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  • The Wonderful Sounds Of Christmas (Holiday Colored) The Wonderful Sounds Of Christmas (Holiday Colored) Quick View

    $54.99
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    The Wonderful Sounds Of Christmas (Holiday Colored)


    Limited Numbered Holiday-Colored 180-Gram Vinyl


    Pressed At Quality Record Pressings


    Gatefold Tip-On LP Jackets From Stoughton Printing


    Worthy of audiophile treatment. Not every Christmas tune meets that high standard. But
    every song on this album, with each song chosen by Acoustic Sounds owner and CEO
    Chad Kassem, sounds better than it ever has before. These are some of the most familiar
    - and in most cases, well-recorded - Christmas tracks ever. We feel we're bringing you
    a record that you and your family will enjoy every year forevermore. These truly are The
    Wonderful Sounds Of Christmas.


    From the peaceful solemnity of Harry Simeone Chorale's "The Little Drummer Boy" to
    the festive spirit of Jose Feliciano's "Feliz Navidad," The Wonderful Sounds Of Christmas
    brings you the very best examples of holiday songs ever recorded. With wonderful music
    in abundance, this Christmas compilation offers a celebration of the season's most joyous
    and cherished songs. Truly, Christmas has never sounded better!


    Christmas compilations have been perennials for the music industry for many decades,
    but rarely has there ever been a collection like this one in which the nuances of Christmas
    recordings are presented with such care. The masterful audio quality on this compilation
    captures every musical moment - as if you were listening to the delicate sound of a
    snowflake touching your ear.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    LP 1
    1. The Christmas Song (Merry Christmas To You) - Nat "King" Cole
    2. Baby, It's Cold Outside - Ray Charles and Betty Carter
    3. Christmas Time Is Here (Vocal) - Vince Guaraldi Trio
    4. Please Come Home For Christmas - Charles Brown
    5. Rockin' Around The Christmas Tree - Brenda Lee
    6. Sleigh Ride - Ella Fitzgerald
    7. Rudolph, The Red-Nosed Reindeer - Gene Autry
    8. The Little Drummer Boy - Harry Simeone Chorale
    9. Jingle Bell Rock - Bobby Helms
    10. Ave Maria - Aaron Neville
    11. Christmas Time Is Here (Instrumental) - Vince Guaraldi Trio


    LP 2
    1. Merry Christmas, Baby - Charles Brown
    2. Winter Wonderland - Ray Charles
    3. Please Come Home For Christmas - Aaron Neville
    4. Jingle Bell Rock - Chet Atkins
    5. Feliz Navidad - Jose Feliciano
    6. Sleigh Ride - Leroy Anderson
    7. Rudolph, The Red-Nosed Reindeer - Ella Fitzgerald
    8. Santa Baby - Eartha Kitt
    9. Merry Christmas, Baby - Kenny Burrell
    10. Stille Nacht (Silent Night) - Oscar's Motet Choir
    11. White Christmas - Bing Crosby

    Various Artists
    $54.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Christmas Classics Christmas Classics Quick View

    $19.99
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    Christmas Classics

    Christmas isn't Christmas without Bing, now is it? This LP adds White Christmas (live on The Frank Sinatra Show ) to Peace on Earth/The Little Drummer Boy (the famous TV performance with David Bowie); Frosty the Snowman; Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer; O Holy Night; Winter Wonderland; Do You Hear What I Hear? and more!
    1. White Christmas
    2. Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas
    3. Winter Wonderland
    4. What Child Is This? / The Holly And The Ivy Medley
    5. Little Drummer Boy
    6. O Holy Night
    7. The Littlest Angel
    8. Let It Snow! Let It Snow! Let It Snow!
    9. Hark! The Herald Angels Sing
    10. Frosty The Snowman
    11. Rudolph, The Red-Nosed Reindeer (feat. John Scott Trotter & His Orchestra, Jud Conlon's Rhythmaires)
    12. I Wish You A Merry Christmas
    13. Do You Hear What I Hear?
    14. Pat-A-Pan / While Shepherds Watched Their Flock
    15. Christmas Dinner Country Style
    16. Peace On Earth / The Little Drummer Boy Medley (feat. David Bowie)
    Bing Crosby
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Someday At Christmas Someday At Christmas Quick View

    $19.99
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    Someday At Christmas

    Enjoy the holidays with this Stevie Wonder Christmas album that includes standards like The Little Drummer Boy and Silver Bells!
    1. Someday At Christmas
    2. Silver Bells
    3. Ave Maria
    4. The Little Drummer Boy
    5. One Little Christmas Tree
    6. The Day That Love Began
    7. The Christmas Song
    8. Bedtime For Toys
    9. Christmastime
    10. Twinkle Twinkle Little Me
    11. A Warm Little Home On A Hill
    12. What Christmas Means To Me
    Stevie Wonder
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Not So Silent Night...Christmas With REO Speedwagon Not So Silent Night...Christmas With REO Speedwagon Quick View

    $19.99
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    Not So Silent Night...Christmas With REO Speedwagon

    REO SPEEDWAGON'S Christmas album featuring "Silent Night", "Little Drummer Boy", "Happy Xmas (War Is Over") and many more REO versions of Christmas favorites.
    1. The First Noel
    2. Winter Wonderland
    3. Silent Night
    4. Deck The Halls
    5. Little Drummer Boy
    6. Angels We Have Heard On High (Gloria)
    7. Children Go Where I Send Thee
    8. God Rest Ye, Merry Gentlemen
    9. Happy Xmas (War Is Over)
    10. Blue Christmas
    11. Joy To The World
    REO Speedwagon
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Chicago Christmas: What's it Gonna Be Santa? Chicago Christmas: What's it Gonna Be Santa? Quick View

    $19.99
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    Chicago Christmas: What's it Gonna Be Santa?

    Chicago's Christmas album, Chicago 25 , was one of the most successful modern holiday albums. Now retitled, this is a jazz-rock, bell-jinglin' gem: Silent Night; Sleigh Ride; Little Drummer Boy; Winter Wonderland; White Christmas , and more Xmas music Chicago-style!
    1. Let It Snow! Let It Snow! Let It Snow!
    2. Little Drummer Boy
    3. Sleigh Ride
    4. This Christmas
    5. Jolly Old St. Nicholas
    6. The Christmas Song
    7. Rudolph, The Red-Nosed Reindeer
    8. Christmas Time Is Here
    9. Santa Claus Is Coming To Town
    10. Have Yourself A Merry Little Christmas
    11. White Christmas
    12. Silent Night
    Chicago
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Christmas Spirit The Christmas Spirit Quick View

    $29.99
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    The Christmas Spirit


    The Johnny Cash/Friday Music 180 Gram Audiophile Vinyl Series Continues!


    The Classic Top Charting 1963 Christmas Album


    First Time Audiophile White Vinyl & Gatefold Cover Presentation


    Mastered Impeccably By Joe Reagoso - Manufactured At R.T.I.


    Johnny Cash was a musical phenomenon and an American icon
    with his legendary musical career starting in the 50's at Sun Records.
    His plethora of hit recordings led to a major move to Columbia
    Records, and the late legend charted recordings in all the major
    formats like country, rock , pop, folk, and gospel genres, sharing his
    legendary vocal, guitar and songwriting persona for millions of fans
    worldwide.


    With 1963's The Christmas Spirit Lp, Johnny Cash teams up
    with producer Don Law (Ray Price) and created one of the most
    revered holiday and inspirational hit albums of all time. The album
    features Johnny's stellar interpretations of both popular and religious
    favorites like the definitive hit version of I Heard The Bells On
    Christmas Day, the Tex Ritter favorite Here Was A Man, June Carter
    Cash's Christmas As I Knew It, plus more traditional fare like Blue
    Christmas and The Little Drummer Boy. His impressive readings of
    inspirational favorites like Silent Night, Holy Night, plus Johnny's own
    The Christmas Spirit and Who Kept The Sheep, truly made the The
    Christmas Spirit Lp a groundbreaking effort for this sorely missed
    legend.


    This fine album has been out of print for decades on vinyl, and
    it is our honor to announce the first time 180 Gram Audiophile Vinyl
    presentation of The Christmas Spirit by the late great Johnny Cash
    on Friday Music. This limited edition audiophile masterpiece is now
    impeccably mastered by Joe Reagoso and also for a very limited
    time is pressed by R.T.I. on White Vinyl for the holidays. Also,
    the Lp features the original Lp artwork not seen in years, in a first
    time gatefold presentation exclusively from the Columbia Records
    archives.


    I Heard The Bells On Christmas Day ..

    1. The Christmas Spirit
    2. I Heard The Bells On Christmas Day
    3. Blue Christmas
    4. The Gifts They Gave
    5. Here Was A Man
    6. Christmas As I Knew It
    7. Silent Night, Holy Night
    8. The Little Drummer Boy
    9. Ringing The Bells For Jim
    10. We Are The Shepherds
    11. Who Kept The Sheep
    12. The Ballad Of The Harp Weaver
    Johnny Cash
    $29.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP Buy Now
  • Average White Band Average White Band Quick View

    $31.99
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    Average White Band

    First Time Friday Music 180 Gram Audiophile Vinyl


    Mastered Impeccably By Joe Reagoso At Friday Music & Capitol Mastering


    Their self-effacing name to the contrary, Average White Band was anything but - one of the few white groups to cross the color line and achieve success and credibility playing funk, with their tight, fiery sound also belying their Scottish heritage, evoking American R&B hotbeds like Detroit, Memphis, and Philadelphia instead. Singer/bassist Alan Gorrie, guitarists Hamish Stuart and Onnie McIntyre, tenor saxophonist Malcolm Duncan, keyboardist/saxophonist Roger Ball, and drummer Robbie McIntosh comprised the original Average White Band lineup. Veterans of numerous Scottish soul and jazz groups, they made their debut in 1973 as the opening act at Eric Clapton's Rainbow Theatre comeback gig, soon issuing their debut LP, Show Your Hand, to little notice. After adopting the abbreviated moniker AWB, a year later the band issued their self-titled sophomore effort, topping the American pop charts with the Arif Mardin-produced instrumental "Pick Up the Pieces." The record's mammoth success was nevertheless tempered by the September 23, 1974 death of McIntosh, who died at a Hollywood party after overdosing on heroin.


    Ex-Bloodstone drummer Steve Ferrone replaced McIntosh for AWB's third album, 1975's Cut the Cake, which scored a Top Ten hit with its title track as well as two other chart entries, "If I Ever Lose This Heaven" and "School Boy Crush." (Put It Where You Want It, issued later that same year, was simply a retitled and repackaged Show Your Hand.) With 1976's Soul Searching, the group reclaimed the full Average White Band name, scoring their final Top 40 hit with "Queen of My Soul." Following the live Person to Person, they issued Benny & Us, a collaboration with soul legend Ben E. King. However, after subsequent outings, including 1978's Warmer Communications, 1979's Feel No Fret, and 1980's Shine, failed to recapture the energy of AWB's peak, the group dissolved in 1982, with Ferrone later joining Duran Duran and Stuart recording with Paul McCartney. Gorrie, Ball, and McIntyre reformed Average White Band in 1989, tapping vocalist Alex Ligertwood for their comeback effort Aftershock. Oft-sampled by hip-hop producers throughout the 1990s, the group continued touring prior to releasing Soul Tattoo in 1996. The live album, Face to Face, followed three years later.

    1. You Got It
    2. Got The Love
    3. Pick Up The Pieces

    4. Person To Person

    5. Work To Do
    6. Nothing You Can Do

    7. Just Wanna Love You Tonight
    8. Keepin' It To Myself

    9. I Just Can't Give You Up

    10. There's Always Someone Waiting
    Average White Band
    $31.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP Buy Now
  • Birth Control Birth Control Quick View

    $22.99
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    Birth Control

    Three albums into their career, New Jersey's Fight Amp show no desire to outgrow their tough but taut noise rock tendencies, but that hardly means they are treading water in a sea of retarded sexuality either. Released in 2012, Birth Control introduces new drummer Dan Smith (who, conveniently, also designed its cover art) into vocalist/guitarist Mike McGinnis and vocalist/bassist Jon DeHart's private little fight club, and the tenacious, unforgiving music they produce in unison makes it just as easy to imagine the trio members sparring in a seedy old boxing gym as bashing away at their instruments in a dingy rehearsal space. And while the boys last just eight rounds (songs) on Birth Control, most of 'em extend well beyond the regulation three minutes and boast a series of curiously style-departing codas -- e.g., the menacing echoes of "White Pickett," the piano on "Should've Worn Black" -- that enhance the illusion of a championship bout going the distance. By and large, most tracks ("Fly Trap," "Creepy Kicks," "I Am the Corpse") focus on punishing instrumental interplay, guitars verging on the atonal, while McGinnis incessantly barks against the fading of the light, escalating to outright screams when the rage becomes more than he can contain. Not until the late-album instrumental left turn "Goner" does the band forgo its customary energy for a more measured, though no less intense, approach where bass grooves call the shots as guitars and drums deliver the body blows. All of which raises the question: are you man or woman enough to go toe to toe with Fight Amp? Then get in the ring!

    1. Fly Trap

    2. White Pickett

    3. Creepy Kicks

    4. Should've Worn Black

    5. Shallow Grave

    6. Goner

    7. I'm Out

    8. I Am the Corpse

    Fight Amp
    $22.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Present Tense Present Tense Quick View

    $19.99
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    Present Tense


    Heavyweight Vinyl In A Gatefold Jacket


    Wild Beasts' Present Tense is a dramatically new album. Gleaming and sparkling with 1980s and
    1990s electronic sound rethought and retooled with exquisite detail for the 21st century. It doesn't
    sound like any boys-with-guitars band you've ever heard. And despite the coherence of its sweeping
    song structures, it wasn't written so much as constructed from the ground up from tiny phrases and
    fragments, then it was layered together in the studio by Wild Beasts with co-producers Lexxx
    and Brian Eno protege Leo Abrahams. "We spent ages programming and piecing individual parts
    together," says the band's drummer Chris Talbot, "it was built on computers rather than played first, and
    we had the feeling that anyone in the band could do anything without feeling they had one role to stick
    to." Even using this cut and paste recording style the band somehow retains all of the coherence that
    can only come from years playing together in basements and on stages. Wild Beasts have created their
    own world which the listener has no choice but to enter and immerse themselves in.


    Wild Beasts are more of a band than most bands. They've spent their career thus far deconstructing
    exactly what it is to be a band, trying to escape the constraints of what is expected from four lads
    playing together - and more so than ever on the deliberately synthetic, instrument-swapping Present
    Tense. But here they are, four albums down and more than eight years since they first played together
    in this lineup, still feeling like a gang, still feeling like a band as it is supposed to be, with a single clear
    vision and sound. Just a few minutes in a room together with them, seeing how their four distinct
    personalities play off one another, and it's obvious.


    WILD BEASTS are:

    Hayden Thorpe - vocals, guitar, bass, keys

    Tom Fleming - vocals, guitar, bass, keys

    Ben Little - guitar, keys

    Chris Talbot - drums

    1. Wanderlust
    2. Nature Boy
    3. Mecca
    4. Sweet Spot
    5. Daughters
    6. Pregnant Pause
    7. A Simple Beautiful Truth
    8. A Dog's Life
    9. Past Perfect
    10. New Life
    11. Palace
    Wild Beasts
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Brothers Brothers Quick View

    $24.99
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    Brothers

    W/ CD version of the album included.


    The maturation of the Black Keys as record makers and performers has been both subtle and startling. With their 2008 Nonesuch release Attack & Release, the fifth album of their eight-year career which doubled the sales of their previous album and Nonesuch debut Magic Potion, guitarist Dan Auerbach and drummer Patrick Carney illustrated the durability of their few-frills sound, a mysterious and heavy brew of '70s-vintage rock, classic R&B and timeless, downhearted blues. Producer and pal Danger Mouse, their first outside collaborator, didn't try to reinvent their sound but further isolated its essence with the help of a few carefully chosen guest players and some retro-modern electronic gear. It didn't need to get slicker to get better, or, as the Boston Globe put it, Attack & Release proves that cleaning up the boys still won't stop them from tracking mud all over the house.


    Danger Mouse returned to co-produce Tighten Up on Brothers, but for the most part, the duo was on its own, spending ten days at the legendary Muscle Shoals studio in Alabama and coming up with the an even more intensely focused, deeply soulful set that includes a cover of Jerry Butler's Never Gonna Give You Up. The performances are inventive and impassioned: Auerbach extends his vocal range to falsetto on lead-off track Everlasting Light and The Only One; Howlin' For You opens with a Gary Glitter-style drum riff and the chorus practically invites singing along. The tunes offer a surprising amount of lyrical candor and more than a little dark humor; the grooves alternate between ballsy swagger and bluesy rumination. The album reflects where Auerbach and Carney have been lately, most recently collaborating with a who's who of New York City MC's, including RZA, Q Tip, Mos Def and Raekwon on the 2009 BlakRocBlack Keys fan Damon Dash. They've also pursued projects on their own, Auerbach with his solo Keep It Hid album and tour, Carney with his band Drummer and its debut disc, Feels Good Together. Their maturation didn't happen just in the studio, though. Carney admits, Dan and I grew up a lot as individuals and musicians prior to making this album. Our relationship was tested in many ways but at the end of the day, we're brothers, and I think these songs reflect that. super-session organized by hip-hop impresario and


    Brothers was primarily cut in Muscle Shoals, a setting that turned out to have more in common with the Akron, Ohio factories where the Black Keys used to record. The place was desolate, the town depressed, so once again the duo slipped into a world all its own. They did additional recording at Auerbach's Easy Eye Sound System in Akron and The Bunker in Brooklyn. The album was mixed by engineer Tchad Blake, a veteran of sessions with Los Lobos, Pearl Jam and Peter Gabriel. Says Carney, The way he approaches mixing is the same way we approach making music. Respecting the past while being in the present..

    1. Everlasting Light
    2. Next Girl
    3. Tighten Up
    4. Howlin' For You
    5. She's Long Gone
    6. Black Mud
    7. The Only One
    8. Too Afraid To Love
    9. Ten Cent Pistol
    10. Sinister Kid
    11. The Go Getter
    12. I'm Not The One
    13. Unknown Brother
    14. Never Gonna Give You Up
    15. These Days
    The Black Keys
    $24.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Sweetenings (Pure Pleasure) Sweetenings (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Sweetenings (Pure Pleasure)

    Harry 'Sweets' Edison, a smooth and suave trumpeter, was a cohort of orchestra leader Count Basie, a favourite of bandleader Nelson Riddle, and a noted backup artist for the most prominent vocalists of his time. Edison, with his energetic yet reticent blowing style, bridged a genre gap between the early classic jazz sound of Louis Armstrong and modern bebop modes. Edison, who played equally well in both styles, had a special talent for sustaining his trumpet notes and injecting each single tone with expression and soul never heard before or after.


    The special quality of his trumpet playing earned him the nickname 'Sweets' because of the sweetness of the tones. Likewise his ability to control the tone of his trumpet brought him to the forefront as a session musician, playing accompaniments for the most respected vocalists of his time.


    Edison was a true pioneer of jazz. An old-time homespun boy, born in Columbus, Ohio, he never knew with certainty even the year of his birth. According to his best knowledge, he was born in 1919, although some sources list the date as early as 1915. Edison knew even less about his own father, a Native American of the Hopi (Apache) tribe and a drifter who stayed only a few weeks with Edison's mother before taking to the road and was rarely heard from afterward. Edison spent his early years with an uncle, who was a coal miner and a farmer, in Louisville, Kentucky. It was Edison's uncle who taught the boy to play the pump organ and to play scales on an old cornet. Edison, who also listened to his uncle's records, was especially inspired by the music of Louis Armstrong and Bessie Smith.


    Harry Sweets Edison added something special to any date in which he took part, but these 1958 sessions he led for Roulette are especially enjoyable. Joined by either Jimmy Jones or Kenny Drew on piano and Joe Benjamin or John Simmons on bass, along with tenor saxophonist Jimmy Forrest and drummer Charlie Persip, Edison's trumpet swings effortlessly through a batch of standards and originals.


    The loping blues Centerpiece became a classic jazz composition, recorded by numerous jazz artists, but this was its debut appearance on LP. Jive at Five dates from his years with Count Basie and finds the band sticking to an accompanying role in this swinging but brief arrangement. Edison utilizes a mute in the gently swinging Louisiana, while he showboats just a bit in a brief take of It Happened in Monterey. While this record might have offered a little more variety by giving solo space to some of the talented sidemen present, this long out of print LP is well worth acquiring.



    Musicians:



    • Harry Edison (trumpet)

    • Jimmy Forrest (tenor saxophone)

    • Jimmy Jones (piano)

    • Joe Benjamint (bass)

    • John Simmons (bass)

    • Charlie Persip (drums)



    Recording: November 1958 in New York
    Production: Teddy Reig




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Centerpiece
    2. Candy
    3. Jive At Five
    4. Imagination
    5. Louisana
    6. Harriet
    7. It Happened In Monterey
    8. If I Had You
    9. Paradise
    10. Indiana
    11. Pussy Willow
    12. Sweetenings
    Harry Sweets Edison
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Sadnecessary Sadnecessary Quick View

    $25.99
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    Sadnecessary

    You never know who you're going to meet on the first day of school. Sometimes, you can end up being introduced to one of the best friends you'll ever
    know. That was the case for Clemens and Philipp-otherwise known as Milky Chance. The Kassel, Germany duo met in an Advanced Music Course at
    the start of eleventh grade, and they creatively gelled right off the bat.


    They got along so great that they played in a local band until graduation. Even though the group disbanded when their drummer left Kassel, Clemens and
    Philipp kept on making music. Weaving together elegant electronic production with acoustic guitars and lilting, lush vocals, they harnessed a style
    unequivocally their own.


    Clemens put it best, Think of it as the singer-songwriter spirit mixed with electronic beats. Somehow, it's always a little bit melancholy, but there's a
    positive spin. You can dance to most of it too! Melancholy is something that I carry within me. I write the best songs when this mood catches me."
    In order to capture that, the boys built a tiny studio in the quiet house Clemens grew up in. Over the course of two weeks in 2013, they cut their full-length
    debut, Sadnecessary, on a minimalist setup, spending hours getting the settings just right. They didn't need anything more than a rudimentary interface,
    microphone, and computer. That's why Sadnecessary sizzles so much.


    After cutting the tracks, Clemens and Philipp uploaded the first single Stolen Dance to YouTube. With its bright handclaps, plaintive acoustic guitars, and
    his own gravelly smooth delivery, the song became a viral sensation, eventually racking up over 30 million-plus YouTube views and made them the most
    blogged about act on HypeM for that month.


    About the song, he says, It's less of a story than a feeling. The feeling in the song refers to a certain moment I wanted to hold on to. It's the sentiment you
    experience when you miss somebody you really like and just can't spend time with that person. You're sad the other person isn't there, but you're also
    happy for the beautiful moments you've spent together.


    Sadnecessary, released on the musicians' own Lichtdicht Records in Europe, became a phenomenon followed by packed shows around the continent. In
    early 2014, Republic Records inked a deal with Milky Chance to release the record stateside, opening them up to their largest audience yet.


    Now, songs like Down By The River flow between poetic musing and delightfully danceable grooves. Clemens remains honest at every turn though.
    There is actually a personal story behind 'Down By The River', he adds. In general it's about being in love, but there's a lot of room for interpretation.
    That's important to us.


    Ultimately, because of that emotional expanse, these songs will resonate loudly with listeners everywhere. Clemens leaves off, At the end of the day,
    we're most happy when people discover our music for themselves and have fun at one of our concerts. It's just great when they listen to a song and
    connect it to a personal experience. That's the most amazing thing, and we'd love to encourage that.


    Led by the irresistibly catchy, danceable track "Stolen Dance" - which has already hit #1 in 15 countries and amassed over 50 million views on YouTube -
    German duo Milky Chance are now poised for greatness in the states as well.


    The duo weaves elegant electronic production with acoustic guitars, along with lilting, lush vocals. It's a unique sound that is unequivocally their own.

    1. Stunner
    2. Flashed Junk Mind
    3. Becoming
    4. Running
    5. Indigo
    6. Sadnecessary
    7. Down By The River
    8. Sweet Sun
    9. Fairytale
    10. Stolen Dance
    11. Loveland
    12. Feathery
    Milky Chance
    $25.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • El Camino El Camino Quick View

    $24.99
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    El Camino

    Reviewing The Black Keys' 2010 Top Ten breakthrough album Brothers, Rolling Stone called the duo a two-man combo with a big-band mind. That description seems downright prophetic now. With the hard-rocking El Camino, The Black Keys' fourth Nonesuch release, guitarist-singer Dan Auerbach and drummer Patrick Carney conjure up an exhilarating, stadium-sized sound in collaboration with producer and friend Danger Mouse. El Camino boasts a no-nonsense brilliance: The pace is fast, the mood is upbeat, the choruses unfailingly addictive made for shouting along, preferably in a large, sweaty crowd.


    A band already at the top of its game has gotten even better. And The Black Keys have done pretty damn well so far this year, with three 2011 Grammy awards for Brothers under their belt, an MTV Video Music Award for Tighten Up, more than 850,000 copies of Brothers sold in the U.S., and upwards of a million units worldwide, plus innumerable licensing placements in film, TV, and commercials. El Camino features one stand-out track after another, such as first single Lonely Boy, Gold on the Ceiling, and the surprising, acoustic-guitar-driven, tempo-shifting Little Black Submarines.


    This record is more straight ahead rock and roll raw, driving, and back to basics, says Auerbach. As Carney has put it, The Black Keys respect the past while being in the present, and that formula has made them sound like nothing less than the future of rock and roll. While the largely self-produced Brothers, recorded at the famed Muscle Shoals Studio in Alabama, had a more soul and blues-oriented sound, El Camino often recalls the blitzkrieg-paced British-style rock of the 1960s and 70s, post-Beatles and pre-punk: artists like T-Rex, The Sweet, and Gary Glitter, along with the heavier swing of such bands as Led Zeppelin and Black Sabbath.


    The references are there, but the sound is very much contemporary and utterly their own, equally informed by The Black Keys' passion for hip hop and R&B and bolstered by the atmospheric production approach of Danger Mouse (a.k.a. Brian Burton), who was behind the boards for 2008's Attack & Release and collaborated with them on the funky Tighten Up for Brothers. As Auerbach notes, Brian understands all the different kinds of music we're into. He's got really great ideas about melody and song structure. For him it's all about the song. Also rejoining them is consistently innovative mixing engineer Tchad Blake, who Auerbach calls a genius with audio, a complete wizard.


    El Camino arrives just in time to serve as the ideal holiday gift for The Black Keys' rapidly growing fan base. It came together quickly in an unfettered burst of creativity by the hard-charging pair. They recorded these 11 tracks between tour dates for Brothers at Auerbach's new Easy Eye Studio in Nashville, where he and Carney have now relocated after years of working in their native Akron, Ohio. The duo plans to embark on a six week European Tour at the start of the New Year, with U.S. dates to follow shortly thereafter-including several arenas.


    In a time of global austerity, The Black Keys work simply and efficiently, with a minimum of tools and a wealth of ideas, to produce the richest, fattest, coolest music around. Upon the release of Brothers last year, Britain's Uncut magazine called them one of the best rock'n'roll bands on the planet, and El Camino, confirms that.

    1. Lonely Boy
    2. Dead And Gone
    3. Gold On The Ceiling
    4. Little Black Submarines
    5. Money Maker
    6. Run Right Back
    7. Sister
    8. Hell Of A Season
    9. Stop Stop
    10. Nova Baby
    11. Mind Eraser
    The Black Keys
    $24.99
    Vinyl LP + CD - Sealed Buy Now
  • Rapture Rapture Quick View

    $18.99
    Buy Now
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    Rapture


    White Colored Vinyl


    Intoxicating and memorably tuneful - Pitchfork


    Gorgeously Weary - The Guardian


    An idiosyncratic, deeply individual voice - Clash Magazine


    The new album from Tropics, aka 27 year old Chris Ward, looks
    outwards, armed with a newfound confidence that foregrounds his
    vocal performance and songwriting.


    It's a musical progression that mirrors a personal one: the early Tropics
    output was all made in the idyllic, if isolated setting of Ward's
    grandmother's empty house in the seaside town of Southsea, which
    he moved into after graduating from university to focus on writing
    and recording. He was alone there - "like, really alone. For days, I had
    literally no distractions." Having moved to London in 2013, Ward now
    splits his time between the city and the road, having played in
    America, Mexico and across Europe throughout the past year with his
    live band Keith Vaz and Morgan Hislop.


    Tropics' new full-length Rapture is the culmination of this journey. A multi-instrumentalist
    from an early age, Ward has always drawn on his musical upbringing
    when composing, but this time around he's pushed himself to develop
    a fuller sound than ever with the help of Vaz, Hislop and specialist jazz
    drummer Gillan McLaughlin. Taking influence from Beach Boys, Max
    Roach and Arthur Russell, Ward has crafted an album that fuses his
    love of avant-garde percussion, 70s and 80s singer-songwriters such
    as Peter Gabriel known for pop-leaning hooks, and deep production
    that takes cues from ambient music.


    The very first iterance of the record is the crystal clear vocal that kicks
    off 'Blame'. Ward explains that performing live so much caused him to
    step outside of his comfort zone: "I used to be a bit dubious about
    using my vocal too much, and felt like my strength was in sampling
    and playing keys. It's kind of switched now in that I feel a lot more
    comfortable just holding a microphone and losing myself." Inspired by
    the vocal performances of the likes of Little Dragon and Innovative
    Leisure labelmates Rhye, Ward also found a new lease of life in
    experimenting with more androgynous vocals.


    But even as his sound has greater scope than ever before, Rapture is
    still a deeply personal endeavour. The majority of the songs started
    life in Ward's home, in front of a piano, before being built on in the
    studio. The first half of the record is a chronicle of a whirlwind
    relationship: the piano-led title track "Rapture" addresses this theme,
    striving for the throes of ecstatic happiness but never quite making it
    there. "It's got this feeling of hope and joy, even though it is coming
    from a sad place," says Ward. "It's about the struggles in your life to
    get to where you want to be." Elsewhere, lyrics such as, "You ran away
    just like my luck did" hint at Ward's love for literature and his poetic
    touch, something he further explores on the album's second side.
    Later, the album grows more ambient and the literary references more
    apparent. "Gloria" takes its name from the character of a frustrated
    wife in F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Beautiful and Damned. Likewise,
    "Torrents of Spring" - also named for a work of 20th century American
    fiction - builds to a sax-led climax over two painstaking minutes, and
    the penultimate "House of Leaves" is "a really slow-burning ambient
    instrumental; it's kind of a nod to the first stuff I made".


    Whether filling dance floors or simply filling up your headspace,
    Rapture is an intricate and intimate record that presents the many
    faces of Tropics in a more revealing light than ever before.

    1. Blame
    2. Hunger
    3. Indigo
    4. Kwiat
    5. Rapture
    6. Perfume Kinship
    7. Torrents of Spring
    8. Home & Consonance
    9. Gloria
    10. House of Leaves
    11. Not Enough
    Tropics
    $18.99
    Colored Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Deer Tick Vol. 2 Deer Tick Vol. 2 Quick View

    $19.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Deer Tick Vol. 2

    The best art often challenges widely held preconceptions about performance and beauty.We're moved when we find the sublime in the gross, entranced when crassness collides with grace. It makes poetic sense that one of this practice's finest current purveyors is named after a blood-sucking survivor.

    Deer Tick: undercutting expectations since 2004.

    I think a lot of my favorite artists have always done stuff like that, Deer Tick front man John McCauley says from his home in Nashville, reflecting on his band's love of unexpected mashups: tender lyrics layered over pissed off guitars; classical music flourishes delivered nearly naked and high. Deer Tick's perfected it all, mostly as an outlier, revered by a legion of fans, respected by peers, but not part of any one scene. With their highly anticipated new project(s), two new albums released simultaneously titled Deer Tick Vol. 1 and Deer Tick Vol.2, the crew from Rhode Island prove that their punk-roots rock has only gotten better with age.

    Ambitious and smart, the twin albums complement one another but also stand independently.Vol. 1 is classic Deer Tick: folk-rooted acoustic guitars and soft piano cushion out-front vocals. Vol. 2 commits wholly to the band's longtime garage-rock flirtations for a triumphant foray into punk.

    McCauley sees the two records as a natural progression. I think it's something that wa sbound to happen, just because I've always had one foot in each door, he says. Every album we've put out has had its manic moments in one way or another. I felt good enough about everything that I was writing to think that we could truly separate our two big interests: quiet and loud.

    It's been four years since Deer Tick's last release Negativity, and devotees have grown restless. It wasn't that the band-made up of McCauley, guitarist Ian O'Neil, drummer DennisRyan, and bassist Christopher Ryan-was withholding information. They just weren't sure they had anything more to share. It wasn't anything that we actually talked about, McCauleysays. We never said, 'Hey, we should take a break,' or 'Maybe this isn't working anymore.'We just took some time off. We'd just done our 10-year anniversary shows, and I had a kid like two weeks later. He pauses before adding with a hint of a laugh, We just kind of got comfortable away from each other.

    McCauley, O'Neil, and the two Ryans popped up solo and on others' projects. Personal lives also underwent massive changes, especially for McCauley, who married Vanessa Carlton and became a dad. The couple's little girl is now two years old. For the first time ever, Deer Tick-an all-consuming band known for constant touring and steady artistic output-took a backseat.

    When the band came back together for their beloved after-party shows at the Newport Folk Festival, the reunion reminded them what they missed about creating with one another.Playing that week with the guys made me really want to do it-it made everyone want to do it, McCauley says. So we started making some plans to go in the studio.

    The result, recorded at Ardent Studios in Memphis, Tennessee, is a bold double punch that reminds us not only why Deer Tick has been so missed, but why they've become important artists. The songwriting on both volumes is masterful. McCauley wrote most of the tunes alone, but O'Neil and Dennis Ryan also make killer contributions. Self-aware and never self important,McCauley excels at provocative lyrics that are sometimes confessional, sometimes accusatory. His compositions capture those internal contradictions that define us, like rock and-rollsongs of myself delighting in the multitudes and putting them on display.

    Vol. 1 opener Sea of Clouds is a dreamy mediation on letting go, featuring stripped down instrumentation that swells into a mini-symphony, all anchored by angelic harmonies and McCauley's familiar melodic snarl. It's not the only time McCauley mulls over what it takes to move on. Heart-tugging Only Love mixes sadness and hope for a snapshot of impending loss. I thought, 'Nobody writes a song about that kind of weird, ominous feeling you get inthe final 24 to 48 hours of a relationship,' McCauley says. I wanted to capture that mood in a song.

    Sauntering Card House is a flamenco-soaked threat with grotesque imagery, while lounge readyCocktail is a wry, piano-fueled stroll through fond boozy memories. I guess it's kindof a song about my strange relationship with alcohol-I'm still learning how to deal with it,McCauley says. I'm not a teetotaler. I've tried that. It's not for me. I'm not into the support group thing. I enjoy life with a drink. Trying to keep my life in balance can be hard, but it's something I'm capable of doing now.

    Tricky relationships with drugs and alcohol are addressed in different ways on both volumes.Hushed Vol. 1 closer Rejection pulses with vulnerability. I wrote it about trying to help somebody in some way, McCauley says. What was going through my mind but I didn't say in the lyrics is just reaching your hand out to somebody who's going through substance abuse problems. Vol. 2's Jumpstarting-a favorite track of McCauley's-offers the same kind of lifeline: he shouts startlingly sweet promises over crunchy guitars.

    Look How Clean I Am immediately follows. Written and sung by O'Neil, the song doesn't poke fun at sobriety but offers a droll take down of how some use it as a means or marketing vehicle to further celebrity. It's one of many genuinely funny moments on the project. JumpingS.M.F., (aka Shitty Music Festival) written and delivered by McCauley, takes hilarious shots at a summer institution. I thought I'd write that one for any band who's ever had a bad time at a music festival. It's one of my attempts at humor on the record, but then it just kind of comes off as anger, McCauley says with a laugh.

    McCauley wrote gorgeous instrumental Pulse thinking about the 2016 Orlando nightclub shooting. He lets his piano do the talking. It's a Whale is punk perfection, all screams and growling guitars. That's probably the most political I'll ever get in a song, McCauley says. I tried to put myself in the really dark head space of maybe a men's rights activist or something like that while trying to poke fun at it. His chants of Atta boy! Atta girl! are the ideal blend of smirk-inducing and scary.

    McCauley says he believes Sea of Clouds and It's a Whale probably best capture theextremities of both records. He's right, of course: it's Vol. 1's quiet vs. Vol. 2's loud-Deer Tick's dual personalities, finally channeled onto two distinct and equally brilliant records.These albums represent a new phase of my life that I haven't entirely figured out yet,McCauley says. I don't really know what's going to happen, but that's part of the excitement for me.

    1. Don't Hurt
    2. Jumpstarting
    3. Look How Clean I Am
    4. It's a Whale
    5. Tiny Fortunes
    6. Sloppy
    7. Wants / Needs
    8. S.M.F.
    9. Pulse
    10. Mr. Nothing Gets Worse
    Deer Tick
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Deer Tick Vol. 1 Deer Tick Vol. 1 Quick View

    $19.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Deer Tick Vol. 1

    The best art often challenges widely held preconceptions about performance and beauty.We're moved when we find the sublime in the gross, entranced when crassness collides with grace. It makes poetic sense that one of this practice's finest current purveyors is named after a blood-sucking survivor.

    Deer Tick: undercutting expectations since 2004.

    I think a lot of my favorite artists have always done stuff like that, Deer Tick front man John McCauley says from his home in Nashville, reflecting on his band's love of unexpected mashups: tender lyrics layered over pissed off guitars; classical music flourishes delivered nearly naked and high. Deer Tick's perfected it all, mostly as an outlier, revered by a legion of fans, respected by peers, but not part of any one scene. With their highly anticipated new project(s), two new albums released simultaneously titled Deer Tick Vol. 1 and Deer Tick Vol.2, the crew from Rhode Island prove that their punk-roots rock has only gotten better with age.

    Ambitious and smart, the twin albums complement one another but also stand independently.Vol. 1 is classic Deer Tick: folk-rooted acoustic guitars and soft piano cushion out-front vocals. Vol. 2 commits wholly to the band's longtime garage-rock flirtations for a triumphant foray into punk.

    McCauley sees the two records as a natural progression. I think it's something that was bound to happen, just because I've always had one foot in each door, he says. Every album we've put out has had its manic moments in one way or another. I felt good enough about everything that I was writing to think that we could truly separate our two big interests: quiet and loud.

    It's been four years since Deer Tick's last release Negativity, and devotees have grown restless. It wasn't that the band-made up of McCauley, guitarist Ian O'Neil, drummer Dennis Ryan, and bassist Christopher Ryan-was withholding information. They just weren't sure they had anything more to share. It wasn't anything that we actually talked about, McCauley says. We never said, 'Hey, we should take a break,' or 'Maybe this isn't working anymore.'We just took some time off. We'd just done our 10-year anniversary shows, and I had a kid like two weeks later. He pauses before adding with a hint of a laugh, We just kind of got comfortable away from each other.

    McCauley, O'Neil, and the two Ryans popped up solo and on others' projects. Personal lives also underwent massive changes, especially for McCauley, who married Vanessa Carlton and became a dad. The couple's little girl is now two years old. For the first time ever, Deer Tick-an all-consuming band known for constant touring and steady artistic output-took a backseat.

    When the band came back together for their beloved after-party shows at the Newport Folk Festival, the reunion reminded them what they missed about creating with one another.Playing that week with the guys made me really want to do it-it made everyone want to do it, McCauley says. So we started making some plans to go in the studio.

    The result, recorded at Ardent Studios in Memphis, Tennessee, is a bold double punch that reminds us not only why Deer Tick has been so missed, but why they've become important artists. The songwriting on both volumes is masterful. McCauley wrote most of the tunes alone, but O'Neil and Dennis Ryan also make killer contributions. Self-aware and never self important,McCauley excels at provocative lyrics that are sometimes confessional, sometimes accusatory. His compositions capture those internal contradictions that define us, like rock and-rollsongs of myself delighting in the multitudes and putting them on display.

    Vol. 1 opener Sea of Clouds is a dreamy mediation on letting go, featuring stripped down instrumentation that swells into a mini-symphony, all anchored by angelic harmonies and McCauley's familiar melodic snarl. It's not the only time McCauley mulls over what it takes to move on. Heart-tugging Only Love mixes sadness and hope for a snapshot of impending loss. I thought, 'Nobody writes a song about that kind of weird, ominous feeling you get in the final 24 to 48 hours of a relationship,' McCauley says. I wanted to capture that mood ina song.

    Sauntering Card House is a flamenco-soaked threat with grotesque imagery, while lounge readyCocktail is a wry, piano-fueled stroll through fond boozy memories. I guess it's kind of a song about my strange relationship with alcohol-I'm still learning how to deal with it,McCauley says. I'm not a teetotaler. I've tried that. It's not for me. I'm not into the support group thing. I enjoy life with a drink. Trying to keep my life in balance can be hard, but it's something I'm capable of doing now.

    Tricky relationships with drugs and alcohol are addressed in different ways on both volumes.Hushed Vol. 1 closer Rejection pulses with vulnerability. I wrote it about trying to help somebody in some way, McCauley says. What was going through my mind but I didn't sayin the lyrics is just reaching your hand out to somebody who's going through substance abuse problems. Vol. 2's Jumpstarting-a favorite track of McCauley's-offers the same kind of lifeline: he shouts startlingly sweet promises over crunchy guitars.

    Look How Clean I Am immediately follows. Written and sung by O'Neil, the song doesn't poke fun at sobriety but offers a droll takedown of how some use it as a means or marketing vehicle to further celebrity. It's one of many genuinely funny moments on the project. JumpingS.M.F., (aka Shitty Music Festival) written and delivered by McCauley, takes hilarious shots at a summer institution. I thought I'd write that one for any band who's ever had a bad time ata music festival. It's one of my attempts at humor on the record, but then it just kind of comes off as anger, McCauley says with a laugh.

    McCauley wrote gorgeous instrumental Pulse thinking about the 2016 Orlando nightclub shooting. He lets his piano do the talking. It's a Whale is punk perfection, all screams and growling guitars. That's probably the most political I'll ever get in a song, McCauley says. I tried to put myself in the really dark headspace of maybe a men's rights activist or something like that while trying to poke fun at it. His chants of Atta boy! Atta girl! are the ideal blend of smirk-inducing and scary.

    McCauley says he believes Sea of Clouds and It's a Whale probably best capture theextremities of both records. He's right, of course: it's Vol. 1's quiet vs. Vol. 2's loud-Deer Tick's dual personalities, finally channeled onto two distinct and equally brilliant records.These albums represent a new phase of my life that I haven't entirely figured out yet,McCauley says. I don't really know what's going to happen, but that's part of the excitement for me.

    1. Half Believing (By The Black Angels)
    2. Card House
    3. Doomed From The Start
    4. Hope Is Big
    5. Only Love
    6. Cocktail
    7. Me And My Man
    8. End Of The World
    9. Limp Right Back
    10. Rejection
    Deer Tick
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • I Am Very Far I Am Very Far Quick View

    $19.99
    Buy Now
    x

    I Am Very Far

    The goal was to push my brain to places it didnt want to go. The idea was to not have any idea, to keep myself confused about what I was doing, frontman Will Sheff says about Okkervil Rivers newest album. The resulting record, I Am Very Far, is a startling break from anything this band has done before. By turns terrifying and joyous, violent and serene, grotesque and romantic, its a celebration of forces beyond our control.


    On I AmVery Far, Sheff emerges not only as a songwriter of the highest caliber, but a producer and arranger of singular vision. Abandoning the tidy conceptual arcs of Okkervil Rivers previous albums, I Am Very Far is a monolithic, darkly ambiguous work, one that doesnt readily offer up its secrets.


    Work on I Am Very Far started in early 2009, after a year spent on the music of others. Sheff contributed vocals to The New Pornographers album Together, wrote a song for Norah Jones The Fall, and helmed the Roky Erickson record True Love Cast Out All Evil, for which his album notes received a Grammy nomination. Immediately upon wrapping up work and leaving Ericksons company, Sheff drove to his home state of New Hampshire for lengthy isolated writing sessions. I wanted to go back home and re-start writing again, like Id never written a song previously, he says, and I wanted the music and lyrics to be both completely wedded together and a little bit beyond my control.


    Sheff emerged from the writing process with 30 or so songs, which he narrowed down to 18. In contrast to Okkervil Rivers usual practice of holing up in one studio for months on end, he opted for a series of short, high-intensity sessions, each in a different location, each employing completely different methods than the one before it. For songs like Rider and Wake and Be Fine, Sheff gathered together a massive version of Okkervil River; two drummers, two pianists, two bassists, and seven guitarists, all playing live in one room, and led them on a week of live-in-the-studio marathon sessions, performing a single song obsessively over and over for as many as 12 hours to capture just the right take. Finishing the record from home, Sheff constantly edited and reworked the album, reinventing the song structures, re-recording vocals, re-writing until the very last minute, reshaping even the tiniest of details, ultimately creating an album that plays not only as a lush, seamless epic, but also as the most deeply personal effort of his career.


    What can listeners expect? Richer and weirder than The Stage Names and deeper and moodier than even Black Sheep Boy, I Am Very Far is dense, fragmented, opaque. A reverie of uncertainty, it feels at once disorienting and oddly familiar, threatening and friendly. Okkervil River have thrown away all maps and compasses but they continue to chart their way, unblinking, toward destinations unknown.

    1. The Valley

    2. Piratess
    3. Rider
    4. Lay of the Last Survivor
    5. White Shadow Waltz
    6. We Need a Myth
    7. Hanging from a Hit
    8. Show Yourself
    9. Your Past Life as a Blast
    10. Wake and Be Fine
    11. The Rise

    Okkervil River
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • The Grinding Wheel The Grinding Wheel Quick View

    $31.99
    Buy Now
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    The Grinding Wheel

    Armed with pioneering pure metal proposals like "Death Rider," "The Beast Within," and "Raise The Dead" already in 1982, New Jersey's Overkill were a rock-solid part of the first clutch of bands forging in fire this music known as thrash metal. Along with Metallica, Exodus, Slayer and cross-town doppelgangers Anthrax, D.D. Verni and Bobby "Blitz" Ellsworth were helping to create a new form of metal that is still as vibrant today as when the band's first album, Feel the Fire was issued by Jonny Zazula's Megaforce Records back in the spring of '85.


    Witness Overkill's 18th album of blistering yet precise and thought-provoking thrash magic, The Grinding Wheel, a record on which thrash's ultimate team of five machined parts shows up and executes to perfection with a little punk thrown in for bad measure.


    But a life dedicated to metal can be a grind, hence the title of this sparks-a-flyin' record. "It just makes sense for us," reflects D.D. "If you've been making metal for almost 40 years like we have, it can be a grind. But we also liked the old school metal idea of referencing "Grinder," the Judas Priest song, which suits the album because it has classic metal parts on it as well as the thrash parts. There's a blue collar feel to that title too, and that's how we approach Overkill. The guitar case is basically a lunchbox and we go to work."


    "One of the principles-if not characteristics-of the band is that it's been grinding through for long, long periods of time," seconds Blitz. "Decades to this point. And not necessarily with huge gains with regards to popularity, but for sure, with huge gains in as much as we can earn a living while doing the kind of music that we want. And so the idea of grinding it out over the decades became a device for writing the album, whether it would be riffs or lyrics."


    Despite, as D.D. says, the album's classic metal references (such as Black Sabbath in "Come Heavy" and Iron Maiden in "The Long Road" and the epic and cinematic title track), when the band gets up a full head of thrash steam, they bring to the party a trademark punk aesthetic, forged from trips on the train to CBGB and Max's Kansas City to witness original punk legends such as The Damned and The Dead Boys.


    "Punk is huge for Overkill," confirms Verni. "And it's something we very specifically brought back to the band in a sort of second wave, beginning with Ironbound in 2010 and then The Electric Age and White Devil Armory. I know from my end, it came from talking to the band and talking to fans. We had some of those metal records in the middle of our career where I wasn't paying enough attention to the punk rock vibe of the band. But just before we started writing Ironbound, I was very specific about getting back into that mentality, picking up on that energy again. You're not going to hear any Green Day or Ramones in us, but the energy and the attitude of punk mixed with the New York vibe that's what Overkill is, compared to other bands. You don't hear any of that in Megadeth; you don't hear any of that in Slayer. It's more specific to what we brought to the thrash world."


    Central to that premise is the incendiary "Let's All Go to Hades" which is sure to become a pit favourite. "This one was a hell of a lot of fun," says Blitz. "You know, I've always written abstractly. I'm not the guy who says, 'I'm going to crush your skull into dust.' I like writing more so from an abstract point of view, putting a slew of thoughts together that create one idea, like a puzzle more than a specific black or white. And when I looked at all these lyrics when I was done, I said, oh my God, I'm 57 and I finally matured (laughs). Oh, this is gross! (laughs). But I do like tongue-in-cheek songs like 'Hades,' where it says, sort of let's all go to the Bataclan, you know, stand arm in arm and sing 'Killed by Death.' I kind of tied in not long ago events, specifically what happened in Paris, with losing Lemmy. After that, I'm on a train from Paris to Istanbul on the Orient express, which actually existed (laughs)-it actually went from Paris to Istanbul. So that one is mapped out a bit more."


    Adds D.D., "It's not a 'smash your face into the wall' kind of song. It got a little bit of fun in it. I know any time you talk to the really heavy thrash guys, they go, 'Oh, no, no, no-no fun allowed. It's got to be heavy and brutal every second.' But that song definitely has a bit of fun in it. And we've done that before, with things like 'Old School' and 'Fuck You.' We're not afraid to do a bit of that sometimes."


    Another favorite lyric of Blitz', which is set to a non-nonsense old school thrash track, is "Our Finest Hour." "It's about the recognition of sameness," explains Ellsworth. "I think people are comfortable when they recognize themselves in someone else. And 'Our Finest Hour' is kind of a detailed journey through that concept. It's like, 'Come on over here; I recognize you.' I've always been a firm believer in the fact that it's great to accomplish things on your own, but people are always stronger as a group-that's the basic outline of that tune."


    At the other end of the spectrum from punk is a song like "The Long Road." D.D. readily agrees that there was a Maiden influence as part of this one's crafting. "Oh yeah, for sure. The opening, along with a little section in there with the vocals, definitely feels like New Wave of British Heavy Metal.


    More evident in the band's panoramic classic metal passages, but even articulated here on "Our Finest Hour," is another storied Overkill trademark, the definition one gets in the band's bass parts. Combine this with the Mensa-like percussive wizardry of Ron Lipnicki (laid bare for all to hear at headphone levels through the smack of his gravity-defying double bass work), and The Grinding Wheel emerges as a record with a remarkable rhythm section foundation from which to rise.


    "I've had that kind of sound now for a long time," says Verni. "There are a lot of bass players that say, 'I want to feel the bass.' And it's like, I just couldn't give a shit about feeling the bass. To me that's low-end. Guitars have low-end, kick drums have low-end, bass has low-end-I want to hear the bass, not feel it. So from a long time ago, that's what I would be doing on my EQ. I would be tweaking and turning knobs until not only could I feel it, but I can hear it separate from the guitars. And as a result, the bass just got more and more aggressive. I'm not a finesse player at all, on a bass. I bang the shit out of it, and I kind of do that to get away from the guitars and give it its own identity, its own sound, its own thing, so the bass has its own personality, not just serving as a foundation for the guitars."


    This affects the writing as well, says Blitz. "Don't forget, D.D. is a guitarist. He's been playing guitar probably more so than bass in his spare time since the late '80s. This is a guy who has two-and-a-half decades of six strings under his belt. So we get more of a unique perspective; it gives this band its unique qualities when it comes to songwriting. Because it's a guy holding six strings who's got plenty of experience playing those six strings, but thinking from the other perspective. So you get a punchier thing; you don't get a lot of fluff. When you compare Overkill to some of our contemporaries, there you get a guitar player writing guitar-based songs. D.D. is writing, first and foremost, from a rhythm perspective, and that's what drives the songs. Add Dave Linsk to the picture, once there's a ten-note riff written, then you have the best of both worlds."


    Which brings us back to the aforementioned machine-like efficiency of the five guys that comprise Overkill, this idea that there are no weak links within this particular classic five-piece with two guitars lineup of metal warriors.


    "That's the strength of the band," explains Blitz. "Dave is really the one that holds the guitar reigns in this band. He's a writer at his core. You know, he's one of these guys who brushes his teeth and hears a rhythm the way the bristles are hitting the enamel (laughs). He's that dude. 'Oh wait a second, I have another idea.' He has an idea a minute, and if that's the case, some of them are going to be great. So he holds the reins. When it comes to Derek, he's more the opinionated thought later on. And so when it runs through the machine, being D.D. and myself, then Dave, Derek comes in and can change that song. It's always kind of good to have, let's say, a chief and some Indians. And it depends who's wearing the chief hat at any particular time. But I think at the end of the day, when you're looking for a clean perspective, it goes through Derek-that's usually what his contribution is, more of a finalization."


    And Ron? "He's one-of-a-kind," says Verni. "He's a great drummer. I've worked with him for a bunch of records now. This is our fifth record together and so I really understand how he plays at this point. Working with him in the studio is just a pleasure, because he's so right on it."


    After heaping all manner of praise on legendary producer Andy Sneap (brought on only for mix given Verni's proven acumen at the task), D.D. further clarifies the reason Overkill can be at the top of their game 18 records into their distinguished run.


    "I have a studio and I did most of it at my place; I've been doing it that way for a while now. And now the group of guys we have in the band has been pretty consistent for a while. So we have a nice mix; everybody kind of knows their role, and is good at their role. Everybody brings a little something to the party. And I think that's why these last couple of records people ask, 'How is it that your records get better after 25 years?' And I think part of it is that everybody has a role in the band, everybody is comfortable with their role, and they're really good at the part they have. So the records actually get better. It's like having a team, instead of having a whole bunch of chiefs and no Indians.


    But a proven people's band like Overkill-a more personable bunch you'll never meet-fully recognizes that part of the band's success in being able to survive and thrive with the grind is due to the allegiance of the band's considerable worldwide fan base.


    "For sure," says Blitz. "One of the things with regard to grind, with regard to four decades of Overkill, it's good to be here, but it's obviously earned, not just by us but by the people that support this in general. The fact is that it's not just us grinding it out. I mean, maybe it is when it comes to the studio and writing and recording songs, from that selfish perspective. But the reason something exists for decades is based on group effort. Like we had talked about earlier with 'Our Finest Hour,' people are stronger together. In that light, this band is, let's say, not just our project, but it's a project by and for all those who hold it dear."

    1. Mean, Green, Killing Machine
    2. Goddamn Trouble
    3. Our Finest Hour
    4. Shine On
    5. The Long Road
    6. Let's All Go To Hades
    7. Come Heavy
    8. Red, White And Blue
    9. The Wheel
    10. The Grinding Wheel
    11. Emerald
    Overkill
    $31.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Grinding Wheel (Yellow And Black Vinyl) The Grinding Wheel (Yellow And Black Vinyl) Quick View

    $31.99
    Buy Now
    x

    The Grinding Wheel (Yellow And Black Vinyl)

    Pressed On Yellow And Black Vinyl

    Armed with pioneering pure metal proposals like Death Rider, The Beast Within, and Raise The Dead already in 1982, New Jersey's Overkill were a rock-solid part of the first clutch of bands forging in fire this music known as thrash metal. Along with Metallica, Exodus, Slayer and cross-town doppelgangers Anthrax, D.D. Verni and Bobby Blitz Ellsworth were helping to create a new form of metal that is still as vibrant today as when the band's first album, Feel the Fire was issued by Jonny Zazula's Megaforce Records back in the spring of '85.

    Witness Overkill's 18th album of blistering yet precise and thought-provoking thrash magic, The Grinding Wheel, a record on which thrash's ultimate team of five machined parts shows up and executes to perfection with a little punk thrown in for bad measure.

    But a life dedicated to metal can be a grind, hence the title of this sparks-a-flyin' record. It just makes sense for us, reflects D.D. If you've been making metal for almost 40 years like we have, it can be a grind. But we also liked the old school metal idea of referencing Grinder, the Judas Priest song, which suits the album because it has classic metal parts on it as well as the thrash parts. There's a blue collar feel to that title too, and that's how we approach Overkill. The guitar case is basically a lunchbox and we go to work.

    One of the principles-if not characteristics-of the band is that it's been grinding through for long, long periods of time, seconds Blitz. Decades to this point. And not necessarily with huge gains with regards to popularity, but for sure, with huge gains in as much as we can earn a living while doing the kind of music that we want. And so the idea of grinding it out over the decades became a device for writing the album, whether it would be riffs or lyrics.

    Despite, as D.D. says, the album's classic metal references (such as Black Sabbath in Come Heavy and Iron Maiden in The Long Road and the epic and cinematic title track), when the band gets up a full head of thrash steam, they bring to the party a trademark punk aesthetic, forged from trips on the train to CBGB and Max's Kansas City to witness original punk legends such as The Damned and The Dead Boys.

    Punk is huge for Overkill, confirms Verni. And it's something we very specifically brought back to the band in a sort of second wave, beginning with Ironbound in 2010 and then The Electric Age and White Devil Armory. I know from my end, it came from talking to the band and talking to fans. We had some of those metal records in the middle of our career where I wasn't paying enough attention to the punk rock vibe of the band. But just before we started writing Ironbound, I was very specific about getting back into that mentality, picking up on that energy again. You're not going to hear any Green Day or Ramones in us, but the energy and the attitude of punk mixed with the New York vibe that's what Overkill is, compared to other bands. You don't hear any of that in Megadeth; you don't hear any of that in Slayer. It's more specific to what we brought to the thrash world.

    Central to that premise is the incendiary Let's All Go to Hades which is sure to become a pit favourite. This one was a hell of a lot of fun, says Blitz. You know, I've always written abstractly. I'm not the guy who says, 'I'm going to crush your skull into dust.' I like writing more so from an abstract point of view, putting a slew of thoughts together that create one idea, like a puzzle more than a specific black or white. And when I looked at all these lyrics when I was done, I said, oh my God, I'm 57 and I finally matured (laughs). Oh, this is gross! (laughs). But I do like tongue-in-cheek songs like 'Hades,' where it says, sort of let's all go to the Bataclan, you know, stand arm in arm and sing 'Killed by Death.' I kind of tied in not long ago events, specifically what happened in Paris, with losing Lemmy. After that, I'm on a train from Paris to Istanbul on the Orient express, which actually existed (laughs)-it actually went from Paris to Istanbul. So that one is mapped out a bit more.

    Adds D.D., It's not a 'smash your face into the wall' kind of song. It got a little bit of fun in it. I know any time you talk to the really heavy thrash guys, they go, 'Oh, no, no, no-no fun allowed. It's got to be heavy and brutal every second.' But that song definitely has a bit of fun in it. And we've done that before, with things like 'Old School' and 'Fuck You.' We're not afraid to do a bit of that sometimes.

    Another favorite lyric of Blitz', which is set to a non-nonsense old school thrash track, is Our Finest Hour. It's about the recognition of sameness, explains Ellsworth. I think people are comfortable when they recognize themselves in someone else. And 'Our Finest Hour' is kind of a detailed journey through that concept. It's like, 'Come on over here; I recognize you.' I've always been a firm believer in the fact that it's great to accomplish things on your own, but people are always stronger as a group-that's the basic outline of that tune.

    At the other end of the spectrum from punk is a song like The Long Road. D.D. readily agrees that there was a Maiden influence as part of this one's crafting. Oh yeah, for sure. The opening, along with a little section in there with the vocals, definitely feels like New Wave of British Heavy Metal.

    More evident in the band's panoramic classic metal passages, but even articulated here on Our Finest Hour, is another storied Overkill trademark, the definition one gets in the band's bass parts. Combine this with the Mensa-like percussive wizardry of Ron Lipnicki (laid bare for all to hear at headphone levels through the smack of his gravity-defying double bass work), and The Grinding Wheel emerges as a record with a remarkable rhythm section foundation from which to rise.

    I've had that kind of sound now for a long time, says Verni. There are a lot of bass players that say, 'I want to feel the bass.' And it's like, I just couldn't give a shit about feeling the bass. To me that's low-end. Guitars have low-end, kick drums have low-end, bass has low-end-I want to hear the bass, not feel it. So from a long time ago, that's what I would be doing on my EQ. I would be tweaking and turning knobs until not only could I feel it, but I can hear it separate from the guitars. And as a result, the bass just got more and more aggressive. I'm not a finesse player at all, on a bass. I bang the shit out of it, and I kind of do that to get away from the guitars and give it its own identity, its own sound, its own thing, so the bass has its own personality, not just serving as a foundation for the guitars.

    This affects the writing as well, says Blitz. Don't forget, D.D. is a guitarist. He's been playing guitar probably more so than bass in his spare time since the late '80s. This is a guy who has two-and-a-half decades of six strings under his belt. So we get more of a unique perspective; it gives this band its unique qualities when it comes to songwriting. Because it's a guy holding six strings who's got plenty of experience playing those six strings, but thinking from the other perspective. So you get a punchier thing; you don't get a lot of fluff. When you compare Overkill to some of our contemporaries, there you get a guitar player writing guitar-based songs. D.D. is writing, first and foremost, from a rhythm perspective, and that's what drives the songs. Add Dave Linsk to the picture, once there's a ten-note riff written, then you have the best of both worlds.

    Which brings us back to the aforementioned machine-like efficiency of the five guys that comprise Overkill, this idea that there are no weak links within this particular classic five-piece with two guitars lineup of metal warriors.

    That's the strength of the band, explains Blitz. Dave is really the one that holds the guitar reigns in this band. He's a writer at his core. You know, he's one of these guys who brushes his teeth and hears a rhythm the way the bristles are hitting the enamel (laughs). He's that dude. 'Oh wait a second, I have another idea.' He has an idea a minute, and if that's the case, some of them are going to be great. So he holds the reins. When it comes to Derek, he's more the opinionated thought later on. And so when it runs through the machine, being D.D. and myself, then Dave, Derek comes in and can change that song. It's always kind of good to have, let's say, a chief and some Indians. And it depends who's wearing the chief hat at any particular time. But I think at the end of the day, when you're looking for a clean perspective, it goes through Derek-that's usually what his contribution is, more of a finalization.

    And Ron? He's one-of-a-kind, says Verni. He's a great drummer. I've worked with him for a bunch of records now. This is our fifth record together and so I really understand how he plays at this point. Working with him in the studio is just a pleasure, because he's so right on it.

    After heaping all manner of praise on legendary producer Andy Sneap (brought on only for mix given Verni's proven acumen at the task), D.D. further clarifies the reason Overkill can be at the top of their game 18 records into their distinguished run.

    I have a studio and I did most of it at my place; I've been doing it that way for a while now. And now the group of guys we have in the band has been pretty consistent for a while. So we have a nice mix; everybody kind of knows their role, and is good at their role. Everybody brings a little something to the party. And I think that's why these last couple of records people ask, 'How is it that your records get better after 25 years?' And I think part of it is that everybody has a role in the band, everybody is comfortable with their role, and they're really good at the part they have. So the records actually get better. It's like having a team, instead of having a whole bunch of chiefs and no Indians.

    But a proven people's band like Overkill-a more personable bunch you'll never meet-fully recognizes that part of the band's success in being able to survive and thrive with the grind is due to the allegiance of the band's considerable worldwide fan base.

    For sure, says Blitz. One of the things with regard to grind, with regard to four decades of Overkill, it's good to be here, but it's obviously earned, not just by us but by the people that support this in general. The fact is that it's not just us grinding it out. I mean, maybe it is when it comes to the studio and writing and recording songs, from that selfish perspective. But the reason something exists for decades is based on group effort. Like we had talked about earlier with 'Our Finest Hour,' people are stronger together. In that light, this band is, let's say, not just our project, but it's a project by and for all those who hold it dear.

    1. Mean, Green, Killing Machine
    2. Goddamn Trouble
    3. Our Finest Hour
    4. Shine On
    5. The Long Road
    6. Let's All Go To Hades
    7. Come Heavy
    8. Red, White And Blue
    9. The Wheel
    10. The Grinding Wheel
    11. Emerald
    Overkill
    $31.99
    Colored Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Sorceress (Black Vinyl) Sorceress (Black Vinyl) Quick View

    $29.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Sorceress (Black Vinyl)

    Pressed On Black Vinyl


    There are few bands that can or will match Sweden's Opeth. Since forming in the tiny Stockholm suburb of Bandhagen in 1990, the Swedes have eclipsed convention, defiantly crushed the odds, and, most importantly, crafted 12 stunningly beautiful, become one of the best bands on the planet; on album or on stage. Ask any Opeth fan. Enquire with any band that's shared the proverbial pine with the Swedes. Or, get a label representative to talk Opeth. They'll all tell you the same thing: Opeth are peerless. And they're only getting better.


    Opeth's new album, Sorceress, their first for Nuclear Blast via the band's imprint label Moderbolaget Records, is proof chief architect Mikael Åkerfeldt has a near-endless well of greatness inside. From the album's opener "Persephone" to "The Wilde Flowers" and "Strange Brew" to the album's counterpart title tracks "Sorceress" and "Sorceress II", Opeth's twelfth full-length is an unparalleled adventure, where visions cleverly and secretly change, colours mute as if weathered by time, and sounds challenge profoundly. Sorceress is, by definition, moored in Åkerfeldt's impressive record collection-his one true vice-but, as always, there's more invention than appropriation at play.


    "This time around I didn't think about what I wanted to do," Åkerfeldt reveals. "I was forced to write. But once I started, it was easy. This record, like the last record, didn't take long to write. Like five or six months. The thoughts behind this record developed as I was writing. The only thing I was thinking about with this record was to write that songs didn't musically connect. I made sure if I had a song that was new sounding for this record, I'd make the next song completely different. I think the songs are very different from one another. It's very diverse."


    Certainly, every Opeth record has had diversity. In 1995, Orchid reset the rules of death metal. Six years later, Blackwater Park hit the high note for musicality in a genre generally devoid of it. Damnation, in 2003, was the work of a band determined to upend the norm. Five years after that, Watershed closed Opeth's chapter on death metal by visiting its darkest corners and holding its native brutality aloft. And in 2014, Pale Communion officially bridged the progressive music gap by twisting the intrepid sounds of '60s, '70s, and '80s into contemporary brilliance. So, really, what's so different about Sorceress?


    "My music taste got a little wider," grins Åkerfeldt. "I started listening to jazz. I bought a lot of Coltrane records. I never really thought Coltrane would be for me because I like 'dinner jazz.' I like comfortable, soft, nice, and lovely jazz. Like Miles Davis' '50s stuff. Porgy and Bess, for example. I guess Dave Brubeck fits in there, too. So, that's the only new influx of musical inspiration for me. Other than that, I've been buying the same type of records I always have. Prog, symphonic rock, singer/songwriter, metal, hard rock But there wasn't anything that set me off like The Zombies or Scott Walker. Nothing got me going this time."


    Actually, that's not entirely true. Åkerfeldt's always mining for progressive gold. Good, rare music is particularly good at getting his motor running. He found double-gold in one-off Italian outfit Il Paese dei Balocchi and Bobak, Jons, Malone's ultra-obscure Motherlight album. To wit, get Åkerfeldt talking about either and he's all too pleased to discuss the finer points of Il Paese dei Balocchi's string-based darkness or how he fan-boyed Malone via email to get the famed British orchestrator and one-time Iron Maiden producer to contribute to Sorceress.


    "I absolutely love Il Paese dei Balocchi," Åkerfeldt professes. "They did one album. It's insanely good. It has everything I love about progressive rock in it. This album is so orchestrated and epic. It's got lots of string sections. It's very moody, dark, and sad. It's a mystery they didn't do any more. As for Will Malone, he did the strings and stuff for the Sabbath records-Sabotage and Never Say Die! But now he does strings for pop artists like Joss Stone, The Verve, Depeche Mode. I looked him up, mostly because he was the house engineer for Morgan Studios in the '60s. He was also in a few bands. Like Orange Bicycle and played on the Motherlight album. He also had a solo record, which is also amazing and superbly rare. It's orchestral. The bulk of it is strings. It's kind of like Nick Drake."


    Åkerfeldt's quick to point out, however, his newfound progressive music loves didn't directly inspire him to write Sorceress. The majority of the album was penned in Opeth's rehearsal space, where, nestled comfortably in a corner, a computer, a keyboard, and a microphone sit ready for the next Opeth epic. It isn't plush, but it's exactly the type of environment the frontman needs to focus his creative self into song.


    "When I'm in a writing mode, I have tunnel vision," says Åkerfeldt. "I have a really good work ethic. I go down to the studio everyday early in the morning and I work. I absolutely love it. It's so much fun. It's much easier now, too. I write complete demos. I sequence the songs in the order I want them to be on the record. I do mixing. I do overdubs. Once I'm done, I give copies to the guys so they can listen to the album. They practice to it on their own. When it's time to go into the studio, everybody does their own thing. It obviously works."


    For Sorceress, Opeth returned to Rockfield Studios in Wales, where the Swedes had tracked Pale Communion in 2014 with Tom Dalgety. The experience was so positive and historical-the countryside studio was also home to pivotal Budgie, Queen, Rush, Judas Priest, and Mike Oldfield recordings-there really was no other option for Opeth and crew. Rockfield Studios or bust! The studio, with Dalgety yet again in tow, provided the necessary isolation, the right bucolic atmosphere, the best gear, and three square meals a day for Sorceress to come out the other end spitting fire. All in 12 bittersweet days, too.


    "There was a time when I came out of our recordings a wreck," Åkerfeldt bemoans. "But now I come out with a wish. I wish it wouldn't have gone so quickly. There's emptiness after I leave the studio. I love writing and recording in the studio. It's lovely at Rockfield. It's in the sticks. It's got horses and cows. There's lots of sheep in Wales. But the studio is just a studio. It's so beautiful there. So quiet. It's a residential studio as well, so we live there while we're recording. We have chefs for us, too. So, we can just be there, playing, recording, and hanging out."


    If life is like a Peter Max poster, the lyrics to Sorceress aren't. There's color, but they've been treated, corrupted, and befouled. That is to say, they're much darker. Some of bleak lyrical tones stem from Åkerfeldt's personal life-and are thusly contorted beyond recognition-while others touch grimly on topics like love and what happens to people on the other side of it. In fact, some of the lyrical ideas are similar to what was happening on Blackwater Park.


    "I made sure to write good lyrics," Åkerfeldt laughs. "This sounds very old-fashioned black metal to say, but the lyrics are misanthropic. It's not a concept record, so there's no theme running through the record. Most of the record deals with love. The negative aspects of love. The jealously, the bitterness, the paranoia, and the mind games of love. So, it's a love record. Love songs. Love can be like a disease or a spell."


    Luckily, for Åkerfeldt and crew-bassist Martín MÉndez, drummer Martin Axenrot, guitarist Fredrik Åkesson, and keyboardist Joakim Svalberg-the lineup doesn't have to deal with Sorceress' main theme. They've been together since Heritage was completed, and according to Åkerfeldt he's not been in a better band situation before. Not since Orchid. Not since Still Life. Not since Ghost Reveries.


    "It's the best band situation I've ever had. Fans will look at our eras and have their favorite lineup, but this is the best. Even the happiest days of the first and second lineups aren't comparable to what I have now. We never fight. It's like a good work team. We know each other professionally and personally. As much as we're a band, we're also friends. We hang out when we're not doing Opeth."


    A core team is a good thing, when Opeth's credibility is in full view of fans and critics. Åkerfeldt's very aware of what the masses have had to say about Opeth since Watershed. While some disliked the musical shift on Heritage, most have applauded it. They've come to expect something new from Opeth. True to form, Sorceress will give long-time fans and weary critics reason to re-think Opeth and what it takes to be musically fearless.


    "I hope they'll like the record," posits Åkerfeldt. "I can only talk from my perspective and taste here, but we offer diversity that's not really present in the scene today. Whatever genre. We've always been a special band. We've gotten a lot of shit for being different. We still do. Our time will come, I think. It comes down to perseverance. It comes down to not giving up or giving in to public opinion. Music is about doing your own thing or going your own way."

    1. Persephone
    2. Sorceress
    3. The Wilde Flowers
    4. Will O The Wisp
    5. Chrysalis
    6. Sorceress 2
    7. The Seventh Sojourn
    8. Strange Brew
    9. A Fleeting Glance
    10. Era
    11. Persephone (Slight Return)
    12. The Ward
    13. Spring MCMLXXIV
    Opeth
    $29.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Bound For Glory (Out Of Stock) Bound For Glory (Out Of Stock) Quick View

    $37.99
    x

    Bound For Glory (Out Of Stock)

    Previously unreleased early broadcast featuring rare versions of many early Springsteen hits!


    April 1973 from The Main Point, Bryn Mawr, Philadelphia


    By mid 1972 the rock landscape was looking decidedly dull. The search for a new Beatles or a new Dylan to re-unite the Woodstock generation and their younger siblings had come to nothing and the natives were getting restless. So when word began to filter through of new-kid-on-the-block Bruce Springsteen breaking out of home city Asbury Park, New Jersey, and playing shows nationwide that reconfirmed audiences faith in the redemptive power of rock n roll, hope began to restore. Bruce had signed a recording deal with Columbia in mid-72 and had been working on his debut record since. Greetings From Asbury Park saw the light of day in early 73, and within the week Springsteen, with a little help from three of the soon to be named East Street Band, were performing their first ever radio broadcast, aired on Boston's WBCN FM. A quite remarkable performance ensued with Bruce and the boys in excellent humour and fine form as they played a terrific set, although remarkably including just one cut from Greetings. The show was an intimate affair without an audience but gave listeners their first glimpse into Springsteen's infectious personality, enormous enthusiasm and unique sense of humour. It also drove home the message that here was an artist who could prove to be the new messiah, with songs that quite beggared belief. The second show featured on this LP is Bruce's very first broadcast from the Main Point venue in Bryn Mawr, just outside Philadelphia - the venue at which Bruce's most prestigious and highly regarded broadcast was made, the astonishing 1975 gig that has also recently been released. This April 1973 set differs widely from the January 73 show as the full band (drummer Vini Lopez joins proceedings) rock out, and comparisons with the largely acoustic Boston broadcast remain fascinating. That was pretty good, Bruce is heard to mutter as the final track of this broadcast draws to a close - providing the perfect understatement for the burgeoning talent heard maturing in these two broadcasts, and equally for the shows themselves, as just one listen to this remarkable LP will testify.


    LP1 - Live broadcast on WBCN-FM BOSTON 9th Jan 1973
    1. Satin Doll
    2. Bishop Danced
    3. Circus Story
    4. Song For Orphans
    5. Does This Bus Stop At 82nd Street?


    LP2 - Live broadcast on WMMR-FM PHILADELPHIA 24th
    6. New York Song
    7. Circus Story
    8. Spirit In The Sky
    9. Does This Bus Stop At 82nd Street?
    10. Santa Ana
    11. Tokyo
    12. Thundercrack

    Bruce Springsteen
    $37.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Temporarily out of stock
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