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  • Drink The Sea Drink The Sea Quick View

    $19.99
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    Drink The Sea

    The Glitch Mob is a collaboration of three Dj's (edit, Ooah and Boreta) that play the genre of dance music known as glitch hop. Glitch hop is characterized by the use of sound effects made to resemble a computer or machine encountering some sort of technical problem (aka glitching). This might be hard to imagine for some so here is an example [url]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gwcdc5zUuGM&feature=related[/url]. The Glitch Mob never used the glitch aesthetic quite that often but rather only in parts to help transitions or add variety. On Drink The Sea however, the glitch sound is gone and the band seems to have opted for a more heavy house sound with some trancy influences.

    - Simon Harris (Sputnik Music)
    1. Animus Vox
    2. Bad Wings
    3. How to Be Eaten by a Woman
    4. A Dream Within a Dream
    5. Fistful of Silence
    6. Between Two Points (feat. Swan)
    7. We Swarm
    8. Drive It Like You Stole It
    9. Fortune Days
    10. Starve the Ego, Feed the Soul
    The Glitch Mob
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • AudioQuest Chicago Interconnect Cable MULTIPLE LENGTHS AVAILABLE AudioQuest Chicago Interconnect Cable Quick View

    $74.95
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    AudioQuest Chicago Interconnect Cable


    Have a question about this product? Please email our audio advisor or call 1-877-929-8729 with any questions or concerns regarding your equipment purchase.



    RCA to RCA


    Custom Lengths Available Upon Request


    Every March 17 on St. Patrick's Day, New York City merely paints a green line down the center of its Fifth Avenue parade route-a stunt easily pulled off by any city-but only Chicago dyes an entire river the perfect shade of emerald green to honor Irish culture. Why green? Thanks to Ireland's lush vegetation, the island is often lovingly referred to as the Emerald Isle. To the Irish, a green display of pride is not to be taken lightly. In the United States, even those of non-Irish descent know to wear green clothing on St. Patrick's Day, or else be playfully pinched by an Irish friend or colleague! But it's one thing to don a green shirt or tie, another thing altogether to transform a 156-mile long river. Chicago's Stephen M. Bailey, the man who orchestrated the transformation, boasted that he'd turn the River Chicago into the River Shannon (Ireland's longest) for a day, and, eventually, he did.


    There was no specific recipe for successfully dyeing a river. A bit of trial and error was required. Initially, over 100 pounds of dye was used, and the river stayed green for a week! In the second year, 50 pounds of dye kept the river green for three full days. In the third year, it was found that using 25 pounds of dye would turn the river green for a single day. Two years later, environmental concerns led to the formation of a new vegetable-based dye that produces a perfect sea of green and lasts for four or five hours-40 pounds of the stuff does the trick. Following suit across the nation, major canals, minor creeks, city blocks, drinking fountains, and even the Presidential Fountain at the White House are dyed green for St. Patrick's Day-all thanks to the wonderful example set in Chicago.


    SOLID LONG-GRAIN COPPER (LGC) CONDUCTORS: Solid conductors eliminate strand-interaction distortion. Chicago's solid Long-Grain Copper allows a smoother and clearer sound than cables using regular OFHC (Oxygen-Free High-Conductivity) copper. OFHC is a general metal industry specification regarding "loss" without any concern for distortion. LGC has fewer oxides within the conducting material, less impurities, less grain boundaries, and definitively better performance.


    NITROGEN-INJECTED HARD-CELL FOAM INSULATION: Nitrogen-Injected Hard-Cell Foam insulation is used exclusively in most of AudioQuest's video and digital audio cables. Similar to Foamed-PE, it is nitrogen-injected to create air pockets. 'Hard' foam is used because the stiffness of the material allows the conductors in the cable to maintain the same relationship with each other along the full length of the cable, thus ensuring that the characteristic impedance of the cable is consistent.


    METAL-LAYER NOISE-DISSIPATION SYSTEM (NDS): 100% shield coverage is easy. Preventing captured RF Interference from modulating the equipment's ground reference requires AQ's Noise-Dissipation System. Noise-Dissipation System prevents a significant amount of RFI from reaching the equipment's ground plane.


    DOUBLE-BALANCED GEOMETRY: Two ideal audio conductors separate from the cable's shield. Not only does this prevent the shield from being used as an inferior audio path, but it further optimizes sound quality by only grounding the shield at one end, reducing system ground-plane modulation.


    COLD-WELDED GOLD-PLATED PLUGS: This plug design allows for a connection devoid of solder, which is a common source of distortion. Because the ground shells are stamped instead of machined, the metal can be chosen for low distortion instead of machinability.


    AudioQuest
    $74.95
    Analog-Audio Interconnect Cable (Pair) - Multiple Lengths Available
    Buy Now
  • African Piano African Piano Quick View

    $25.99
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    African Piano

    South African pianist-composer Abdullah Ibrahim, still performing at the time of this 1969 live album under the pseudonym Dollar Brand, unleashed a mastery so enticing on African Piano, it's a wonder that any of the folks at the club where it was recorded had the resolve to treat it as background to their dining. By the same token, reinforcement of that fact by constant ambient noises renders Ibrahim's performance all the more sacred by contrast.


    Amid a sea of chatter, cleared throats, and sudden intakes of breath, he breaks the surf with the gentle yet hip ostinato of "Bra Joe From Kilimanjaro," working meditative tendrils into the bar light. Over this his right hand brings about an explosive sort of thinking that spins webs in a flash and connects them to larger others. With clarion fortitude, he drops bluesy accents along the way: a trail of crumbs leading to "Selby That The Eternal Spirit Is The Only Reality." Ironically (or not), this is the most solemn blip on the album's radar and blends into the ivory tickling of "The Moon." Here Ibrahim's heartfelt, dedicatory spirit comes to the fore, proving that, while technically proficient, he possesses a descriptive virtuosity that indeed evokes a pockmarked surface lit in various phases, harnessing sunlight as if it were skin in dense, vibrating harvest. The kinesis of this tune is diffused in the tailwind of "Xaba," which then flows into "Sunset In Blue," in which Ibrahim's ancestral awareness is clearest. The level of respect evoked here for both the dead and the living lends a ritualistic quality by virtue of its tight structuring, which despite hooks at the margins flies freely in its magic circle. "Kippy" is a smoother reverie with flickers of flame. A beautiful amalgam of measures and means, it slips an opiate of reflection into its own drink. After this, the intense two minutes of gospel and downward spirals that is "Jabulani-Easter Joy" takes us into "Tintinyana," thereby crystallizing the album's flowing energies. Tracks bleed into one another: they runneth from the same cup, their spiritual resonance deep and true.


    African Piano is a gorgeous, thickly settled album, but one that is always transparent when it comes to origins. Such is the tenderness of Ibrahim's craft, which speaks with a respect that transcends the sinews, muscles, and eardrums required to bring it to life. It finds joy in history, connecting to it like an Avatar's tail to steed.

    1. Bra Joe From Kilimanjaro
    2. Selby That The Eternal Spirit Is The Only Reality
    3. The Moon
    4. Xaba
    5. Sunset In Blue
    6. Kippy
    7. Jabulani Easter Joy
    8. Tintiyana
    Abdullah Ibrahim
    $25.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Every Good Boy Deserves Fudge Every Good Boy Deserves Fudge Quick View

    $17.99
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    Every Good Boy Deserves Fudge

    1991 will forever be remembered as the year that alternative rock broke through to the masses. It seemed like every other week there was another great new alt-rock album to discover, such as Nirvana's Nevermind, Soundgarden's Badmotorfinger, Primus's Sailing The Seas of Cheese, and the Smashing Pumpkins' Gish, so Mudhoney couldn't have picked a better time to issue their sophomore release. Every Good Boy Deserves Fudge was issued right in the middle of the whole grunge movement, and while it didn't sell in the vast quantities of some other Seattle bands' albums, it did stir up quite a buzz for Mudhoney. Some of the band's finest moments are included here, such as Generation Genocide, Let it Slide, Into the Drink, Who You Drivin' Now? and Fuzzgun '91.
    1. Generation Genocide
    2. Let It Slide
    3. Good Enough
    4. Something So Clear
    5. Thorn
    6. Into the Drink
    7. Broken Hands
    8. Who You Drivin' Now?
    9. Move Out
    10. Shoot the Moon
    11. Fuzzgun '91
    12. Pokin' Around
    13. Don't Fade IV
    14. Check-Out Time
    Mudhoney
    $17.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Deer Tick Vol. 2 Deer Tick Vol. 2 Quick View

    $19.99
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    Deer Tick Vol. 2

    The best art often challenges widely held preconceptions about performance and beauty.We're moved when we find the sublime in the gross, entranced when crassness collides with grace. It makes poetic sense that one of this practice's finest current purveyors is named after a blood-sucking survivor.

    Deer Tick: undercutting expectations since 2004.

    I think a lot of my favorite artists have always done stuff like that, Deer Tick front man John McCauley says from his home in Nashville, reflecting on his band's love of unexpected mashups: tender lyrics layered over pissed off guitars; classical music flourishes delivered nearly naked and high. Deer Tick's perfected it all, mostly as an outlier, revered by a legion of fans, respected by peers, but not part of any one scene. With their highly anticipated new project(s), two new albums released simultaneously titled Deer Tick Vol. 1 and Deer Tick Vol.2, the crew from Rhode Island prove that their punk-roots rock has only gotten better with age.

    Ambitious and smart, the twin albums complement one another but also stand independently.Vol. 1 is classic Deer Tick: folk-rooted acoustic guitars and soft piano cushion out-front vocals. Vol. 2 commits wholly to the band's longtime garage-rock flirtations for a triumphant foray into punk.

    McCauley sees the two records as a natural progression. I think it's something that wa sbound to happen, just because I've always had one foot in each door, he says. Every album we've put out has had its manic moments in one way or another. I felt good enough about everything that I was writing to think that we could truly separate our two big interests: quiet and loud.

    It's been four years since Deer Tick's last release Negativity, and devotees have grown restless. It wasn't that the band-made up of McCauley, guitarist Ian O'Neil, drummer DennisRyan, and bassist Christopher Ryan-was withholding information. They just weren't sure they had anything more to share. It wasn't anything that we actually talked about, McCauleysays. We never said, 'Hey, we should take a break,' or 'Maybe this isn't working anymore.'We just took some time off. We'd just done our 10-year anniversary shows, and I had a kid like two weeks later. He pauses before adding with a hint of a laugh, We just kind of got comfortable away from each other.

    McCauley, O'Neil, and the two Ryans popped up solo and on others' projects. Personal lives also underwent massive changes, especially for McCauley, who married Vanessa Carlton and became a dad. The couple's little girl is now two years old. For the first time ever, Deer Tick-an all-consuming band known for constant touring and steady artistic output-took a backseat.

    When the band came back together for their beloved after-party shows at the Newport Folk Festival, the reunion reminded them what they missed about creating with one another.Playing that week with the guys made me really want to do it-it made everyone want to do it, McCauley says. So we started making some plans to go in the studio.

    The result, recorded at Ardent Studios in Memphis, Tennessee, is a bold double punch that reminds us not only why Deer Tick has been so missed, but why they've become important artists. The songwriting on both volumes is masterful. McCauley wrote most of the tunes alone, but O'Neil and Dennis Ryan also make killer contributions. Self-aware and never self important,McCauley excels at provocative lyrics that are sometimes confessional, sometimes accusatory. His compositions capture those internal contradictions that define us, like rock and-rollsongs of myself delighting in the multitudes and putting them on display.

    Vol. 1 opener Sea of Clouds is a dreamy mediation on letting go, featuring stripped down instrumentation that swells into a mini-symphony, all anchored by angelic harmonies and McCauley's familiar melodic snarl. It's not the only time McCauley mulls over what it takes to move on. Heart-tugging Only Love mixes sadness and hope for a snapshot of impending loss. I thought, 'Nobody writes a song about that kind of weird, ominous feeling you get inthe final 24 to 48 hours of a relationship,' McCauley says. I wanted to capture that mood in a song.

    Sauntering Card House is a flamenco-soaked threat with grotesque imagery, while lounge readyCocktail is a wry, piano-fueled stroll through fond boozy memories. I guess it's kindof a song about my strange relationship with alcohol-I'm still learning how to deal with it,McCauley says. I'm not a teetotaler. I've tried that. It's not for me. I'm not into the support group thing. I enjoy life with a drink. Trying to keep my life in balance can be hard, but it's something I'm capable of doing now.

    Tricky relationships with drugs and alcohol are addressed in different ways on both volumes.Hushed Vol. 1 closer Rejection pulses with vulnerability. I wrote it about trying to help somebody in some way, McCauley says. What was going through my mind but I didn't say in the lyrics is just reaching your hand out to somebody who's going through substance abuse problems. Vol. 2's Jumpstarting-a favorite track of McCauley's-offers the same kind of lifeline: he shouts startlingly sweet promises over crunchy guitars.

    Look How Clean I Am immediately follows. Written and sung by O'Neil, the song doesn't poke fun at sobriety but offers a droll take down of how some use it as a means or marketing vehicle to further celebrity. It's one of many genuinely funny moments on the project. JumpingS.M.F., (aka Shitty Music Festival) written and delivered by McCauley, takes hilarious shots at a summer institution. I thought I'd write that one for any band who's ever had a bad time at a music festival. It's one of my attempts at humor on the record, but then it just kind of comes off as anger, McCauley says with a laugh.

    McCauley wrote gorgeous instrumental Pulse thinking about the 2016 Orlando nightclub shooting. He lets his piano do the talking. It's a Whale is punk perfection, all screams and growling guitars. That's probably the most political I'll ever get in a song, McCauley says. I tried to put myself in the really dark head space of maybe a men's rights activist or something like that while trying to poke fun at it. His chants of Atta boy! Atta girl! are the ideal blend of smirk-inducing and scary.

    McCauley says he believes Sea of Clouds and It's a Whale probably best capture theextremities of both records. He's right, of course: it's Vol. 1's quiet vs. Vol. 2's loud-Deer Tick's dual personalities, finally channeled onto two distinct and equally brilliant records.These albums represent a new phase of my life that I haven't entirely figured out yet,McCauley says. I don't really know what's going to happen, but that's part of the excitement for me.

    1. Don't Hurt
    2. Jumpstarting
    3. Look How Clean I Am
    4. It's a Whale
    5. Tiny Fortunes
    6. Sloppy
    7. Wants / Needs
    8. S.M.F.
    9. Pulse
    10. Mr. Nothing Gets Worse
    Deer Tick
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Deer Tick Vol. 1 Deer Tick Vol. 1 Quick View

    $19.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Deer Tick Vol. 1

    The best art often challenges widely held preconceptions about performance and beauty.We're moved when we find the sublime in the gross, entranced when crassness collides with grace. It makes poetic sense that one of this practice's finest current purveyors is named after a blood-sucking survivor.

    Deer Tick: undercutting expectations since 2004.

    I think a lot of my favorite artists have always done stuff like that, Deer Tick front man John McCauley says from his home in Nashville, reflecting on his band's love of unexpected mashups: tender lyrics layered over pissed off guitars; classical music flourishes delivered nearly naked and high. Deer Tick's perfected it all, mostly as an outlier, revered by a legion of fans, respected by peers, but not part of any one scene. With their highly anticipated new project(s), two new albums released simultaneously titled Deer Tick Vol. 1 and Deer Tick Vol.2, the crew from Rhode Island prove that their punk-roots rock has only gotten better with age.

    Ambitious and smart, the twin albums complement one another but also stand independently.Vol. 1 is classic Deer Tick: folk-rooted acoustic guitars and soft piano cushion out-front vocals. Vol. 2 commits wholly to the band's longtime garage-rock flirtations for a triumphant foray into punk.

    McCauley sees the two records as a natural progression. I think it's something that was bound to happen, just because I've always had one foot in each door, he says. Every album we've put out has had its manic moments in one way or another. I felt good enough about everything that I was writing to think that we could truly separate our two big interests: quiet and loud.

    It's been four years since Deer Tick's last release Negativity, and devotees have grown restless. It wasn't that the band-made up of McCauley, guitarist Ian O'Neil, drummer Dennis Ryan, and bassist Christopher Ryan-was withholding information. They just weren't sure they had anything more to share. It wasn't anything that we actually talked about, McCauley says. We never said, 'Hey, we should take a break,' or 'Maybe this isn't working anymore.'We just took some time off. We'd just done our 10-year anniversary shows, and I had a kid like two weeks later. He pauses before adding with a hint of a laugh, We just kind of got comfortable away from each other.

    McCauley, O'Neil, and the two Ryans popped up solo and on others' projects. Personal lives also underwent massive changes, especially for McCauley, who married Vanessa Carlton and became a dad. The couple's little girl is now two years old. For the first time ever, Deer Tick-an all-consuming band known for constant touring and steady artistic output-took a backseat.

    When the band came back together for their beloved after-party shows at the Newport Folk Festival, the reunion reminded them what they missed about creating with one another.Playing that week with the guys made me really want to do it-it made everyone want to do it, McCauley says. So we started making some plans to go in the studio.

    The result, recorded at Ardent Studios in Memphis, Tennessee, is a bold double punch that reminds us not only why Deer Tick has been so missed, but why they've become important artists. The songwriting on both volumes is masterful. McCauley wrote most of the tunes alone, but O'Neil and Dennis Ryan also make killer contributions. Self-aware and never self important,McCauley excels at provocative lyrics that are sometimes confessional, sometimes accusatory. His compositions capture those internal contradictions that define us, like rock and-rollsongs of myself delighting in the multitudes and putting them on display.

    Vol. 1 opener Sea of Clouds is a dreamy mediation on letting go, featuring stripped down instrumentation that swells into a mini-symphony, all anchored by angelic harmonies and McCauley's familiar melodic snarl. It's not the only time McCauley mulls over what it takes to move on. Heart-tugging Only Love mixes sadness and hope for a snapshot of impending loss. I thought, 'Nobody writes a song about that kind of weird, ominous feeling you get in the final 24 to 48 hours of a relationship,' McCauley says. I wanted to capture that mood ina song.

    Sauntering Card House is a flamenco-soaked threat with grotesque imagery, while lounge readyCocktail is a wry, piano-fueled stroll through fond boozy memories. I guess it's kind of a song about my strange relationship with alcohol-I'm still learning how to deal with it,McCauley says. I'm not a teetotaler. I've tried that. It's not for me. I'm not into the support group thing. I enjoy life with a drink. Trying to keep my life in balance can be hard, but it's something I'm capable of doing now.

    Tricky relationships with drugs and alcohol are addressed in different ways on both volumes.Hushed Vol. 1 closer Rejection pulses with vulnerability. I wrote it about trying to help somebody in some way, McCauley says. What was going through my mind but I didn't sayin the lyrics is just reaching your hand out to somebody who's going through substance abuse problems. Vol. 2's Jumpstarting-a favorite track of McCauley's-offers the same kind of lifeline: he shouts startlingly sweet promises over crunchy guitars.

    Look How Clean I Am immediately follows. Written and sung by O'Neil, the song doesn't poke fun at sobriety but offers a droll takedown of how some use it as a means or marketing vehicle to further celebrity. It's one of many genuinely funny moments on the project. JumpingS.M.F., (aka Shitty Music Festival) written and delivered by McCauley, takes hilarious shots at a summer institution. I thought I'd write that one for any band who's ever had a bad time ata music festival. It's one of my attempts at humor on the record, but then it just kind of comes off as anger, McCauley says with a laugh.

    McCauley wrote gorgeous instrumental Pulse thinking about the 2016 Orlando nightclub shooting. He lets his piano do the talking. It's a Whale is punk perfection, all screams and growling guitars. That's probably the most political I'll ever get in a song, McCauley says. I tried to put myself in the really dark headspace of maybe a men's rights activist or something like that while trying to poke fun at it. His chants of Atta boy! Atta girl! are the ideal blend of smirk-inducing and scary.

    McCauley says he believes Sea of Clouds and It's a Whale probably best capture theextremities of both records. He's right, of course: it's Vol. 1's quiet vs. Vol. 2's loud-Deer Tick's dual personalities, finally channeled onto two distinct and equally brilliant records.These albums represent a new phase of my life that I haven't entirely figured out yet,McCauley says. I don't really know what's going to happen, but that's part of the excitement for me.

    1. Half Believing (By The Black Angels)
    2. Card House
    3. Doomed From The Start
    4. Hope Is Big
    5. Only Love
    6. Cocktail
    7. Me And My Man
    8. End Of The World
    9. Limp Right Back
    10. Rejection
    Deer Tick
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
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