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Lightning Strikes

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  • Rock In A Hard Place Rock In A Hard Place Quick View

    $24.99
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    Rock In A Hard Place

    Originally released in 1982, Rock In A Hard Place is the only album in Aerosmith history to not include guitarist Joe Perry. The band still created world-class rock as evidenced in the title track as well as Prelude to Joanie, "Lightning Strikes," "Jailbait," "Bitch's Brew," and "Bolivian Ragamuffin.
    1. Jailbait (2012 Remaster)
    2. Lightning Strikes (2012 Remaster)
    3. Bitch's Brew (2012 Remaster)
    4. Bolivian Ragamuffin (2012 Remaster)
    5. Cry Me A River (2012 Remaster)
    6. Prelude To Joanie (2012 Remaster)
    7. Joanie's Butterfly (2012 Remaster)
    8. Rock In A Hard Place (Cheshire Cat) (2012 Remaster)
    9. Jig Is Up (2012 Remaster)
    10. Push Comes To Shove (2012 Remaster)

    Aerosmith
    $24.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Don't Look Back Don't Look Back Quick View

    $34.99
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    Don't Look Back

    Import

    Lightning never strikes twice in the same place, but when it does, it does so with a vengeance. After gaining huge success with the debut Boston, Boston's main songwriter Tom Scholz worked on the sophomore album for two years and this resulted in yet another perfectly produced piece of art. Released in 1978, Don't Look Back eventually reached 7 times Platinum. The album contains the radio hit "Don't Look Back", sturdy Rockers like "Party" and "Feelin' Satised" and mellow songs like "It's Easy". This stu is top of the bill and you know it!

    1. Don't Look Back
    2. The Journey
    3. It's Easy
    4. A Man I'll Never Be
    5. Feelin' Satised
    6. Party
    7. Used To Bad News
    8. Don't Be Afraid
    Boston
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Warrior On The Edge Of Time Warrior On The Edge Of Time Quick View

    $37.99
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    Warrior On The Edge Of Time

    Bright Yellow Vinyl


    Warrior on the Edge of Time is Hawkwind's fifth studio album. It reached number 13 on the U.K. album charts at the time of it's initial release and was their third and last album to make the U.S. Billboard chart, where it peaked at number 150. Warrior on the edge of time truly shows that it is possible for lightning to strike the same place twice. With this record being equal in stature and ability to Hall of the Mountain Grill.

    1. Assault And Battry / The Golden Void
    2. The Wizard Blew His Horn
    3. Opa-Loka
    4. The Demented King
    5. Magnu
    6. Standing At The Edge
    7. Spiral Galaxy 28948
    8. Warriors

    9. Dying Seas
    10. Kings Of Speed
    Hawkwind
    $37.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Ladder The Ladder Quick View

    $37.99
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    The Ladder

    Import


    The Ladder is a synthesis of the best traits of the experimental Fragile era and the pop-oriented 90125 era. Producer Bruce Fairbairn completed The Ladder shortly before his death in 1999, and unlike some of his work with Bon Jovi, Aerosmith, Kiss, and others, he didn't overproduce it. Vocalist Jon Anderson, lead guitarist Steve Howe, and bass guitarist Chris Squire all have fine moments, and drummer Alan White is consistent. The roles of keyboardist Igor Khoroshev and, in particular, guitarist Billy Sherwood are less clear. It occasionally seems the purpose of Khoroshev's keyboards is providing a variety of sonic textures instead of functioning as a lead instrument. Sherwood's second guitar tends to flesh out the sound. Homeworld (The Ladder) is a tight band performance, but the supple vocals/acoustic guitar/piano coda is the best part. Howe's bouncy acoustic guitar drives Lightning Strikes, yet the biggest surprise is the addition of a horn section. The energetic Face to Face is the strongest track, and Squire lets loose with a sputtering bassline. If Only You Knew is a sweet, straightforward love song Anderson wrote for his wife. The Messenger has a smooth, funky feel -- a remarkable feat considering prog rock is usually considered the whitest rock genre. New Language is the best long song on The Ladder, thanks to a clever arrangement giving all six members an opportunity to demonstrate their talents.

    1. Homeworld (The Ladder)
    2. It Will Be A Good Day (The River)
    3. Lightning Strikes
    4. Can I?
    5. Face To Face
    6. If Only You Knew
    7. To Be Alive (Hep Yadda)
    8. Finally
    9. The Messenger
    10. New Language
    11. Nine Voices (Longwalker)
    Yes
    $37.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Freak Flag Freak Flag Quick View

    $17.99
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    Freak Flag

    Greg Brown, accomplished songwriter, co-founder of the influential indie roots label Red House and former musical director for Garrison Keillor's A Prairie Home Companion radio program, is a prolific songwriter and it's a good thing. As the result of a fateful lighting strike on the studio where he was working, Brown lost the recordings that were to comprise his next album. For most artists, losing that much material would have been a creatively scarring and demoralizing experience. For Greg, it was just an excuse to turn inward once again, and write more songs.


    Of the songs that came to comprise his 24th album Freak Flag, the title track is all that remains of that ill-fated lost original album. Greg wrote ten new songs, moving on to record them at Memphis, Tennessee's legendary Ardent Studios. This time there were no storms, but creative lightning did strike again, resulting in what many have called Greg's best album. Like a jagged stone worked by ocean waves, Brown's signature rough hewn-yet-velvet-smooth baritone is in fine form on Freak Flag. Produced by Bo Ramsey, the album also includes a cover of Brown's wife Iris Dement's Let the Mystery Be and Brown's daughter Pieta's song Remember the Sun.


    1. Someday House

    2. Where Are You Going When You're Gone
    3. Rain & Snow
    4. Freak Flag
    5. Lovinest One
    6. I Don't Know Anybody In This Town
    7. Flat Stuff
    8. Mercy Mercy Mercy
    9. Let the Mystery Be
    10. Remember The Sun
    11. Tenderhearted Child

    Greg Brown
    $17.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Silent Reign Of Heroes (Awaiting Repress) Silent Reign Of Heroes (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $22.99
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    Silent Reign Of Heroes (Awaiting Repress)

    This Lynyrd Skynyrd-style, blues rock outfit emerged from the US deep south. The name derived from a tale of a woman in seventeenth-century Salem who beheaded her lovers with an axe after sleeping with them. The initial line-up comprised Dave Hlubek (guitar), Steve Holland (guitar), Duane Roland (guitar), Banner Thomas (bass), Danny Joe Brown (vocals) and Bruce Crump (drums). Their 1978 debut album, produced by Tom Werman (of Cheap Trick and Ted Nugent fame), was an instant success, with its three-pronged guitar onslaught and gut-wrenching vocals. The band then achieved a US Top 20 placing with their second album, Flirtin` With Disaster. Brown was replaced by Jimmy Farrar in 1980, before the recording of the band`s third album, Beatin` The Odds. Farrar`s vocals were less distinctive than Brown`s, and an element of their identity was lost during the time that Farrar fronted the band. Nevertheless, commercial success continued, with both Beatin` The Odds and Take No Prisoners peaking on the Billboard album chart at numbers 25 and 36, respectively. In 1982, Danny Joe Brown rejoined the band in place of the departed Farrar, while Thomas and Crump were replaced by Riff West and B.B. Borden respectively. No Guts ... No Glory emerged and marked a return to the band`s roots: explosive guitar duels, heart-stopping vocals and steadfast rock `n` roll. Surprisingly, the album flopped and Hlubek insisted on a radical change in direction. Steve Holland quit and drummer Crump returned, while keyboard player John Galvin (from the Danny Joe Brown Band) was recruited for the recording of The Deed Is Done. This was a lightweight pop rock album, largely devoid of Molly Hatchet`s former trademarks. Following its release, the band retired temporarily to lick their wounds and reassess their future. In 1985, Double Trouble Live was unveiled, with a return to former styles. It included versions of their best-known songs, plus a Lynyrd Skynyrd tribute in the form of `Freebird`. Founder member Dave Hlubek subsequently departed, to be replaced by Bobby Ingram. The band signed a new recording contract with Capitol Records and returned with 1989`s Lightning Strikes Twice. This leaned away from their southern roots towards highly polished AOR. Featuring cover versions of Paul Stanley`s `Hide Your Heart` and `There Goes The Neighborhood`, the album was poorly received by fans and critics alike. A number of line-up changes ensued in the early 90s, leaving Brown as the only remaining original member. During this period he was continually plagued by illness as a result of diabetes. and eventually left Molly Hatchet in 1996 as they embarked on another recording comeback. The line-up that recorded Devil`s Canyon comprised Bobby Ingram, John Galvin, Phil McCormack (vocals), Bryan Bassett (guitar), Andy McKinney (bass) and Mac Crawford (drums). The revived band, with additional keyboard player Tim Donovan, then completed 1998`s Silent Reign Of Heroes. Further line-up changes saw mainstays Ingram, Galvin and McCormack joined by a regularly rotating cast list of musicians, as the band continued to tour and record with great success. Original guitarist Hlubek rejoined the line-up in early 2005 shortly before his former colleague Danny Joe Brown succumbed to diabetes.

    1. Mississippi Moon Dog

    2. World of Trouble

    3. Silent Reign of Heroes

    4. Miss Saturday Night

    5. Blue Thunder

    6. Just Remember (You're the Only One)

    7. Junk Yard Dawg

    8. Dead and Gone (Redneck Song)

    9. Saddle Tramp

    10. Fall of the Peacemakers

    11. Whiskey Man

    12. One Man's Pleasure

    Molly Hatchet
    $22.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • Kingdom Of XII Kingdom Of XII Quick View

    $22.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Kingdom Of XII

    This Lynyrd Skynyrd-style, blues rock outfit emerged from the US deep south. The name derived from a tale of a woman in seventeenth-century Salem who beheaded her lovers with an axe after sleeping with them. The initial line-up comprised Dave Hlubek (guitar), Steve Holland (guitar), Duane Roland (guitar), Banner Thomas (bass), Danny Joe Brown (vocals) and Bruce Crump (drums). Their 1978 debut album, produced by Tom Werman (of Cheap Trick and Ted Nugent fame), was an instant success, with its three-pronged guitar onslaught and gut-wrenching vocals. The band then achieved a US Top 20 placing with their second album, Flirtin` With Disaster. Brown was replaced by Jimmy Farrar in 1980, before the recording of the band`s third album, Beatin` The Odds. Farrar`s vocals were less distinctive than Brown`s, and an element of their identity was lost during the time that Farrar fronted the band. Nevertheless, commercial success continued, with both Beatin` The Odds and Take No Prisoners peaking on the Billboard album chart at numbers 25 and 36, respectively. In 1982, Danny Joe Brown rejoined the band in place of the departed Farrar, while Thomas and Crump were replaced by Riff West and B.B. Borden respectively. No Guts ... No Glory emerged and marked a return to the band`s roots: explosive guitar duels, heart-stopping vocals and steadfast rock `n` roll. Surprisingly, the album flopped and Hlubek insisted on a radical change in direction. Steve Holland quit and drummer Crump returned, while keyboard player John Galvin (from the Danny Joe Brown Band) was recruited for the recording of The Deed Is Done. This was a lightweight pop rock album, largely devoid of Molly Hatchet`s former trademarks. Following its release, the band retired temporarily to lick their wounds and reassess their future. In 1985, Double Trouble Live was unveiled, with a return to former styles. It included versions of their best-known songs, plus a Lynyrd Skynyrd tribute in the form of `Freebird`. Founder member Dave Hlubek subsequently departed, to be replaced by Bobby Ingram. The band signed a new recording contract with Capitol Records and returned with 1989`s Lightning Strikes Twice. This leaned away from their southern roots towards highly polished AOR. Featuring cover versions of Paul Stanley`s `Hide Your Heart` and `There Goes The Neighborhood`, the album was poorly received by fans and critics alike. A number of line-up changes ensued in the early 90s, leaving Brown as the only remaining original member. During this period he was continually plagued by illness as a result of diabetes. and eventually left Molly Hatchet in 1996 as they embarked on another recording comeback. The line-up that recorded Devil`s Canyon comprised Bobby Ingram, John Galvin, Phil McCormack (vocals), Bryan Bassett (guitar), Andy McKinney (bass) and Mac Crawford (drums). The revived band, with additional keyboard player Tim Donovan, then completed 1998`s Silent Reign Of Heroes. Further line-up changes saw mainstays Ingram, Galvin and McCormack joined by a regularly rotating cast list of musicians, as the band continued to tour and record with great success. Original guitarist Hlubek rejoined the line-up in early 2005 shortly before his former colleague Danny Joe Brown succumbed to diabetes.

    1. Heart of the U.S.A.

    2. Cornbread Mafia

    3. One Last Ride

    4. Why Won't You Take Me Home

    5. Turn My Back on Yesterday

    6. Gypsy Trail

    7. White Lightning

    8. Tumbling Dice

    9. Angel in Dixie

    10. Kickstart to Freedom

    11. Dreams of Life

    12. Edge of Sundown

    13. Bounty Hunter

    Molly Hatchet
    $22.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Highway 61 Revisited Highway 61 Revisited Quick View

    $49.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Highway 61 Revisited

    Highway 61 Revisited on Numbered Limited Edition 180 Gram 45RPM 2LP from Mobile Fidelity


    Dylan's First Entirely Rock-Backed Album Marks Sea Change in Sound and Potential of Popular Music


    Ranked #4 on Rolling Stone's 500 Greatest Albums of All Time List


    Album-Opening Like a Rolling Stone Challenging, Bold, Revolutionary-And Arguably the Best Rock Song Ever Recorded


    Widescreen Sonics: Brilliant Collision of Evocative Poetry, Swirling Roots-Based Soul, and Hard-Driving Blues Sounds Incredible on MoFi 45RPM Pressing


    1965 Set Also Includes Ballad of a Thin Man, Desolation Row, and Just Like Tom Thumb's Blues


    Its title references the road that spans North Minnesota to the Mississippi Delta, and the formative blues, country, and roots sounds connected to its existence. The highway also lays claim to towering musical myths and deaths, many tied to the blues lexicon and narrative. All figure prominently on the revolutionary beacon that is Highway 61 Revisited, the 1965 set that overturned rules, upended preexisting limits, and utterly changed everything in its path. Ranked the fourth-greatest album ever made by Rolling Stone, its reach, power, and content boggle the mind nearly five decades after its release.


    Mastered on Mobile Fidelity's world-renowned mastering system and pressed on 180 gram LP at RTI, this restored 45RPM analog version presents the life-altering music in reference-quality sound-so much so that the record's famous first lightning-strike note is now indeed the "snare shot that sound[s] like somebody'd kicked open the door to your mind," as once described by Bruce Springsteen.


    Teeming with organic energy, palpable voltage, and countless textures, the LP faithfully recreates the dimensions, vibes, and events associated with the six days Dylan and Co. spent at Columbia's Studio A. Everything from the soundstages to dynamics, instrumental separation to balances, resonates with enormous might and insightful perspective. Wider grooves mean more information reaches your ears.


    Recorded amidst a time of unfathomable turmoil and frustration that witnessed Dylan booed by fans, labeled a traitor, and call into question his work, Highway 61 Revisited roars and snarls, jabs and criticizes. Its bonfire of cynicism, fury, indignation, and absurdity forever transformed rock, what it could mean, and what it could do. Supported by a thundering, commanding band that included guitarist Mike Bloomfield and organist Al Kooper, Dylan hopscotches between tempos, moods, and melodies. The symmetry of the songs references a scattered hybrid of R&B, blues, folk, soul, gospel, vaudeville, and garage rock pieces that Dylan assembles in the shape of a brilliant, mind-teasing aural puzzle.


    Outside of "Like a Rolling Stone"-the six-minute-plus anthem that both challenged and chewed up all preconceived notions of an acceptable radio single by way of its length, ambition, and vitriol-every tune was captured shortly after Dylan's contentious performance at the Newport Folk Festival. The lingering impact of the hostility comes through in both the searing music and rich, literate, zinging poetry. Dylan's sneering tones, raucous arrangements, and unmistakable resentment toward both the establishment and counterculture that adopted him, and assume the form of songs such as "Ballad of a Thin Man," "Queen Jane Approximately," "Tombstone Blues," and the stupefying "Desolation Row."


    At its core, Highway 61 Revisited is about experience, reality, and the cruelties and truths that lie outside soporific safety nets and bourgeois ideals. These reasons-and the bold musicianship, ace performances, inimitable sonics, and vast lyrical expanses-are why the album means as much today as it did in the mid-1960s. Akin to Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band and Dark Side of the Moon, this is an album that everyone needs to own and hear in the best-possible fidelity.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Like a Rolling Stone
    2. Tombstone Blues
    3. It Takes a Lot to Laugh, It Takes a Train to Cry
    4. From a Buick 6
    5. Ballad of a Thin Man
    6. Queen Jane Approximately
    7. Highway 61 Revisited
    8. Just Like Tom Thumb's Blues
    9. Desolation Row
    Bob Dylan
    $49.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP 45 RPM - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Highway 61 Revisited (Mono) Highway 61 Revisited (Mono) Quick View

    $49.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Highway 61 Revisited (Mono)

    Highway 61 Revisited on Numbered Limited Edition Mono 180 Gram 45RPM 2LP from Mobile Fidelity


    Dylan's First Entirely Rock-Backed Album Marks Sea Change in Sound and Potential of Popular Music


    Ranked #4 on Rolling Stone's 500 Greatest Albums of All Time List


    Album-Opening Like a Rolling Stone Challenging, Bold, Revolutionary-And Arguably the Best Rock Song Ever Recorded


    Brilliant Collision of Evocative Poetry, Swirling Roots-Based Soul, and Hard-Driving Blues Sounds Incredible in Mono on Mobile Fidelity Vinyl: 2LP Set Strictly Limited to 3,000 Copies


    1965 Set Also Includes Ballad of a Thin Man, Desolation Row, and Just Like Tom Thumb's Blues


    Its title references the road that spans North Minnesota to the Mississippi Delta, and the formative blues, country, and roots sounds connected to its existence. The highway also lays claim to towering musical myths and deaths, many tied to the blues lexicon and narrative. All figure prominently on the revolutionary beacon that is Highway 61 Revisited, the 1965 set that overturned rules, upended preexisting limits, and utterly changed everything in its path. Ranked the fourth-greatest album ever made by Rolling Stone, its reach, power, and content boggle the mind more than five decades after its release.


    Mastered on Mobile Fidelity's world-renowned mastering system, pressed at RTI, and strictly limited to 3,000 copies, this restored analog mono version presents the life-altering music in reference-quality sound - so much so that the record's famous first lightning-strike note is now indeed the snare shot that sound[s] like somebody'd kicked open the door to your mind, as once described by Bruce Springsteen.


    Teeming with organic energy, palpable voltage, and countless textures, Mobile Fidelity's mono 2LP set faithfully recreates the instrumentation, moods, and events associated with the six days Dylan and Co. spent at Columbia's Studio A. While many people experienced Highway 61 Revisited in stereo even at the time of its release, hearing it in mono reveals even more definition, focus, and liveliness. In particular, Dylan's voice is surrounded by more space and atmosphere, and its forefront position makes the lyrics that much more powerful. This is the way everyone would've been introduced to Like a Rolling Stone on AM radio. There's no substitute for such authenticity.


    Recorded amidst a time of unfathomable turmoil and frustration that witnessed Dylan booed by fans, labeled a traitor, and call into question his work, Highway 61 Revisited roars and snarls, jabs and criticizes. Its bonfire of cynicism, fury, indignation, and absurdity forever transformed rock, what it could mean, and what it could do. Supported by a thundering, commanding band that included guitarist Mike Bloomfield and organist Al Kooper, Dylan hopscotches between tempos, moods, and melodies. The symmetry of the songs references a scattered hybrid of R&B, blues, folk, soul, gospel, vaudeville, and garage rock pieces that Dylan assembles in the shape of a brilliant, mind-teasing aural puzzle.


    Outside of "Like a Rolling Stone"-the six-minute-plus anthem that both challenged and chewed up all preconceived notions of an acceptable radio single by way of its length, ambition, and vitriol-every tune was captured shortly after Dylan's contentious performance at the Newport Folk Festival. The lingering impact of the hostility comes through in both the searing music and rich, literate, zinging poetry. Dylan's sneering tones, raucous arrangements, and unmistakable resentment toward both the establishment and counterculture that adopted him, and assume the form of songs such as "Ballad of a Thin Man," "Queen Jane Approximately," "Tombstone Blues," and the stupefying "Desolation Row."


    At its core, Highway 61 Revisited is about experience, reality, and the cruelties and truths that lie outside soporific safety nets and bourgeois ideals. These reasons-and the bold musicianship, ace performances, inimitable sonics, and vast lyrical expanses-are why the album means as much today as it did in the mid-1960s. Akin to Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band and Dark Side of the Moon, this is an album that everyone needs to own and hear in the best-possible fidelity.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Like a Rolling Stone
    2. Tombstone Blues
    3. It Takes a Lot to Laugh, It Takes a Train to Cry
    4. From a Buick 6
    5. Ballad of a Thin Man
    6. Queen Jane Approximately
    7. Highway 61 Revisited
    8. Just Like Tom Thumb's Blues
    9. Desolation Row
    Bob Dylan
    $49.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP Mono 45 RPM - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Fuchsia Swing Song Fuchsia Swing Song Quick View

    $19.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Fuchsia Swing Song

    During the Blue Note 75th anniversary celebration the label released 100 essential Blue Note LPs and asked New York Times readers what titles they'd like to see make the list. This album is one of five new reissues that were hand-selected by Blue Note President, Don Was, based on New York Times reader recommendations.


    Recorded in 1964 immediately after leaving the Miles Davis Quintet, Sam Rivers' Fuchsia Swing Song is one of the more auspicious debuts the label released in the mid-'60s. Rivers was a seasoned session player (his excellent work on Larry Young's Into Somethin' is a case in point) and a former member of Herb Pomeroy's Big Band before he went out with Davis. By the time of his debut, Rivers had been deep under the influence of Coltrane and Coleman, but wasn't willing to give up the blues just yet. Hence the sound on Fuchsia Swing Song is one of an artist who is at once very self-assured, and in transition.


    Using a rhythm section that included Tony Williams (whose Life Time he had guested on), pianist Jaki Byard, and bassist Ron Carter, Rivers took the hard bop and blues of his roots and poured them through the avant-garde colander. Today, players like Joshua Redman, Branford Marsalis, and James Carter do it all the time, but in 1964 it was unheard of. You either played hard bop or free; Davis' entire modal thing hadn't even completely blasted off yet. The title and opening track is a case in point.


    Rivers opens with an angular figure that is quickly translated by the band into sweeping, bopping blues. Rivers legato is lightning quick and his phrasing touches upon Coleman Hawkins, Sonny Rollins, Coleman, and Coltrane, but his embouchure is all his. He strikes the balance and then takes off on both sides of the aisle. Byard's comping is actually far more than that, building in rhythmic figures in striated minors just behind the tenor. Downstairs Blues Upstairs sounds, initially anyway, like it might have come out of the Davis book so deep is its blue root. But courtesy of Byard and Williams, Rivers goes to the left after only four choruses, moving onto the ledge a bit at a time, running knotty arpeggios through the center of the melody and increasingly bending his notes into succeeding intervals while shifting keys and times signatures


    He never goes completely over the edge as he would on his later Blue Note dates. The most difficult cut on the date is Luminous Monolith, with its swing-like figure introducing the melody. Eight bars in, the syncopation of the rhythm sections begins a stutter stem around the time and then the harmony with Byard building dense chords for Rivers to jump off of. On the Connoisseur Series CD (shame on Blue Note once again for making some of its best outside records limited editions; titles like this should be as readily available as Horace Silver's Song for My Father, but the label had been playing it ever so safe for a while and making fans buy the limited number of titles over and again) there are alternate takes of Luminous Monolith and three more of Downstairs Blues Upstairs, making it a very worthwhile look at the entire session.


    This is a highly recommended date. Rivers never played quite like this again.


    - Thom Jurek

    1. Fuchsia Swing Song

    2. Downstairs Blues Upstairs

    3. Cyclic Episode
    4. Luminous Monolith

    5. Beatrice
    6. Ellipsis
    Sam Rivers
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Lost Themes Lost Themes Quick View

    $21.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Lost Themes

    John Carpenter has been responsible for much of the horror genre's most striking soundtrack work in the fifteen movies he's both directed and scored. The themes can instantly flood his fans' musical memory with imagery of a menacing shape stalking a babysitter, a relentless wall of ghost-filled fog, lightning-fisted kung fu fighters, or a mirror holding the gateway to hell. The all-new music on Lost Themes asks Carpenter's acolytes to visualize their own nightmares.


    "Lost Themes was all about having fun," Carpenter says. "It can be both great and bad to score over images, which is what I'm used to. Here there were no pressures. No actors asking me what they're supposed to do. No crew waiting. No cutting room to go to. No release pending. It's just fun. And I couldn't have a better set-up at my house, where I depended on (collaborators) Cody (Carpenter, of the band Ludrium) and Daniel (davies, who wrote the songs for I, Frankenstein) to bring me ideas as we began improvising. The plan was to make my music more complete and fuller, because we had unlimited tracks. I wasn't dealing with just analogue anymore. It's a brand new world. And there was nothing in any of our heads when we started other than to make it moody."


    As is Carpenter's style, repetition is the key to the thundering power of these tracks, their energy swirling with shredding chords, soaring organs, unnerving pianos and captivating percussion. Horror fans will be reminded of Carpenter's past works, as well as ancestors like Mike Oldfield's Tubular Bells and Goblin's Suspiria.


    "They're little moments of score from movies made in our imaginations," Carpenter says. "Now I hope it inspires people to create films that could be scored with this music."

    1. Vortex
    2. Obsidian
    3. Fallen
    4. Domain
    5. Mystery
    6. Abyss
    7. Wraith
    8. Purgatory
    9. Night
    John Carpenter
    $21.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
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