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  • In Paris: The ORTF Recordings In Paris: The ORTF Recordings Quick View

    $35.99
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    In Paris: The ORTF Recordings

    Limited Edition 180 Gram Vinyl Pressing Of 2,000


    Gatefold LP Includes Booklet With Essays, Unpublished Photos, Collector Postcards


    Mastered By The Legendary Engineer Bernie Grundman


    Resonance Records, in partnership with the National Audiovisual Institute (INA) of France, is pleased to announce the release of Larry Young In Paris/The ORTF Recordings. Presenting groundbreaking performances by jazz organist and pianist, Larry Young, these studio and live recordings from 1964 and 1965 made for French Radio and never before issued on record will be released in a limited edition 2-LP set.


    Producer Zev Feldman notes, It's particularly exciting because none of this music has ever been heard before except on its initial broadcast in France five decades ago. I think that's something to celebrate and a call for us all - as we often do with the archival recordings we at Resonance Records uncover - to revisit and discuss this legendary artist's legacy.


    Musicians featured on these recordings include trumpet legend Woody Shaw, tenor saxophonist and bandleader Nathan Davis and drummer Billy Brooks. An international cast of supporting players: French pianist Jack DiÉval tenor saxophonist Jean-Claude Fohrenbach and bassist Jacques B. Hess; Italian drummer Franco Manzecchi, Jamaican trumpet player Sonny Grey and Guadaloupean percussionist Jacky Bamboo round out the personnel. This album marks the first new release of Larry Young music in thirty-eight years.


    This project came about in 2012 when Resonance Records producer Zev Feldman traveled to France to explore the ORTF (Office of French Radio and Television) archives (the media vaults overseen by the French National Audiovisual Institute (INA) in the hope of finding undiscovered treasures, which he suspected he might find there. Feldman asked INA executives about specific artists and was stunned to learn that the vaults contained recordings documenting some of the greatest American jazz musicians who lived in - or visited - Paris in the 1960's, including Larry Young. Resonance Records presents in this album tapes that had been sitting idly in the vaults for nearly 50 years, scrupulously maintained by INA. Resonance will also be releasing other future projects from the INA vaults. More details to come soon. Producer Feldman states, It's been a thrill of the lifetime working with Christiane Lemire, Laure Audinot and Pascal Rozat at INA France to find this great music and shepherd this release. No question about it, this project represents jazz through diplomacy and the greater good of a mission. These recordings showcase American artists who found their home and voice in Europe at a time when the American landscape wasn't always as supportive. Feldman continues, When we started to explore the vaults of ORTF and search for recordings to release, we had a wish list of various artists we were on the hunt for, but Larry was the one artist whom I personally felt we needed to look extra hard for. I couldn't be more thrilled with what we found and which we are now releasing. I hope we'll all revisit this genius's legacy and appreciate why he mattered so much.


    While in France, Larry Young recorded at the ORTF Studios in Paris (now Maison de Radio France) as a sideman with the Nathan Davis Quartet, the Jazz aux Champs-ÉlysÉes All-Stars and with his own piano trio which included bassist Jacques B. Hess drummer and Franco Manzecchi. Larry Young In Paris/The ORTF Recordings includes selections from the original tapes, which were recorded specifically to be broadcast on French Radio. As noted, the only time these recordings have been shared with the public were on their original broadcasts on two iconic monthly French radio programs: Musique aux Champs-ÉlysÉes, hosted by French musician and producer Jack DiÉval; and Jazz sur scène, hosted by producer and jazz scholar AndrÉ Francis. Shortly after these recordings were made, Larry Young returned to New York to record the classic album Unity, his second album for Blue Note.


    Larry Young died at the tragically young age of 38 in 1978. Larry Young In Paris: The ORTF Recordings is a tribute to his memory and endorsed by the estate of Larry Young. Produced by Zev Feldman with Executive Producers George Klabin and Michael Cuscuna. Sound Restoration by Fran Gala and George Klabin. Mastering by Fran Gala at Resonance Records Studios.

    LP 1
    1. Trane of Thought
    2. Talkin' About J.C.
    3. Mean to Me
    4. La Valse Grise
    5. Discothèque


    LP 2
    1. Luny Tune
    2. Beyond All Limits
    3. Black Nile
    4. Zoltan
    5. Larry's Blues

    Larry Young
    $35.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Love Devotion Surrender (Speakers Corner) Love Devotion Surrender (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Love Devotion Surrender (Speakers Corner)

    For some, Love Devotion Surrender is an album where, exceptionally, John McLaughlin plays the piano and organist Jan Hammer plays the drums. For others, it is the most spiritual album ever by Carlos Santana. And though both disciples were shown the way and inspired by the same guru (Sri Chinmoy) at one and the same time, this album is filled with the spirit of John Coltrane. In order to communicate their differing understanding and interpretation of Trane's music, the two musicians formed a 'project band' made up of members of Santana's ensemble and the Mahavishnu Orchestra. In their performance of Love Supreme, Santana's somewhat dragging melody-maker role amalgamates with McLaughlin's high-speed staccato to a viscous drive. This approach functions just as well in slow motion: Coltrane's miniature, slow composition Naima is performed in a flowing and inspired manner by the duo on their acoustic guitars.



    The arrangements carry Santana's hallmark: the occasionally somewhat intellectual but certainly not long-pondered-over sound is enhanced by the sound of agitated congo beats and the chanted vocals are heard as if from afar. By the time fans of Santana's major albums have got to the expansive gospel song Let Us Go Into The House, they will have rediscovered their Carlos and his timeless solos once again. It is apparent that love and devotion are by no means just memorials of a time gone by but a surrender to oneself in its most perfect form.



    Musicians:



    • Mahavishnu John McLaughlin (guitar, piano)

    • Carlos Santana (guitar)

    • Larry Young (organ)

    • Doug Rauch (bass)

    • Armando Peraza (conga)

    • Billy Cobham, Don Alias, Jan Hammer, Mike Shrieve (drums)



    Recording: 1973 by Glen Kolotkin

    Production: Mahavishnu John McLaughlin & Carlos Santana



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. A Love Supreme
    2. Naima
    3. The Life Divine
    4. Let Us Go Into the House of the Lord
    5. Meditation
    Santana
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Fuchsia Swing Song Fuchsia Swing Song Quick View

    $19.99
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    Fuchsia Swing Song

    During the Blue Note 75th anniversary celebration the label released 100 essential Blue Note LPs and asked New York Times readers what titles they'd like to see make the list. This album is one of five new reissues that were hand-selected by Blue Note President, Don Was, based on New York Times reader recommendations.


    Recorded in 1964 immediately after leaving the Miles Davis Quintet, Sam Rivers' Fuchsia Swing Song is one of the more auspicious debuts the label released in the mid-'60s. Rivers was a seasoned session player (his excellent work on Larry Young's Into Somethin' is a case in point) and a former member of Herb Pomeroy's Big Band before he went out with Davis. By the time of his debut, Rivers had been deep under the influence of Coltrane and Coleman, but wasn't willing to give up the blues just yet. Hence the sound on Fuchsia Swing Song is one of an artist who is at once very self-assured, and in transition.


    Using a rhythm section that included Tony Williams (whose Life Time he had guested on), pianist Jaki Byard, and bassist Ron Carter, Rivers took the hard bop and blues of his roots and poured them through the avant-garde colander. Today, players like Joshua Redman, Branford Marsalis, and James Carter do it all the time, but in 1964 it was unheard of. You either played hard bop or free; Davis' entire modal thing hadn't even completely blasted off yet. The title and opening track is a case in point.


    Rivers opens with an angular figure that is quickly translated by the band into sweeping, bopping blues. Rivers legato is lightning quick and his phrasing touches upon Coleman Hawkins, Sonny Rollins, Coleman, and Coltrane, but his embouchure is all his. He strikes the balance and then takes off on both sides of the aisle. Byard's comping is actually far more than that, building in rhythmic figures in striated minors just behind the tenor. Downstairs Blues Upstairs sounds, initially anyway, like it might have come out of the Davis book so deep is its blue root. But courtesy of Byard and Williams, Rivers goes to the left after only four choruses, moving onto the ledge a bit at a time, running knotty arpeggios through the center of the melody and increasingly bending his notes into succeeding intervals while shifting keys and times signatures


    He never goes completely over the edge as he would on his later Blue Note dates. The most difficult cut on the date is Luminous Monolith, with its swing-like figure introducing the melody. Eight bars in, the syncopation of the rhythm sections begins a stutter stem around the time and then the harmony with Byard building dense chords for Rivers to jump off of. On the Connoisseur Series CD (shame on Blue Note once again for making some of its best outside records limited editions; titles like this should be as readily available as Horace Silver's Song for My Father, but the label had been playing it ever so safe for a while and making fans buy the limited number of titles over and again) there are alternate takes of Luminous Monolith and three more of Downstairs Blues Upstairs, making it a very worthwhile look at the entire session.


    This is a highly recommended date. Rivers never played quite like this again.


    - Thom Jurek

    1. Fuchsia Swing Song

    2. Downstairs Blues Upstairs

    3. Cyclic Episode
    4. Luminous Monolith

    5. Beatrice
    6. Ellipsis
    Sam Rivers
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Time And The River Time And The River Quick View

    $29.99
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    Time And The River

    Time and The River is a brand new album from Jazz saxophonist David Sanborn. It is his first collaboration in the studio with producer and bass player Marcus Miller in over fifteen years. Through the years, the two have worked together on a number of records, winning five Grammy Awards and their albums went Gold multiple times.


    In his three-and-a-half-decade career, Sanborn has released 24 albums, won six Grammy Awards and has had eight gold albums and one platinum album. He continues to be one of the most highly active musicians of his genre. Though Sanborn has worked in many genres, his solo recordings typically blend jazz with instrumental pop and R&B. He released his first solo album Taking Off in 1975 and has worked extensively as a session musician, notably on David Bowie's Young Americans (1975).


    Time and The River is a groove oriented jazz album, with funky beats and beautiful ballads where Sanborn can show the emotional side of his legendary saxophone skills. Additional credits go to Roy Assaf, Justin Mullens, Tim Vaughn, Ricky Peterson, Javier Diaz, Marcus Baylor, Larry Braggs, Randy Crawford.

    1. A La Verticale
    2. Ordinary People
    3. Drift
    4. Can't Get Next To You feat. Larry Braggs
    5. Oublie Moi
    6. Seven Days Seven Nights
    7. Windmills of Your Mind feat. Randy Crawford
    8. Spanish Joint
    9. Overture (from The Manchurian Candidate)
    David Sanborn
    $29.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Columbia Years 1968-1969 The Columbia Years 1968-1969 Quick View

    $25.99
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    The Columbia Years 1968-1969

    All Tracks Previously Unreleased (Except Track B5/8)


    Production By Miles Davis & Teo Macero


    Featuring Performances From Hugh Masekela, Mitch Mitchell (Jimi Hendrix Experience), John Mclaughlin, Herbie Hancock, Harvey Brooks, Wayne Shorter, Billy Cox (Band Of Gypsys), Larry Young, And Members Of The Jazz Crusaders


    Remastered From The Original Analog Master Tapes


    New Interviews, Rare Photos, And Unseen Historical Documents From The Teo Macero Archive


    One can hardly imagine Prince, Erykah Badu, or Outkast without the influence of Betty Davis. Her style of raw and revelatory punk-funk defies any notions that women can't be visionaries in the worlds of rock and pop. In recent years, rappers from Ice Cube to Talib Kweli have rhymed over her intensely strong but sensual music. Betty penned the song ''Uptown'' for The Chambers Brothers and wrote the tunes that got The Commodores signed to Motown. The Detroit label soon came calling, pitching a Motown songwriting deal, which Betty turned down. Motown wanted to own everything. Heading to the UK, Marc Bolan of T. Rex urged the creative dynamo to start writing for herself. A common thread throughout Betty's career would be her unbending DIY ethic, which made her quickly turn down anyone who didn't fit with the vision. She would eventually say no to Eric Clapton as her album producer, seeing him as too banal. In 1968, she married Miles Davis and quickly influenced him on the magic of psychedelic rock along with introducing him to Jimi Hendrix-personally inspiring the classic album, Bitches Brew.


    Miles and Betty fans have long debated the truth of a near mythological session recorded in Studios B and E at Columbia's 52nd Street Studios on May 14th and 20th, 1969. The landmark session was produced by Miles and Teo Macero and featured Betty on vocals, accompanied by Jimi Hendrix Experience drummer Mitch Mitchell, guitarist John McLaughlin, Herbie Hancock on keys, and Dylan/Miles session bassist Harvey Brooks. Other players included bassist Billy Cox (Band of Gypsys), saxophonist Wayne Shorter, and organist Larry Young. Now, Light In The Attic, with full support from Betty herself, presents these recordings to the public for the very first time. These historic sessions-never heard, never bootlegged-predate Miles' revolutionary album, Bitches Brew, and are the true birth of Miles' jazz-rock explorations, along with the roots for Betty's groundbreaking funk that came years later, starting with her self-titled debut in 1973. While, ultimately, these recordings would go unreleased for nearly half a century, they would greatly shape each of their careers.


    The vibe is intrinsically unique, fresh, and futuristic-jazz heavyweights playing psychedelia, rock, and jazz-fusion long before the term became commonplace. The songs include Betty originals and covers of classics by Creedence and Cream. The concepts explored on these previously unheard sessions fueled concepts that wouldn't be fully realized until years later with Miles' seminal On The Corner.


    Additionally, included here is the first time rerelease of a 1968 Columbia single, recorded in October 1968 at Columbia Studios in Los Angeles. The session was produced by Jerry Fuller and featured South African maverick Hugh Masekela on trumpet and arrangements, plus members of jazz-funk pioneers The Crusaders-including trombonist Wayne Henderson and pianist Joe Sample. Two of the three tracks included here from this session are previously unreleased.


    This deluxe package is a treasure trove for both Betty and Miles fans, including rare documents from the pen of co-producer Teo Macero, rarely seen photos from legendary photographer Baron Wolman, and new interviews with Mrs. Davis herself, Harvey Brooks, and Hugh Masekela-the entire project overseen with Betty's full blessing.

    1. Hangin' Out
    2. Politician Man

    3. Down Home Girl

    4. Born On The Bayou

    5. I'm Ready, Willing & Able (Take 1)

    6. I'm Ready, Willing & Able (Take 9)

    7. It's My Life (Alternate Take)

    8. Live, Love, Learn

    9. My Soul Is Tired
    Betty Davis
    $25.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Rising Grace Rising Grace Quick View

    $35.99
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    Rising Grace

    Wolfgang Muthspiel - whom The New Yorker has called "a shining light" among today's jazz guitarists - made his ECM leader debut in 2014 with the trio disc Driftwood, featuring him alongside two longtime colleagues, bassist Larry Grenadier and drummer Brian Blade. For his follow-up - Rising Grace - the Austrian guitarist has convened a very special quintet, adding jazz luminary Brad Mehldau on piano and the outstanding young trumpeter Ambrose Akinmusire to the subtly virtuosic Grenadier/Blade rhythm section.


    Muthspiel moves between electric guitar and classically tinged acoustic six-string, his playing by turns grooving ("Boogaloo") and enchanting ("Rising Grace"). The lyrical flights of Akinmusire's trumpet and the probing improvisations of Mehldau run through Muthspiel's rich set of compositions like golden threads, the tracks including a warm tribute to a late, great ECM artist, Kenny Wheeler ("Den Wheeler, Den Kenny"). Rising Grace also includes a deeply melodious piece that Mehldau composed especially for the album, "Wolfgang's Waltz."


    Musicians:

    Wolfgang Muthspiel - Guitar

    Ambrose Akinmusire - Trumpet

    Brad Mehldau - Piano

    Larry Grenadier - Double Bass

    Brian Blade - Drums

    1. Rising Grace
    2. Intensive Care
    3. Triad Song
    4. Father And Sun
    5. Wolfgang's Waltz
    6. Superonny
    7. Boogaloo
    8. Den Wheeler, Den Kenny
    9. Ending Music
    10. Oak
    Wolfgang Muthspiel
    $35.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Soul Eyes Soul Eyes Quick View

    $19.99
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    Soul Eyes

    Singer, songwriter and pianist Kandace Springs will release her debut full-length album Soul Eyes on Blue Note Records. Produced by Grammy-winning producer Larry Klein (Lizz Wright, Melody Gardot, Joni Mitchell, Herbie Hancock), the album touches upon soul and pop while channeling her jazz influences as well as her Nashville upbringing. Kandace counts such stylists as Billie Holiday, Ella Fitzgerald, Nina Simone, Roberta Flack and Norah Jones as her heroes, but as evidenced by Soul Eyes, Springs mimics none of them.


    Kandace's journey to discovering her uniqueness didn't happen overnight. In fact, her 2014 self-titled debut EP had a decidedly contemporary R&B/hip-hop bent with production by Pop & Oak (Rihanna, Nicki Minaj, Miguel). The EP was incredibly well-received and led to performances on Late Show With David Letterman, Jimmy Kimmel Live and The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon, as well as appearances at the Afropunk and Bonnaroo festivals.


    Kandace was dubbed a "suave songstress" (Wall Street Journal), "a versatile and vital artist" (Afropunk), and "a vocal force to be reckoned with" (Okayplayer). Essence Magazine named her a New & Next artist and Interview Magazine made her their Music Discovery, writing that while "Hearing the word jazz might revert a listener's thoughts to the music of yesteryear...Up-and-comer Kandace Springs aims to change this notion. The singer, songwriter, and pianist blends elements of soul, jazz, and pop, producing a unique and modern twist on the genre that appeals to young and old listeners alike."


    As amazing an experience as that was, as Kandace got ready to record her album she couldn't shake the feeling that she wasn't yet singing her true self. Conversations with her longtime producers Carl Sturken and Evan Rogers led to soul searching and rethinking her musical direction. Also during this period, Kandace attracted the attention of Prince, who heard her makeover of Sam Smith's "Stay With Me" on the website Okayplayer. The music icon invited her to perform with him at Paisley Park for the 30th anniversary of Purple Rain. "He encouraged me a lot before I recorded this new record, especially during the time in which I was trying to figure out my sound," Kandace says. "He told me that I needed to do what comes naturally to me. He was absolutely right."


    For Soul Eyes, Kandace continued working closely with Rogers and Sturken, but they also recruited Klein to help the singer bring out her distinctive artistic traits. "Larry wanted me to be free in the studio," she recalls. "I've been through a lot of other sessions in which the producer tries to take control of your sound. Larry was just like, 'Go in and play what you feel.' That ultimately led to the best outcome; he captured this record perfectly."


    Klein praises Kandace as a "natural." "In this era, in which flash and hunger for fame is often equated with talent, she's that rare person who sings and plays because that is what she needs to do in life," he says. "When I first heard Kandace, I was sold after hearing one song. Her smoky voice coupled with a sense of phrasing way beyond her years, and her angular way of accompanying herself on piano grabbed me right away."


    The eleven songs contained on Soul Eyes are a mix of Kandace's originals and co-writes as well as the jazz classic "Soul Eyes" and songs by Jesse Harris, Shelby Lynne, War, and others. The album features Kandace's playing piano alongside an illustrious cast of musicians that includes trumpeter Terence Blanchard, guitarists Dean Parks and Jesse Harris, drummer Vinnie Colaiuta, organist Pete Kuzma, bassist Dan Lutz, percussionist Pete Korpela.

    1. Talk To Me
    2. Soul Eyes feat. Terence Blanchard
    3. Place To Hide
    4. Thought It Would Be Easier
    5. Novocaine Heart
    6. Neither Old Nor Young
    7. Too Good Too Last feat. Terence Blanchard
    8. Fall Guy
    9. The World Is A Ghetto
    Kandace Springs
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Freedom & Surrender Freedom & Surrender Quick View

    $24.99
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    Freedom & Surrender

    Freedom and Surrender

    The circuitous dance between the beginning and the end.


    Something amazing and terrifying happened to me as I entered into my 30s. I realized that I had run far off the course of my scripted plans, my projections for who I'd be, what I'd be doing, and how it would feel at this point. Then, the realization the mapped trail couldn't be recovered. A hound without a hunt, I was captured by unfamiliar woods far from earshot of the original game and players. Untethered by marriage with a scrap pile of maternal designs that never took root, I found myself forced, thank goodness, to let go.


    The pageantry of over-identifying with past experiences and old ideals had ended. In review, I found that life's unfolding had exceeded my most elaborate visions while other hopes had slipped into ruin in the clasp of my determined hands. Meanwhile, a new meekness and curiosity made all of my experiences sacred and overwhelming, something akin to a reverent depression. Desire was quieted in my heart, and I was uneasy in the cool of my newness, wondering what I really wanted to do next.


    When the label suggested that I consider working with Larry Klein, my entire focus shifted with a warm shrug, Why not? He's produced some of my favorite records. Within a few conversations I had found plenty of reasons to trust the voice on the other end of the line. I knew that I was respected for my potential and achievements, and he wasn't new to dealing with strong women. Another shrug, Why not? I had plenty to sing about now, a heart cracked open by disappointment, a will broken by the truth. I was ready for a new project, the kind of baby that I knew how to make.


    It was suggested to me initially that I make a record of covers. It was the very moment my hard head became bent on writing my way out of my valley, no matter how hard or long I'd have to work for it. I'd count my steps and tell stories until I met the ridge line without borrowing anyone else's view. This was not my hour to cover, but to uncover, and hopefully, the reveal would be worth something. I trembled in the wait for my own revelation.


    I scurried around the country (Nashville, New York and LA) to have collaborative conversations with old and new friends. I remembered how to just sit with people and talk, even though I was on a schedule and budget. We all spoke like we were on Grandma's porch, but the work got done. To my delighted surprise, much of this record was written with Larry himself.


    My average day of preproduction with him looked like: A sunrise run and swim at Santa Monica pier, showing up to his studio sandy, salty, and red faced, talking through beautiful rambles with him and David Batteau while high on espresso. Then we'd get snagged by a soulful riff from Larry's acoustic bass guitar as he noodled along (seemingly) aimlessly. Often a story would present a hook and we'd return the next day with responses. This felt like an old and dignified pace of work, but also kind of risky. However, I looked up after a few months of these weeklong neighborly sits and real songs were following us, a train getting longer, each car intact and connected as we rolled on.


    In the evenings I listened to demos of the budding songs on my phone as the sun set over the Pacific. I could see them, unmade movies. The tide of communion would pull back and the shining pieces left could be made into anything. This is when I knew that I had, in these mosaic sessions, stumbled upon a new page of my life.


    I remembered the feeling of being found. One of the most moving songs from it's inception was, Somewhere Down the Mystic. Playing on the simple wonders of my rustic Appalachian life, we imagined a love lost to death and the feeling of it's lasting warmth, a nod to love's reach across life's threshold.


    Months later, on February 20th, I had a near death experience, sliding across 300 yards of ice coated mountain curve. I softened my body and rested my hands in my lap. The heavy car floated silently towards a 75 foot ravine that ended with a wide band of frozen creek. Ok was the only thing I could get out in a sigh. I was stopped by a young bellwood tree that grew out of the bank like a hook. I slowed my breathing and meditated in suspension. About 20 minutes later, a young neighbor pulled the door open, reaching in with a strong arm to guide my climb out. Now when I sing the chorus, I see the gracious hole and the sweet sapling that grows over it. It threw me back, a fish returned to the river with a cut lip.


    The pink bells of the tree can be seen on my homepage, and I want to keep such simple things close from now on. Why not? They were strong enough to save me. In surrender I experience freedom. The gift of an end is a beginning. I greet the sun with the only reason I've ever needed, why not?

    -Lizz Wright

    1. Freedom
    2. The Game
    3. The New Game
    4. Lean In
    5. Right Where You Are
    6. River Man
    7. Somewhere Down The Mystic
    8. Real Life Painting
    9. To Love Somebody
    10. Here And Now
    11. You
    12. Blessed The Brave
    13. Surrender
    Lizz Wright
    $24.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Paris 1969 Paris 1969 Quick View

    $19.99
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    Paris 1969

    Blue Note Records has announced Thelonious Monk Paris 1969, a fascinating and important late-career document of the legendary jazz pianist and composer in performance with his Quartet at the Salle Pleyel concert hall in Paris, France on December 15, 1969. Beautifully captured on B&W film, the concert also featured a surprise guest appearance from renowned drummer Philly Joe Jones. Also included is a rare on-camera interview with Monk that was conducted by the French bassist Jacques Hess after the concert.


    "The 1969 Paris concert captures the power and the undiminished beauty of Monk's music, reminding us that even as his body aged his musical imagination knew no limits," writes Monk scholar Robin Kelley in his liner notes essay. However, Kelley also illuminates what a peculiar and challenging moment 1969 was for the 52-year-old pianist. Monk hadn't achieved true success until the late-50s with his legendary run at the Five Spot CafÉ in New York City with John Coltrane (a band that was brilliantly captured on the lost recording Thelonious Monk Quartet with John Coltrane at Carnegie Hall from 1957 which was discovered and released on Blue Note in 2005). By the early-60s Monk's success had peaked when he signed with Columbia Records and was eventually featured on the cover of TIME Magazine in 1964.


    However, by 1969, in addition to health issues, Monk's success was beginning to wane with the emergence of rock and the resulting jazz fusion movement. His recording contract with Columbia had just come to end after an ill-advised attempt at marketing him to a younger rock audience. That disappointment was followed by the departure of drummer Ben Riley and bassist Larry Gales from his band which left Monk with two chairs to fill on short notice before his European tour.


    Monk eventually found two young musicians - bassist Nate Hygelund and drummer Paris Wright - to fill out the Quartet with his longtime tenor saxophonist Charlie Rouse. Luckily the inexperienced rhythm section had some time to gel before hitting the stage in Paris with a lengthy engagement in London followed by stops in Germany and Italy. By the time they reached the Pleyel the band was in fine form, which made for a triumphant return for Monk to the very stage he had made his Parisian debut on in 1954 in front of a hostile audience who felt that Monk was too avant-garde. 15 years later the situation could not have been more different with an enthusiastic audience and the concert being broadcast on television.


    In addition to rollicking Quartet versions of Monk classics such as "I Mean You," "Straight No Chaser," and "Blue Monk," the set also includes three stunning solo piano performances on "Don't Blame Me," "I Love You Sweetheart Of All My Dreams," and "Crepuscule With Nellie." However, an undeniable highlight of the concert was when the veteran drummer Philly Joe Jones who was an expat living in Paris at the time comes from backstage to borrow the sticks from the 17-year-old Wright, providing a palpable spark on Monk's "Nutty."

    1. I Mean You
    2. Ruby My Dear
    3. Straight No Chaser
    4. Bright Mississippi
    5. Light Blue
    6. Epistrophy
    7. Don't Blame Me
    8. I Love You Sweetheart of All My Dreams
    9. Crepuscule With Nellie
    10. Bright Mississippi
    11. Nutty
    12. Blue Monk
    Thelonious Monk
    $19.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Gratitude Gratitude Quick View

    $44.99
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    Gratitude

    180 Gram Translucent Blue Colored Vinyl With Gatefold Cover


    Mastered Impeccably By Joe Reagoso


    Manufactured At R.T.I.


    During the 1970s, a new brand of pop music was born - one that was steeped in African and African-American styles - particularly jazz and R&B but appealed to a broader cross-section of the listening public. As founder and leader of the band Earth, Wind & Fire, Maurice White not only embraced but also helped bring about this evolution of pop, which bridged the gap that has often separated the musical tastes of black and white America. It certainly was successful, as EWF combined high-caliber musicianship, wide-ranging musical genre eclecticism, and '70s multicultural spiritualism. "I wanted to do something that hadn't been done before," Maurice explains. "Although we were basically jazz musicians, we played soul, funk, gospel, blues, jazz, rock and dance music which somehow ended up becoming pop. We were coming out of a decade of experimentation, mind expansion and cosmic awareness. I wanted our music to convey messages of universal love and harmony without force-feeding listeners' spiritual content."Maurice was born December 19, 1941, in Memphis, TN. He was immersed in a rich musical culture that spanned the boundaries between jazz, gospel, R&B, blues and early rock. All of these styles played a role in the development of Maurice's musical identity. At age six, he began singing in his church's gospel choir but soon his interest turned to percussion. He began working gigs as a drummer while still in high school. His first professional performance was with Booker T. Jones, who eventually achieved stardom as Booker T and the MGs.After graduating high school, Maurice moved to the Windy City to continue his musical education at the prestigious Chicago Conservatory Of Music. He continued picking up drumming jobs on the side, which eventually lead to a steady spot as a studio percussionist with the legendary Chicago label, Chess Records. At Chess, Maurice had the privilege of playing with such greats as Etta James, Fontella Bass, Billy Stewart, Willie Dixon, Sonny Stitt and Ramsey Lewis, whose trio he joined in 1967. He spent nearly three years as part of the Ramsey Lewis Trio. "Ramsey helped shape my musical vision beyond just the music," Maurice explains. "I learned about performance and staging." Maurice also learned about the African thumb piano, or Kalimba, an instrument whose sound would become central to much of his work over the years.In 1969, Maurice left the Ramsey Lewis Trio and joined two friends in Chicago, Wade Flemons and Don Whitehead, as a songwriting team composing songs and commercials in the Chicago area. The three friends got a recording contract with Capitol and called themselves the "Salty Peppers," and had a marginal hit in the Mid-western area called "La La Time." That band featured Maurice on vocals, percussion and Kalimba along with keyboardists/vocalists Wade Flemons and Don Whitehead.


    After relocating to Los Angeles and signing a new contract with Warner Bros., Maurice simultaneously made what may have been the smartest move of his young career. He changed the band's name to Earth, Wind & Fire (after the three elements in his astrological chart). The new name also captured Maurice's spiritual approach to music - one that transcended categories and appealed to multiple artistic principals, including composition, musicianship, production, and performance. In addition to White, Flemons and Whitehead, Maurice recruited Michael Beal on guitar, Leslie Drayton, Chester Washington and Alex Thomas on horns, Sherry Scott on vocals, percussionist Phillard Williams and his younger brother Verdine on bass.


    Earth, Wind & Fire recorded two albums for Warner Brothers: the self-titled 1970 album Earth, Wind And Fire and the 1971 album The Need Of Love. A single from this album, "I Think About Lovin' You," provided EWF with their first Top 40 R&B hit. Also in 1971, the group performed the soundtrack to the Melvin Van Peebles film 'Sweet Sweetback's Baadasssss Song'.


    In 1972, White dissolved the line-up (except he and brother Verdine White) and added Jessica Cleaves (vocals - formerly of the R&B group The Friends of Distinction), Ronnie Laws (flute, saxophone), Roland Bautista (guitar), Larry Dunn (keyboard), Ralph Johnson (percussion) and Philip Bailey (vocals, formerly of Friends & Love). Maurice became disillusioned with Warner Brothers, which had signed the group primarily as a jazz act. Maurice, in contrast, was more interested in combining elements of jazz, rock, and soul into an evolving form of fusion, a truly universal sound.


    A performance at New York's Rockefeller Center introduced EWF to Clive Davis, then President of Columbia Records. Davis loved what he saw and bought their contract from Warner Bros. With Columbia Records, debuting with the 1972 album Last Days And Time, the group slowly began to build a reputation for innovative recordings and exciting, live shows, complete with feats of magic (floating pianos, spinning drum kits, vanishing artists) engineered by Doug Henning and his then-unknown assistant David Copperfield. Their first gold album, Head To The Sky, peaked at number 27 pop in the summer of 1973, yielding a smooth tangy cover of "Evil" and the title track single. The first platinum EWF album, Open Our Eyes, whose title track was a remake of the classic originally recorded by Savoy Records group the Gospel Clefs, included "Mighty Mighty" (number four R&B) and "Kalimba Story" (number six R&B).


    Maurice once again shared a label roster with Ramsey Lewis, whose Columbia debut Sun Goddess, was issued in December 1974. The radio-aired title track was released as a single under the name Ramsey Lewis and Earth, Wind & Fire. It went to number 20 R&B in early 1975. The Sun Goddess album went gold, hitting number 12 pop in early 1975. Maurice had also played on Lewis' other high-charting album, Wade In The Water; the title track single peaked at number three R&B in the summer of 1966.


    The inspiration for "Shining Star" (one of EW&F's most beloved singles) was gleaned from thoughts Maurice had during a walk under the star-filled skies that surrounded the mountains around Caribou Ranch, CO a popular recording site and retreat during the '70s. The track was originally included in the 'That's The Way Of The World' movie that starred Harvey Keitel and was produced by Sig Shore (Superfly). "Shining Star" glittered at number one R&B for two weeks and hit number one pop in early 1975. It was included on their 1975 multi-platinum album That's The Way Of The World that held the number one pop spot for three weeks in Spring 1975 and earned them their first Grammy Award. The title track single made it to number five R&B in summer of 1975. It also yielded the classic ballad "Reasons," an extremely popular radio-aired album track.


    The multi-platinum album Gratitude held the number one pop album spot for three weeks in late 1975. On the album was "Singasong" (gold, number one R&B for two weeks, number five pop), the Skip Scarborough ballad "Can't Hide Love" (number 11 R&B), and the popular radio-aired album tracks "Celebrate," "Gratitude," and the live version of "Reasons." In 1976, Maurice decided he wanted to record a spiritual album. The multi-platinum album Spirit parked at number two pop for two weeks in fall of 1976 and boasted the gold, number one R&B single "Getaway" and "Saturday Nite." Spirit is remembered as one of EWF's best albums and sadly for also being the last project of Producer Charles Stepney. He died May 17, 1976, in Chicago, IL, at the age of 45. Charles was a former Chess Records arranger/producer/session musician/multi-instrumentalist/songwriter and Maurice's main collaborator on his EWF projects. The multi-platinum album All 'N All peaked at number three pop in late 1977, won three Grammy's, and had arrangements by Chicago soul mainstay Tom Tom Washington and Eumir Deodato. The singles were "Serpentine Fire" (number one R&B for seven weeks) and "Fantasy." The group's horn section, the legendary Phenix Horns (Don Myrick on saxophone, Louis Satterfield on trombone, Rahmlee Michael Davis and Michael Harris on trumpets) became an integral part of the Earth, Wind & Fire sound.


    During this time, Maurice produced several artists such as The Emotions (1976's Flowers and 1977's Rejoice which included the number one R&B/pop hit "Best Of My Love") and Deniece Williams (1976's This Is Niecy which included the Top Ten R&B hit "Free"). In the late seventies, in association with Columbia Records, Maurice also launched a record label, ARC.


    The multi-platinum greatest-hits set The Best Of Earth, Wind & Fire, Vol. I included a cover of the Beatles' "Got To Get You Into My Life" went to number one R&B and number nine pop in Summer 1978. The group performed the song in the 1978 Bee Gees/Peter Frampton movie 'Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band'. Another single, "September," made it to number one R&B, number eight pop in early 1978. On the flip side was the enchanting popular radio-aired album track "Love's Holiday" from All 'N All.


    Their live performances were stellar as well. Sellout crowds were spellbound by the band's bombastic performances. Their performances blasted a cosmic wave of peace, love and other happy vibrations to audiences using a combination of eye-popping costumes, lights, pyrotechnics and plain old good music. Sometimes they even threw in magic illusions. Earth, Wind & Fire's message was one of universal harmony, in both musical and cultural senses. "We live in a negative society," Maurice told Newsweek. "Most people can't see beauty and love. I see our music as medicine."


    The multi-platinum album I Am hit number three pop in Summer 1979 on the strength of the million-selling single "Boogie Wonderland" with The Emotions (number two R&B for four weeks, number six pop) and the phenomenal gold ballad "After The Love Has Gone," written by David Foster, Jay Graydon and Bill Champlin that stayed at number two R&B/pop for two weeks. Their Faces album peaked at number ten pop in late 1980 and was boosted to gold by the singles "Let Me Talk" (number eight R&B), "You" (number ten R&B), and "And Love Goes On."


    The million-selling funked-up "Let's Groove," co-written by The Emotions' Wanda Vaughn and her husband Wayne Vaughn, was the track that re-energized EWF's career, parking at number one R&B for eight weeks and number three pop, causing their Raise! album to go platinum (hitting number five pop in late 1981). Their next gold album Powerlight made it to number 12 pop in spring 1983 and included the Top Ten R&B single and Grammy-nominated "Fall In Love With Me." Their 1983 Electric Universe album stalled at number 40 pop, breaking the band's string of gold, platinum and multi-platinum albums.


    In 1983, Maurice decided he and the band needed a break. During this hiatus, Maurice recorded his self-titled solo album Maurice White and produced various artists including Neal Diamond, Barbra Streisand and Jennifer Holliday. Reuniting with the band in 1987, EWF released the album Touch The World and scored yet another number one R&B single, "System of Survival" and embarked on a corresponding nine-month world tour. This was followed by the 1988 release The Best Of Earth, Wind & Fire Vol. II.


    In 1990 the group released the album Heritage. Two years later, Earth, Wind & Fire released The Eternal Dance; a 55-track boxed set retrospective of the band's entire history. The appearance of such a project after a prolonged period of relative inactivity signaled to many listeners that the band was calling it quits but that did not turn out to be case. In 1993, EWF released the album, Millennium that included the Grammy-nominated "Sunday Morning" and "Spend The Night."


    Earth, Wind & Fire kept recording and in 1996 released Avatar and Greatest Hits Live; followed by 1997's In The Name Of Love; 2002's That's The Way Of The World: Alive In '75; Live In Rio which was recorded during their 1979 "I Am World Tour;" 2003's The Promise, which included the Grammy-nominated "Hold Me" and 2005's Illumination, which included the Grammy-nominated "Show Me The Way."


    In 2000, the nine-piece '70s edition of Earth, Wind & Fire reunited for one night only in honor of their induction into The Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame. In 2001, Eagle Rock Entertainment released the documentary 'Earth, Wind & Fire: Shining Stars', which contains rarely seen historic video footage along with in-depth interviews with the band members.


    Even though Maurice is no longer a part of the touring group, he remains the band's heart and soul from behind the scenes as composer and producer. Maurice reflects, "I wanted to create a library of music that would stand the test of time. 'Cosmic Consciousness' is the key component of our work. Expanding awareness and uplifting spirits is so important in this day. People are looking for more. I hope our music can give them some encouragement and peace."

    LP 1
    1. Introduction

    2. Africano/ Power Medley

    3. Yearnin' Learnin'

    4. Devotion

    5. Sun Goddess
    6. Reasons

    7. Sing A Message To You


    LP 2
    1. Shining Star

    2. New World Symphony
    3. Sunshine

    4. Singasong

    5. Gratitude

    6. Celebrate

    7. Can't Hide Love

    Earth, Wind & Fire
    $44.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Buy Now
  • A Treasure (180 Gram) (Out Of Stock) A Treasure (180 Gram) (Out Of Stock) Quick View

    $54.99
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    A Treasure (180 Gram) (Out Of Stock)

    Latest In Young's Archive Performance Series Spotlights Artist's Incredible 1984-85 Run w/ the All-Star Lineup of the International Harvesters


    Bound for Glory: Young's Country-Minded Gems Sparkle Onstage


    Five of the Dozen Tracks Never Before Released Including Sought-After Grey Riders


    Audiophile-Grade Vinyl: 4th Side Features Special Etching


    Includes MP3 Download of Entire Album


    Neil Young's Archive Performance Series returns in 2011 with a true gem that will please both hardcore fans as well as music listeners seeking insight into one of the most unheralded, unexpected tours in history. Captured during Young's 1984-85 tour with a group of country pros named the International Harvesters, and featuring several of the most acclaimed performances in the legendary artist's career, A Treasure lives up to its name and more. 180g 2LP, mastered by Chris Bellman from the original tapes and pressed at Pallas, features a special art etching on the fourth side. In addition to the incredible sound, it's the music that really matters.


    The 12-track live album includes songs, five of which are previously unreleased, recorded during Young's 1984 and 1985 U.S. tours without the support of an album or Young's then-record label due to unique and unusual circumstances. A Treasure features Young's onstage work with some of the greatest artists in the history of country music, including the late, great Ben Keith on steel and slide guitar and Rufus Thibodeaux on fiddle, along with living legends Spooner Oldham and Hargus Pig Robbins on piano, Tim Drummond and Joe Allen on bass, and Karl Himmel on drums, among many others.


    The live album captures the iconic artist during a fascinating time in his career, when he was facing criticism and lawsuits from his then-current record company for exploring a more traditionally country sound. You can call me erratic, Young said when asked at the time about his tendency toward musical shape-shifting, but I've been consistent about it, consistently erratic. A Treasure is akin to a sonic time capsule, instantly transporting the listener to the time and place when it was made. I love this record, Young says. I hadn't heard these takes in 25 years, but when we unearthed them, co-producer Ben Keith said, 'This is a treasure.'


    Part of what makes A Treasure so compelling is the musical contributions of The International Harvesters, with whom Young was playing at the time. Many of them were already paragons within the country music world and their notoriety has only grown in the years since. I just love to hear those guys, Young says. They're all country music legends. Those behind the scenes also made significant contributions to A Treasure's sonic potency. Tim Mulligan mixed and mastered the tracks. At the time these songs were recorded, Bob Sterne was the tour manager, Tim Foster ran the stage, and Larry Cragg was in charge of the band's instruments.


    Mastered from the original tapes by Chris Bellman at Bernie Grundman Mastering, pressed at Pallas, and featuring heavenly sound, this is both an audiophile delight and musical revelation. Also includes MP3 download of entire record. Don't pass this up!


    1. Amber Jean

    2. Are You Ready For The Country?
    3. It Might Have Been
    4. Bound For Glory
    5. Let Your Fingers Do The Walking

    6. Flying On The Ground Is Wrong
    7. Motor City
    8. Soul Of A Woman

    9. Get Back To The Country
    10. Southern Pacific
    11. Nothing Is Perfect
    12. Grey Riders

    Neil Young
    $54.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Temporarily out of stock
  • Howard Tate (Out Of Stock) Howard Tate (Out Of Stock) Quick View

    $24.99
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    Howard Tate (Out Of Stock)

    Singer Howard Tate cracked the R&B Top 20 three times in the late 1960s, left music and endured hardship and anonymity for nearly 30 years and beginning in the early 2000s returned to his rightful place as one of America's most revered soul performers.


    Tate was born in Macon, Georgia, in 1939 and moved with his family to Philadelphia as a young boy. In his teens, he joined a north Philadelphia gospel group, the Gainors, that also featured to-be star Garnet Mimms. The group recorded in the early 1960s for Mercury Records and Cameo Records before Tate left to become the featured singer of organist Bill Doggett's group.


    In the mid-'60s, Mimms urged producer Jerry Ragovoy to check out Tate, and from 1966 to 1969 Tate and Ragovoy recorded about 10 singles, the first for the Utopia label, the rest for Verve. Ain't Nobody Home (1966), Look At Granny Run Run (1966) and Stop (1967), all written or co-written by Ragovoy, each charted R&B Top 20. But to rock audiences, Tate was best known as the original performer of Get It While You Can, which became one of Janis Joplin's signature tunes. Tate's debut album, Get It While You Can, was released in 1966 to tremendous acclaim. Rolling Stone called the album a spectacular showcase of suave, muscular good-powered singing, heavily influenced by Sam Cooke, with a joyous, shrieking falsetto that became Tate's trademark.


    Tate recorded a few more singles for Lloyd Price's label, Turntable, before reuniting briefly with Ragovoy for sessions on Atlantic. After one more single on Epic in 1974, Tate all but vanished. Despite his success, he was unhappy with how the music business was treating him, never having seen any royalties.


    Tate sold securities in the New Jersey and Philadelphia areas into the 1980s when he succumbed to substance abuse and endured a very tumultuous period of homelessness and personal loss. He turned his life around and began work as a minister and counselor in the early 1990s. Then in 2001, a musician Tate had toured with back in the 1960s saw him in a supermarket and within hours Tate's old producer, Jerry Ragovoy, was calling, resulting in a return to the studio for the Grammy-nominated Rediscovered. He followed up with Howard Tate Live in 2006, A Portrait Of Howard - with guests Lou Reed, Carla Bley and Larry Goldings - in 2007 and Blue Day in 2008.


    Music luminaries have recognized and celebrated Tate's trademark voice throughout the years, with Elvis Costello calling him the missing link between Jackie Wilson and Al Green. Among the well-known musicians that have covered songs originally recorded by Tate are Joplin (Get It While You Can), Jimi Hendrix (Stop), Hugh Masekela (Stop), B.B. King (Ain't Nobody Home), Ry Cooder (Look At Granny Run Run) and Grand Funk Railroad (Look At Granny Run Run).

    1. Look At Granny Run Run
    2. Sweet Sixteen
    3. Louisiana 1927
    4. Ill Be Home
    5. Dear Lord
    6. Aint Nobody Home
    Howard Tate
    $24.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP D2D -Sealed Direct to Disc (D2D) Temporarily out of stock
  • The Nightfly (45 RPM Box Set) (Out Of Stock) The Nightfly (45 RPM Box Set) (Out Of Stock) Quick View

    $99.99
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    The Nightfly (45 RPM Box Set) (Out Of Stock)

    Mastered From The Original Master Tapes With Mobile Fidelity's One-Step Process: The Nightfly US1S 45RPM Box Set Is The Ultimate Analog Version Of Donald Fagen's 1982 Landmark Debut


    Lavish Packaging Includes Opulent Box And Special Foil-Stamped Jackets: Deluxe Audiophile Pressing Strictly Limited To 6000 Numbered Copies


    Cinema For The Ears: The Nightly Remains One Of The Best-Sounding Albums Ever Made With Reference Production, Standout Playing, And Jazz-Like Arrangements That Embody Timeless Cool


    Donald Fagen's largely autobiographical The Nightfly remains one of the best-sounding albums ever made. Revered by audiophiles, the Steely Dan co-founder's 1982 set immediately became a demonstration disc at hi-fi shows and audio salons the world over. It also quickly emerged as an irreplaceable monitor-evaluating tool for recording-studio engineers and front-of-the-house testing device for concert-venue soundboard engineers who continue to use it today. Painstakingly recorded over eight months by illustrious producer Gary Katz and a Hall of Fame-worthy cast of perfectionist-minded musicians, The Nightfly endures as a rare trifecta of superlative performance, consummate songwriting, and crisp, benchmark production. Mobile Fidelity is honored to give this seminal effort unsurpassed treatment befitting the most serious music connoisseurs.


    Fagen's solo debut reaches three-dimensional sonic and emotional heights never before attained by analog recordings on Mobile Fidelity's opulent UD1S (UltraDisc One-Step) box set. Strictly limited to 5,000 numbered copies, this ultra-hi-fi collector's edition literally and figuratively brings you closer to music that picks up where Steely Dan's Gaucho leaves off. You'll enjoy deep-black backgrounds, boundless soundstaging, pointillist details, staggering dynamics, and arguably, the most lifelike tonalities and nuances ever committed to vinyl. Experienced via UD1S, The Nightfly places Fagen and his session pros in your listening room. Every note, breath, and movement is reproduced with exquisite accuracy, wowing clarity, and impeccable balance. Consider this edition your new go-to reference.


    The lavish packaging and beautiful presentation of Mobile Fidelity's The Nightfly pressing befit its extremely select status. Housed in a deluxe box, this UD1S version contains special foil-stamped jackets and faithful-to-the-original graphics that illuminate the splendor of the recording. No expense has been spared. Aurally and visually, this reissue of The Nightfly is a curatorial artifact meant to be preserved, poured over, touched, and examined. It is made for discerning listeners that prize sound quality and creativity, and who desire to fully immerse themselves in the art - and everything involved with the album, from the images to the textures and liner notes.


    Nominated for seven Grammy Awards, The Nightfly represent[s] certain fantasies that might have been entertained by a young man growing up in the remote suburbs of a northeastern city during the late fifties and early sixties, i.e., one of my general height, weight, and build, pens Fagen in the liner notes, revealing the work's thematic thrust and wistful, nostalgic appeal. At their core, songs look at the world via an optimistic, mindfully innocent lens and through the eyes of an adolescent holed up in his bedroom with his ear to a radio whose exciting transmissions inspire thoughts of futuristic cities, late-night deejays, otherworldly hopes, and Cold War romances. Cinema for the ears, The Nightfly comes on like a film transferred to wax - its stories filled with relatable vulnerability, ambition, and warmth.


    It is also timelessly cool, with everything from the iconic album cover - complete with Fagen in the role of a cigarette-smoking disk jockey spinning a Sonny Rollins album on an RCA turntable at 4:09 in the morning - to the flawless playing honoring the laid-back, hip, stylish jazz pedigree of the arrangements. Indeed, The Nightfly's fame owes as much to the stunning contributions by stickler musicians - saxophonist Michael Brecker, trumpeter Randy Brecker, guitarist Larry Carlton, drummer Steve Jordan, bassist Marcus Miller, drummer Jeff Porcaro, and Harmonica Frank Floyd included - as it does the particulars behind its creation, which involved cutting-edge technology, novel microphoning techniques, and pioneering recording methods that gave Fagen exactly what he demanded. His insistence on dialing in exacting drum sounds is by itself the stuff of legend.


    The results of the meticulous sessions transcend eras and generations - part of its very design. Virtually every track connects with classic 50s and 60s styles. Green Flower Street doubles as an homage to the jazz standard On Green Dolphin Street. The title track draws imagery from blues pioneer Charley Patton. Ruby Baby references soul greats the Drifters. Maxine nods to harmonies perfected by big-band vocal quartets like the Four Freshmen. The Goodbye Look acknowledges the bossa-nova craze of Fagen's youth. In all respects, The Nightfly rules the airwaves.


    More About Mobile Fidelity UltraDisc One-Step and Why It Is Superior

    Instead of utilizing the industry-standard three-step lacquer process, Mobile Fidelity Sound Lab's new UltraDisc One-Step (UD1S) uses only one step, bypassing two processes of generational loss. While three-step processing is designed for optimum yield and efficiency, UD1S is created for the ultimate in sound quality. Just as Mobile Fidelity pioneered the UHQR (Ultra High-Quality Record) with JVC in the 1980s, UD1S again represents another state-of-the-art advance in the record-manufacturing process. MFSL engineers begin with the original master tapes and meticulously cut a set of lacquers. These lacquers are used to create a very fragile, pristine UD1S stamper called a convert. Delicate converts are then formed into the actual record stampers, producing a final product that literally and figuratively brings you closer to the music. By skipping the additional steps of pulling another positive and an additional negative, as done in the three-step process used in standard pressings, UD1S produces a final LP with the lowest noise floor possible today. The removal of the additional two steps of generational loss in the plating process reveals tremendous amounts of extra musical detail and dynamics, which are otherwise lost due to the standard copying process. The exclusive nature of these very limited pressings guarantees that every UD1S pressing serves as an immaculate replica of the lacquer sourced directly from the original master tape. Every conceivable aspect of vinyl production is optimized to produce the most perfect record album available today.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. I.G.Y.
    2. Green Flower Street
    3. Ruby Baby
    4. Maxine
    5. New Frontier
    6. The Nightfly
    7. The Goodbye Look
    8. Walk Between Raindrops
    Donald Fagen
    $99.99
    Vinyl LP UltraDisc One-Step 45 RPM Box Set - 2 LPs Sealed Temporarily out of stock
  • Greatest Hits (Out Of Stock) Greatest Hits (Out Of Stock) Quick View

    $42.99
    x

    Greatest Hits (Out Of Stock)

    180 Gram Translucent Gold Colored Vinyl With Gatefold Cover


    During the 1970s, a new brand of pop music was born - one that was steeped in African and African-American styles - particularly jazz and R&B but appealed to a broader cross-section of the listening public. As founder and leader of the band Earth, Wind & Fire, Maurice White not only embraced but also helped bring about this evolution of pop, which bridged the gap that has often separated the musical tastes of black and white America. It certainly was successful, as EWF combined high-caliber musicianship, wide-ranging musical genre eclecticism, and '70s multicultural spiritualism. "I wanted to do something that hadn't been done before," Maurice explains. "Although we were basically jazz musicians, we played soul, funk, gospel, blues, jazz, rock and dance music which somehow ended up becoming pop. We were coming out of a decade of experimentation, mind expansion and cosmic awareness. I wanted our music to convey messages of universal love and harmony without force-feeding listeners' spiritual content."Maurice was born December 19, 1941, in Memphis, TN. He was immersed in a rich musical culture that spanned the boundaries between jazz, gospel, R&B, blues and early rock. All of these styles played a role in the development of Maurice's musical identity. At age six, he began singing in his church's gospel choir but soon his interest turned to percussion. He began working gigs as a drummer while still in high school. His first professional performance was with Booker T. Jones, who eventually achieved stardom as Booker T and the MGs.After graduating high school, Maurice moved to the Windy City to continue his musical education at the prestigious Chicago Conservatory Of Music. He continued picking up drumming jobs on the side, which eventually lead to a steady spot as a studio percussionist with the legendary Chicago label, Chess Records. At Chess, Maurice had the privilege of playing with such greats as Etta James, Fontella Bass, Billy Stewart, Willie Dixon, Sonny Stitt and Ramsey Lewis, whose trio he joined in 1967. He spent nearly three years as part of the Ramsey Lewis Trio. "Ramsey helped shape my musical vision beyond just the music," Maurice explains. "I learned about performance and staging." Maurice also learned about the African thumb piano, or Kalimba, an instrument whose sound would become central to much of his work over the years.In 1969, Maurice left the Ramsey Lewis Trio and joined two friends in Chicago, Wade Flemons and Don Whitehead, as a songwriting team composing songs and commercials in the Chicago area. The three friends got a recording contract with Capitol and called themselves the "Salty Peppers," and had a marginal hit in the Midwestern area called "La La Time." That band featured Maurice on vocals, percussion and Kalimba along with keyboardists/vocalists Wade Flemons and Don Whitehead.


    After relocating to Los Angeles and signing a new contract with Warner Bros., Maurice simultaneously made what may have been the smartest move of his young career. He changed the band's name to Earth, Wind & Fire (after the three elements in his astrological chart). The new name also captured Maurice's spiritual approach to music - one that transcended categories and appealed to multiple artistic principals, including composition, musicianship, production, and performance. In addition to White, Flemons and Whitehead, Maurice recruited Michael Beal on guitar, Leslie Drayton, Chester Washington and Alex Thomas on horns, Sherry Scott on vocals, percussionist Phillard Williams and his younger brother Verdine on bass.


    Earth, Wind & Fire recorded two albums for Warner Brothers: the self-titled 1970 album Earth, Wind And Fire and the 1971 album The Need Of Love. A single from this album, "I Think About Lovin' You," provided EWF with their first Top 40 R&B hit. Also in 1971, the group performed the soundtrack to the Melvin Van Peebles film 'Sweet Sweetback's Baadasssss Song'.


    In 1972, White dissolved the line-up (except he and brother Verdine White) and added Jessica Cleaves (vocals - formerly of the R&B group The Friends of Distinction), Ronnie Laws (flute, saxophone), Roland Bautista (guitar), Larry Dunn (keyboard), Ralph Johnson (percussion) and Philip Bailey (vocals, formerly of Friends & Love). Maurice became disillusioned with Warner Brothers, which had signed the group primarily as a jazz act. Maurice, in contrast, was more interested in combining elements of jazz, rock, and soul into an evolving form of fusion, a truly universal sound.


    A performance at New York's Rockefeller Center introduced EWF to Clive Davis, then President of Columbia Records. Davis loved what he saw and bought their contract from Warner Bros. With Columbia Records, debuting with the 1972 album Last Days And Time, the group slowly began to build a reputation for innovative recordings and exciting, live shows, complete with feats of magic (floating pianos, spinning drum kits, vanishing artists) engineered by Doug Henning and his then-unknown assistant David Copperfield. Their first gold album, Head To The Sky, peaked at number 27 pop in the summer of 1973, yielding a smooth tangy cover of "Evil" and the title track single. The first platinum EWF album, Open Our Eyes, whose title track was a remake of the classic originally recorded by Savoy Records group the Gospel Clefs, included "Mighty Mighty" (number four R&B) and "Kalimba Story" (number six R&B).


    Maurice once again shared a label roster with Ramsey Lewis, whose Columbia debut Sun Goddess, was issued in December 1974. The radio-aired title track was released as a single under the name Ramsey Lewis and Earth, Wind & Fire. It went to number 20 R&B in early 1975. The Sun Goddess album went gold, hitting number 12 pop in early 1975. Maurice had also played on Lewis' other high-charting album, Wade In The Water; the title track single peaked at number three R&B in the summer of 1966.


    The inspiration for "Shining Star" (one of EW&F's most beloved singles) was gleaned from thoughts Maurice had during a walk under the star-filled skies that surrounded the mountains around Caribou Ranch, CO a popular recording site and retreat during the '70s. The track was originally included in the 'That's The Way Of The World' movie that starred Harvey Keitel and was produced by Sig Shore (Superfly). "Shining Star" glittered at number one R&B for two weeks and hit number one pop in early 1975. It was included on their 1975 multi-platinum album That's The Way Of The World that held the number one pop spot for three weeks in Spring 1975 and earned them their first Grammy Award. The title track single made it to number five R&B in summer of 1975. It also yielded the classic ballad "Reasons," an extremely popular radio-aired album track.


    The multi-platinum album Gratitude held the number one pop album spot for three weeks in late 1975. On the album was "Singasong" (gold, number one R&B for two weeks, number five pop), the Skip Scarborough ballad "Can't Hide Love" (number 11 R&B), and the popular radio-aired album tracks "Celebrate," "Gratitude," and the live version of "Reasons." In 1976, Maurice decided he wanted to record a spiritual album. The multi-platinum album Spirit parked at number two pop for two weeks in fall of 1976 and boasted the gold, number one R&B single "Getaway" and "Saturday Nite." Spirit is remembered as one of EWF's best albums and sadly for also being the last project of Producer Charles Stepney. He died May 17, 1976, in Chicago, IL, at the age of 45. Charles was a former Chess Records arranger/producer/session musician/multi-instrumentalist/songwriter and Maurice's main collaborator on his EWF projects. The multi-platinum album All 'N All peaked at number three pop in late 1977, won three Grammy's, and had arrangements by Chicago soul mainstay Tom Tom Washington and Eumir Deodato. The singles were "Serpentine Fire" (number one R&B for seven weeks) and "Fantasy." The group's horn section, the legendary Phenix Horns (Don Myrick on saxophone, Louis Satterfield on trombone, Rahmlee Michael Davis and Michael Harris on trumpets) became an integral part of the Earth, Wind & Fire sound.


    During this time, Maurice produced several artists such as The Emotions (1976's Flowers and 1977's Rejoice which included the number one R&B/pop hit "Best Of My Love") and Deniece Williams (1976's This Is Niecy which included the Top Ten R&B hit "Free"). In the late seventies, in association with Columbia Records, Maurice also launched a record label, ARC.


    The multi-platinum greatest-hits set The Best Of Earth, Wind & Fire, Vol. I included a cover of the Beatles' "Got To Get You Into My Life" went to number one R&B and number nine pop in Summer 1978. The group performed the song in the 1978 Bee Gees/Peter Frampton movie 'Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band'. Another single, "September," made it to number one R&B, number eight pop in early 1978. On the flip side was the enchanting popular radio-aired album track "Love's Holiday" from All 'N All.


    Their live performances were stellar as well. Sellout crowds were spellbound by the band's bombastic performances. Their performances blasted a cosmic wave of peace, love and other happy vibrations to audiences using a combination of eye-popping costumes, lights, pyrotechnics and plain old good music. Sometimes they even threw in magic illusions. Earth, Wind & Fire's message was one of universal harmony, in both musical and cultural senses. "We live in a negative society," Maurice told Newsweek. "Most people can't see beauty and love. I see our music as medicine."


    The multi-platinum album I Am hit number three pop in Summer 1979 on the strength of the million-selling single "Boogie Wonderland" with The Emotions (number two R&B for four weeks, number six pop) and the phenomenal gold ballad "After The Love Has Gone," written by David Foster, Jay Graydon and Bill Champlin that stayed at number two R&B/pop for two weeks. Their Faces album peaked at number ten pop in late 1980 and was boosted to gold by the singles "Let Me Talk" (number eight R&B), "You" (number ten R&B), and "And Love Goes On."


    The million-selling funked-up "Let's Groove," co-written by The Emotions' Wanda Vaughn and her husband Wayne Vaughn, was the track that re-energized EWF's career, parking at number one R&B for eight weeks and number three pop, causing their Raise! album to go platinum (hitting number five pop in late 1981). Their next gold album Powerlight made it to number 12 pop in spring 1983 and included the Top Ten R&B single and Grammy-nominated "Fall In Love With Me." Their 1983 Electric Universe album stalled at number 40 pop, breaking the band's string of gold, platinum and multi-platinum albums.


    In 1983, Maurice decided he and the band needed a break. During this hiatus, Maurice recorded his self-titled solo album Maurice White and produced various artists including Neal Diamond, Barbra Streisand and Jennifer Holliday. Reuniting with the band in 1987, EWF released the album Touch The World and scored yet another number one R&B single, "System of Survival" and embarked on a corresponding nine-month world tour. This was followed by the 1988 release The Best Of Earth, Wind & Fire Vol. II.


    In 1990 the group released the album Heritage. Two years later, Earth, Wind & Fire released The Eternal Dance; a 55-track boxed set retrospective of the band's entire history. The appearance of such a project after a prolonged period of relative inactivity signaled to many listeners that the band was calling it quits but that did not turn out to be case. In 1993, EWF released the album, Millennium that included the Grammy-nominated "Sunday Morning" and "Spend The Night."


    Earth, Wind & Fire kept recording and in 1996 released Avatar and Greatest Hits Live; followed by 1997's In The Name Of Love; 2002's That's The Way Of The World: Alive In '75; Live In Rio which was recorded during their 1979 "I Am World Tour;" 2003's The Promise, which included the Grammy-nominated "Hold Me" and 2005's Illumination, which included the Grammy-nominated "Show Me The Way."


    In 2000, the nine-piece '70s edition of Earth, Wind & Fire reunited for one night only in honor of their induction into The Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame. In 2001, Eagle Rock Entertainment released the documentary 'Earth, Wind & Fire: Shining Stars', which contains rarely seen historic video footage along with in-depth interviews with the band members.


    Even though Maurice is no longer a part of the touring group, he remains the band's heart and soul from behind the scenes as composer and producer. Maurice reflects, "I wanted to create a library of music that would stand the test of time. 'Cosmic Consciousness' is the key component of our work. Expanding awareness and uplifting spirits is so important in this day. People are looking for more. I hope our music can give them some encouragement and peace."

    LP 1
    1. Shining Star

    2. That's The Way Of The World
    3. September

    4. Can't Hide Love

    5. Got To Get You Into My Life
    6. Sing A Song

    7. Gratitude

    8. Serpentine Fire

    9. Fantasy


    LP 2
    1. Kalimba Story
    2. Mighty Mighty

    3. Reasons

    4. Saturday Nite

    5. Let's Groove

    6. Boogie Wonderland ( with The Emotions)
    7. After The Love Has Gone

    8. Getaway

    Earth, Wind & Fire
    $42.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Temporarily out of stock
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