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  • Mack The Knife: Ella In Berlin Mack The Knife: Ella In Berlin Quick View

    $27.99
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    Mack The Knife: Ella In Berlin

    Import


    "This LP is a classic. Ella Fitzgerald is heard at the peak of her powers during a Berlin concert that is famous for her unique version of 'Mack the Knife'; when she forgot the words in midperformance, she substituted spontaneous and remarkable lyrics of her own. This music (which also includes a hot version of 'How High the Moon') is essential for all serious jazz collections."

    - Scott Yanow (All Music)

    1. That Old Black Magic*
    2. Our Love Is Here To Stay*
    3. Gone With The Wind
    4. Misty
    5. The Lady Is A Tramp
    6. The Man I Love
    7. Summertime
    8. Too Darn Hot
    9. Lorelei
    10. Mack The Knife
    11. How High The Moon?
    11. Love For Sale **
    12. Just One Of Those Things **


    *From the same concert. Not on the original LP
    **Bonus Tracks

    Ella Fitzgerald
    $27.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Mack The Knife: Ella In Berlin Mack The Knife: Ella In Berlin Quick View

    $24.99
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    Mack The Knife: Ella In Berlin

    43-year-old Ella rolls through her typical routine in feisty fashion on this 1960 recording, which documents the opening show of her European tour. There's the Satchmo impersonation (a joyous Mack the Knife), the lengthy scat showcase (How High the Moon), and a bevy of Gershwin and Porter tunes. Supported by pianist Paul Smith's quartet, Ella's voice sounds earthier than usual and her phrasing is as appealing as ever. She's tender on Misty and sultry on Too Darn Hot.
    1. Gone With The Wind
    2. Misty
    3. The Lady Is A Tramp
    4. The Man I Love
    5. Summertime
    6. Too Darn Hot
    7. Lorelei
    8. Mack The Knife
    9. How High The Moon
    Ella Fitzgerald
    $24.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Ella In Berlin / Hollywood Ella In Berlin / Hollywood Quick View

    $36.99
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    Ella In Berlin / Hollywood

    Import


    2x 180-Gram Vinyl


    One of Fitzgerald's most acclaimed live performances. At this concert in Berlin, Fitzgerald improvised lyrics for "Mack the Knife" after forgetting the original lyrics. In recognition of this, she received the Best Female Vocal Performance. This album was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1999. During her Scat solo on 'How High the Moon', Fitzgerald quotes the Charlie Parker composition 'Ornithology', which is in fact based on the chord changes for 'How High the Moon', as a springboard for her own scat improvisation. This recording of 'How High the Moon' is considered one of Fitzgerald's best scat solos, if not one of the best in jazz. "Ella in Hollywood" features several songs that serve as starting points for Ella's seemingly effortless scat solos, and a selection of beautiful ballads. This album features Ella at the height of her vocal powers

    LP 1: Ella In Berlin
    1. Gone With The Wind
    2. Misty
    3. The Lady Is A Tramp
    4. The Man I Love
    5. Summertime
    6. Too Darn Hot
    7. Lorelei
    8. Mack The Knife
    9. How High The Moon
    10. That Old Black Magic*
    11. Our Love Is Here To Stay*


    LP 2: Ella In Hollywood
    1. This Could Be The Start Of Something Big
    2. I've Got The World On A String
    3. You're Driving Me Crazy
    4. Just In Time
    5. It Might As Well Be Spring
    6. Take The "A" Train
    7. Stairway To The Stars
    8. Mr. Paganini
    9. Satin Doll
    10. Blue Moon
    11. Baby, Won't You Please Come Home
    12. Air Mail Special


    *Bonus Track

    Ella Fitzgerald
    $36.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Newport Jazz Festival: Live At Carnegie Hall (Pure Pleasure) Newport Jazz Festival: Live At Carnegie Hall (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $49.99
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    Newport Jazz Festival: Live At Carnegie Hall (Pure Pleasure)

    This is a wonderful live album. Recorded toward the end of Ella's career, by concert's end it is apparent that she has about lost her voice, but not the audience's adoration. The album showcases her in various settings: with the (obviously) reconstituted Chick Webb Orchestra, with Ellis Larkins, with Joe Pass and with Tommy Flanagan (of course); the album also has some nods to the Webb Orchestra, noteworthy for late-career blowing by 'Lockjaw' Davis. Highlights: Nice Work If You Can Get It, Good Morning Heartache (an intended and most worthy tribute to Lady Day), Miss Otis Regrets, the first encore of Some of these Days, and intended set-ender of Ella doing what she does best, scatting through Lemon Drop.



    Musicians:



    • Ella Fitzgerald (vocal)

    • Chick Webb Orchestra




    Recording: July 1973 at Carnegie Hall, New York



    Format: 2LPs 33rpm / gatefold sleeve



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. I've Gotta Be Me
    2. Good Morning Heartache
    3. Miss Otis Regrets
    4. Medley: Don't Worry 'Bout Me/These Foolish Things
    5. Any Old Blues
    6. A-Tisket A-Tasket
    7. Indian Summer
    8. Smooth Sailing
    9. You Turned The Tables On Me
    10. Nice Work If You Can Get It
    11. I've Got A Crush On You
    12. Medley: I Can't Get Started/The Young Man With The Horn/'Round Midnight
    13. Star Dust
    14. C Jam Blues
    15. Medley: Taking A Chance On Love/I'm In The Mood For Love
    16. Lemon Drop
    17. Some Of These Days
    18. People
    Ella Fitzgerald
    $49.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Porgy & Bess (Speakers Corner) Porgy & Bess (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $69.99
    Buy Now
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    Porgy & Bess (Speakers Corner)

    The dream of creating an American opera such as Scott Joplin's Treemonisha, written in 1911, inspired George Gershwin a good twenty years later to amazing compositional feats. While Gershwin had brought his musical and musical comedies with great Éclat to Broadway, he wanted his through-composed stage work Porgy And Bess to be regarded as a legitimate opera.



    No matter whether one regards this exceptional work as »American folk opera« (The New York Times) or as a veristic portrayal of African-American life, central to the work is the expressionistic orchestral music that includes (work) songs, spirituals and elements of jazz, and the cast of singers, which, at the insistence of Gershwin, featured African-American singers.



    This stipulation will certainly have suited Verve boss Norman Granz who engaged not only a fresh and lively big band but also a classical string orchestra to support his successful duo of Ella and Louis. Thanks to this superb line-up, the catchy song I Got Plenty O' Nuttin' rolls along sleekly with swing and drive, while Summertime and Bess, You Is My Woman Now wafts away to the sound of heavenly violins. Listening to this music, you couldn't care less about the genre or category, just as long as these two genial musicians perform wonderfully arranged material from the American Song Book. The incomparable nasal twang of Armstrong's solo trumpet seeks out unerringly jazz elements where you would least expect them.



    Musicians:



    • Ella Fitzgerald (vocal)

    • Louis Armstrong (trumpet, vocal)




    Recording: August 1957 in Los Angeles and October 1957 in Chicago

    Production: Norman Granz




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    LP1
    1. Overture

    2. Summertime
    3. I Wants To Stay Here
    4. My Man's Gone Now
    5. I Got Plenty O' Nuttin
    6. Buzzard Song
    7. Bess, You Is My Woman Now


    LP2
    1. It Ain't Necessarily So

    2. What You Want Wid Bess
    3. A Woman Is A Somtime Thing
    4. Oh, Doctor Jesus
    5. Medley: Here Come De Honey Man / Crab Man / Oh, Dey's So Fresh & Fine
    6. There's A Boat Dat's Leavin' Soon For New York
    7. Bess, Oh Where Is My Bess?
    8. Oh Lawd. I, On My Way!

    Ella Fitzgerald and Louis Armstrong
    $69.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Empathy Empathy Quick View

    $49.99
    Buy Now
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    Empathy

    Mastered by George Marino at Sterling Sound


    ...these are all truly classic Verve titles that you simply don't want to miss...most importantly, the sound of these reissues is nothing short of astounding. Particularly the early Billie and Ella mono records are incredible treasures of sonic beauty. I'd definitely ask Santa for the whole set, or, if you want to cherry pick, the most classic titles. Whatever you decide, you owe yourself at least a half dozen! Winner of a 2012 Positive Feedback Online Writers' Choice Award - Danny Kaey, Positive Feedback Online, November/December 2011


    This album came about through a fortuitous convergence of circumstances. Shelly Manne & His Men were appearing at New York's Village Vanguard, sharing the bill with the Bill Evans Trio. Getting Riverside's permission to let the pianist participate, Creed Taylor set up a session at Rudy Van Gelder's studio with Evans and Manne sharing top billing. Manne's bass player, Monty Budwig, made up the trio. This was a busman's holiday for Evans, who was freed from the musical parameters he had set for his then-current trio. The result is that his playing seemed lighter, freer, and more relaxed than it had for a while. The album kicks off with a jaunty version of Irving Berlin's The Washington Twist from the unsuccessful Mr. President with Budwig sharing the honors with Evans as much as Manne. Manne spends most of his time driving Evans into more diminished and sharper playing than was usually Evans' wont. Another relatively unfamiliar Berlin work, Let's Go Back to the Waltz, gives full reign to Evans' lyricism. The longest tune on the set is an audacious, almost lampooned version of With a Song in My Heart with light chordal phrasing that pretty much characterized much of the tone coming from this session.


    Recorded in 1962.


    Bill Evans, piano

    Shelly Manne, drums

    Monty Budwig, bass


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. The Washington Twist
    2. Danny Boy
    3. Let's Go Back To Te Waltz
    4. With A Song In My Heart
    5. Goodbye
    6. I Believe In You
    Shelly Manne & Bill Evans
    $49.99
    200 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP 45RPM - Sealed Buy Now
  • Swiss Movement (Speakers Corner) Swiss Movement (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Swiss Movement (Speakers Corner)

    Les McCann had already been playing his way through the clubs and record studios on the US west coast for ten years when his appearance on 21 June 1969 at the relatively new and jazz-soaked festival in Montreux on Lake Geneva changed all that. There, he celebrated his greatest musical success, his number one hit. Half ironically, but proudly in later concerts, when the piano stool could hardly bear him due to his size and weight, he stressed that Swiss Movement had supported him, his wife, children and grandchildren.


    Compared To What is a catchy melody that is heard on the radio, again and again, all around the world, today, tomorrow and the day after It is unmistakable, still groovy, full of soul, humorous, stirring. And Cold Duck Time is no way inferior: Eddie Harris blows for all he is worth. Everyone can hear that Benny Bailey was challenged by the unknown themes, but this maestro still managed to capture the audience's ear and attention.


    Swiss Movement is, and will remain forever, a highlight among all the jazz LPs that have been recorded live and it shouldn't be missing from any collector's shelf. Along with Benny Goodman's Carnegie Hall Concert from 1938, Charlie Parker & Co.'s Massey Hall concert from 1953, and Ella Fitzgerald's Berlin concert from 1960 - and very few others


    Musicians:


    • Eddie Harris (tenor saxophone)
    • Benny Bailey (trumpet)
    • Les McCann (piano, violin)
    • Leroy Vinnegar (bass)
    • Donald Dean (drums)


    Recording: June 1969 live at Montreux Jazz Festival

    Production: Joel Dorn & Nesuhi Ertegun


    About Speakers Corner


    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. Compared To What
    2. Cold Duck Time
    3. Kathleen's Theme
    4. You Got It In Your Soulness
    5. The Generation Gap
    Les McCann & Eddie Harris
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Leadbelly (Pure Pleasure) Leadbelly (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Leadbelly (Pure Pleasure)

    Leadbelly's last recording sessions for a commercial record label, held in the early fall of 1944, yielded a dazzling 12 songs, embracing virtuoso guitar blues (Grasshoppers In My Pillow), pounding piano-driven scatting (The Eagle Rocks, with Leadbelly himself at the ivories, a talent for which he wasn't usually recognized), and familiar standards done in some startlingly different ways, including Goodnight, Irene, Rock Island Line, and Ella Speed, done with the understated accompaniment of a zither (courtesy of Paul Mason Howard) as well as his own guitar. Leadbelly was in excellent voice and top form on guitar and piano - having gone to California to test the commercial waters, he met Tex Ritter, an old friend, who arranged for Leadbelly to come to his house and, with Merle Travis playing as well and Capitol executive Lee Gillette present, auditioned then and there for the label; he was energized by the experience, and Capitol's recording caught the brightest as well as the deepest tones in his playing, thus making this record one of the very best showcases for acoustic 12-string guitar of the period. Sadly, only a handful of these tracks were issued during the man's own lifetime, thus convincing him that they were another career dead end - in 1956 (and again in 1962) they emerged with an impassioned annotation by Dave Dexter Jr., imploring people to buy these last commercial sides by one of the most celebrated bluesmen of the century.



    Production notes: Whilst this album has been mastered and produced to the highest possible standards it is NOT upto what would be considered audiophile standards. This would be impossible bearing in mind the standards of recording and mastering at the time.




    Musicians:



    • Leadbelly (guitar, piano)

    • Paul Mason Howard (zither)




    Recording: October 1944 in Hollywood, USA

    Production: Dave Dexter Jr. and Lee Gilette



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    Goodnight Irene
    Grasshoppers In My Pillow

    The Eagle Rocks
    Rock Island Line

    Ella Speed
    Backwater Blues
    Take This Hammer
    Tell Me, Baby
    Eagle Rock Rag

    Western Plain
    Sweet Mary Blues
    On A Christmas Day
    Huddie Ledbetter
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • I Remember (Pure Pleasure) I Remember (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    I Remember (Pure Pleasure)

    Jazz singer Dianne Reeves was born into a family rich in musical background. Her uncle, Charles Burrell, a bass player with the Denver Symphony Orchestra, introduced her to the music of jazz singers such as Ella Fitzgerald, Billie Holiday, and, especially impressive to Reeves, Sarah Vaughan.



    Her musical career includes a tour with Eduardo del Barrio's group Caldera; singing with Billy Childs' jazz band Night Flight; touring with Sergio Mendes; from 1983-86 touring with Harry Belafonte as a lead singer. She also sang at the closing ceremony of the 2002 Winter Olympic Games in Salt Lake City.



    Reeves has been awarded four Grammys for Best Jazz Vocal Performances for the albums In the Moment - Live In Concert (2001), The Calling: Celebrating Sarah Vaughan (2002), A Little Moonlight (2003), and Good Night and Good Luck (soundtrack) (2006).


    Recorded at Madhatter Studios, Los Angeles, California on September 10-11, 1990 and The Van Gelder Studio, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey on April 27-28 and May 9, 1988.


    Features:



    • 180g Vinyl

    • Re-mastered by Ron McMaster at Capitol Studios


    Musicians:



    • Dianne Reeves, vocals

    • Kevin Eubanks, acoustic guitar

    • Bobby Hutcherson, vibraphone

    • Greg Osby, alto saxophone

    • Justo Almario, saxophone

    • Charles Mims, piano

    • Billy Childs, piano

    • Donald Brown, piano

    • Mulgrew Miller, piano

    • Chris Severin, bass

    • Charnett Moffett, bass

    • Billy Kilson, drums

    • Marvin Smitty Smith, drums

    • Terri Lyne Carrington, drums

    • Ron Powell, percussion, wind chimes

    • Bill Summers, percussion

    • Luis Conte, percussion


    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Afro Blue
    2. The Nearness Of You / Misty
    3. I Remember Sky
    4. Love For Sale
    5. Softly As In The Morning Sunrise
    6. Like A Lover
    7. How High The Moon
    8. You Taught My Heart To Sing
    9. For All We Know
    Dianne Reeves
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • But Beautiful (Pure Pleasure) But Beautiful (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    But Beautiful (Pure Pleasure)

    A highly successful and respected jazz and soul singer, Nancy Wilson bridges the gap between the classic pop vocal era of Peggy Lee, Frank Sinatra and Ella Fitzgerald and the belting R&B divas of today. Though Nancy Wilson has always cited the emotionally naked, androgynous vocal style of Jimmy Scott as her primary influence, her voice carries definite echoes of Dinah Washington and Sarah Vaughan. Yet Wilson also has always had a strong feeling for post-Sam Cooke soul and the tartness of her delivery carries more than an echo of the sometimes-icy Lena Horne. Young and heart-stoppingly beautiful, Wilson was discovered singing in a N.Y.C. jazz club in the late 1950s by Cannonball Adderley, who told his management at Capitol Records that they needed to scoop her up before another label did. Wilson was immediately signed and started recording for Capitol, the premier vocal label of the 1950s and '60s.




    Musicians:



    • Nancy Wilson (vocal)

    • Hank Jones (piano)

    • Gino Bertachini (guitar)

    • Ron Carter (bass)

    • Grady Tate (drums)




    Recording: November 1969 in New York City

    Production: David Cavanaughdeutsch




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Happiness Is A Thing Called Joe
    2. Oh! Look At Me Now
    3. Glad To Be Unhappy
    4. Do It Again
    5. But Beautiful
    6. Easy Living
    7. Prelude To A Kiss
    8. I Thought About You
    9. For Heaven's Sake
    10. Supper Time
    11. I'll Walk Alone
    12. Darn That Dream
    13. In A Sentimental
    Nancy Wilson
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Now It's My Turn (Pure Pleasure) Now It's My Turn (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Now It's My Turn (Pure Pleasure)

    Arguably the most adventurous female jazz singer of all time, Betty Carter was an idiosyncratic stylist and a restless improviser who pushed the limits of melody and harmony as much as any bebop horn player. The husky-voiced Carter was capable of radical, off-the-cuff re-workings of whatever she sang, abruptly changing tempos and dynamics, or rearranging the lyrics into distinctive, off-the-beat rhythmic patterns. She could solo for 20 minutes, scat at lightning speed, or drive home an emotion with wordless, bluesy moans and sighs. She wasn't quite avant-garde, but she was definitely 'out'. Yet as much as Carter was fascinated by pure, abstract sound, she was also a sensitive lyric interpreter when she chose, a tender and sensual ballad singer sometimes given to suggestive asides. Her wild unpredictability kept her marginalized for much of her career, and she never achieved the renown of peers like Ella Fitzgerald, Sarah Vaughan, or Carmen McRae. What was more, her exacting musical standards and assertive independence limited her recorded output somewhat. But Carter stuck around long enough to receive her proper due; her unwillingness to compromise eventually earned her the respect of the wider jazz audience, and many critics regarded her as perhaps the purest jazz singer active in the '80s and '90s.



    Musicians:



    • Betty Carter (vocal)

    • John Hicks (piano)

    • Walter Booker (bass)

    • Unknown (drums)



    Recording: March and June 1976 at Sound Ideas Studio C by Joe Ferla

    Production: Fred Bailin




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Music Maestro, Please
    2. Swing Brother Swing
    3. I Was Telling Him About You
    4. Wagon Wheels
    5. New Blues (You Purr)
    6. Most Gentlemen Don't Like Love
    7. Making Dreams Come True

    8. Open the Door
    9. Just Friends
    10. Star Eyes
    11. No More Words
    Betty Carter
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Grand Stan (Pure Pleasure) Grand Stan (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
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    Grand Stan (Pure Pleasure)

    Mr. Levey worked with Peggy Lee, Ella Fitzgerald, Bobby Darin and many other singers, and with the big bands of Benny Goodman, Woody Herman and Stan Kenton. He was also a ubiquitous presence in Los Angeles recording studios for many years. But he earned his place in jazz history primarily through his work with Charlie Parker and Dizzy Gillespie, the leading lights of bebop.



    A self-taught drummer who played left-handed even though he was naturally right-handed, Mr. Levey was still a teenager when he began attracting attention for the ease with which he handled the breakneck tempos and tricky accents of the modern style. Working with Gillespie and Parker, he also attracted attention for being one of two white musicians (the pianist Al Haig was the other) in an otherwise all-black group, by no means a common sight in the 1940's.



    Stan Levey was born in Philadelphia on April 5, 1926. The son of a prizefight promoter, he took up boxing about the same time he took up drums, and for a few years pursued both careers. But boxing, at which he was never exceptional, soon lost out to drumming, at which he was.



    His work with Gillespie and Parker in 1945, when bebop was new and controversial, won him the admiration of his peers but not much of a living. Greater success came a few years later when he began working with big bands.



    In 1954, after two years with Kenton, he settled in Los Angeles, where he spent five years with the Lighthouse All-Stars, the group in residence at a popular local nightclub. He was also in great demand for studio work, recording with many of the best-known musicians in jazz and playing on hit records like Peggy Lee's Fever. In addition, his drumming was heard on the soundtracks of hundreds of movies and television shows, including five Disney documentaries for which he wrote the music.



    Musicians:



    • Conte Candoli (trumpet)

    • Frank Rosolino (trombone)

    • Richie Kamuca (tenor saxophone)

    • Sonny Clark (piano)

    • Leroy Vinnegar (bass)

    • Stan Levey (drums)



    Recording: August 1955 in New York City



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    1. Yesterdays
    2. Angel Cake
    3. Why Do I Love You
    4. Grand Stan
    5. Hit That Thing
    6. Blues At Sunrise
    7. A Gal In Calico
    8. Tiny's Tune
    Stan Levey
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
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