Pro-ject Authorized & Certified VPI Dealer

VINYL. OUR WAY OF LIFE SINCE 2004

(877) 929-8729
Site Search
Menu Free shipping on domestic orders over $49.99! - We ship worldwide!
20% Off Vinyl - LP20
Home > Products for: '

Fricsay

'
  • 1
Results per page:
  • Beethoven: Symphony No. 9 Beethoven: Symphony No. 9 Quick View

    $37.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Beethoven: Symphony No. 9

    Import


    Ludwig van Beethoven's "Symphony No. 9 in D
    minor, Op. 125" (also known as "the Choral"), is
    Beethoven's final complete symphony. Completed
    in 1824, the symphony is one of the best-known
    works in classical music. "Egmont Overture, Op.
    84" by Ludwig van Beethoven, is a set of incidental
    music pieces for the 1787 play of the same name
    by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe. It consists of an
    overture followed by a sequence of nine pieces
    for soprano, male narrator and full symphony
    orchestra. Beethoven wrote it between October
    1809 and June 1810. The "Leonora Overture No.
    3, Op. 72a was composed in 1806, and is the most
    successful of the three Leonora overtures.

    LP 1: SYMPHONY NO. 9 IN D MINOR "CHORAL", OP. 125
    1. I. Allegro ma non troppo, un poco maestoso
    2. II. Molto vivace
    3. III. Adagio molto e cantabile 1


    LP 2:
    1. IV. Presto
    2. IV. Presto - Allegro assai 1
    3. Egmont Overture, Op. 84
    4.Leonore Overture NO. 3, Op. 72a

    Ferenc Fricsay / Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra
    $37.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Beethoven: Triple Concerto in C Beethoven: Triple Concerto in C Quick View

    $44.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Beethoven: Triple Concerto in C

    Ferenc Fricsay conducts the Berlin Radio Symphony Orchestra and pianist Geza Anda, violinist Wolfgang Schneiderhan and cellist Pierre Fournier on a performance of Beethoven's Triple Concerto in C major, Op 56. 180g vinyl pressing from Clearaudio.


    The widespread interest both in the technical capabilities of solo instruments and in the symphony, whose formal outlines became established toward the end of the 18th century, accounts for the popularity at that time of "concertante symphonies" in which several solo instruments (strings, wind) combined to oppose the orchestra. Despite the popularity, Beethoven was correct when he wrote about his Triple Concerto "that a concertante with these three solo parts is something new."


    The novelty lay in the usage of this connection with the piano. The difference between the piano's method of tone production and that of the other instruments alongside the piano's "mechanics" resulted in tonal problems. These problems arose both within the solo trio and in its relationship to the orchestra. Beethoven, who was interested throughout his whole career in experiments to extend the scope of instrumental music, here combined the styles of chamber music and of concertante symphonic writing to great effect.


    Musicians:

    Beethoven (composer)

    Ferenc Fricsay (conductor)

    Berlin Radio Symphony Orchestra Geza Anda (piano)

    Wolfgang Schneiderhan (violin)

    Pierre Fournier (cello)

    1. Allegro
    2. Largo (attacca)

    3. Rondo alla polacca
    Ferenc Fricsay
    $44.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Tchaikovsky - Symphony No. 6 Pathetique (Speakers Corner) (Awaiting Repress) Tchaikovsky - Symphony No. 6 Pathetique (Speakers Corner) (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Tchaikovsky - Symphony No. 6 Pathetique (Speakers Corner) (Awaiting Repress)

    Made during the pioneering days of stereo technology when everyone was vying for a piece of the cake, it is hard to believe that this absolutely top-notch recording of Tchaikovsky's "PathÉtique" has never been brought to the ears of music lovers until today. And it is even more unbelievable since it was made by a first-class orchestra, the Berlin Radio Symphony Orchestra, and conducted by one of the greatest conductors of the 20th century, Ferenc Fricsay. The reasons for the non-release are a matter of speculation because those responsible have kept them under their hat.



    Not even the man behind the microphone, Werner Wolf, can recall making this recording - although a yellowed recording protocol discloses carefully noted details about the recording venue and date. No wonder that the tapes never got made into records. It is not with a little pride and much joyful anticipation that the announcement can be made: the record is spinning on the turntable at last!



    And at long last a gap in Fricsay's repertoire can be closed. Specially recommended: listen to the wonderful clarity of the upper strings which is preserved even in the softest passages.



    This record was part of the 3-LP Set "The Conductors" and is now available again.




    Musicians:



    • Radio-Symphony-Orchestra Berlin

    • Ferenc Fricsay (conductor)




    Recording: 17-19 and 22 September 1959 at Jesus-Christus Kirche, Berlin, by GÜnter

    Hermanns and Werner Wolf / Production: Otto Gerdes





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    Symphony No. 6 in B minor, Op. 74 (Pathetique)
    Satz: Adagio - Allegro non troppo
    Satz: Allegro con grazia
    Satz: Allegro molto vivace
    Satz: Finale. Adagio lamentoso
    Pyotr Ilich Tchaikovsky
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • Mozart: Mass in C Minor (Speakers Corner) Mozart: Mass in C Minor (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Mozart: Mass in C Minor (Speakers Corner)

    It is not often that incomplete works enjoy great popularity. And it is even rarer that a torso should exercise such great importance in music history, but this is the case with Mozart's Great Mass, K. 427. The C minor Mass is always spoken of as if it were complete: it is spoken of with reverence, eyes looking towards Heaven, lost in the beauty of the music, transported to celestial heights. Mozart combines the compositional style of the Baroque masters with the more modern style of the Viennese Classic. Lofty arioso sections alternate with tremendous choral sections for up to eight parts whose splendid and spectacular timbre broke the bounds of tradition and set new standards for the genre.



    This Mass is, of course, not merely performed but celebrated, as the Berlin RSO under its Principal Conductor Ferenc Fricsay has so admirably demonstrated in this recording. Precise entries, strict tempi, a polished orchestral timbre and vocal soloists so brilliant one might think they were standing in one's own front room lend this recording top marks for musical quality and repertoire value.




    Musicians:



    • Maria Stader

    • Hertha Töpper

    • Ernst Haefliger

    • Ivan Sardi

    • Chorus

    • The Berlin Radio Symphony Orchestra

    • Ferenc Fricsay (conductor)




    Recording: September/ October 1967 at the Haus des Rundfunks, Berlin by Werner Wolf

    Production:Otto Gerdes





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Mozart: Concerto For Piano And Orchestra No. 19 & 27 (Speakers Corner) Mozart: Concerto For Piano And Orchestra No. 19 & 27 (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Mozart: Concerto For Piano And Orchestra No. 19 & 27 (Speakers Corner)

    In spite of the varying degrees of popularity of Mozart's numerous piano concertos, no one would seriously consider ranking them by quality. It would certainly prove an impossible task, for each and every one of these intense yet often playful compositions could be considered the most perfect of its genre. In view of this, one should concentrate on each work's highly individual character and this can hardly be more contrasting than in the present two pieces. Thanks to the joyous, energetic disposition of No. 19 in F major, K. 259, it appears to be filled with the exuberant spirit of Mozart's Viennese period - a time when he amazed audiences with his dexterity at the keyboard. As a contrast, the mood of the late No. 27 in B flat major, K. 595, which was performed in a small circle, is introvert and mellow. The old adage that Mozart's final concerto was a gesture of farewell and filled with a premonition of death is certainly not substantiated by Haskil and Fricsay's performance. Through the subtle and flowing clarity of her piano part under the tense and elastic opposition of the orchestra, the soloist banishes the question of the end of time into the background and so pays hommage to the relaxed and self-assured mastery of the Salzburg composer.





    Musicians:



    • Clara Haskil (piano)

    • Bayerisches Staatsorchester

    • Ferenc Fricsay (conductor)




    Recording: September 1955 at Jesus-Christus-Kirche, Berlin, by Harald Baudis and May 1957 at Herkules Saal, Munich by Werner Wolf

    Production: Wolfgang Lohse / Otto Gerdes




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No. 19 F major, K. 459
    2. Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No. 27 B flat major, K. 595
    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Bartok: Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No. 1 (Speakers Corner) Bartok: Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No. 1 (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Bartok: Concerto for Piano and Orchestra No. 1 (Speakers Corner)


    Between Bartók's Rhapsody for Piano and his First Piano Concerto lie 22 years of development, a struggle to find subject matter, form and his own musical language. While the Rhapsody from 1904 is dominated by a late-Romantic tone, which delights in a free, craggy and capricious feast of affable harmonies, the Piano Concerto reflects contemplation and a delving into the formal strictness of the classical three-movement concerto form. Rather less concerto-like and unconventional is, however, the use of the piano as a percussion instrument, which after just a few bars on the winds, hammers out an unrelenting staccato against the harsh and dissonant orchestra. In the slow movement too the piano is predominantly employed as a percussion instrument that, like the pendulum of a clock, rhythmically bulldozes on against the cheerless, bleak winds. Wild emotion predominates in the Finale. Stormy, insistent figures in the piano are answered by the orchestra with animated blows, but the quick flashes of melodies cannot establish themselves and are slashed to pieces as if caught in a storm.
    This uncompromising severity presents an enormous challenge that is mastered with aplomb by GÉza Anda and the RSO Berlin under Ferenc Fricsay.




    Musicians:



    • GÉza Anda and the Radio Symphonie Orchester Berlin

    • Ferenc Fricsay (conductor)





    Recording: October 1960 at Jesus-Christus-Kirche, Berlin, by GÜnter Hermanns

    Production: Otto Gerdes





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Allegro Moderato - Allegro
    2. Andante
    3. Allegro Molto
    Bela Bartok
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Bartok: Concerto for Piano and Orchestra Nos. 2 and 3 (Speakers Corner) Bartok: Concerto for Piano and Orchestra Nos. 2 and 3 (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Bartok: Concerto for Piano and Orchestra Nos. 2 and 3 (Speakers Corner)


    Bartók wanted his Second Piano Concerto to be understood as a contrast to his harsh and - for the orchestra - extremely difficult First Piano Concerto. But notwithstanding its more easily understandable theme, this work too was composed using strict classical sonata form. With a bright atmosphere, fired on by the sound of trumpets, the theme of the first movement forges ahead and sets the course for the whole work. Lively exuberance and a committed interplay between the soloist and orchestra result in a work that is wholly positive throughout and which remains full of energy yet bell-like and accessible right up to the final movement.


    Bartok composed his third and final piano concerto in the year of his death -1945. However, the work in no way possesses a mood of demise but breathes a worldly-wise, cheerful, and mellowed atmosphere. Delightfully audible melodies, with a chorale-like grandeur in the middle movement, are woven into a rhythmically lively but well-rounded and flowing movement structure.
    With these two piano concertos, GÉza Anda and the RSO Berlin led by the legendary Ferenc Fricsay, complete their great artistic achievement, which began with the recording of Bartók's Rhapsody op. 1 and his First Piano Concerto (DGG 138 708). For anyone who possesses just one of these two LPs, the other is absolutely essential.




    Musicians:



    • GÉza Anda and the Radio Symphonie Orchester Berlin

    • Ferenc Fricsay (conductor)





    Recording: September 1959 at Jesus-Christus-Kirche, Berlin, by Werner Wolf

    Production: Hans Weber & Otto Gerdes





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Piano Concerto No. 2 - Allegro
    2. Piano Concerto No. 2 - Adagio - Presto - Adagio
    3. Piano Concerto No. 2 - Allegro Molto
    4. Piano Concerto No. 3 - Allegretto
    5. Piano Concerto No. 3 - Allegro Religioso
    6. Piano Concerto No. 4 - Allegro Vivace
    Bela Bartok
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Concert For Violin & Orchestra Concert For Violin & Orchestra Quick View

    $44.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Concert For Violin & Orchestra

    Johanna Martzy has hitherto only been heard on records here in the Brahms Concerto and that performance established her at once as a great player. This record entirely confirms the verdict. She has an unerring sense of tempo - how exactly right is her speed for the slow movement: and her freshness and rhythm in the finale are a delight. This is just the sort of performance this concerto needs and it is one that will commend the music to anyone who has so far not been particularly captivated by the work. ... The orchestral accompaniment is extremely well done. - Gramophone


    Musicians:

    Johanna Martzy

    Rias Symphonie-Orchester, Berlin

    Feren Fricsay, conductor

    Antonin Dvorak (1841-1904)
    Concert for Violin and Orchestra, A minor, Op. 53
    Antonin Dvorak
    $44.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • 1
Go to top