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  • Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me Soundtrack Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me Soundtrack Quick View

    $45.99
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    Twin Peaks: Fire Walk With Me Soundtrack

    Director Approved Artwork


    Composer Approved Audio


    Sleeve Notes By Film Critic Mark Kermode (Approved By David Lynch And Angelo Badalamenti)


    Vinyl Re-Master By Tal Miller At Warner Archives


    Laquers Cut By David Cheppa At Plush Vinyl


    2 X 180-Gram Cherry Pie Vinyl


    425gsm Gatefold Sleeve Housed Inside A Bespoke Black Die Cut Outer Jacket With Black Spot Varnish Finish, Complete With Obi Strip


    Fire Walk With Me is an altogether more brooding affair than the Twin Peaks series soundtrack. Badalamenti won a grammy for the title track of this LP and it's not hard to see why- it's dangerous, and bursting with smokey jazz thanks to Jimmy Scott. We went back to the master tapes in the Warner Archives and had this recut to fit across two LPs as the score clocks in at 51 minutes. It sounds incredible and punchy, but super nuanced too.


    From the brooding opening bars of the main Fire Walk With Me Theme, Angelo Badalamenti's gorgeous, eerie score introduces us to a cinematic experience which significantly begins with the smashing of a television screen. Just as the Main Title from Blue Velvet echoed the Hitchcockian hues of Bernard Herrmann, so here we have just the slightest touch of Taxi Driver, as Jim Hynes' plaintive, keening trumpet soars above a landscape of melancholy keyboards, drawing us into a world which is at once alien and familiar.

    LP 1
    1. Theme From Twin Peaks - Fire Walk With Me
    2. The Pine Float
    3. Sycamore Trees
    4. Don't Do Anything (I Wouldn't Do)
    5. A Real Indication


    LP 2
    1. Questions In A World Of Blue
    2. The Pink Room
    3. The Black Dog Runs At Night
    4. Best Friends
    5. Moving Through Time
    6. Montage From Twin Peaks - Girl Talk / Birds In Hell / Laura Palmer's Theme / Falling
    7. The Voice Of Love

    Angelo Badalamenti
    $45.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Gratitude Gratitude Quick View

    $44.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Gratitude

    180 Gram Translucent Blue Colored Vinyl With Gatefold Cover


    Mastered Impeccably By Joe Reagoso


    Manufactured At R.T.I.


    During the 1970s, a new brand of pop music was born - one that was steeped in African and African-American styles - particularly jazz and R&B but appealed to a broader cross-section of the listening public. As founder and leader of the band Earth, Wind & Fire, Maurice White not only embraced but also helped bring about this evolution of pop, which bridged the gap that has often separated the musical tastes of black and white America. It certainly was successful, as EWF combined high-caliber musicianship, wide-ranging musical genre eclecticism, and '70s multicultural spiritualism. "I wanted to do something that hadn't been done before," Maurice explains. "Although we were basically jazz musicians, we played soul, funk, gospel, blues, jazz, rock and dance music which somehow ended up becoming pop. We were coming out of a decade of experimentation, mind expansion and cosmic awareness. I wanted our music to convey messages of universal love and harmony without force-feeding listeners' spiritual content."Maurice was born December 19, 1941, in Memphis, TN. He was immersed in a rich musical culture that spanned the boundaries between jazz, gospel, R&B, blues and early rock. All of these styles played a role in the development of Maurice's musical identity. At age six, he began singing in his church's gospel choir but soon his interest turned to percussion. He began working gigs as a drummer while still in high school. His first professional performance was with Booker T. Jones, who eventually achieved stardom as Booker T and the MGs.After graduating high school, Maurice moved to the Windy City to continue his musical education at the prestigious Chicago Conservatory Of Music. He continued picking up drumming jobs on the side, which eventually lead to a steady spot as a studio percussionist with the legendary Chicago label, Chess Records. At Chess, Maurice had the privilege of playing with such greats as Etta James, Fontella Bass, Billy Stewart, Willie Dixon, Sonny Stitt and Ramsey Lewis, whose trio he joined in 1967. He spent nearly three years as part of the Ramsey Lewis Trio. "Ramsey helped shape my musical vision beyond just the music," Maurice explains. "I learned about performance and staging." Maurice also learned about the African thumb piano, or Kalimba, an instrument whose sound would become central to much of his work over the years.In 1969, Maurice left the Ramsey Lewis Trio and joined two friends in Chicago, Wade Flemons and Don Whitehead, as a songwriting team composing songs and commercials in the Chicago area. The three friends got a recording contract with Capitol and called themselves the "Salty Peppers," and had a marginal hit in the Mid-western area called "La La Time." That band featured Maurice on vocals, percussion and Kalimba along with keyboardists/vocalists Wade Flemons and Don Whitehead.


    After relocating to Los Angeles and signing a new contract with Warner Bros., Maurice simultaneously made what may have been the smartest move of his young career. He changed the band's name to Earth, Wind & Fire (after the three elements in his astrological chart). The new name also captured Maurice's spiritual approach to music - one that transcended categories and appealed to multiple artistic principals, including composition, musicianship, production, and performance. In addition to White, Flemons and Whitehead, Maurice recruited Michael Beal on guitar, Leslie Drayton, Chester Washington and Alex Thomas on horns, Sherry Scott on vocals, percussionist Phillard Williams and his younger brother Verdine on bass.


    Earth, Wind & Fire recorded two albums for Warner Brothers: the self-titled 1970 album Earth, Wind And Fire and the 1971 album The Need Of Love. A single from this album, "I Think About Lovin' You," provided EWF with their first Top 40 R&B hit. Also in 1971, the group performed the soundtrack to the Melvin Van Peebles film 'Sweet Sweetback's Baadasssss Song'.


    In 1972, White dissolved the line-up (except he and brother Verdine White) and added Jessica Cleaves (vocals - formerly of the R&B group The Friends of Distinction), Ronnie Laws (flute, saxophone), Roland Bautista (guitar), Larry Dunn (keyboard), Ralph Johnson (percussion) and Philip Bailey (vocals, formerly of Friends & Love). Maurice became disillusioned with Warner Brothers, which had signed the group primarily as a jazz act. Maurice, in contrast, was more interested in combining elements of jazz, rock, and soul into an evolving form of fusion, a truly universal sound.


    A performance at New York's Rockefeller Center introduced EWF to Clive Davis, then President of Columbia Records. Davis loved what he saw and bought their contract from Warner Bros. With Columbia Records, debuting with the 1972 album Last Days And Time, the group slowly began to build a reputation for innovative recordings and exciting, live shows, complete with feats of magic (floating pianos, spinning drum kits, vanishing artists) engineered by Doug Henning and his then-unknown assistant David Copperfield. Their first gold album, Head To The Sky, peaked at number 27 pop in the summer of 1973, yielding a smooth tangy cover of "Evil" and the title track single. The first platinum EWF album, Open Our Eyes, whose title track was a remake of the classic originally recorded by Savoy Records group the Gospel Clefs, included "Mighty Mighty" (number four R&B) and "Kalimba Story" (number six R&B).


    Maurice once again shared a label roster with Ramsey Lewis, whose Columbia debut Sun Goddess, was issued in December 1974. The radio-aired title track was released as a single under the name Ramsey Lewis and Earth, Wind & Fire. It went to number 20 R&B in early 1975. The Sun Goddess album went gold, hitting number 12 pop in early 1975. Maurice had also played on Lewis' other high-charting album, Wade In The Water; the title track single peaked at number three R&B in the summer of 1966.


    The inspiration for "Shining Star" (one of EW&F's most beloved singles) was gleaned from thoughts Maurice had during a walk under the star-filled skies that surrounded the mountains around Caribou Ranch, CO a popular recording site and retreat during the '70s. The track was originally included in the 'That's The Way Of The World' movie that starred Harvey Keitel and was produced by Sig Shore (Superfly). "Shining Star" glittered at number one R&B for two weeks and hit number one pop in early 1975. It was included on their 1975 multi-platinum album That's The Way Of The World that held the number one pop spot for three weeks in Spring 1975 and earned them their first Grammy Award. The title track single made it to number five R&B in summer of 1975. It also yielded the classic ballad "Reasons," an extremely popular radio-aired album track.


    The multi-platinum album Gratitude held the number one pop album spot for three weeks in late 1975. On the album was "Singasong" (gold, number one R&B for two weeks, number five pop), the Skip Scarborough ballad "Can't Hide Love" (number 11 R&B), and the popular radio-aired album tracks "Celebrate," "Gratitude," and the live version of "Reasons." In 1976, Maurice decided he wanted to record a spiritual album. The multi-platinum album Spirit parked at number two pop for two weeks in fall of 1976 and boasted the gold, number one R&B single "Getaway" and "Saturday Nite." Spirit is remembered as one of EWF's best albums and sadly for also being the last project of Producer Charles Stepney. He died May 17, 1976, in Chicago, IL, at the age of 45. Charles was a former Chess Records arranger/producer/session musician/multi-instrumentalist/songwriter and Maurice's main collaborator on his EWF projects. The multi-platinum album All 'N All peaked at number three pop in late 1977, won three Grammy's, and had arrangements by Chicago soul mainstay Tom Tom Washington and Eumir Deodato. The singles were "Serpentine Fire" (number one R&B for seven weeks) and "Fantasy." The group's horn section, the legendary Phenix Horns (Don Myrick on saxophone, Louis Satterfield on trombone, Rahmlee Michael Davis and Michael Harris on trumpets) became an integral part of the Earth, Wind & Fire sound.


    During this time, Maurice produced several artists such as The Emotions (1976's Flowers and 1977's Rejoice which included the number one R&B/pop hit "Best Of My Love") and Deniece Williams (1976's This Is Niecy which included the Top Ten R&B hit "Free"). In the late seventies, in association with Columbia Records, Maurice also launched a record label, ARC.


    The multi-platinum greatest-hits set The Best Of Earth, Wind & Fire, Vol. I included a cover of the Beatles' "Got To Get You Into My Life" went to number one R&B and number nine pop in Summer 1978. The group performed the song in the 1978 Bee Gees/Peter Frampton movie 'Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band'. Another single, "September," made it to number one R&B, number eight pop in early 1978. On the flip side was the enchanting popular radio-aired album track "Love's Holiday" from All 'N All.


    Their live performances were stellar as well. Sellout crowds were spellbound by the band's bombastic performances. Their performances blasted a cosmic wave of peace, love and other happy vibrations to audiences using a combination of eye-popping costumes, lights, pyrotechnics and plain old good music. Sometimes they even threw in magic illusions. Earth, Wind & Fire's message was one of universal harmony, in both musical and cultural senses. "We live in a negative society," Maurice told Newsweek. "Most people can't see beauty and love. I see our music as medicine."


    The multi-platinum album I Am hit number three pop in Summer 1979 on the strength of the million-selling single "Boogie Wonderland" with The Emotions (number two R&B for four weeks, number six pop) and the phenomenal gold ballad "After The Love Has Gone," written by David Foster, Jay Graydon and Bill Champlin that stayed at number two R&B/pop for two weeks. Their Faces album peaked at number ten pop in late 1980 and was boosted to gold by the singles "Let Me Talk" (number eight R&B), "You" (number ten R&B), and "And Love Goes On."


    The million-selling funked-up "Let's Groove," co-written by The Emotions' Wanda Vaughn and her husband Wayne Vaughn, was the track that re-energized EWF's career, parking at number one R&B for eight weeks and number three pop, causing their Raise! album to go platinum (hitting number five pop in late 1981). Their next gold album Powerlight made it to number 12 pop in spring 1983 and included the Top Ten R&B single and Grammy-nominated "Fall In Love With Me." Their 1983 Electric Universe album stalled at number 40 pop, breaking the band's string of gold, platinum and multi-platinum albums.


    In 1983, Maurice decided he and the band needed a break. During this hiatus, Maurice recorded his self-titled solo album Maurice White and produced various artists including Neal Diamond, Barbra Streisand and Jennifer Holliday. Reuniting with the band in 1987, EWF released the album Touch The World and scored yet another number one R&B single, "System of Survival" and embarked on a corresponding nine-month world tour. This was followed by the 1988 release The Best Of Earth, Wind & Fire Vol. II.


    In 1990 the group released the album Heritage. Two years later, Earth, Wind & Fire released The Eternal Dance; a 55-track boxed set retrospective of the band's entire history. The appearance of such a project after a prolonged period of relative inactivity signaled to many listeners that the band was calling it quits but that did not turn out to be case. In 1993, EWF released the album, Millennium that included the Grammy-nominated "Sunday Morning" and "Spend The Night."


    Earth, Wind & Fire kept recording and in 1996 released Avatar and Greatest Hits Live; followed by 1997's In The Name Of Love; 2002's That's The Way Of The World: Alive In '75; Live In Rio which was recorded during their 1979 "I Am World Tour;" 2003's The Promise, which included the Grammy-nominated "Hold Me" and 2005's Illumination, which included the Grammy-nominated "Show Me The Way."


    In 2000, the nine-piece '70s edition of Earth, Wind & Fire reunited for one night only in honor of their induction into The Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame. In 2001, Eagle Rock Entertainment released the documentary 'Earth, Wind & Fire: Shining Stars', which contains rarely seen historic video footage along with in-depth interviews with the band members.


    Even though Maurice is no longer a part of the touring group, he remains the band's heart and soul from behind the scenes as composer and producer. Maurice reflects, "I wanted to create a library of music that would stand the test of time. 'Cosmic Consciousness' is the key component of our work. Expanding awareness and uplifting spirits is so important in this day. People are looking for more. I hope our music can give them some encouragement and peace."

    LP 1
    1. Introduction

    2. Africano/ Power Medley

    3. Yearnin' Learnin'

    4. Devotion

    5. Sun Goddess
    6. Reasons

    7. Sing A Message To You


    LP 2
    1. Shining Star

    2. New World Symphony
    3. Sunshine

    4. Singasong

    5. Gratitude

    6. Celebrate

    7. Can't Hide Love

    Earth, Wind & Fire
    $44.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Buy Now
  • Greatest Hits (Awaiting Repress) Greatest Hits (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $42.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Greatest Hits (Awaiting Repress)

    180 Gram Translucent Gold Colored Vinyl With Gatefold Cover


    During the 1970s, a new brand of pop music was born - one that was steeped in African and African-American styles - particularly jazz and R&B but appealed to a broader cross-section of the listening public. As founder and leader of the band Earth, Wind & Fire, Maurice White not only embraced but also helped bring about this evolution of pop, which bridged the gap that has often separated the musical tastes of black and white America. It certainly was successful, as EWF combined high-caliber musicianship, wide-ranging musical genre eclecticism, and '70s multicultural spiritualism. "I wanted to do something that hadn't been done before," Maurice explains. "Although we were basically jazz musicians, we played soul, funk, gospel, blues, jazz, rock and dance music which somehow ended up becoming pop. We were coming out of a decade of experimentation, mind expansion and cosmic awareness. I wanted our music to convey messages of universal love and harmony without force-feeding listeners' spiritual content."Maurice was born December 19, 1941, in Memphis, TN. He was immersed in a rich musical culture that spanned the boundaries between jazz, gospel, R&B, blues and early rock. All of these styles played a role in the development of Maurice's musical identity. At age six, he began singing in his church's gospel choir but soon his interest turned to percussion. He began working gigs as a drummer while still in high school. His first professional performance was with Booker T. Jones, who eventually achieved stardom as Booker T and the MGs.After graduating high school, Maurice moved to the Windy City to continue his musical education at the prestigious Chicago Conservatory Of Music. He continued picking up drumming jobs on the side, which eventually lead to a steady spot as a studio percussionist with the legendary Chicago label, Chess Records. At Chess, Maurice had the privilege of playing with such greats as Etta James, Fontella Bass, Billy Stewart, Willie Dixon, Sonny Stitt and Ramsey Lewis, whose trio he joined in 1967. He spent nearly three years as part of the Ramsey Lewis Trio. "Ramsey helped shape my musical vision beyond just the music," Maurice explains. "I learned about performance and staging." Maurice also learned about the African thumb piano, or Kalimba, an instrument whose sound would become central to much of his work over the years.In 1969, Maurice left the Ramsey Lewis Trio and joined two friends in Chicago, Wade Flemons and Don Whitehead, as a songwriting team composing songs and commercials in the Chicago area. The three friends got a recording contract with Capitol and called themselves the "Salty Peppers," and had a marginal hit in the Midwestern area called "La La Time." That band featured Maurice on vocals, percussion and Kalimba along with keyboardists/vocalists Wade Flemons and Don Whitehead.


    After relocating to Los Angeles and signing a new contract with Warner Bros., Maurice simultaneously made what may have been the smartest move of his young career. He changed the band's name to Earth, Wind & Fire (after the three elements in his astrological chart). The new name also captured Maurice's spiritual approach to music - one that transcended categories and appealed to multiple artistic principals, including composition, musicianship, production, and performance. In addition to White, Flemons and Whitehead, Maurice recruited Michael Beal on guitar, Leslie Drayton, Chester Washington and Alex Thomas on horns, Sherry Scott on vocals, percussionist Phillard Williams and his younger brother Verdine on bass.


    Earth, Wind & Fire recorded two albums for Warner Brothers: the self-titled 1970 album Earth, Wind And Fire and the 1971 album The Need Of Love. A single from this album, "I Think About Lovin' You," provided EWF with their first Top 40 R&B hit. Also in 1971, the group performed the soundtrack to the Melvin Van Peebles film 'Sweet Sweetback's Baadasssss Song'.


    In 1972, White dissolved the line-up (except he and brother Verdine White) and added Jessica Cleaves (vocals - formerly of the R&B group The Friends of Distinction), Ronnie Laws (flute, saxophone), Roland Bautista (guitar), Larry Dunn (keyboard), Ralph Johnson (percussion) and Philip Bailey (vocals, formerly of Friends & Love). Maurice became disillusioned with Warner Brothers, which had signed the group primarily as a jazz act. Maurice, in contrast, was more interested in combining elements of jazz, rock, and soul into an evolving form of fusion, a truly universal sound.


    A performance at New York's Rockefeller Center introduced EWF to Clive Davis, then President of Columbia Records. Davis loved what he saw and bought their contract from Warner Bros. With Columbia Records, debuting with the 1972 album Last Days And Time, the group slowly began to build a reputation for innovative recordings and exciting, live shows, complete with feats of magic (floating pianos, spinning drum kits, vanishing artists) engineered by Doug Henning and his then-unknown assistant David Copperfield. Their first gold album, Head To The Sky, peaked at number 27 pop in the summer of 1973, yielding a smooth tangy cover of "Evil" and the title track single. The first platinum EWF album, Open Our Eyes, whose title track was a remake of the classic originally recorded by Savoy Records group the Gospel Clefs, included "Mighty Mighty" (number four R&B) and "Kalimba Story" (number six R&B).


    Maurice once again shared a label roster with Ramsey Lewis, whose Columbia debut Sun Goddess, was issued in December 1974. The radio-aired title track was released as a single under the name Ramsey Lewis and Earth, Wind & Fire. It went to number 20 R&B in early 1975. The Sun Goddess album went gold, hitting number 12 pop in early 1975. Maurice had also played on Lewis' other high-charting album, Wade In The Water; the title track single peaked at number three R&B in the summer of 1966.


    The inspiration for "Shining Star" (one of EW&F's most beloved singles) was gleaned from thoughts Maurice had during a walk under the star-filled skies that surrounded the mountains around Caribou Ranch, CO a popular recording site and retreat during the '70s. The track was originally included in the 'That's The Way Of The World' movie that starred Harvey Keitel and was produced by Sig Shore (Superfly). "Shining Star" glittered at number one R&B for two weeks and hit number one pop in early 1975. It was included on their 1975 multi-platinum album That's The Way Of The World that held the number one pop spot for three weeks in Spring 1975 and earned them their first Grammy Award. The title track single made it to number five R&B in summer of 1975. It also yielded the classic ballad "Reasons," an extremely popular radio-aired album track.


    The multi-platinum album Gratitude held the number one pop album spot for three weeks in late 1975. On the album was "Singasong" (gold, number one R&B for two weeks, number five pop), the Skip Scarborough ballad "Can't Hide Love" (number 11 R&B), and the popular radio-aired album tracks "Celebrate," "Gratitude," and the live version of "Reasons." In 1976, Maurice decided he wanted to record a spiritual album. The multi-platinum album Spirit parked at number two pop for two weeks in fall of 1976 and boasted the gold, number one R&B single "Getaway" and "Saturday Nite." Spirit is remembered as one of EWF's best albums and sadly for also being the last project of Producer Charles Stepney. He died May 17, 1976, in Chicago, IL, at the age of 45. Charles was a former Chess Records arranger/producer/session musician/multi-instrumentalist/songwriter and Maurice's main collaborator on his EWF projects. The multi-platinum album All 'N All peaked at number three pop in late 1977, won three Grammy's, and had arrangements by Chicago soul mainstay Tom Tom Washington and Eumir Deodato. The singles were "Serpentine Fire" (number one R&B for seven weeks) and "Fantasy." The group's horn section, the legendary Phenix Horns (Don Myrick on saxophone, Louis Satterfield on trombone, Rahmlee Michael Davis and Michael Harris on trumpets) became an integral part of the Earth, Wind & Fire sound.


    During this time, Maurice produced several artists such as The Emotions (1976's Flowers and 1977's Rejoice which included the number one R&B/pop hit "Best Of My Love") and Deniece Williams (1976's This Is Niecy which included the Top Ten R&B hit "Free"). In the late seventies, in association with Columbia Records, Maurice also launched a record label, ARC.


    The multi-platinum greatest-hits set The Best Of Earth, Wind & Fire, Vol. I included a cover of the Beatles' "Got To Get You Into My Life" went to number one R&B and number nine pop in Summer 1978. The group performed the song in the 1978 Bee Gees/Peter Frampton movie 'Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band'. Another single, "September," made it to number one R&B, number eight pop in early 1978. On the flip side was the enchanting popular radio-aired album track "Love's Holiday" from All 'N All.


    Their live performances were stellar as well. Sellout crowds were spellbound by the band's bombastic performances. Their performances blasted a cosmic wave of peace, love and other happy vibrations to audiences using a combination of eye-popping costumes, lights, pyrotechnics and plain old good music. Sometimes they even threw in magic illusions. Earth, Wind & Fire's message was one of universal harmony, in both musical and cultural senses. "We live in a negative society," Maurice told Newsweek. "Most people can't see beauty and love. I see our music as medicine."


    The multi-platinum album I Am hit number three pop in Summer 1979 on the strength of the million-selling single "Boogie Wonderland" with The Emotions (number two R&B for four weeks, number six pop) and the phenomenal gold ballad "After The Love Has Gone," written by David Foster, Jay Graydon and Bill Champlin that stayed at number two R&B/pop for two weeks. Their Faces album peaked at number ten pop in late 1980 and was boosted to gold by the singles "Let Me Talk" (number eight R&B), "You" (number ten R&B), and "And Love Goes On."


    The million-selling funked-up "Let's Groove," co-written by The Emotions' Wanda Vaughn and her husband Wayne Vaughn, was the track that re-energized EWF's career, parking at number one R&B for eight weeks and number three pop, causing their Raise! album to go platinum (hitting number five pop in late 1981). Their next gold album Powerlight made it to number 12 pop in spring 1983 and included the Top Ten R&B single and Grammy-nominated "Fall In Love With Me." Their 1983 Electric Universe album stalled at number 40 pop, breaking the band's string of gold, platinum and multi-platinum albums.


    In 1983, Maurice decided he and the band needed a break. During this hiatus, Maurice recorded his self-titled solo album Maurice White and produced various artists including Neal Diamond, Barbra Streisand and Jennifer Holliday. Reuniting with the band in 1987, EWF released the album Touch The World and scored yet another number one R&B single, "System of Survival" and embarked on a corresponding nine-month world tour. This was followed by the 1988 release The Best Of Earth, Wind & Fire Vol. II.


    In 1990 the group released the album Heritage. Two years later, Earth, Wind & Fire released The Eternal Dance; a 55-track boxed set retrospective of the band's entire history. The appearance of such a project after a prolonged period of relative inactivity signaled to many listeners that the band was calling it quits but that did not turn out to be case. In 1993, EWF released the album, Millennium that included the Grammy-nominated "Sunday Morning" and "Spend The Night."


    Earth, Wind & Fire kept recording and in 1996 released Avatar and Greatest Hits Live; followed by 1997's In The Name Of Love; 2002's That's The Way Of The World: Alive In '75; Live In Rio which was recorded during their 1979 "I Am World Tour;" 2003's The Promise, which included the Grammy-nominated "Hold Me" and 2005's Illumination, which included the Grammy-nominated "Show Me The Way."


    In 2000, the nine-piece '70s edition of Earth, Wind & Fire reunited for one night only in honor of their induction into The Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame. In 2001, Eagle Rock Entertainment released the documentary 'Earth, Wind & Fire: Shining Stars', which contains rarely seen historic video footage along with in-depth interviews with the band members.


    Even though Maurice is no longer a part of the touring group, he remains the band's heart and soul from behind the scenes as composer and producer. Maurice reflects, "I wanted to create a library of music that would stand the test of time. 'Cosmic Consciousness' is the key component of our work. Expanding awareness and uplifting spirits is so important in this day. People are looking for more. I hope our music can give them some encouragement and peace."

    LP 1
    1. Shining Star

    2. That's The Way Of The World
    3. September

    4. Can't Hide Love

    5. Got To Get You Into My Life
    6. Sing A Song

    7. Gratitude

    8. Serpentine Fire

    9. Fantasy


    LP 2
    1. Kalimba Story
    2. Mighty Mighty

    3. Reasons

    4. Saturday Nite

    5. Let's Groove

    6. Boogie Wonderland ( with The Emotions)
    7. After The Love Has Gone

    8. Getaway

    Earth, Wind & Fire
    $42.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • Neck Of The Woods Neck Of The Woods Quick View

    $19.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Neck Of The Woods

    Neck of the Woods, the third album from Los Angeles, CA fuzz-rockers Silversun Pickups, started with a chance meeting when the band stumbled across Grammy-winning producer Jacknife Lee (R.E.M., U2, Weezer) while recording guest vocals for a Snow Patrol track. But band frontman Brian Aubert is quick to point out that, in fact, pretty much everything about the album from producer to studio location right down to its found-photo album art, has been serendipitous. It's bizarre, the affable singer/guitarist explains. We can't take credit for any of it. It just accidentally happened.


    For one example of a happy accident, Aubert was surprised to discover Lee's home studio was smack in the middle of the Topanga Canyon woods, minutes from where the singer grew up. I hadn't been back in years, he recalls. I thought it would be fun to walk down my old street. It was like playing with fire a little bit. So much came back that I had forgotten about and it was a really emotional experience. I just realized this place and the feelings I had are still ingrained in me.


    Aubert says the songs sound like a horror movie, all of them beginning to percolate while he was country-hopping and people-watching during a European vacation. (2009's) Swoon was more about what I was feeling at that particular time, he says, whereas with this one, I wanted to see what built me. It was learning why I am the way I am.

    1. Skin Graph
    2. Make Believe
    3. Bloody Mary (nerve endings)
    4. Busy Bees
    5. Here We Are (chancer)
    6. Mean Spirits
    7. Simmer
    8. The Pit
    9. Dots and Dashes (enough already)
    10. Gun-shy Sunshine
    11. Out of Breath
    Silversun Pickups
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Johnny Cash's Greatest Hits (Pre-Order) Johnny Cash's Greatest Hits (Pre-Order) Quick View

    $32.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Johnny Cash's Greatest Hits (Pre-Order)

    Celebrating 5 Decades Of Johnny's Monumental Hits Collection


    First Time 180 Gram Translucent Gold Audiophile Vinyl


    Mastered Impeccably By Joe Reagoso At Friday Music Studios - Pressed At R.T.I.


    Striking Gatefold Cover Artwork


    Features Big Hits I Walk The Line, Jackson, Orange Blossom Special, It Ain't Me Babe, & Understand Your Man


    Johnny Cash was born during the great depression into a poor family in Arkansas. At a very young age, he worked on the family farm and experienced many of life's struggles. This is also the time he would develop his love for music, family and the Bible, which followed him closely throughout his long career.


    In the early fifties after spending time in the Air Force, he moved to Memphis, became friends with folks like Roy Orbison, Carl Perkins, Elvis Presley and Jerry Lee Lewis, and ultimately cut some sides at Sun Studios which became the catalyst that would kick-start the beginnings of a soon to be worldwide superstar, troubadour and humanitarian unlike the world has ever known. The folks at Columbia Records knew that this young fellow named Johnny Cash was destined for superstardom. They quickly signed the legend to a long-term deal, and his first Columbia singles like his prolific Don't Take Your Guns to Town forever etched "The Man In Black" trademark to his name.


    In 1967 after many chart-topping country and pop albums and a bevy of hit singles and Grammy Awards, more fame followed as the brass at Columbia Records honored their journeyman Johnny Cash with his first hits collection, the multi-platinum Johnny Cash's Greatest Hits. The album was a blockbuster as it topped the charts, making this a crossover hit with both country and pop audiences, proving once again that his career was of historic merit. Filled with more hits than a roadside jukebox, the amazing album takes off with the classic duet with wife June Carter Cash and Grammy Award winner Jackson. This chart-topping single is followed up by one of his most famous songs the number one I Walk the Line.


    More treasures follow with the country belter Understand Your Man and Cash's own hit interpretation of Orange Blossom Special, which truly made the album a treasure trove of hits.


    More greatest hits follow as the LP features a nice helping of solid smashes like Ring of Fire Five Feet High and Rising and probably one of the first Bob Dylan covers ever with his haunting It Ain't Me Babe. In total, the album showcases eleven important Johnny Cash recordings which have truly gone on to become international classics for all time.


    In honor of the Man, the Music and the Legend, Friday Music is very proud and honored to announce the first time 180 Gram Audiophile Translucent Gold Vinyl release of the Columbia Records classic Johnny Cash's Greatest Hits. As another fine installment in our exciting Johnny Cash 180 Gram Audiophile Vinyl Series, we are very pleased to present this masterwork in all its stereophonic glory.


    Mastered impeccably by Joe Reagoso at Friday Music Studios and manufactured at R.T.I., Johnny Cash's Greatest Hits will be a much-anticipated dream release for his fans everywhere! For this exclusive presentation, we are also including striking gatefold artwork which includes the groundbreaking original LP cover photo by Sandy Speiser and are also enclosing a poly bag to protect your album cover and poly lined inner sleeve to help keep your Johnny Cash vinyl in mint shape.


    Johnny Cash's Greatest Hits A history-making album from a historic legend, an audiophile dream release first-time translucent gold audiophile vinyl From your friends at Friday Music

    1. Jackson
    2. I Walk The Line
    3. Understand Your Man
    4. Orange Blossom Special
    5. The One On The Right Is On The Left
    6. Ring Of Fire
    7. It Ain't Me, Babe
    8. The Ballad Of Ira Hayes
    9. The Rebel
    10. Five Feet High And Rising
    11. Don't Take Your Guns To Town
    Johnny Cash
    $32.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP PRE-ORDER Buy Now
  • Johnny Cash Greatest Hits Volume 1 (Awaiting Repress) Johnny Cash Greatest Hits Volume 1 (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $31.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Johnny Cash Greatest Hits Volume 1 (Awaiting Repress)

    First Time on Audiophile Vinyl


    Gatefold Cover presentation of his classic 1967 multi-platinum Greatest Hits LP!!!


    Mastered impeccably by Joe Reagoso and Kevin Gray from the original Columbia Records tapes


    Manufactured at R.T.I.


    Johnny Cash was born during the great depression into a poor family in Arkansas. At a very young age he worked on the family farm
    and experienced many of life's struggles. This is also the time he would develop his love for music, family and the Bible, which followed him
    closely throughout his long career. In the early fifties after spending time in the Air Force, he moved to Memphis, became friends with folks
    like Roy Orbison, Carl Perkins, Elvis Presley and Jerry Lee Lewis, and ultimately cut some sides at Sun Studios which became the catalyst
    that would kick-start the beginnings of a soon to be worldwide superstar, troubadour and humanitarian unlike the world has ever known.


    The folks at Columbia Records knew that this young fellow named Johnny Cash was destined for superstardom. They quickly signed
    the legend to a long term deal, and his first Columbia singles like his prolific Don't Take Your Guns to Town forever etched "The Man In Black"
    trademark to his name.


    In 1967 after many chart topping country and pop albums and a bevy of hit singles and Grammy Awards, more fame followed as the
    brass at Columbia Records honored their journeyman Johnny Cash with his first hits collection, the multi-platinum Johnny Cash's Greatest
    Hits Volume 1.


    The album was a blockbuster as it topped the charts, making this a crossover hit with both country and pop audiences, proving once again that his career was of historic merit.
    Filled with more hits than a roadside jukebox, the amazing album takes off with the classic duet with wife June Carter Cash and
    Grammy Award winner Jackson. This chart topping single is followed up by one of his most famous songs the number one I Walk the Line.


    More treasures follow with the country belter Understand Your Man and Cash's own hit interpretation of Orange Blossom Special, which truly
    made the album a treasure trove of hits.
    More greatest hits follow as the LP features a nice helping of solid smashes like Ring of Fire, Five Feet High and Rising, the aforementioned Don't Take Your Guns to Town, and probably one of the first Bob Dylan covers ever with his haunting It Ain't Me Babe. In total, the
    album showcases eleven important Johnny Cash recordings which have truly gone on to become international classics for all time.


    In honor of the Man, the Music and the Legend, Friday Music is very proud and honored to announce the first time 180 Gram Audiophile Vinyl release of the Columbia Records classic Johnny Cash's Greatest Hits Volume 1 by Johnny Cash.
    As a first installment in our exciting Johnny Cash 180 Gram Audiophile Vinyl Series, we are very pleased to present this masterwork
    in all its stereophonic glory. Mastered impeccably from the original Columbia Records tapes by Joe Reagoso at Friday Music Studios with
    Kevin Gray and manufactured at R.T.I., Johnny Cash's Greatest Hits Volume 1 will be a much anticipated audiophile dream release for his
    fans everywhere!


    For this exclusive presentation, we are also including for the first time ever gatefold artwork which includes the groundbreaking
    original LP cover photo by Sandy Speiser and are also enclosing a poly bag to protect your album cover and poly lined inner sleeve to help
    keep your Johnny Cash vinyl in mint shape.
    Johnny Cash's Greatest Hits Volume 1 A history making album from a historic legend, an audiophile dream release first time
    gatefold cover is now an audiophile vinyl dream come true From your friends at Relayer Friday Music Stay tuned for more Johnny Cash
    original Columbia Records audiophile vinyl and remastered compact disc recordings from Relayer Friday Music.

    Side One
    1. Jackson
    2. I Walk the Line
    3. Understand Your Man
    4. Orange Blossom Special
    5. The One on the Right
    Is on the Left


    Side Two
    1. Ring of Fire
    2. It Ain't Me, Babe
    3. The Ballad of Ira Hayes
    4. The Rebel-Johnny Yuma
    5. Five Feet High and Rising
    6. Don't Take Your Guns
    to Town

    Johnny Cash
    $31.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • Stand For Something Or Die For Nothing Stand For Something Or Die For Nothing Quick View

    $20.99
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    Stand For Something Or Die For Nothing


    Boston. Titletown. The Cradle of Liberty. Beantown. From popular neighborhoods like Jamaica Plain and Davis Square to the more hardscrabble quarters like Mattapan and Roxbury, Boston is a complex fabric of people, cultures, and viewpoints. None more Boston are punk rock outfit, Street Dogs. From the air they breathe and the food they eat to the communities they serve-frontman Mike McColgan is a Boston Fire Department 911 Dispatcher and drummer Pete Sosa is an honorary member of the City of Boston-and the values they uphold, Street Dogs exemplify their city and what it has to offer the world. Across the group's storied 16-year career, they've hit hard, spoke the truth, and walked the walk. New album, Stand for Something or Die for Nothing, is proof the Bostonians continue to live and be empowered by their punk rock, tell-it-like-it-is ethos.


    "Anyone who has ever listened to our group knows we are Bostonians to the bone," says bassist Johnny Rioux. "We all love the city. It's our home. I think our fans abroad get a window into our city and what it is like to grow up here and live here through a multitude of different life experiences [from our music]."


    Indeed, Sicut Patribus Sit Street Dogs Nobis. But the primary motivator to pick up where 2010's lauded self-titled left off wasn't to continue waving the sky blue at the Boston Common, but to sound the alarm that our leadership and the affluent are taking advantage of society. The wedge is being driven between classes, deeper and deeper, where the rich get richer and the poor are afforded fewer choices in life, like education, opportunity, and the pursuit of a good life, respected liberties, and unquestionable happiness. This gift, as it were, has given the Street Dogs have plenty to write about eight years after their Hellcat Records' swansong.


    "The dumbing down of America is a reason to write songs in 2018," Rioux asserts. "People need to wake the fuck up and realize the rich won't drain the swamp or look after the working man and woman. [So] we hit on familiar turf and we go outside our zone as well on Stand for Something or Die for Nothing. It's tough to contain my excitement for this record and our fans are going to love it. Everyone stepped way up."


    If there's one thing that sets the self-titled apart from Stand for Something or Die for Nothing it's the songwriting. Tracks like "Other Ones," "Angels Calling," "Working Class Heroes," and "Never Above You, Never Below You" show Street Dogs at their finest: loud, abrasive, confrontational, and unifying. In fact, there's not one track on the group's sixth full-length that doesn't convey brotherhood, common values, and the ability to stand together against anyone with aims to disfigure or disband their raised fist.


    "On Stand for Something or Die for Nothing, we took our time making sure everything was worked out as well as it possibly could be with multiple re-writes of songs and painstaking takes," says Rioux. "The band wrote this record together as a unit. This is the most full-band record we have ever made with everyone contributing. It's our best record. I really believe that and all the hard-painstaking work we put in people will hear and feel. With respects to the self-titled record we were moving at very quick and prolific pace back then. That record came together fast and is special."


    Recorded at Woolly Mammoth Studios, Sugarland Studio, and Q Division Studios with Rioux in the producer's chair, mix master Sean Cahalin at the desk, and mastering ace Jeff Lipton navigating, Stand for Something or Die for Nothing is a punk rock album for the new era. Rioux was careful to balance the DIY tenets of punk with the professional requirements of recording an album. The result was hard won, but Stand for Something or Die for Nothing is a punk rock triumph, with tracks like "The Comeback Zone," "Lest We Forget," and the title track delivering modern-day anthems that kick ass and take names.


    "Other than Sean being a total professional and super-proficient, there aren't really any specific stories to Stand for Something or Die. I've always has had a hand in the production of our records and I can be demanding in the studio! That all said, I think we have our best sounding record to date. It has all the energy of our live shows in it. Fans will immediately tell it's us when they hear it."


    While the definition of punk rock has its divisions, Street Dogs are, no doubt, part of the genre's proud history. Stand for Something or Die is undoubtedly punk rock. Using Rioux's definition (or not): "What's punk to me is people living how they want to not how they are told to."


    Amen, brother.

    1. Stand For Something Or Die For Nothing
    2. Other Ones
    3. The Comeback Zone
    4. Angels Calling (feat. Slaine)
    5. These Ain't The Old Days
    6. Working Class Heroes
    7. Lest We Forget
    8. The Round Up
    9. Mary On Believer Street
    10. Never Above You, Never Below You
    11. Torn And Frayed
    Street Dogs
    $20.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Future Future Quick View

    $19.99
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    Future

    It's something we all want the answers for. It's something we fear. It's something we want to have a grip on.


    The future.


    So we ask for clearcut forecasts, desperately seeking security in precise, defined direction. Tossing and turning, we think if we could just glimpse the end of the book, we'd rest easy. We make plans and maps, charting out our lives and where we want them to go. We find ourselves filled with anxieties, pressure, worries


    Jordan Feliz knows the feeling.


    But he didn't write his newest album, Future, because he figured out all the answers to his path. Quite the opposite. This record was born out of Feliz making peace with the fact that he doesn't, none of us can, know what his future holds. Cling to your best-laid plans until your knuckles turn white, mark your calendar up and down, worry yourself dizzy But the real answer is accepting that we do not hold the future in our own two hands. And thank goodness, because the One who does has already written better stories for us than we ever could.


    The past:


    Following widespread acclaim for his first album, The River, Jordan Feliz began the journey of recording a new one. But the process didn't start how he expected or hoped.


    "I started going through anxiety and honestly didn't know how to begin, because I felt like 'Everything I create isn't going to be good enough.'" Jordan remembers.


    He was on tour, trying to write for the album, but experiencing panic attacks. He found himself unable to connect with the songs he'd been working on.


    "My head wasn't in the right spot. My heart wasn't either. it was more focused on appeasing people. It was listening to myself and not to God."


    Then back home with friends and co-writers Paul Duncan and Colby Wedgeworth, he marched not around the fear, but through it. And on the other side was solid ground.


    "I said 'What if I just can't do it?' but then Paul says to me 'Look man, there's no pressure. Everything in your future has already been plotted by Jesus. He has paved every step of the way for you, in a way to have favor on your life. Our future is not wound up in our success, but in the inheritance of God.'"


    With those words, something clicked for Jordan. He took a breath. He let go. He remembered that his future is held by the strong, kind hands of the Father.


    "Sometimes it's really hard to silence out the world and just listen to the small, still voice. But once I refocused and listened to Him, He had a message for me," Feliz shares. "A fire was set in me to write a song about freedom. A song we can sing to be stoked that every single day there's a God that loves us, never ceases, and never fails."


    That day they wrote "Witness," which would go on to be Feliz's first single for Future, in only 45 minutes.


    "And that's when the record started."


    It's certainly not the first time Jordan's had to rely on faith. Six years ago, following much prayer, he and his wife ventured to Nashville after feeling called to make the move; the only catch: they didn't even have enough money to make it all the way from California to Music City. They were depending on a few performance gigs Jordan had along the route.


    "But all the shows I was scheduled to play got cancelled. At first we were stressed and asking 'What do we do?'. We just felt like the Lord was saying 'You need to go.You just need to trust me.' We had to decide to think about what the Lord has for us, instead of what we have for ourselves. Watch and prepare for what He can do, not what we think we can do."


    He ended up with a spontaneous opportunity to perform for less than 30 people, who bought more than enough merchandise to get the Felizes to Nashville.


    "We sobbed in the car," he reflects. "For God to show us that He gives us more than we even need "


    Jordan tells that story in the album's track "All Along," his most personal song to date. With the first lyric describing his literal first moment of breath, Feliz goes on to tell some of his life's highlights, revealing God's presence through each moment of every season.


    And that's what marks this album as a mature step forward for the singer-songwriter. The vibrant pop melodies are not only infectious, but deep-rooted in the vulnerable walks of faith he's ventured through in the past year.


    "This record is just chock-full of story. Every single song," Jordan says. "It's kind of me taking a piece of my life, my heart, my beliefs, and my trust in God and just giving them to people. And hopefully they'll hold onto the message and learn to trust God even more through it."


    He wrote most of the album on the road with a hectic tour schedule and only eight other writers. Feliz was surprised to find that he loved this unorthodox writing process, saying it allowed for him and cowriters to spend more time simply experiencing life together, then reflect on it through creating music. Gone was the pressure to sit in a room and crank out a hit song. The result: more authentic songs that come from inspiration found in everyday life. Songs the musicians poured themselves into- including one of Jordan's favorites, "Faith," which came about from a middle-of-the-night writing session.


    "That never would've happened back home," Jordan laughs.


    And as Feliz and his team were wrapping up, something incredible happened for an album that began from a place of insecurity. When it came time to make the final song decisions, typically a stressful and challenging process, Jordan felt an unexpected peace.


    "Not even kidding, the day we left that meeting, we all just kind of knew those were the songs. With The River, we thought through every little thing, but this time it feels like the Lord just gave us these songs and was like 'This is it. You don't need anything other than these.' And we still wrote over 40 songs, but it was so clear that these were the ones that were going to be recorded. We hadn't even heard them produced yet, so we were just hoping it was all going to turn out right and it did. These songs were gifted to me by the Lord."


    The present:


    Jordan Feliz belts out "Witness" to a roaring crowd.


    "Your love is moving mountains every day of my life. Can I get a witness?"


    Hands shoot up, voices join in, souls worship. Jordan beams. It's the smile of a heart that knows it's landed in the hands of its Protector. The smile of a heart, fearlessly honest, that is connecting with others. A heart that's traveled through uncertainty, and probably will again, but will always find home in the story already written for it.


    Jordan listens to the new record, the latest season of his life in musical form. Those early doubts have transformed into peace. The shame into compassion. The worry into joy, and the fear into excitement.


    "Probably craziest of all is that I didn't see any of it coming together at beginning. I thought 'There's no way this is going to get done and I'm going to be able to handle it,' and it just happened. This entire project comes down to the fact that every day I'm learning how to trust God more and more and more."


    He doesn't know how the next chapter reads. But he knows something more important: the Author.


    "Every time I think about the concept of this record, it feels like it's purposeful for people to grab onto the idea of a song and hold onto it for a very long time. That's what it stands for. It stands for what's coming. It stands for what God has for our life."


    The future:


    Written. Held.

    1. Witness
    2. Count That High
    3. Faith
    4. Streets Of Gold
    5. Pages
    6. Lay It Down
    7. Future
    8. All Along
    9. Changed
    10. 180
    11. That's The Life
    12. My Shelter
    13. Blank Canvas
    Jordan Feliz
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Beulah Beulah Quick View

    $15.99
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    Beulah

    Beulah. It's a small, complicated word with a tangle of meanings.


    It's the title of John Paul White's new album, his first in nearly a decade, a remarkably and assuredly diverse collection spanning plaintive folk balladry, swampy southern rock, lonesome campfire songs, and dark acoustic pop. Gothic and ambitious, with a rustic, lived-in sound, it's a meditation on love curdling into its opposite, on recrimination defining relationships, on hope finally filtering through doubt.


    Beulah is also a White family nickname. "It's a term of endearment around our house," White explains, "like you would call someone 'Honey.' My dad used to call my little sister Beulah, and I call my daughter Beulah. It's something I've always been around."


    Beulah is also something much loftier. For the poet and painter William Blake, Beulah was a place deep in the collective spiritual unconscious. "I won't pretend to be the smartest guy in the world," says White, "but I dig a lot of what he's written. Beulah was a place you could go in your dreams. You could go there in meditation, to relax and heal and center B photo credit: Allister Ann 119 west 57th street, penthouse north, new york, ny 10019 t 212.741.1000 www.sacksco.com SACKS A CO. N D yourself. It wasn't a place you could stay, but you came back to the world in a better state."


    And perhaps the music on this album originated in that "pleasant lovely Shadow where no dispute can come." According to White, the songs came to him unbidden-and not entirely welcome. "When these songs started popping into my head, I had been home for a while and I was perfectly happy. I wasn't looking for songs. I didn't know whether any would pop back in my head again, and I was honestly okay with that. I'm a very happy father and husband, and I love where I live. I love working with artists for a label that I think is doing good work."


    Far from the grind and glamour of Nashville-where he worked for years as a working songwriter before stepping into the spotlight himself-White settled in his hometown of Muscle Shoals, Alabama, a wellspring of gritty Southern rock and soul since the 1960s. Together with Alabama Shakes keyboard player Ben Tanner and Shoals native Will Trapp, he founded and runs Single Lock Records, a local indie label that has released records by some of the Yellowhammer State's finest, including Dylan LeBlanc, St. Paul & the Broken Bones, and legendary songwriter and keyboard player Donnie Fritts. The label is based in a small ranch house a stone's throw from White's own home, which would come in handy when those songs started invading his head.


    "Honestly, I tried to avoid them, but then I realized the only way I was going to get rid of them was if I wrote them down. I got my phone out and I'd sing these little bits of melody, then put it away and move on. But eventually I got to a place where it was a roar in my head, and that pissed me off." Due to his experiences as a gun-for-hire in Nashville, White was reluctant to romanticize the creative process, to turn it into a spiritual pursuit. "Then one day I told my wife I think I'm going to go write a song. She was as surprised as I was. I went and wrote probably eight songs in three days. It was like turning on a faucet."


    Most artists would kill for such a downpour, but White was wary of the consequences. He knew that writing songs would lead to recording them, which would result in releasing them, and that means touring and leaving home for weeks at a time. "As soon as I write a song, I start thinking what other people might think of it. I've talked to friends about this: What is it about us that makes us do that? Why can't I just sit on my back porch and sing these songs out into the ether? I don't have an answer for it yet, but I think it's just part of who I am. I need that reaction. I need to feel like I'm moving someone in a good way or in a bad way. I need to feel like there's a connection."


    White threw himself into the project, no longer the reluctant songwriter but a craftsman determined to make the best album possible-to do these songs justice. He cut several songs at the renowned FAME Studios in his hometown, where Aretha Franklin, Wilson Pickett, the Allmans, the Osmonds, Bobbie Gentry, Arthur Conley, and Clarence Carter recorded some of their most popular hits.


    One product of those sessions is "What's So," which introduces itself by way of a fire-andbrimstone riff, as heavy as a guilty conscience-the kind of riff you wouldn't be surprised to hear on a Sabbath album. But White's vocals are gritty and soulful, a product of the Shoals, almost preacherly as he sings about earthly and eternal damnation: "Sell your damn soul or get 119 west 57th street, penthouse north, new york, ny 10019 t 212.741.1000 www.sacksco.com SACKS A CO. N D right with the man, keep treading water as long as you can," he exhorts the listener. "But before you do, you must understand that you don't get above your raisin'." It's the heaviest moment on the record, perhaps the darkest in White's career.


    At the other end of the spectrum is "The Martyr," one of the catchiest tunes White has ever penned. The spryness of the melody imagines Elliott Smith wandering the banks of the Tennessee River, yet the song is shot through with a pervasive melancholy as White wrestles with his own demons. "Keep falling on your sword, sink down a little more," he sings over a dexterous acoustic guitar theme. This is not, however, a song about some unnamed person, but rather a pained self-diagnosis: "These are the wounds that I will not let heal, the ones that I deserve and seem so real." White knows he's playing the martyr, but he leaves the song hauntingly open-ended, as though he isn't sure what to do with this epiphany beyond putting it in a song.


    The rest of Beulah was recorded in the Single Lock offices/studio near White's home. "I can be more relaxed about the process. We can all just sit there and talk about records or baseball without feeling like someone's standing over our shoulders. That's a big deal to me, not to feel pressured. And I'm only about twenty yards away from home, so I can walk over and throw a baseball with my kids or make dinner with my wife."


    Some of the quieter-but no less intense-songs on Beulah were created in that environment, including the ominously erotic opener "Black Leaf" and the Southern gothic love song "Make You Cry." As he worked, a distinctive and intriguing aesthetic began to grow clearer and clearer, one based in austere arrangements and plaintive moods. These are songs with empty spaces in them, dark corners that could hold ghosts or worse. "There were certain moments when Ben and I would finish up a song, listen back to it, and think how in the world did we get here. But that's just what the songs ask for. These are the sounds in my head. This is the sound of me thinking and living and breathing and doing."


    Once White had everything assembled and sequenced, it was time to give the album a title, to wrap everything up for the listener. Beulah stuck-not only because of family history or Blake, but because White realized that making music was his own trip to Beulah. "If you had to sum up what music is for most people in this world, it's that. It's that escape. It's that refuge. You go there and you come back and you use that to help you with your life. You always have that as a place to go."

    1. Black Leaf
    2. What's So
    3. The Once And Future Queen
    4. Make You Cry
    5. Fight For You
    6. Hope I Die
    7. I've Been Over This Before (Feat. The Secret Sisters)
    8. The Martyr
    9. Hate The Way You Love Me
    10. I'll Get Even
    John Paul White
    $15.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Die Healing (Awaiting Repress) Die Healing (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $21.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Die Healing (Awaiting Repress)

    "Die Healing" featuring original SAINT VITUS vocalist Scott Reagers! This is essential doom!!!!


    Recommended if You Like: BLACK SABBATH, TROUBLE, COUNT RAVEN, CANDLEMASS, THE OBSESSED, HIGH ON FIRE, SLEEP, BARONESS, MASTODON, SIR LORD BALTIMORE


    Die Healing is a pivotal point in Vitus' discog; not only their very last before they temporarily ended their relentlessly classic doom metal album releases with a thirteen year hiatus, but their third recording with Scott Reagers, who helped make the eponymous debut, Hallow's Victim and EP The Walking Dead such milestones of doom. And what a way to go out. Many will tell you this is actually Saint Vitus' finest moment, and although I favour the debut and Wino's career zenith Born Too Late above it, there is no doubt it deserves as solid a place in the pantheon of doom as Nightfall or Master Of Reality or In The Rectory Of The Bizarre Reverend.


    The band's sound and instrumentation is class without question. The guitar tone saw a slight departure from the fuzz prevalent on Wino-albums (including the 2012 opus Lillie: F-65), with something more of an electric edge familiar to C.O.D. Fret not, the tone is still plenty burly, and of course massively appropriate for the toking of vaporous substances.


    The guitar solos are likewise a little clearer - though of course solos like on 'One Mind' and 'Return Of The Zombie' have that inimitable Chandler scaling chaos in spades, squeaking like a dozen metal detectors malfunctioning. In general though the album's sound gives the feeling of the band moving forward with the sound established on the underappreciated, Chritus Linderson-assisted C.O.D., while welcoming their original singer back into the fold as easily as if he'd never left. It comes together brilliantly.


    What cements the album's place atop the pile of '90s Vitus releases is that it's a lot more solid than V and C.O.D. in terms of songs, chock full of highlights with nary a skippable track. 'Dark World' heralds absolutely no messing about, a timeless slow burn Saint Vitus classic to get you going. Reagers unlocks his trademark moon-touched howls, boosted here with a gruffness and depth that must have come with age. He can still hit the unnerving highs that made the debut such a unique piece. Not to mention his more aghast and tragic-heroic style is accompanied by a lyrical shift toward tales of horror and myth, adding further colours of yore to the band's solidified musical approach (although 'In The Asylum' is as brilliantly witty a tale of human disintegration as anything Wino has written for Vitus).


    Some of the great knells peeling off Chandler's guitar in the main riff of 'Let The End Begin' are highlights for Vitus' entire career. It climaxes with a great rocking section, splashed with sumptuous guitar and bass solos, in a move actually quite uncharacteristic for the band, who tended to steer between leadweight trawling songs and more rambunctious cuts. The eerie build on 'Sloth' is another of the band's best moments. The entire song, with its off-kilter structure and wailing chorus, is an example of just how muscular the band's creative fibers were at the time. 'Return of the Zombie', a quasi-sequel to the classic, shifty song off the debut of course, makes its mark with a crazed vocal performance and some spooky effects. And of course there's more, I've just listed a few real standouts but the album is too generous in its blessings for them to be exhaustively listed.


    It's just a really solid album that builds on all the best things the band had done to date while keeping the songwriting fresh. What a swansong this was. This album is the reason Lillie: F-65 had such vast expectations from me. A must have.


    - joncheetham88 (Metal Archives)

    1. Dark World
    2. One Mind
    3. Let The End Begin
    4. Trail Of Pestilence
    5. Sloth
    6. Return Of The Zombie
    7. In The Asylum
    8. Just Another Notch
    Saint Vitus
    $21.99
    Vinyl LP Reissue - Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • Tutu (Awaiting Repress) Tutu (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $39.99
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    Tutu (Awaiting Repress)


    2-LP Set On 180-gram Vinyl Includes Remastered Original Studio Album, Plus Unreleased Live Performances


    Extra 180-Gram Vinyl LP Of Live Performances By The Miles Davis Octet Of The Nice Jazz Festival Of 1986, Available For The First Time On Vinyl


    Packaging Is A Replica Of The Original Vinyl Album, Including Stickers, LP Labels, Irving Penn's Beautiful And Iconic Photographs


    30 Years ago, Miles Davis made waves in the music world when he left Columbia Records to sign recording and publishing contracts with Warner Bros. and Warner Chappell in 1985. With a new label to call home, Davis immediately started working on the album, which originally had the working title, Perfect Way, named after a song by new wave pop band Scritti Politti that he was covering on the album. The album was later renamed Tutu by producer Tommy LiPuma, taken from news headlines of the day referencing the well-known South African archbishop and anti-apartheid leader, Desmond Tutu.


    Rhino celebrates one of jazz music's most revered and innovative talents with a 2-LP deluxe edition set on 180-gram vinyl of Miles Davis' TUTU, released to coincide with the 30th Anniversary of Davis signing with Warner. The deluxe edition includes a remastered LP of the original album and a bonus LP of live performances at the Nice Festival held in 1986, packaged with the original artwork featuring photographs by the legendary Irving Penn.


    TUTU pushed Davis back into center stage, winning him two Grammy® awards, when even the most reverent seemed to admit that his best music lay in the past. Tutu stands as an important part of the Davis legacy, and a testament to a prolific artist whose boundless creativity continuously redefined a genre throughout his legendary career.


    As Davis recalled, Tutu "started with some music that George Duke, the piano player sent to me." Davis' affection for the initial track - eventually titled "Backyard Ritual" and filled with synthesizer sounds and electronic beats - revealed the trumpeter's willingness to consider music written by others, and the use of cutting-edge electronics.


    Producer Tommy LiPuma recruited composer and studio musician Marcus Miller to collaborate on the project, who at 27, had already made a name for himself in jazz, R&B and popular music, playing funk, rock, bebop and hip hop. Davis later praised him as being "so hip and into the music that he even walks in tempo . . . in the studio we make a great team."


    "Technology was kind of exploding and I thought it would be interesting to hear Davis making his way through this new world," said Miller. Performing on the album were George Duke, Adam Holzman and Bernard Wright, percussionists Paulinho Da Costa and Steve Reid, drummer Omar Hakim and violinist Michael Urbaniak all contributed tracks; keyboardist Jason Miles played a significant role as well, programming the synthesizers and helping push the tracks to a level of sonic detail that could compete with contemporary recordings.


    Tutu would feature a variety of tunes that offered a mix of flavors and mood. Besides the title track, four were composed by Miller - "Splatch," "Portia," "Don't Lose Your Mind" and "Full Nelson" (the last a tribute to another South African leader, Nelson Mandela). "Tomaas" - named by Davis for LiPuma - was co-written by Davis and Miller, based on ideas Davis had previously recorded. The selections were rounded out by one cover - "Perfect Way," which Davis had initially chosen to be the album's title track.


    By that summer, Davis' group was touring Europe. With a four-night run approaching at the Grande Parade du Jazz festival in Nice, France, the decision was made to record the group at its prime. It was a wise choice. Warner Bros. hired a mobile recording truck and all four concerts were taped. "Everybody in the band knew we were being recorded so we were on our game," remembers his nephew, drummer Vince Wilburn. "Miles had an uncanny knack for knowing not only what to record but when and where. Every night was more beautiful than the one before: wonderful weather, captive audiences and the band was on fire."


    "At the time, there wasn't anything that jumped out at me," LiPuma admits. "Believe me, if I thought there had been, I would've put an album out. But having spent some time with the music, it's brilliant - and I think it's an important recording." Like the best live recordings, these tracks are both historic and timeless - filled with a spirit and snap that can still be felt today, yet cannot be repeated.

    LP 1
    1. Tutu
    2. Tomaas
    3. Porttia
    4. Splatch
    5. Backyard Ritual
    6. Perfect Way
    7. Don't Lose Your Mind
    8. Full Nelson


    LP 2 - Live from Nice Festival, France, July 1986
    1. Portia
    2. Human Nature
    3. Carnival Time
    4. Splatch
    5. New Blues

    Miles Davis
    $39.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • Black Beauty Black Beauty Quick View

    $26.99
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    Black Beauty

    28-page, full-color book (11" x 11")


    Extensive essay by Ben Edmonds (Creem, Rolling Stone, Mojo) featuring all-new interviews


    Abundant, never-before-seen photographs by Herbert Worthington (Fleetwood Mac's Rumours)


    Brilliantly mastered by multi-GRAMMY® nominee Dan Hersch (Paul Simon, Kinks, Cars,The Band)


    Mastered for vinyl by multi-GRAMMY® winner Doug Sax (The Who, Rolling Stones, Pink Floyd)


    Black Beauty, the never-before-released masterpiece by Arthur Lee's legendary psychedelic rock band Love, is available on 180-gram vinyl LP. Recorded in 1973 for the ambitious new label Buffalo Records,
    the album remained unreleased when the company folded. Finally, after 39 years High Moon Records is honored to fulfill Arthur Lee's wish that Black Beauty be heard by music fans worldwide. Black Beauty is making its first-ever official release
    in any format, anywhere! With unparalelled sound and state-of-the-art packaging, critics are hailing Black Beauty as an instant classic. Black Beauty is that rarest of rock artifacts: an unreleased,
    full-length studio album, from an undisputed musical
    genius. Black Beauty is the missing link in a catalog that includes Forever Changes, the classic 1967 Love album the New York Times called "one of the most affecting and beguiling albums of all time. With Black Beauty, Arthur Lee manages to combine searing 70's-rock with gorgeous melodies and stellar songwriting - topped off by his most distinctive, snarling, soulful vocals ever. With its wonderfully eclectic collection of songs, the
    album offers Love fans a rare glimpse into a previously undocumented phase of Arthur Lee's fabled career, while shining a light for new fans to discover the unique genius that is the music of Arthur Lee and Love.



    It's tempting to play what-if with Love's lost labor, Black Beauty, which was recorded in 1973 but shelved for nearly four decades. What if Buffalo Records hadn't gone out of business just prior to the album's release? What if Black Beauty had actually hit stores? What if it hadn't languished in limbo until years after Arthur Lee's death? Would it have stopped Love's slide into obscurity? Would it have signaled a comeback for the man who masterminded Forever Changes, still one of the most complex and compelling artifacts of 1960s Los Angeles? Would his life and career have played out any differently? Would we think of him today as something other than a cult artist, inspired as well as damned by his era?


    It's difficult to imagine any answers to those questions, but it says a lot about Lee that the album even raises these what-ifs and coulda-beens. The very qualities that made him such a fascinating voice-- restlessness, excitability, paranoia, perfectionism, single-mindedness-- may have doomed any commercial prospects more than his notorious fear of travel ever did. After recording Forever Changes, he fired the band and hired new musicians to take their places. Every subsequent album featured a different line-up, although the changes seem based more on personality than on musical direction or ability. Never stagnant, Love was in constant flux, always in a state of development but never quite arriving. So the operative question becomes: Was this the version of Love that Lee had been working toward?


    For Black Beauty-- which is finally seeing release via High Moon Records, although the reissue has been delayed for two years-- Lee assembled guitarist Melvan Whittington, bass player Robert Rozelle, and drummer Joe Blocker. This may be the hardiest and most muscular of Love's post-Changes rosters, with remarkable force and range. With crisp production by Paul Rothchild, best known for his work with the Doors, Love build from a potent blues rock foundation not dissimilar to that of Jimi Hendrix, but without the distracting shamanistic persona and guitar pyrotechnics. "Walk Right In" struts into country rock territory, rewriting Cannon's Jug Stompers 1929 hit into a plea for empathy, and "Beep Beep" attempts a sort of pop reggae, albeit not entirely convincingly.


    On the whole, this particular line-up sounds perfectly rough and unrehearsed, generating a tense energy on "Skid" and "Stay Away" even as they suggest a band still figuring out exactly what they can do together. It's a strong album, but it's not another Forever Changes, whose accomplishments in retrospect were unrepeatable, or even another Four Sail. On the other hand, Lee wasn't aiming to craft something in that vein. Still, especially considering the professional setbacks he had faced in the years leading up to Black Beauty-- which includes being dropped by Elektra and shuffling through a series of independent labels-- Lee sounds engaged and invigorated, forgoing the bitterness that had rankled the band for a slightly more hopeful outlook. On stand-out "Can't Find It", he sings, "Every time I cry my heart out, and every time I play the fool, but there's gotta be something in this lonely world for me." The confession is all the more bittersweet for being capped with the line, "but I can't find it without you." It's ostensibly a love song, but could just as easily be addressed to his audience. His creative satisfaction relies on having a listener to complete the circuit, which makes this album's long shelf life all the sadder.

    -Stephen M. Deusner (Pitchfork, May 15, 2013)

    1. Young & Able
    2. Midnight Sun
    3. Can't Find It
    4. Walk Right In
    5. Skid
    6. Beep Beep
    7. Stay Away
    8. Lonely Pigs
    9. See Myself In You
    10. Product Of The Times
    Love
    $26.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
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