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  • Bricks Are Heavy (Red Vinyl) Bricks Are Heavy (Red Vinyl) Quick View

    $23.99
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    Bricks Are Heavy (Red Vinyl)

    Pressed On Red Vinyl


    Bricks Are Heavy was the third album by L7 originally released in 1992. Produced by Butch Vig Bricks Are Heavy is somewhat poppier with more focused songwriting than their previous LP's and was the bands breakthrough album fueled by the success of the single Pretend We're Dead. L7 was often associated with the then raging Grunge movement (even though they were from L.A.) and it's not hard to see why as the album features abrasive, sledgehammer guitar riffs and plenty of heavy rockers with the songs Wargasm, Slide, and Everglade. The group emphasized their feminist and Riot Grrrl side with This Ain't Pleasure and Diet Pill. First domestic release on vinyl for this early 90s alternative classic.

    1. Wargasm
    2. Scrap
    3. Pretend We're Dead
    4. Diet Pill
    5. Everglade
    6. Slide
    7. One More Thing
    8. Mr. Integrity
    9. Monster
    10. Shitlist
    11. This Ain't Pleasure
    L7
    $23.99
    Colored Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Slap-Happy Slap-Happy Quick View

    $19.99
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    Slap-Happy

    Vinyl reissue of L7's classic Slap-Happy LP on limited edition grey marble vinyl.
    1. Crackpot Baby
    2. On My Rockin' Machine
    3. Lackey
    4. Human
    5. Livin' Large
    6. Freeway
    7. Stick To The Plan
    8. War With You
    9. Long Green
    10. Little One
    11. Freezer Burn
    12. Mantra Down
    L7
    $19.99
    Colored Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Fat Of The Land The Fat Of The Land Quick View

    $24.99
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    The Fat Of The Land

    Few albums were as eagerly anticipated as The Fat of the Land, the Prodigy's long-awaited follow-up to Music for the Jilted Generation. The Fat of the Land was touted as the album that would bring electronica/techno to a wide American audience; and indeed it went on to sell 2.8 million copies in the US. The Fat of the Land delivers exactly what anyone would expect: intense hip-hop-derived rhythms, imaginatively reconstructed samples, and meaningless shouted lyrics from Keith Flint and Maxim. Half of the album does sound quite similar to "Firestarter," especially when Flint is singing. Still, Liam Howlett is an inventive producer, and he can make songs like "Smack My Bitch Up" and "Serial Thrilla" kick with a visceral power, but he is at his best on the funky hip-hop of "Diesel Power" (which is driven by an excellent Kool Keith rap) and "Funky Shit," as wellas the mind-bending neo-psychedelia of "Narayan" (featuring guest vocals by Crispian Mills of Kula Shaker) and the bloodcurdling cover of L7's "Fuel My Fire," which features vocals by Republica's Saffron. All those guest vocalists mean something -- Howlett is at his best when he's writing for himself or others."Firestarter" and all of its rewrites capture the fire of the Prodigyat their peak, and the remaining songs have imagination that give the album weight. The Fat of the Land is damn good.
    1. Smack My Bitch Up
    2. Breathe
    3. Diesel Power
    4. Funky Shit
    5. Serial Thrilla
    6. Mindfields
    7. Narayan
    8. Firestarter
    9. Climbatize
    10. Fuel My Fire
    Prodigy
    $24.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Dove (Awaiting Repress) Dove (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $17.99
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    Dove (Awaiting Repress)

    The dream-rock band Belly blazed a bright trail in the '90s, releasing two albums full of taut, yet wondrous music that was memorable for its rumbling bass lines and insistent drumming as it was for its glittering riffs and airy vocals. Their new album Dove, which was recorded with friend of the band Paul Q. Kolderie, places Belly back on that trail, bridging the gaps between reverbed-out bliss and spaghetti-western drone and muscular, hook-forward pop.


    Belly came together in 1991, when vocalist-guitarist Tanya Donelly (Throwing Muses, The Breeders) began playing with brothers (and fellow Rhode Islanders) Tom (guitar) and Chris (drums) Gorman, as well as bassist Fred Abong. He left before the band's 1993 debut Star came out, and Gail Greenwood, then playing around Providence, joined. Star was a hit with critics and listeners alike, spawning the alt-radio and MTV staple "Feed the Tree." The band toured extensively behind the gold-certified album, touring with the likes of Radiohead, the Cranberries, and Pavement and playing a show at the Hippodrome in Paris where they opened for U2 and the Velvet Underground.


    Belly opened 1994 with two Grammy nominations, scoring nods for Best Alternative Music Album and Best New Artist at that year's edition of the awards. That summer, the band began work on King, their harder-edged second album. Belly toured behind that 1995 release extensively, opening for R.E.M. in Europe and bringing along Catherine Wheel and Superchunk for the American tour; their last gig was in November 1995, and the band officially dissolved in 1996.


    Since then, Belly's members kept busy, with Donelly releasing a string of hailed solo albums and touring with Throwing Muses, Greenwood performing with brash rockers L7 and revved-up punker Bif Naked, and Tom Gorman performing with fellow New England alt-rockers Buffalo Tom and Donelly's Throwing Muses partner Kristin Hersh before launching a photography business in New York with his brother. They had occasionally broached the topic of getting back together in individual settings; Greenwood and Tom Gorman separately collaborated with Donelly on her Swan Song Series omnibus.


    The idea of a Belly reunion, though, gained serious traction a few years ago. "We had just gotten to the point where we were just missing each other, and missing the music," says Donelly. "The music I've been doing in the past several years has been very collaborative, which made me kind of homesick for Belly; I missed that sense of having a band."


    Early rehearsals showed that Belly was still very much a unit, the years falling away as the quartet went to work on older material. "We immediately fell back into our original relationship and musical dynamics," says Donelly. "Just a lot of laughing-it felt like a real reunion in the best and truest sense from the first practice on. We had a bit of trepidation: 'Is this going to work?' But the first practice really set all our anxiety to rest."


    Eventually, though, the band's members, who had collaborated sporadically in the interim, got the itch to bring new songs into their set as a curveball for listeners-and for themselves, too. "You almost want to put yourself in the deep end," says Chris Gorman. "That just seems to be the inclination for creative people-you never just want to feel comfortable. You're always going, 'Well, what's the part of the night that's really going to make me really, really nervous and freaked out?' And that usually is, 'Let's try a new song.' When it works, that's the most the rewarding moment in the night."


    Belly previewed some of their new songs, including the prowling "Army of Clay" and the folk-tinged "Human Child," at their early reunion dates to effusive audiences. "The crowds have been amazing," says Donelly. "We've never really operated on a level before where live shows feel genuinely communal. We got such great feedback on the new stuff-people were just as enthusiastic about it," Donelly recalls. That handful of tracks blossomed into Dove, a dozen songs that nod to past glories while also showcasing the four members' growth as songwriters and musicians, adding dramatic flourishes like strings and vibed-out guitars to the group's already widescreen sound.


    Belly recorded most of the rhythm tracks for Dove at Stable Sound Studios in Portsmouth, RI, vocals at Greenwood's home studio, and guitars and overdubs in Tom's and Tanya's home studios. The songs spun out of a new songwriting system that was necessitated by the four members' far-flung hometowns. "It required a lot of trust," says Donelly, "because we were sending raw snippets to each other-anything from 30-second pieces to full songs. Tom and Gail and I would send demos back and forth, and then Chris would add drums to whatever snippets he'd heard, and Tom would sew everything together. It would sometimes be a very circuitous route to a song, but it was really fun."


    "All three of the songwriters were locked in and working in a way that complemented the others' strengths," says Chris Gorman. "Gail's writing was in top form. Tanya is able to make anybody's song her own-she's got that gift. And Tom has really honed his arrangement and production style."


    The shimmering, expansive "Shiny One," which pairs dreamy vocal harmonies with urgent riffing and dramatic string flourishes, is one of the best examples of Belly's new process. "I have a lot of affection for that one," says Donelly. "It was the first completely collaborative song we've ever done-Gail wrote the riff and the chorus, Tom and I wrote the verse and bridge, Chris's parts shaped the direction and vibe. When I hear it, I hear all four of us equally."


    While Dove's flight was aided by previews of some new tracks during the band's reunion tour, the band is excited to release the album in full, and to show it off to audiences around the world. "We're all looking forward to presenting these songs in a live setting, and having the opportunity to play together again," says Chris Gorman. "We should be in for a really exciting year."

    1. Stars Align
    2. Shiny One
    3. Girl
    4. Faceless
    5. Suffer the Fools
    6. Mine
    7. Human Child
    8. Army of Clay
    9. Artifact
    10. Heartstrings
    Belly
    $17.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • Griffons At The Gates Of Heaven Griffons At The Gates Of Heaven Quick View

    $18.99
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    Griffons At The Gates Of Heaven

    The hugely anticipated national debut of Florida-based psychonauts, Sons Of Hippies! 12 all new recordings featuring the passionate vocals of Katherine Kelly, the penetrating grooves of drummer Jonas Canales and bassist David Daley plus pulsating, psychedelic atmospheres that will appeal to fans of space rock bands from Hawkwind to Flaming Lips. Mixed by Jack Endino (Nirvana, L7) and mastered at Abbey Road Studios by Andy Walter (Radiohead, David Bowie, U2).
    1. Forward
    2. Mirrorball
    3. Dark Daisies
    4. Rose
    5. Spaceship Ride
    6. Man or Moon
    7. Magnets
    8. Blood In the Water
    9. Whatever We Spend
    10. Minute x Minute
    11. Animal Battle
    12. Cautionary Tale
    Sons Of Hippies
    $18.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Dead Revolution Dead Revolution Quick View

    $22.99
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    Dead Revolution

    Hammers of Misfortune was formed in the mid-1990s under the name Unholy Cadaver. At the time, the only members were guitarist John Cobbett and drummer Chewy Marzolo, both of whom shared vocal duties. In 2000, the band changed its name to Hammers of Misfortune, taking its moniker from a track on the Unholy Cadaver demo. Recruiting Scalzi and Janis Tanaka (formerly of Fireball Ministry and L7), the band released its 2001 concept album The Bastard. The Bastard received many positive reviews in the metal community, including several "best of 2001" awards from magazines such as Terrorizer. In 2003 the band released their second album The August Engine. This album was also well received by the metal community, getting a 10/10 review from Brave Words & Bloody Knuckles. In 2006 a new lineup toured the US twice, and recorded and released "The Locust Years". After The Locust Years, he band recorded the double album, Fields/Church of Broken Glass (Profound Lore), in 2008. In March 2010, Hammers of Misfortune announced that they had signed a record deal with Metal Blade Records. Since then, Metal Blade has re-released The Bastard, The August Engine, The Locust Years, and Fields/Church of Broken Glass. In October 2011, the band produced their fifth studio album, 17th Street, another critical success which landed on many year end lists, including Popmatters and NPR.


    As for differences between Dead Revolution and its predecessor 17th Street, Cobbett says it's more varied, using different tones. The mainman also thinks it's a darker and heavier effort. If trends and opinions are anything to go by, it would appear Hammers of Misfortune are sliding slowly into, well, darker and heavier territory. 17th Street, by comparison, was fiercer than Fields / Church of Broken Glass. Likewise, Dead Revolution eats its forebear 17th Street for proverbial breakfast. To wit, there's no power ballad ("Summer Tears") on Hammers of Misfortune's newest.

    1. The Velvet Inquisition
    2. Dead Revolution
    3. Sea Of Heroes
    4. The Precipice (Waiting for the Crash...)
    5. Here Comes The Sky
    6. Flying Alone
    7. Days Of '49
    Hammers of Misfortune
    $22.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
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