA, in those places them don lose them common sense, na the number of Nuclear weapons you get, na him give you power pass! Right now! Fight now! Suffer must stop! Just Like That". Therefore, calling on the people to fight now for a better society.

    1. Teacher Don't Teach Me Nonsense
    2. Look and Laugh
    3. Just Like That
    Fela Kuti
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • If The Roses Don't Kill Us If The Roses Don't Kill Us Quick View

    $16.99
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    If The Roses Don't Kill Us

    If The Roses Don't Kill Us was made with Grammy-winning producer Dave Sanger (Asleep at the Wheel) and his partners PJ Herrington and Jay Reynolds. They created a relaxed atmosphere in the studio that gaveDenny's vocals a sharp, visceral presence. The album opener, "Happy Sad" sets the stage for all that follows. When Denny strums a minor chord and sings the word "sad," you're pulled into his world of intense melancholy.


    The descending melody line and bluesy guitar lines of "God's Height" gives the tune a sense of anguished longing, mitigated by Denny's playful vocal. "I was laughing about the thoughts you get at the end of a relationship when you think you're not good enough, but you know you're going to survive." The churchy B3 organ on "Our Kind of Love" suggests Memphis in the early 60s, a feeling echoed in Denny's crooning. "No matter how bad it seems, we only have this moment. When I wrote, 'It's our love, darlin', and we beat ourselves black and blue,' I was realizing how much I love my dark feelings."


    Denny's jubilant vocal dominates "Watch Me Shine" with chiming acoustic guitar and sustained bell-like synthesizer notes adding to the track's righteous mood. "If the Roses Don't Kill Us" is pure country funk with a New Orleans brass band supporting Denny's lively vocal. "Sometimes you have to go crazy to figure out what's important to you," Denny explains. "This is about leaving a relationship when you know the situation isn't really resolved." That ambivalence is the thread that holds the songs on If The Roses Don't Kill Us together. Denny's barely restrained vocals have the ability to describe contradictory feelings with an intensity that gives every word he sings the ring of painful truth. His shimmering, one-of-a-kind voice reaches you on a deep emotional level, touching your heart and soul to deliver his hard won insights with an honesty that makes his singing and songwriting something unique and rare.

    1 Happy Sad

    2 God's Height

    3 Our Kind Of Love

    4 Wings

    5 Million Little Thoughts

    6 Watch Me Shine

    7 If The Roses Don't Kill Us

    8 Love Is A Code Word

    9 Man A Fool

    10 Ride On

    11 Radio

    12 Some Things

    Christopher Denny
    $16.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Out Of The Black Out Of The Black Quick View

    $24.99
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    Out Of The Black

    The raucous, schizophrenic sound of Out Of The Black - much like previous Boys Noize records - has as much to do more with Ridha's attention span as his choice in gear. "I get bored really easily with sounds," he explains, "The exciting part for me is trying to come up with new sounds, putting new sounds in a new dress. I'm sound obsessed. I buy a lot of machines and synths, and I'm always looking for a way to destroy sounds in an unconventional way. I'm always drawn to music and productions that sound entirely different or really naïve or sometimes just stupid. I don´t like it when it sounds too clean and generic, there needs to be some sort of soul. I guess that explains a lot about my sound which I think I instinctually capture. But I do try to keep in mind what I loved about dance music when I started doing this and how it made me feel. Those thoughts were also very much on my mind when I was making this record."


    The new album nicely bridges the gap between his previous two efforts; providing the requisite in-your-face electro bang of classic Boys Noize on tracks like "What You Want", "Rocky 2" and "XTC", or more melodic songs like "Ich R U" and "Reality". At a time when mainstream electronic music-particularly the pervasive cultures of EDM and dubstep-have moved dance music out of the clubs and into the stadiums, Ridha is quick to acknowledge the old school house and acid records that shaped him as a DJ; the very same records that continue to bubble up as an influence on Out of the Black.


    "I never compromise when it comes to creative or musical things," says Ridha. "I only do what I think is cool and what I like. It's not about what the market wants or what people expect. Maintaining artistic freedom has always been the most important thing to me - for my own music or for anyone on my label." As for the title of his new record, Ridha explains that this music isn't coming from out of the blue. In fact, it's the opposite. "I tend to make and produce music only at night," he says. "I also generally only perform at night, so this is music that's coming totally out of the black. Also, they say the color black can absorb all other colors, which is a cool way to think about making music. You absorb every other kind of music-every possible sound-and what comes out of you is something new, something out of the black."

    1. What You Want
    2. XTC
    3. Missile
    4. ICH R U
    5. Rocky 2
    6. Ich Jack
    7. Circus Full Of Clowns (feat. Gizzle)
    8. Touch It
    9. Conchord (feat. Siriusmo)
    10. Reality
    11. Merlin
    12. Got It (feat. Snoop Dogg)
    13. Stop
    14. Yellow (feat. Siriusmo)
    Boys Noize
    $24.99
    Vinyl LP + CD - 3 LPs Sealed Buy Now
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