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  • There's A Riot Goin' On (45 RPM) (Awaiting Repress) There's A Riot Goin' On (45 RPM) (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $49.99
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    There's A Riot Goin' On (45 RPM) (Awaiting Repress)

    Ranked 99/500 on Rolling Stone Magazine's 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.

    Sly And The Family Stone There's A Riot Goin' On 180 gram 45RPM 2LP from ORG Music


    Inducted into the Grammy Hall Of Fame in 1999 & Ranked #99 on Rolling Stone's 500 Greatest Albums Of All Time!


    More than four decades after they first stormed the Pop and R&B charts in the winter of 1968 with "Dance To the Music" - a groundbreaking jam that has the distinction of being chosen for the Grammy Hall Of Fame, the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame's 500 Songs That Shaped Rock, and Rolling Stone magazine's 500 Greatest Songs Of All Time - the music of Sly and the Family Stone is more vital than ever.


    The band's catalog (every single composition penned by Sylvester Stewart aka Sly Stone) includes their three career-defining RIAA gold Billboard #1 Pop/ #1 R&B smashes, "Everyday People," "Thank You (Falletinme Be Mice Elf Again)" and "Family Affair," and their signature Top 40 hits that began with "Dance To the Music" and went on to include "Stand!," "Hot Fun In the Summertime," "Runnin' Away," "If You Want Me To Stay," "Time For Livin', and more.


    Those songs not only inspired an era of youthful rebellion and independence, but also had a potent effect on the course of modern music in general. A dazzling fusion of psychedelic rock, soul, gospel, jazz, and Latin flavors, Sly's music brought the next step - funk - to a disparate populace of hip artists. From Miles Davis and Herbie Hancock, to the halls of Motown and George Clinton's P-Funk, from Michael Jackson and Curtis Mayfield, down the line to Bob Marley, the Isley Brothers, Prince, Public Enemy, Red Hot Chili Peppers, Arrested Development, the Black Eyed Peas, the Roots, OutKast and on and on, Sly's DNA is traceable to every cell of the musical stratosphere.


    Since it took almost two years to make, the fifth album by bonafide superstars Sly and the Family Stone had everyone salivating in anticipation. Needless to say, Sly did not disappoint! 1971's There's A Riot Goin' On finds the Bay Area-based genius getting funkier than ever before, even as his artistic vision becomes progressively darker. Some may have been disappointed that Sly didn't simply re-create the chart successes of earlier singles, but who can argue with the flat-out brilliance of turning recent big hit Thank You (Falettinme Be Mice Elf Agin) on its head to create the mind-boggling Thank You For Talkin' To Me Africa.


    Two of this hypnotic album's best tunes Family Affair and Runnin' Away were gigantic chart hits, and There's A Riot Goin' On hit #1 Pop/ #1 R&B within a few weeks of its release in November, proving beyond any shadow of a doubt that Sly Stone could totally deliver the goods! A transformative masterpiece, There's A Riot Goin' On was inducted into the Grammy Hall Of Fame in 1999, and is ranked #99 on Rolling Stone magazine's '500 Greatest Albums Of All Time.'

    Luv N' Haight

    Just Like A Baby

    Poet

    Family Affair

    Africa Talks To You The Asphalt Jungle

    There's A Riot Goin' On
    Brave & Strong

    (You Caught Me) Smilin'

    Time

    Spaced Cowboy

    Runnin' Away

    Thank You For Talking To Me Africa
    Sly & The Family Stone
    $49.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl 45 RPM LP- 2 LPs Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • Mama Says I'm Crazy Mama Says I'm Crazy Quick View

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    Mama Says I'm Crazy

    Since no one could copyright Mississippi, two major blues performers, Fred McDowell and John Hurt, adopted the state as part of their name. To confuse matters more, both performers made comebacks during the late '50s/early '60s and both specialized in prewar acoustic blues. While a blues novice might find such similarities confusing, the two men's singing and guitar styles are polar opposites. Whereas Hurt's smooth, deep vocals and Piedmont fingerpicking made him easily accessible to the folk revival crowd, McDowell's soulful vocals and forcefully rhythmic guitar represented something more primitive. In 1967, producer George Mitchell brought together McDowell and harp player Johnny Woods for an off-the-cuff session not unlike what one might have heard at a Como, MS, house party. Interestingly, the two men hadn't played together in eight years, but on songs like Standing at the Backdoor and the title track, one would never guess it. This isn't a polite affair, with one player holding back while the other solos. Instead, McDowell and Woods trade notes, overlap, and rush forward on Long Haired Doney and Shake Em' on Down as though they had an unlimited supply of energy. While McDowell's vocals and slashing guitar propel Goin' Away and I Got a Woman forward, Woods' harp adds pizzazz. Acoustic blues fans will warmly embrace Mama Says I'm Crazy and be thankful that Mitchell went to the trouble required to track down Woods for this earthy set.


    - Ronnie D. Lankford, Jr., Allmusic

    1. Shake Em' On Down
    2. Goin' Away
    3. Mama Says I'm Crazy
    4. I Got A Woman
    5. Red Cross Store
    6. Going Down To The River
    7. Standing at the Back Door
    8. What's Going to Become of Men
    9. Long Haired Doney
    10. John Henry
    11. I Walked All Night Long
    Fred McDowell
    $16.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • We're All In This Together We're All In This Together Quick View

    $24.99
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    We're All In This Together

    We're All In This Together features Walter with a different guest on each track, including artists Kenny Wayne Shepherd, Sonny Landreth, Robben Ford, Warren Haynes, Eric Gales, Joe Louis Walker, John Mayall and Joe Bonamassa. Gonna Hurt Like Hell (feat. Kenny Wayne Shepherd) Ain't Goin' Back (feat. Sonny Landreth) The Other Side Of The Pillow (feat. Charlie Musselwhite) She Listens To The Blackbird Sing (feat. Mike Zito) Mr. Davis (feat. Robben Ford) The Sky Is Crying (feat. Warren Haynes) Somebody Goin' Down (feat. Eric Gales) She Steals My Heart Away (feat. Edgar Winter) Crash And Burn (feat. Joe Louis Walker) Too Much To Carry (feat. John Nemeth) Do You Still See Me At All (feat. Jon Trout) Got Nothin' Left (feat. Randy Bachman) Blues For Jimmy T. (feat John Mayall) We're All In This Together (feat. Joe Bonamassa).
    LP 1
    1. Marie's Introduction
    2. Play The Guitar
    3. Help Me
    4. I'm Back
    5. Say Goodbye To The Blues
    6. Almost Gone


    LP 2
    1. Omaha
    2. Tomorrow Seems So Far Away
    3. Playin' Hideaway
    4. Haunted By The Night
    5. Fly Away
    6. Please Take Me Home


    LP 3
    1. Rock Me Baby
    2. Marie's Mood
    3. Serve Me Right To Suffer
    4. Love That We Once Knew

    Walter Trout
    $24.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • The Basement Tapes The Basement Tapes Quick View

    $49.99
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    The Basement Tapes

    Ranked 291/500 on Rolling Stone Magazine's 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.


    Recorded in Basement of Big Pink with The Band: Modern Americana Starts Here


    Audiophile Sound at Last: Sonic Subtleties, Loose Interplay, Organic Spirit, Warm Textures Presented Like Never Before on Definitive Mobile Fidelity Reissue


    Dylan at His Most Humorous, Unguarded, Loose: Folk Tales, Weird Narratives, Rock Ballads, Inside Jokes, Allusions Pepper Alchemic Material


    Includes This Wheels on Fire, You Aint Goin Nowhere, Tears of Rage, Million Dollar Bash, Yazoo Street Scandal


    The Freewheelin Bob Dylan, Another Side of Bob Dylan, Bringing It All Back Home, Blonde on Blonde, and Blood on the Tracks Also Available from Mobile Fidelity


    Basements have long been associated with raw, off-the-cuff rock n roll, the damp and dark spaces serving as the woodshedding venues for countless bands. Yet no basement is more famous, and none yielded music as familiarly weird, wholesomely American, joyously loose, and identifiably humorous as that in the upstate New York house dubbed Big Pink the location where, during the summer and early fall of 1967, Bob Dylan and The Band played a vivid tapestry of covers, originals, and traditionals that signaled the advent of Americana. Once again, the Bard changed the world.


    As part of its Bob Dylan catalog restoration series, Mobile Fidelity is thoroughly humbled to have the privilege of mastering the iconic LP from the original master tapes and pressing it on dead-quiet LPs at RTI. The end result is the very finest, most transparent analog edition of The Basement Tapes ever produced and the first-ever analog reissue. Inimitable, the particulars of The Basement Tapes especially, the gather-round-in-a-huddle assembly of the instrumentalists, home-made character, domestic vibe, and low-volume nature of the recordings come to fore here in a manner that takes the listener down the stairs at 2188 Stoll Road and brings the images of Dylan, Rick Danko, Robbie Robertson, and Co. to life.


    Fresh off experiencing a motorcycle accident and the wrath of audiences hostile to his embrace of amplified music, Dylan elected to retreat to the comforts of rural and family life. He soon began collaborating with members of the Band in his house, ultimately moving the sessions to Big Pink. Informal, peaceful, relaxed, open-minded: The collaborations blanket country stomps, roots hootenannies, forgotten spirituals, earthy originals, chaotic marches, dreamscapes, dance tunes, folk laments, catch-as-you-can improvisations. On The Basement Tapes, mythical ghosts and dead legends reappear, reveling in the absurdity, comedy, mystery, aura, and alchemy.


    In Invisible Republic, his scintillating book about the sessions, cultural critic Greil Marcus states: At a time when the country was tearing itself apart in a war at home over a war abroad, the music was funny and comforting; it was also strange, and somehow incomplete. Out of some odd displacement of art and time, the music seemed both transparent and inexplicable when it was first heard, and it still does. Indeed, The Basement Tapes appear to emanate from an indefinable chasm between modern and ancient, self-evident and mysterious, shapeless and fully formed, abstract and concrete, histories unwritten and chronicled. But every note chimes with freenessa liberating fun, humble simplicity, and bond-creating camaraderie felt in every hoot, holler, laugh, and false start.


    The Basement Tapes capacity to remain so gloriously honest and timeless performances that genuinely could've been made today, ten years from now, or back in the 1930's helps account for their emotional resonance and unsurpassed reputation as a snapshot of how unencumbered American music, and art with deep historical roots and connective cultural tissues, is supposed to sound.


    Mobile Fidelity's reissue squares away the late-night bleariness, jovial atmosphere, low-ceiling dimensions, and ensemble-based perspective of the sessions, allowing the listener to become Hamlet, the dog who slept nearby Dylan, Robertson, and Co. as it all went down. This is not to be missed.


    Given the sonic and artistic merit of this album, we anticipate huge demand.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Odds and Ends
    2. Orange Juice Blues (Blues for Breakfast)
    3. Million Dollar Bash
    4. Yazoo Street Scandal
    5. Goin to Acapulco
    6. Katies Been Gone
    7. Lo and Behold
    8. Bessie Smith
    9. Clothes Line Saga
    10. Apple Suckling Tree
    11. Please Mrs. Henry
    12. Tears of Rage
    13. Too Much of Nothing
    14. Yea! Heavy and a Bottle of Bread
    15. Aint No More Cane
    16. Crash on the Levee (Down in the Flood)
    17. Ruben Remus
    18. Tiny Montgomery
    19. You Aint Goin Nowhere
    20. Dont Ya Tell Henry
    21. Nothing Was Delivered
    22. Open the Door, Homer
    23. Long Distance Operator
    24. This Wheels on Fire
    Bob Dylan and the Band
    $49.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • The Best Of The James Gang (Pre-Order) The Best Of The James Gang (Pre-Order) Quick View

    $34.99
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    The Best Of The James Gang (Pre-Order)


    The 10 Best Songs From The Acclaimed Joe Walsh-Led Trio


    Mastered By Kevin Gray At Cohearent Audio From The Original Analog Tape


    Plating And 200-Gram Pressing By Quality Record Pressings!


    Gatefold Tip-On Jacket By Stoughton Printing


    The 10 best songs from 1969's Yer' Album, 1970's Rides Again and 1971's Thirds. The James Gang, formed in Cleveland, Ohio, in 1966, may be best known as the band that was first to feature guitarist/vocalist Joe Walsh before his rise to stardom as a solo musician and a member of the Eagles.


    The James Gang performed with a stylistic versatility, hard-rocking edge and ultra-sharp musicianship. Their power-trio template has never sounded fiercer than on this Analogue Productions 200-gram reissue. Mastered by Kevin Gray at Cohearent Audio, pressed at Quality Record Pressings - makers of the world's finest-sounding LPs - and packaged in a tip-on heavyweight jacket from Stoughton Printing, this sterling reissue looks as great as it sounds.


    You'll hear James Gang favorites including the FM radio staple Funk #49, - kick-started by the outspoken declaration I sleep all day, out all night/I know where you're goin' - the sexual thrust of the head-bobbing Woman, and proto-metal slash of the multi-part The Bomber. The rest of the track list is just as steeped in psychedelic-and-blues-leaning discourse. Midnight Man, Stop, Yadig? Take A Look Around, Funk #48, Walk Away and the Jack Nitzsche-orchestrated Ashes the Rain and I are rounded out by Walsh's Echoplex-equipped slide guitar, and his trio-mates, band founder Jim Fox on drums, piano and vocals, and bassist Tom Kriss, later replaced by Dale Peters.


    The James Gang burning on stage with the audience getting higher and higher. Listen - this is American music - strong, inventive and clean.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Walk Away
    2. Funk #49
    3. Midnight Man
    4. The Bomber
    - Closet Queen
    - Cast Your Fate To The Wind
    5. Yadig?
    6. Take A look Around
    7. Funk #48
    8. Woman
    9. Ashes, The Rain And I
    10. Stop
    The James Gang
    $34.99
    200 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed PRE-ORDER Buy Now
  • Freddie Mercury: Messenger Of The Gods - The Singles (Box Set) Freddie Mercury: Messenger Of The Gods - The Singles (Box Set) Quick View

    $139.99
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    Freddie Mercury: Messenger Of The Gods - The Singles (Box Set)

    Box Set Features 13 x 7" Singles On Colored Vinyl


    Includes Booklet Featuring Previously Unpublished Photos


    Freddie Mercury was a man of many talents and many different sides. The songs he wrote for and with Queen filled stadiums around the globe and have rightly gone down in history, but he also embarked on a solo career that took him from the clubs of Munich and New York to the great opera houses of the world.


    He was the ultimate showman, but he kept his private life away from the prying eyes of the media; a larger than life rock star who loved disco, classical music and ballet. He was a restless spirit, a true chameleon who reveled in his own contradictions.


    All the different sides of this iconic musician can be found on Freddie Mercury: Messenger Of The Gods - The Singles. Fittingly released on Mercury Records for the world outside North America, and on Hollywood Records in North America, this box set brings together all 13 of Freddie's solo singles on individually coloured vinyl.


    From his debut solo single I Can Hear Music, released under the name Larry Lurex, through the dance floor-influenced solo anthems of the 80s and up to his collaborations with legendary Spanish opera singer Montserrat CaballÉ including the timeless Barcelona, this is a journey through the career of a unique talent.


    Born Farrokh Bulsara on the East African island of Zanzibar on September 5, 1946, the rechristened Freddie Mercury was already a star in his own mind by the time he formed Queen with Brian May and Roger Taylor in 1970. Where his band mates had studied astrophysics, dentistry and electronics at college, Freddie majored in stardom.


    His first solo single actually emerged a week before Queen's own debut 7". Released in 1973 and credited to Larry Lurex in a nod to the fashionably flamboyant noms de rock of the glam era, the Beach Boys cover I Can Hear Music and its B-side, Goin' Back, were recorded as a favour towards a musical project by Trident Studios' house engineer Robin Geoffrey Cable, in 1972.


    As Queen's career rocketed towards the heavens, Freddie poured his energies into the band. It would be more than a decade before he released his second solo single, the pulsating, electronic Love Kills. Originally released in 1984, Love Kills was a collaboration with famed Italian disco producer Giorgio Moroder for the soundtrack to Moroder's update of the groundbreaking 1927 silent movie Metropolis. A Top 10 UK hit, it found Freddie moving away from Queen's traditional sound, paving the way for what he would do next.


    Released in 1985, Freddie's debut solo album, Mr Bad Guy, fully explored the music he had fallen in love with in the dance clubs of Munich and New York. The four hit singles released from that album - I Was Born To Love You, Made In Heaven, Living On My Own and Love Me Like There's No Tomorrow, all of which are included in the Messenger Of The Gods box set - crackled with playfully hedonistic energy, but they also hid a more serious side to Freddie. Here was a man who craved the good times but wanted something deeper as well.


    Within two years, he had abandoned the sound of the clubs for the music of the opera house - though not before releasing both the epic single Time, the theme to the lavish stage musical of the same name produced by Dave Clark, and his outrageous (and strangely revealing) Top 5 cover of The Platters' 1965 hit, The Great Pretender.


    In 1987, he dived headlong into the world of opera and classical music with the towering single, Barcelona. A duet with legendary Spanish soprano Montserrat CaballÉ, an idol of Freddie's, it came about after the opera star asked him to write a song about her home town.


    Barcelona remains one of the most momentous hit singles not just of Freddie's career but in pop history. Not only did it lead to an album of collaborations between these two huge talents, but the title track was also chosen as the official anthem of the 1992 Olympics. That song, together with the two other singles taken from the album, The Golden Boy and How Can I Go On, are all included as part of Messenger Of The Gods with their original B-sides.


    In October 1988 Freddie and Montserrat were invited by the King and Queen of Spain to perform Barcelona on the steps of Barcelona's National Palace of Montjuic at the open air La Nit festival which was staged to mark the arrival of the Olympic Flag from Seoul.


    But sadly, Freddie would not live to see the fruits of his collaboration with Montserrat CaballÉ showcased at the Barcelona Olympics. He passed away on November 24, 1991, just seven months before the Games took place. The grand opening ceremony was a fitting tribute to a man who thrived on spectacle.


    Messenger Of The Gods is completed by two posthumous singles, In My Defence and Living On My Own (No More Brothers Radio Mix), the latter of which became Freddie's first solo number 1 and was the biggest selling European single of the year in 1993.


    Had he lived, it is anyone's guess where this most restless and protean of singer's muses would have taken him. But Messenger Of The Gods - The Singles is a towering legacy, a collection of songs which will never lose their stature of classics and will live on forever.

    Disc 1 - Blue Colored Vinyl
    (a) I Can Hear Music - Larry Lurex (1973)
    (b) Goin' Back - Larry Lurex


    Disc 2 - Orange Colored Vinyl
    (a) Love Kills (1984)


    Disc 3 - Yellow Colored Vinyl
    (a) I Was Born To Love You (1985)
    (b) Stop All The Fighting


    Disc 4 - Red Colored Vinyl
    (a) Made In Heaven [Single Remix] (1985)
    (b) She Blows Hot And Cold


    Disc 5 - White Colored Vinyl
    (a) Living On My Own [Single Edit] (1985)
    (b) My Love Is Dangerous


    Disc 6 - Red Colored Vinyl
    (a) Love Me Like There's No Tomorrow (1985)
    (b) Let's Turn It On


    Disc 7 - Cyan Colored Vinyl
    (a) Time (1986)
    (b) Time [Instrumental]


    Disc 8 - Orange Colored Vinyl
    (a) The Great Pretender (1987)
    (b) Exercises In Free Love [Freddie's Vocal]


    Disc 9 - Clear Colored Vinyl
    (a) Barcelona [Single Version] (1987)
    (b) Exercises In Free Love [Montserrat's Vocal]


    Disc 10 - Gold Colored Vinyl
    (a) The Golden Boy [Single Edit] (1988)
    (b) The Fallen Priest [B-Side Edit]


    Disc 11 - Green Colored Vinyl
    (a) How Can I Go On [Single Version] (1989)

    (b) Overture Piccante


    Disc 12 - Neon Pink Colored Vinyl
    (a) In My Defence (1992)
    (b) Love Kills [Wolf Euro Mix]


    Disc 13 - Yellow Colored Vinyl
    (a) Living On My Own [No More Brothers Radio Mix] (1993)
    (b) Living On My Own [Julian Raymond Album Mix]

    Freddie Mercury
    $139.99
    7 Inch Colored Vinyl Box Set - 13 Singles Sealed Buy Now
  • Goin' Away (Out Of Stock) Goin' Away (Out Of Stock) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Goin' Away (Out Of Stock)

    Part of the ultimate audiophile Prestige stereo reissues from Analogue Productions - 25 of the most collectible, rarest, most audiophile-sounding Rudy Van Gelder recordings ever made. All cut at 33 1/3.


    All mastered from the original analog master tapes by mastering maestro Kevin Gray. 200-gram LPs pressed at Acoustic Sounds' state-of-the-art pressing plant, Quality Record Pressings, plated by Gary Salstrom


    Deep groove label pressings, tip-on jackets on thick cardboard stock


    Sam "Lightnin'" Hopkins, a true poet who invented most of his lyrics on the spot and never seemed to run out of new ideas, was a blues giant of post-war blues whose style was rooted in pre-war Texas traditions. While he cranked up his amp to fierce proportions when performing for his friends at Houston juke joints, producers who recorded him for the so-called folk-blues market usually insisted that he use an acoustic guitar for more "authentic" results. Either way, Lightnin' seldom made a bad record, and this June 4, 1963, session on which he played acoustic was among his finest, thanks much to the sensitive support of bassist Leonard Gaskin and drummer Herbie Lovelle, who did a remarkable job of following his irregular bar patterns and abrupt song endings.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Wake Up Old Lady
    2. Don't Embarrass Me, Baby
    3. Stranger Here
    4. Little Sister's Boogie
    5. Goin' Away
    6. You Better Stop Her
    7. Business You'r Doin'
    8. I'm Wit' It
    Lightnin' Hopkins
    $34.99
    200 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Temporarily out of stock
  • Undefeated (Out of Stock) Undefeated (Out of Stock) Quick View

    $16.99
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    Undefeated (Out of Stock)

    Bobby Bare, Jr. could've phoned in a career. He could've exploited the fact that he's the son of iconic Country Music Hall of Famer Bobby Bare, was born into Nashville's Music Row elite, and counted artists like Shel Silverstein as close family friends and George Jones and Tammy Wynette as next door neighbors. Instead, Bobby blazed a path of unique songwriting craftsmanship with a voice that blows through you like an unyielding wind on the desolate prairie.


    Undefeated is BBJ's first release since 2010 and what he calls his "break-up record," but the whole of it is much more involved: this isn't escapism; it's an emotional survival guide. Undefeated is ten songs of reality checks, clever wordplay, and daring arrangements, the aural companion to that buddy who pulls up a bar stool next to yours to help soak away your sorrows.


    Like a bespectacled, curly haired prizefighter whose opponent is on the ropes, Bobby goes at each release as if it might be his last round, focused, and full of energy and purpose. Undefeated is no different. The song list is a war chest of formidable uppercuts (e.g. distorted pop rock gems "North of Alabama By Mornin'" and "Don't Stand At the Stove"), eye-splitting right jabs (open and orchestral "Don't Wanna Know" and "The Elegant Imposter"), and sneaky left hooks (the crescendoing "As Forever Became Never Again").


    Undefeated is an album of distinct balance, but with raw and varied textures. "North of Alabama By Mornin'" leads with a murky, palm-muted electric guitar and striding, crunchy organ backbeat; a combination that is undeniably kinetic à la Humble Pie's '70s boogie grooves and sinister and sexy, like a Southern doppelganger to Greg Dulli/The Twilight Singers. Bare Jr.'s ghostly high/low vocal layers echo the bleak picture of a metaphorical road trip, when his confidence slips, "Am I holding the steering wheel or is it holding me?/ The transmission is slipping like a pigeon through a tiger's teeth." By the song's finale, though, jubilant yelps ("Oh! Ho! Ho! We're goin' home!") and the electric guitar's pinch-harmonic wailing, indicate that things are headed in the right direction.


    What's most striking about BBJ is his proficiency with a broad sonic palette that fluently conjures uncommon impressions of life's soul-arresting experiences. "The Big Time" is rock 'n' roll reinterpreted through the lens of soulful pedaled bass, celebratory and punchy brass, and the facade of big-city talk ("You're gonna miss me after I hit the big time/ Gonna get brand new famous friends."). In "Blame Everybody (But Yourself)" the band - Young Criminals' Starvation League - taps into a piano-inflected British invasion/Herman's Hermits sort of vibe, blended with the melancholic echo chamber aesthetic of My Morning Jacket.


    At other moments, Bobby channels his country DNA (like in the Hayes Carll co-penned "My Baby Took My Baby Away"), mirror-ball gazing '70s R&B/soul ("Undefeated"), and bright ballads from the hills and hollers of Venice Beach ("If She Cared"). From anyone else, this refusal to play it on the straight and narrow would sound cluttered and disjointed, but Bobby never breaks a sweat.

    1. North of Alabama By Mornin'
    2. If She Cared
    3. The Big Time
    4. Don't Wanna Know
    5. The Elegant Imposter
    6. Undefeated
    7. My Baby Took My Baby Away
    8. Blame Everybody (But Yourself)
    9. As Forever Became Never Again
    10. Don't Stand At The Stove
    Bobby Bare Jr.
    $16.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Temporarily out of stock
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