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  • Wheedle's Groove: Seattle Funk, Modern Soul & Boogie: Volume II 1972-1987 Wheedle's Groove: Seattle Funk, Modern Soul & Boogie: Volume II 1972-1987 Quick View

    $25.99
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    Wheedle's Groove: Seattle Funk, Modern Soul & Boogie: Volume II 1972-1987

    In 2004, the first volume of Wheedle's Groove shone a light on the formerly unheralded soul scene in 1960s and '70s Seattle, followed by a new album in 2008, and then an award winning feature-length documentary film. The on-going Wheedle's Groove series continues to present a vast chapter of the city's musical heritage that has little to do with long-haired rock dudes with guitars. No - in the world of Wheedle's Groove, platform shoes and pimp hats were the order of the day.


    But unlike Volume I, Seattle's soul scene did not stop in 1975. A new volume, Wheedle's Groove Vol. II, documents the period from 1972 to 1987, when funk was superseded by disco and modern soul. Heading into the '80s, artists in the Emerald City caught wind of the hip-hop and electro scenes that were growing in bigger cities across America, and gave the music their own distinct spin.


    As the years unfurl in the tracks of Wheedle's Groove Volume II, so does the recent history of American music, the songs tracing technological changes and social change, and music's move from the club to disco as live bands moved aside for DJs. Witness Septimus, on the cusp of both, blending a live drummer with a Roland drum machine and cutting 'Here I Go Again' on a disco-friendly 12" single.


    Separated from the major centers of soul music, Seattle was a scene that developed out of the gaze of the mainstream music industry, but one that moved just as fast. As John Studamire of the band Priceless remembers, "A lot of the groups around town would have to incorporate that disco sound or you'd sound totally dated."


    Seattle's size and location had a great effect on its sound. Artists on the scene were accustomed to playing small, discreetly segregated club shows and pressing short runs of 45s for local radio stations. Touring happened mostly on a regional scale and artists popped up in a variety of different bands. Fans of Volume I will recognize some familiar names here: Robbie Hill's Family Affair turn in the soul-jazz gem 'Don't Give Up' and Cold, Bold & Together present the undeniable vocal beauty of 'Let's Backtrack.'


    Compiled and sequenced by Seattle's DJ Supreme La Rock, this 18-track compilation will also introduce you to the long-forgotten blue-eyed soul boy Don Brown ('Don't Lose Your Love') and frustrated talents Push, overlooked for record deals on account of singer "Big Joe" Erickson's larger-than-life heft ('You Turn Me On'). There's Frederick Robinson III and his gospel-funk protest tune 'Love One Another', Tony Benton of Teleclere being Seattle's answer to Prince ('Steal Your Love') and Seattle Mariners baseball star Lenny Randle recording a tribute to their infamous stadium.

    1. Epicentre - Get Off The Phone
    2. Priceless - Love In Your Life
    3. Don Brown - Don't Lose Your Love
    4. Deuce featuring Clevon - Your Love Is Fine (Lovin' Fine)
    5. Push - You Turn Me On (Portland Session)
    6. Seattle Pure Dynamite - I Wonder Love
    7. Septimus - Here I Go Again
    8. Priceless - Look At Me
    9. Lenny Randle & Ballplayers featuring Rashawna - Kingdome
    10. Malik Din - Trouble In Mind
    11. Romel Westwood - I'm Through With You
    12. Teleclere - Steal Your Love
    13. Steppen Stones - Darlin Oh Darlin
    14. Cold, Bold & Together - Let's Backtrack
    15. Unfinished Business - Holding On
    16. Frederick Robinson III - Love One Another
    17. Bernadette Bascom - I Don't Wanna Lose Your Love
    18. Robbie Hill's Family Affair - Don't Give Up
    Various Artists
    $25.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Laraaji: Remixes Laraaji: Remixes Quick View

    $15.99
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    Laraaji: Remixes

    Laraaji is a musician, mystic and laughter meditation practitioner based in New York City. He began playing music on the streets in the 1970s, improvising trance inducing jams on a modified autoharp processed through various electronic effects. Brian Eno saw him playing one night in Washington Square Park and invited him to record an album for his seminal Ambient series (Ambient 3: Day Of Radiance, released 1980). Laraaji went onto release a prolific series of albums for a wide variety of labels, many of which he recorded himself at home and sold as cassettes during his street performances. In recent years he has been collaborating with a new generation of underground musicians, such as the 2011 album he recorded for the acclaimed FRKWYS series with Blues Control (That Healing Feeling). As well as the reissues of his music on All Saints, in the past year he has been included on Light In The Attic compilation I Am The Center: Private Issue New Age Music In America 1950 - 1990, and been a live guest of Deerhunter and Jonathan Wilson.
    1. Cave (Bee Mask)
    2. Kalimba (Ela Orleans)
    3. Tilturn (Sun Araw)
    4. Space (Motion Sickness Of Time Travel)
    Laraaji
    $15.99
    12 Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • I'm Just Like You: Sly's Stone Flower 1969-70 I'm Just Like You: Sly's Stone Flower 1969-70 Quick View

    $26.99
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    I'm Just Like You: Sly's Stone Flower 1969-70

    Compilation And Notes By Alec Palao


    An Exclusive New Interview With Sly Stone Himself


    In-depth Liner Notes With First-hand Reminiscences Of The Stone Flower Era From Many Of The Participants


    Features All Five Stone Flower Produced Singles Plus Ten Previously Unissued Cuts From The Label Archives


    All Tracks Newly Remastered From The Original Tapes


    In 1970, The Family Stone were at the peak of their popularity, but the maestro Sly Stone had already moved his head to a completely different space. The first evidence of Sly's musical about-turn was revealed by the small catalog of his new label, Stone Flower: a pioneering, peculiar, minimal electro-funk sound that unfolded over just four seven-inch singles. Stone Flower's releases were credited to their individual artists, but each had Sly's design and musicianship stamped into the grooves-and the words "Written by Sylvester Stewart/Produced and arranged by Sly Stone" on the sticker.


    Set up by Stone's manager David Kapralik with distribution by Atlantic Records, Stone Flower was, predictably, a family affair: the first release was by Little Sister, fronted by Stone's little sister Vaetta Stewart. It was short lived too-the imprint folded in 1971-but its influence was longer lasting. The sound Stone formulated while working on Stone Flower's output would shape the next phase in his own career as a recording artist: it was here he began experimenting with the brand new Maestro Rhythm King drum machine. In conjunction with languid, effected organ and guitar sounds and a distinctly lo-fi soundscape, Sly's productions for Stone Flower would inform the basis of his masterwork There's A Riot Goin' On.


    The first 45 came in February 1970: Little Sister's dancefloor-ready "You're The One" hit Number 22 in the charts-the label's highest showing. The follow-up, "Stanga, also by Little Sister, made the wah pedal the star. The third release came from 6IX, a six-piece multi-racial rock group whose sole release, a super-slow version of The Family Stone's "Dynamite, featured only the lead singer and harmonica player from the group. Joe Hicks was the final Stone Flower stablemate; his pulsing, electronic Life And Death In G&A" is one of the bleakest moments Sly Stone ever created on disc (Hicks' prior single for Scepter, "Home Sweet Home," the first released Stone Flower production, is also included).


    This long overdue compilation of Sly's Stone Flower era gathers each side of the five 45s plus ten previously unissued cuts from the label archives, all newly remastered from the original tapes. In these grooves you'll find the missing link between the rocky, soulful Sly Stone of Stand! and the dark, drum machine-punctuated, overdubbed sound of There's A Riot Going On. I'm Just Like You: Sly's Stone Flower 1969-70 opens up the mysteries of an obscure but monumental phase in Stone's career.

    1. You're The One (Parts 1 & 2) - Little Sister
    2. Just Like A Baby - Sly
    3. Home Sweet Home (Part 2) - Joe Hicks
    4. I'm Just Like You
    5. Somebody's Watching You (full band version) - Little Sister
    6. Life & Death In G & A (Parts 1 & 2) - Joe Hicks
    7. Trying To Make You Feel Good
    8. Stanga - Little Sister
    9. Dynamite
    10. You're The One (early version) - Little Sister
    11. Africa - Sly
    12. I'm Goin' Home (Part 1) - Joe Hicks
    13. Somebody's Watching You - Little Sister
    14. You Can, We Can
    15. Spirit - Sly
    16. I'm Just Like You (full band version)
    17. Scared - Sly
    18. Dynamite (alternate version)
    Sly & The Family Stone
    $26.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • The Columbia Years 1968-1969 The Columbia Years 1968-1969 Quick View

    $25.99
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    The Columbia Years 1968-1969

    All Tracks Previously Unreleased (Except Track B5/8)


    Production By Miles Davis & Teo Macero


    Featuring Performances From Hugh Masekela, Mitch Mitchell (Jimi Hendrix Experience), John Mclaughlin, Herbie Hancock, Harvey Brooks, Wayne Shorter, Billy Cox (Band Of Gypsys), Larry Young, And Members Of The Jazz Crusaders


    Remastered From The Original Analog Master Tapes


    New Interviews, Rare Photos, And Unseen Historical Documents From The Teo Macero Archive


    One can hardly imagine Prince, Erykah Badu, or Outkast without the influence of Betty Davis. Her style of raw and revelatory punk-funk defies any notions that women can't be visionaries in the worlds of rock and pop. In recent years, rappers from Ice Cube to Talib Kweli have rhymed over her intensely strong but sensual music. Betty penned the song ''Uptown'' for The Chambers Brothers and wrote the tunes that got The Commodores signed to Motown. The Detroit label soon came calling, pitching a Motown songwriting deal, which Betty turned down. Motown wanted to own everything. Heading to the UK, Marc Bolan of T. Rex urged the creative dynamo to start writing for herself. A common thread throughout Betty's career would be her unbending DIY ethic, which made her quickly turn down anyone who didn't fit with the vision. She would eventually say no to Eric Clapton as her album producer, seeing him as too banal. In 1968, she married Miles Davis and quickly influenced him on the magic of psychedelic rock along with introducing him to Jimi Hendrix-personally inspiring the classic album, Bitches Brew.


    Miles and Betty fans have long debated the truth of a near mythological session recorded in Studios B and E at Columbia's 52nd Street Studios on May 14th and 20th, 1969. The landmark session was produced by Miles and Teo Macero and featured Betty on vocals, accompanied by Jimi Hendrix Experience drummer Mitch Mitchell, guitarist John McLaughlin, Herbie Hancock on keys, and Dylan/Miles session bassist Harvey Brooks. Other players included bassist Billy Cox (Band of Gypsys), saxophonist Wayne Shorter, and organist Larry Young. Now, Light In The Attic, with full support from Betty herself, presents these recordings to the public for the very first time. These historic sessions-never heard, never bootlegged-predate Miles' revolutionary album, Bitches Brew, and are the true birth of Miles' jazz-rock explorations, along with the roots for Betty's groundbreaking funk that came years later, starting with her self-titled debut in 1973. While, ultimately, these recordings would go unreleased for nearly half a century, they would greatly shape each of their careers.


    The vibe is intrinsically unique, fresh, and futuristic-jazz heavyweights playing psychedelia, rock, and jazz-fusion long before the term became commonplace. The songs include Betty originals and covers of classics by Creedence and Cream. The concepts explored on these previously unheard sessions fueled concepts that wouldn't be fully realized until years later with Miles' seminal On The Corner.


    Additionally, included here is the first time rerelease of a 1968 Columbia single, recorded in October 1968 at Columbia Studios in Los Angeles. The session was produced by Jerry Fuller and featured South African maverick Hugh Masekela on trumpet and arrangements, plus members of jazz-funk pioneers The Crusaders-including trombonist Wayne Henderson and pianist Joe Sample. Two of the three tracks included here from this session are previously unreleased.


    This deluxe package is a treasure trove for both Betty and Miles fans, including rare documents from the pen of co-producer Teo Macero, rarely seen photos from legendary photographer Baron Wolman, and new interviews with Mrs. Davis herself, Harvey Brooks, and Hugh Masekela-the entire project overseen with Betty's full blessing.

    1. Hangin' Out
    2. Politician Man

    3. Down Home Girl

    4. Born On The Bayou

    5. I'm Ready, Willing & Able (Take 1)

    6. I'm Ready, Willing & Able (Take 9)

    7. It's My Life (Alternate Take)

    8. Live, Love, Learn

    9. My Soul Is Tired
    Betty Davis
    $25.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • 13 13 Quick View

    $25.99
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    13

    "Pimps whores pushers dopers gangsters and bottom of the human chain shit-heels. Now you're probably thinking I'm writing about major record companies and their unscrupulous executives and lawyers. You could be right but this time YOU'RE WRONG! I'm describing the characters in my album '13' Some I knew some I invented some are true some are false some I liked some I didn't. But they all had a story to tell and I told it none of 'em seem to care and I don't either have fun

    - Lee Hazlewood


    "He took my voice off the album and put his voice on the album. Now don't forget these were in my keys, it was my charts, it was my everything. Lee Hazlewood was not even remotely going to be considered as an artist for this album and that's the way he wanted it."

    - Larry Marks


    13 was never supposed to be a Lee Hazlewood album. It is perhaps the strangest record in one of the most varied discographies in music. The bombastic brass-heavy funk, deep blues and soul paired with Hazlewood's subterranean baritone would be best enjoyed with a tall Chivas in an off-strip seedy Vegas lounge. It also features one of Hazlewood's greatest lines ever "One week in San Francisco, existing on Nabisco, cookies and bad dreams, sad scenes and dodging paranoia."


    By 1972 Lee Hazlewood had settled in his new homeland of Sweden. His days were spent carousing, making movies with Torbjörn Axelman and releasing albums. To keep up his prolific recorded output, Lee began to mine the recently defunct LHI Records archives for material. One such gem, was an unreleased album by Larry Marks.


    In what became the final days of LHI, staff producer Larry Marks' sonic fingerprints were on nearly everything; songwriting, producing, arranging, and singing. His most profound contribution was steering the creative direction of the label towards soul and R&B, arranging the downright funky LHI singles by Barbara Randolph and Jon Christian. Larry's concept was to take Hazlewood's strongest compositions and arrange them in a soul vibe. An album was completed, but with no distribution in America and no funding, Lee had no vehicle to release Larry's record. The tapes were taken to Sweden, Larry's voice was wiped and Hazlewood's was dubbed .13 was born.

    1. You Look Like A Lady
    2. Tulsa Sunday
    3. Ten Or 11 Towns Ago
    4. Toocie And The River
    5. She Comes Running
    6. Rosacoke Street
    7. I Move Around
    8. And I Loved You Then
    9. Hej, Me I'm Riding
    10. Cold Hard Times
    11. Drums
    12. The Start
    13. Suzie
    Lee Hazlewood
    $25.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Something Special Something Special Quick View

    $22.99
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    Something Special

    The three years spent on MGM Records between 1966 and 1968 were golden ones for Lee Hazlewood. He spent them working with his muse, Suzi Jane Hokom, writing a still-unreleased book, The Quiet Revenge of Elmo Furback, competing with Phil Spector from their respective studios, and coming up with the formula for the boy/girl" songs for which he'd become famous. In fact, the unflattering portrait on the cover of Something Special did little to hint at how hip this late-flowering talent (he was in his late 30s when "These Boots Are Made For Walkin'" made him a star songwriter) had become.


    The common strand on the MGM trilogy is one of the unexpected happening. They were an ill fit for a major label-experimental, difficult to pigeonhole, and unpredictable. Those descriptors apply nowhere more aptly than Something Special. Where 1966's The Very Special World Of Lee Hazlewood and 1967's Lee Hazlewoodism: Its Cause And Cure had employed an arranger, Billy Strange, and a full orchestra, Something Special stripped things back and brought in a flavor of jazz and blues, complete with gravelly-voiced scatting courtesy of collaborator Don Randi. This sat alongside tracks like "Little War" and "Hands," the kind of late night, acoustic balladeering Hazlewood would later seize for his career-highlight LP, Requiem For An Almost Lady. The sound was that of a stripped-down nightclub jazz/blues/folk combo, fully rejecting the psychedelic music going on all over the world.


    The album made clear that forging a career as a serious star was not at the top of Hazlewood's agenda, and at the third opportunity, he'd let the listener in on the joke. Tellingly, Hokom recalls Hazlewood saying the MGM albums were his "expensive demos. I'm sure that MGM thought that they would be successful." Little chance of that with Something Special -it was originally released only in Germany. The same year, Hazlewood founded the LHI imprint, and began building his own empire, one we've been lovingly archiving for the past few years. We now present this missing link in the story, three albums that generated some of Hazlewood's best-and most varied-work.

    1. Shades
    2. This Town
    3. Child
    4. Stone Cold Blues
    5. Little War
    6. Them Girls
    7. Fort Worth
    8. Hands
    9. Mannford, Oklahoma
    10. Summer Night
    11. Moochie Ladeux*
    12. The Lone Ranger Ain t My Friend Anymore*
    Lee Hazlewood
    $22.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Very Special World of Lee Hazlewood The Very Special World of Lee Hazlewood Quick View

    $22.99
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    The Very Special World of Lee Hazlewood

    Lee Hazlewood was a late bloomer. Following a meandering career as a disc jockey, producer, songwriter, label executive and solo artist, Hazlewood hit the jackpot at the ripe age of 37 with "These Boots Are Made For Walkin'," the song Nancy Sinatra took to the top of the charts on both sides of the Atlantic. Its success convinced MGM Records that Hazlewood was a bankable star, and they signed him as an artist in his own right the same year. But as a self-described "non-singer" whose cult 1963 debut, Trouble Is A Lonesome Town, was little more than a happy accident, they'd perhaps gotten the wrong end of the stick where Lee was concerned.


    In three years on the label, Hazlewood delivered three albums and sundry odds and ends, beginning with 1966 album The Very Special World Of Lee Hazlewood. The LP found Hazlewood gunning-in as much as he ever did-for commercial success, blending country, pop, novelty, mariachi, and lounge music into something unusually of-the-moment.


    Lushly orchestrated and-like the album that preceded it-half-sung, half-spoken in a way that Hazlewood made all his own, the album collected solo versions of songs made famous by Sinatra and others ("Sand," "Boots," "So Long Babe," "Summer Wine"-included as a bonus duet with Suzi Jane Hokom) alongside some of his career-best solo compositions, among them the Morricone-like opener, "For One Moment." It's a record of extremes: "When A Fool Loves A Fool" is as light and throwaway as anything he ever laid down, while the wistful "My Autumn's Done Come" (sample lyric: "Let those I-don't-care days come in, I'm tired of holding my stomach in") is as raw and honest.

    1. For One Moment
    2. When a Fool Loves a Fool
    3. Not the Lovin' Kind
    4. Your Sweet Love
    5. Sand
    6. My Autumn's Done Come
    7. These Boots Are Made For Walkin'
    8. I Move Around
    9. So Long, Babe
    10. Bugles In the Afternoon
    11. My Baby Cried All Night Long
    Lee Hazlewood
    $22.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Lee Hazlewoodism: Its Cause and Cure Lee Hazlewoodism: Its Cause and Cure Quick View

    $22.99
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    Lee Hazlewoodism: Its Cause and Cure

    The second of his MGM trilogy-1967's peculiarly named Lee Hazlewoodism: Its Cause And Cure-took on countrified French ye-ye ("The Girls In Paris"), a tale of a young bullfighter built on Spanish guitar and choral cowboys ("Jose"), a string-drenched song about the passing of time ("The Old Man And His Guitar"), and a western epic about a Native American tribe ("The Nights"). And that was just the first four tracks. Elsewhere, the honky tonk madness of "Suzi Jane Is Back In Town," the Byrds-like jangle of "In Our Time" and-in the bonus tracks-an instrumental named "Batman" confirm this to be one of Hazlewood's most far-ranging, far-out LPs ever!
    1. The Girls In Paris
    2. Jose
    3. The Old Man And His Guitar
    4. The Nights
    5. I Am A Part
    6. Home (I'm Home)
    7. After Six
    8. Suzi Jane Is Back In Town
    9. In Our Time
    10. Dark In My Heart
    11. Lee Hazlewood's Woodchucks Frenesi*
    12. Lee Hazlewood's Woodchucks Muchacho*
    13. Lee Hazlewood's Woodchucks Batman*
    Lee Hazlewood
    $22.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • From The Vault - The Marquee Club Live In 1971 From The Vault - The Marquee Club Live In 1971 Quick View

    $34.99
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    From The Vault - The Marquee Club Live In 1971

    A sought-after, rare club performance from The Rolling Stones in 1971 filmed at London's iconic Marquee Club will finally see the light of day, after almost two decades of being stored away in an attic. The Rolling Stones From The Vault: The Marquee - Live in 1971 will finally be released.


    This remarkable performance was filmed for US television in 1971, shortly after The Rolling Stones had completed their 1971 Farewell Tour of the UK, and a month before the release of the album Sticky Fingers. The gig marked the first time tracks 'Brown Sugar', 'Dead Flowers', 'Bitch' and the rarely performed 'I Got The Blues' were showcased live; four tracks taken from the Sticky Fingers album. The line-up at this time was Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Charlie Watts, Mick Taylor and Bill Wyman.


    The show was an intimate, rare club appearance and very little footage has been released, until now. Part of the "From The Vault" series of live concerts from the band's archive, The Rolling Stones From The Vault: The Marquee - Live In 1971 is a must own DVD for any Stones fan, featuring carefully restored footage and sound mixed to perfection by Bob Clearmountain, including 5.1 surround sound.


    The release of The Rolling Stones From The Vault: The Marquee - Live In 1971 coincides with the special edition of album Sticky Fingers, and includes alternative takes of 'I Got The Blues' and 'Bitch', plus a Top of the Pops performance of 'Brown Sugar' from 1971.

    1. Live With Me
    2. Dead Flowers
    3. I Got the Blues
    4. Let It Rock
    5. Midnight Rambler
    6. (I Can't Get No) Satisfaction
    7. Bitch
    8. Brown Sugar
    9. I Got the Blues (Take 1)*
    10. I Got the Blues (Take 2)*
    11. Bitch (Take 1)*
    12. Bitch (Take 2)*
    13. Brown Sugar (Top of the Pops, 1971)*


    * bonus tracks

    The Rolling Stones
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP + DVD - Sealed Buy Now
  • Lights Out Lights Out Quick View

    $17.99
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    Lights Out

    The new Bishop Allen record, Lights Out, is here at last. Here's what went into it: ten years, three full-lengths, twelve EPs, thousands of shows, a move out of Brooklyn, a new home in the wooly wilds of Kingston, NY, time off to score the films Bully and Mutual Friends, as well as an Anderson Cooper 360 special, months of demos, drum tracking in a sweat-lodge attic studio during a July heat wave, a wet Fall arranging guitars, bass, and synths in a now-chilly attic studio, the coldest December on record spent mixing, a close call with a frozen pipe and flooded hard drives, and a photo found on a friend's refrigerator.
    1. Start Again
    2. Why I Had To Go
    3. Crows
    4. No Show
    5. Give It Back
    6. Black Hole
    7. Skeleton Key
    8. Good Talk
    9. Hammer and Nail
    10. Bread Crumbs
    11. No Conditions
    12. Shadow
    Bishop Allen
    $17.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Walk In Africa 1979-81 (Discontinued) Walk In Africa 1979-81 (Discontinued) Quick View

    $24.99
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    Walk In Africa 1979-81 (Discontinued)

    Remastered From Original Sources


    Vinyl Cut By John Golden And Pressed At RTI


    First Ever Anthology


    2xLP Housed In A Deluxe Gatefold Tip-On Jacket With 20-pg Book, And Download Card Full Full Anthology


    Scholarly Liner Notes By Punk In Africa Film Director Keith Jones


    Unseen Photos, Flyers, And Band Ephemera


    The South Africa of the late 1970s was neither the right place nor time to launch a mixed-race punk band. Yet, following the student-inspired Soweto Uprising of 1976, it was also exactly the right conditions to foster a band like National Wake, one formed in an underground commune, and one whose very name exists in protest at the divisive, racist apartheid regime. Never before collected together, Light In The Attic is set to release National Wake's full body of work as Walk In Africa 1979-81.


    Featured heavily in the recent documentary Punk In Africa , National Wake played punk, reggae and tropical funk, equally at home in the city's rock underground and the township nightclub circuit. Ivan Kadey started the band with two brothers, Gary and Punka Khoza. The three were from different worlds - while Ivan was an outsider, a Jewish orphan born in the traditional Johannesburg immigrant neighborhood, Gary, Punka and their family were forcibly moved to the troubled township of Soweto under the apartheid regime. Later joined by guitarist Steve Moni, the whole band grew up against a backdrop of township unrest, social upheaval and suburban tedium that characterized apartheid-era South Africa.


    National Wake released just one album, in 1981. It sold approximately 700 copies before being withdrawn under government pressure. The band subsequently disintegrated, but their influence could be traced in the racially mixed post-punk underground centered around Rockey Street in Johannesburg throughout the 1980s, their legacy transmitted through fanzines and underground cassette trading.


    Sadly, Gary and Punka Khoza both passed away in their 40s. Kadey now works as an architect in Los Angeles, but his attention eventually turned back to the band as their legacy grew in the digital era, with the emergence of specialized music websites and Punk In Africa leading to their rediscovery. Czech State Radio memorably described the band as "perhaps the most dissident music scene of the 20th century: a multi-racial punk band in a fascist police state."


    In 2011, Kadey re-released the band's self-titled album on CD in South Africa, but spoke about having more than 20 tracks that had never seen the light of day - until now. "All of these recordings put together they speak of the whole evolution of the band," he has said. "From a sort of naive, almost belief that we could miraculously change everything to realizing what a struggle it was, and what the country was going through and what it would go through."

    LP1
    1. International News
    2. It's All Right
    3. Walk In Africa
    4. Time And Place
    5. Corner House Stone
    6. Mercenaries
    7. Wake Of The Nation
    8. Supaman


    LP2
    1. Speed It Up
    2. Beat Up The Lights
    3. Black Punk Rockers
    4. Stratocaster
    5. Everybody
    6. Vatsiketeni

    National Wake
    $24.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Cure For Pain Cure For Pain Quick View

    $21.99
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    Cure For Pain

    Low-rock was one way enigmatic Morphine frontman Mark Sandman used to describe his bands beat-inspired blues-jazz-rock holy racket. Along with Sandmans baritone vocal delivery and laconic two-string bass styling, co-founder Dana Colley played a saxophone as his lead instrument of choice instead of the expected guitar, creating a quirky and burning sensibility. Original drummer Jerome Deupree, who was replaced by percussionist Billy Conway during the recording of 1993s Cure For Pain, flushed out the unorthodox trio.


    Released on vinyl as the second title on Light In The Attics Modern Classics Recordings imprint. Featuring the essential songs Buena, Sheila, Candy, and the moving title-track Cure For Pain, this is the albums first-ever U.S. vinyl issue. Modern Classics Cure For Pain features lovingly re-mastered audio, 180g wax, and deluxe tip-on gatefold jacket with original album art.

    1. Dawna
    2. Buena
    3. I'm Free Now
    4. All Wrong
    5. Candy
    6. A Head With Wings
    7. In Spite Of Me
    8. Thursday
    9. Cure For Pain
    10. Mary Won't You Call My Name
    11. Let's Take A Trip
    12. Sheila
    13. Miles Davis' Funeral
    Morphine
    $21.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Complete LHI Recordings The Complete LHI Recordings Quick View

    $25.99
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    The Complete LHI Recordings

    Lee Hazlewood's LHI label only put out interesting albums. Yet despite the psychedelic cowboy's success with Nancy Sinatra and more, being on Lee Hazlewood Industries was no fast-track to success. Gorgeous and talented Detroit, Michigan girl group Honey Ltd had all the makings of a hit band, yet they disappeared after releasing just one album in 1968, a vinyl rarity that now regularly fetches upwards of $2,000.


    Light In The Attic Records is now looking to set the record straight. Having previously explored both the back catalog of Lee Hazlewood and his LHI label via the You Turned My Head Around 45s Box Set, Honey Ltd's The Complete LHI Recordings presents everything the group ever recorded. Fans of The Ronettes, The Shangri-Las and Pentangle are in for a treat - Honey Ltd's music blended social commentary with harmony-drenched, psych-soul pop. Even opening track, 'Warrior', describes the mood of the times, as America sunk into the Vietnam war: "We must kill more people; strong men are what we need!


    Laura Polkinghome, Marsha Jo Temmer and sisters Joan and Alexandra Sliwin are the girls with the angelic voices. Hailing from Detroit, the four members of Honey Ltd grew up in a culture of soul music and dance shows, yet forming a band was never part of the plan. It simply happened after they sung together in a Wayne State University cafeteria and found they'd silenced the room. By 1967 they had formed a group known as the Mama Cats and were playing shows with local singer Bob Seger. By 1968, against a backdrop of rioting in Detroit, they'd hauled over to Los Angeles to give music a go, and it's there that they hitch-hiked to an audition with Lee Hazlewood on Sunset Boulevard. At the time, Lee Hazlewood Industries was in its prime: the money flowed and the roster swelled. "I think Lee just sat there for a while and listened, looking at us," Temmer recalls. "He said, 'Yeah, I think we can do something.' You know - immediately!" Before long, LHI had the band in the studio with crack session music unit The Wrecking Crew.


    These were not enlightened times for girl groups. The group were re-named Honey Ltd by Hazlewood, and were put to work on an album without even realizing it. The band were under the impression they were simply recording singles. As a result, the band were unphased by Honey Ltd's commercial failure.


    The parent label, however, did notice the album's failure but the girls continued on. By the end of 1968, the band joined Bob Hope on the USO tour and headed to Thailand to perform for soldiers. In 1969, Alex married and quit the band, their tenure on LHI was effectively terminated and the remaining members regrouped as country-rock group Eve. But like their music, the girls' outlook remained resolutely sunny.


    "Its all a karmic equation, isn't it? Temmer recalled. "So many things to experience and learn and humbly let go of in this journey. Our friendship is based on love - we love each other always have always will."

    1. The Warrior
    2. No, You Are
    3. I've Got Your Man
    4. Silk N' Honey
    5. For Your Mind
    6. Come Down
    7. Louie, Louie
    8. Tomorrow Your Heart
    9. Eli's Coming
    10. Silver Threads And Golden Needles
    11. I'm So Glad
    12. Love, The Devil
    13. Not For Me
    Honey LTD
    $25.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Chinatown Soundtrack Chinatown Soundtrack Quick View

    $25.99
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    Chinatown Soundtrack

    Newly Remastered Audio


    Housed In A Deluxe Stoughton Tip-On Jacket


    Sometimes, it doesn't take very long to create something brilliant. When producer Robert Evans rejected Phillip Lambro's original score for Chinatown, Jerry Goldsmith was hired to create another, from scratch, in just 10 days.


    To say he rose to the challenge is an understatement. Goldsmith, a 20 year veteran of the TV and movie industry with credits including Dr. Kildare, Planet Of The Apes and even The Waltons theme, turned in a work that was both a career peak for him and the savior of Roman Polanski's masterpiece of neo-noir.


    What was clever about it? It wasn't quite straight jazz, it wasn't quite classical. It was identifiably a movie soundtrack, but an unusual one at that, leaning heavily on Uan Rasey's mournful trumpet solos, sparingly using pianos, harps, strings and percussion, and employing sounds and crashes as overtures. It doesn't try to speak to the film's 1930s setting so much as to the mood and feel of the movie, a piece about political and moral corruption in a water-starved LA featuring Jack Nicholson at the absolute top of his game.


    "I remember [Evans] speaking about the music having a contemporary feel, contemporary meaning the '30s," Goldsmith said in an interview before his 2004 death. "I said, 'Bob, I don't think so - you see that on the screen, why should I do that in the underscore? Emotions are timeless.'"


    Originally released as a soundtrack in 1974, and long out of print, Cinewax's reissue is remastered from the original tapes and is presented with brand new artwork by acclaimed illustrator and painter Sterling Hundley, with layout by Jay Shaw. Drop the needle and hear why Chinatown is, reportedly, David Lynch's favorite soundtrack. Goldsmith was right about emotions

    1. Love Theme From Chinatown (Main Title)
    2. Noah Cross
    3. Easy Living
    4. Jake And Evelyn
    5. I Can't Get Started
    6. The Last Of Ida
    7. The Captive
    8. The Boy On A Horse
    9. The Way You Look Tonight
    10. The Wrong Clue
    11. J.J. Gittes
    12. Love Theme From Chinatown (End Title)
    Jerry Goldsmith
    $25.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • First Issue First Issue Quick View

    $29.99
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    First Issue

    180 Gram Viny


    Includes Gatefold Jacket, Poster and Stickers!


    In 1976 Johnny Rotten and the Sex Pistols set the agenda for punk's year zero with 'Anarchy In The UK', a song that summed up the spirit, sound and attitude of the band in one shocking package. Two years later, the Sex Pistols were in tatters, but Rotten was as unsentimental as you'd hope. He reverted to his real name - John Lydon - and set about forming a band whose very identity kicked against press and media manipulation. Featuring bassist Jah Wobble, drummer Jim Walker and guitarist Keith Levene, his new group were Public Image Limited. The public image would be limited.


    PiL were a very distinct prospect from the Pistols, founded with a greater thought for rhythm, and with a sound that turned the page from snarling punk to a more experimental sound fusing rock, dance, folk, ballet, pop and dub. But that's not to say Lydon's new outfit lacked vitriol. 'Public Image' hits out against the notorious British tabloid press, who never gave Lydon an easy ride, and against his own Sex Pistols public image - "You only saw me for the clothes I wore".


    The debut single (and the album that followed) operated as a theme song and a manifesto: " my entrance/My own creation/My grand finale/My goodbye," as the lyrics had it. It is, essentially, the sound of four people letting loose in a studio - and not caring what anyone else thought.

    1. Theme
    2. Religion I
    3. Religion II
    4. Annalisa
    5. Public Image
    6. Low Life
    7. Attack
    8. Fodderstompf
    Public Image LTD.
    $29.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Betty Davis (Awaiting Repress) Betty Davis (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $20.99
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    Betty Davis (Awaiting Repress)

    One can hardly imagine the genre-busting, culture-crossing musical magic of Outkast, Prince, Erykah Badu, Rick James, The Roots, or even the early Red Hot Chili Peppers without the influence of R&B pioneer Betty Davis. Her style of raw and revelatory punk-funk defies any notions that women can't be visionaries in the worlds of rock and pop. In recent years, rappers from Ice Cube to Talib Kweli to Ludacris have rhymed over her intensely strong but sensual music.


    There is one testimonial about Betty Davis that is universal: she was a woman ahead of her time. In our contemporary moment, this may not be as self-evident as it was thirty years ago - we live in an age that's been profoundly changed by flamboyant flaunting of female sexuality: from Parlet to Madonna, Lil Kim to Kelis. Yet, back in 1973 when Betty Davis first showed up in her silver go-go boots, dazzling smile and towering Afro, who could you possibly have compared her to? Marva Whitney had the voice but not the independence. Labelle wouldn't get sexy with their "Lady Marmalade" for another year while Millie Jackson wasn't "Feelin' Bitchy" until 1977. Even Tina Turner, the most obvious predecessor to Betty's fierce style wasn't completely out of Ike's shadow until later in the decade.


    Ms. Davis's unique story, still sadly mostly unknown, is unlike any other in popular music. Betty wrote the song "Uptown" for the Chambers Brothers before marrying Miles Davis in the late '60s, influencing him with psychedelic rock, and introducing him to Jimi Hendrix - personally inspiring the classic album 'Bitches Brew.'


    But her songwriting ability was way ahead of its time as well. Betty not only wrote every song she ever recorded and produced every album after her first, but the young woman penned the tunes that got The Commodores signed to Motown. The Detroit label soon came calling, pitching a Motown songwriting deal, which Betty turned down. Motown wanted to own everything. Heading to the UK, Marc Bolan of T. Rex urged the creative dynamo to start writing for herself. A common thread throughout Betty's career would be her unbending Do-It-Yourself ethic, which made her quickly turn down anyone who didn't fit with the vision. She would eventually say no to Eric Clapton as her album producer, seeing him as too banal.


    In 1973, Davis would finally kick off her cosmic career with an amazingly progressive hard funk and sweet soul self-titled debut. Davis showcased her fiercely unique talent and features such gems as "If I'm In Luck I Might Get Picked Up" and "Game Is My Middle Name." The album Betty Davis was recorded with Sly & The Family Stone's rhythm section, sharply produced by Sly Stone drummer Greg Errico, and featured backing vocals from Sylvester and the Pointer Sisters.

    1. If I'm In Luck I Might Get Picked Up
    2. Walkin Up The Road
    3. Anti Love Song
    4. Your Man My Man
    5. Ooh Yeah
    6. Steppin In Her I. Miller Shoes
    7. Game Is My Middle Name
    8. In The Meantime
    Betty Davis
    $20.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • They Say I'm Different They Say I'm Different Quick View

    $20.99
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    They Say I'm Different

    Betty Davis' 1974 sophomore album They Say I'm Different features a worthy-of-framing futuristic cover challenging David Bowie's science fiction funk with real rocking soul-fire, kicked off with the savagely sexual ''Shoo-B-Doop and Cop Him'' (later sampled by Ice Cube). Her follow up is full of classic cuts like ''Don't Call Her No Tramp'' and the hilarious, hard, deep funk of ''He Was A Big Freak.''


    Deluxe vinyl pressing housed in old school tip-on gatefold jacket

    1. Shoo-B-Doop and Cop Him
    2. He Was a Big Freak
    3. Your Mama Wants Ya Back
    4. Don't Call Her No Tramp
    5. Git In There
    6. They Say I'm Different
    7. 70's Blues
    8. Special People
    Betty Davis
    $20.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Now That Everything's Been Said Now That Everything's Been Said Quick View

    $22.99
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    Now That Everything's Been Said

    We all know the Carole King who wrote some of the biggest hits of the '60s, from "Will You Love Me Tomorrow" to "Pleasant Valley Sunday," via "The Locomotion" and "(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman." We also know the singer-songwriter behind Tapestry, the album that launched King as a solo singer in her own right. But in between-and not nearly as well known-is King's band, The City, and their album, Now That Everything's Been Said.


    By the mid-'60s, King's marriage to Gerry Goffin, with whom she'd written many of those wonderful hits, had hit the rocks. A divorce loomed, and King all but retired to raise their two daughters. She headed west to Laurel Canyon in '67, taking the children with her, and made the previously unlikely move of joining a progressive folk-rock band. King formed The City with future husband Charles Larkey on bass and Danny Kortchmar on guitar and vocals. With King on piano and vocals, they created a folk rock sound that pre-empted the singer-songwriter boom of the '70s.


    Produced by Lou Adler and featuring Jimmy Gordon on drums, The City's sound is deep and soulful, imperfect but passionate. And the songs, with King writing or co-writing all but one, are as exceptional as you'd expect and as widely covered as her factory work. "Now That Everything's Been Said" was a hit for American Spring, "A Man Without A Dream" was tackled by The Monkees, and "Hi-De-Ho (That Old Sweet Roll)" was a hit for Blood, Sweat & Tears. Central to the album's appeal is King's own stirring reading of her track "Wasn't Born To Follow," covered masterfully by The Byrds for the Easy Rider soundtrack.


    King had been used to a life on the sidelines, and her stage fright left the trio unable to tour the LP which adversely affected their fortunes. That, plus some behind-the-scenes distribution problems, meant the album was quickly deleted, and it remained so for the next thirty years-partly at King's request. Even so, its failure was a surprise to those concerned. "I was 26 when Now That Everything's Been Said was released in 1968," King says of the album. "[We] expected it to zoom to the top of the charts within, at most, a few weeks. Individually and together, we optimistically imagined the album's success as if it had already happened. Danny and Charlie kept telling each other, 'It's a great album. The City is gonna be Number 1 with a bullet!'


    Listening now, you can feel the threads that lead to Tapestry and to the hugely successful performing career that followed. It's not so much an oddity in King's work as the missing link between her two lives. Reissued here in deluxe vinyl, this is, at long last, a chance to own this lost album.

    1. Snow Queen
    2. I Wasn't Born To Follow
    3. Now That Everything's Been Said
    4. Paradise Alley
    5. Man Without A Dream
    6. Victim Of Circumstance
    7. Why Are You Leaving
    8. Lady
    9. My Sweet Home
    10. I Don't Believe It
    11. That Old Sweet Roll (Hi-De-Ho)
    12. All The Time
    The City
    $22.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Creepshow: Original 1982 Score (Colored Vinyl) Creepshow: Original 1982 Score (Colored Vinyl) Quick View

    $38.99
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    Creepshow: Original 1982 Score (Colored Vinyl)

    'Kill Lights' Deep Red with Blue Smoke Colored Colored Vinyl


    Heavyweight Casebound Tip-on Gatefold Jacket With A Satin Coating


    Director Essay From George A. Romero & Composer Essay From John Harrison


    A Built-in Booklet Featuring Production Stills, Artwork, And Liner Notes


    A Satin Coated 12x12 Art Print Of The Creeper


    Full Album Packaging Artwork By Ghoulish Gary Pullin


    Waxwork Records is thrilled to announce their next LP release to the 1982 horror anthology classic, CREEPSHOW. The film was directed by George A. Romero and written by Stephen King. The score was composed and performed by John Harrison (DAY OF THE DEAD, TALES FROM THE DARKSIDE).


    This definitive release of the film score has never before been released. The original master tapes of the CREEPSHOW film score were lost for over 30 years, but with the efforts of composer John Harrison and Waxwork Records, the tapes were located in the attic of Jeree Recording Studios in New Brighton, PA. The tapes remained in remarkable shape over the years and were re-mixed and re-mastered for vinyl. The CREEPSHOW score has never sounded this good.

    1. Prologue
    2. The Creepshow Welcomes You
    3. Henry Is Told The Family Secrets
    4. She Bashed His Head In
    5. Bedelia Arrives
    6. Where's My Cake? I Want My Cake
    7. Nate Comes Out Of The Grave
    8. Henry Goes Looking
    9. Henry Meets Nate; Henry Gets Crushed
    10. I Got My Cake
    11. Sylvia On A Platter - A Meteor Arrives
    12. Jordy Discovers His Meteor
    13. Jordy Hallucinates And Takes A Bath
    14. From The Farm To The Beach
    15. Get In The Hole Harry
    16. If You Can Hold Your Breath
    17. Richard Watches Them Drown
    18. From The Beach To The College
    19. Mike Discovers The Crate
    20. Dex And Mike Move The Crate
    John Harrison
    $38.99
    Colored Vinyl LP- Sealed Buy Now
  • Caveman (Awaiting Repress) Caveman (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $16.99
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    Caveman (Awaiting Repress)

    On Their self-titled sophomore album, Caveman strech thier legs in a number of different, albeit cohesive, directions.


    Caveman-a five-man vibe collective from NYC-released their first album in 2011. As first albums go, CoCo Beware was something akin to a moody statement of intent, a blueprint for a band quickly learning how to create horizon-wide rock songs that were equal parts intimate and expansive. Initially self-released and later snatched up by Fat Possum for re-release in early 2012, the record brims over with four-part harmonies, crystalline guitar lines, and tracks that see-sawed between echoey lullaby ("A Country's King of Dreams") to shoegaze-by-way-of classic-FM-radio sprawl ("Old Friend"). The album quickly elevated Caveman from local band to watch to a sizable touring draw and formidable live act, as evidenced by stints on the road with the likes of The War on Drugs, White Rabbits and Built to Spill. Despite being the work of a brand new band, CoCo Beware displayed a kind of Zen-like ease. It was the sound a five friends settling into a nice groove; the music that happens when, for whatever reason, a lot of seemingly disparate elements finally fall into place.


    "We all went up to Jimmy's grandmother's place in New Hampshire," says singer Matthew Iwanusa. "That's where the new record kind of started. It was literally the attic of her barn, lit up by Christmas lights. We'd all sit in this one room together and one by one we'd all go into the bathroom and record ourselves making the most psycho noises possible. It actually felt kind of like a weird breakthrough. We were all confident and comfortable enough with each other to try out these experiments, which extended itself into the making of the new record which is really just an evolution of this vibe that we'd been cultivating for long time."


    With that, the guys holed up in Brooklyn's Rumpus Room to start recording in earnest with Nick Stumpf (who produced the band's debut album) and Albert Di Fiore behind the controls. The album is a kind of sonic microcosm-a series of emotional yet tough mini-narratives operating within the same quixotic musical universe.


    As a result, the guitars on Caveman are bigger and more expansive, the rhythm section is tighter and more adventurous, the keyboards more opaque and pronounced. Like a marriage between Tangerine Dream, late period Slowdive, and Lindsey Buckingham, tracks like their new single "In the City" and "Ankles" boast synth lines that sound simultaneously retro and futuristic, while "Pricey" and "Never Want to Know" overflow with guitar sounds that could have miraculously floated off an old Cure album. It should be noted that James Carbonetti, the band's primary guitar player, also happens to be one of the most highly regarded guitar makers in New York City.


    And while Caveman's music could certainly operate on the level of dreamy soundscape and still be excellent, the depth of feeling in front man Matthew Iwanusa's lyrics helps weave the songs deeply into your memory. When Iwanusa sings Where's the time to waste on someone else's life? on "Where's the Time," it's hard not to read between the lines. Wonder and regret seem to fuel the record in almost equal measure.

    1. Strange to Suffer
    2. In the City
    3. Shut You Down
    4. Where's the Time
    5. Chances
    6. Over My Head
    7. Ankles
    8. Pricey
    9. I See You
    10. I Never Want to Know
    11. The Big Push
    Caveman
    $16.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
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