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  • New Again New Again Quick View

    $17.99
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    New Again

    Three studio albums, three gold awards, three Modern Rock hits. Now three years after its biggest-selling album to date - the #2 charting Louder Now - Taking Back Sunday returns with a new energy, a new guitarist and a new fearlessness on New Again, produced by David Kahne (Sublime, The Strokes, Paul McCartney). Having toured with Linkin Park's Projekt Revolution, opened for My Chemical Romance at Madison Square Garden, co-headlined Warped, and played Live Earth, Taking Back Sunday fulfills the expectations of a growing fan base and yet expands its musical boundaries with an album that ranges from anthemic rock to engaging pop, the relentless to the infectious. Taking Back Sunday is truly New Again! This vinyl edition is a one-LP set, regular-weight vinyl produced and pressed at Pirates Press.
    1. New Again
    2. Sink Into Me
    3. Lonely, Lonely
    4. Summer, Man
    5. Swing
    6. Where My Mouth Is
    7. Cut Me Up Jenny
    8. Catholic Knees
    9. Capital M-E
    10. Carpathia
    11. Everything Must Go
    Taking Back Sunday
    $17.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Louder Than Bombs Louder Than Bombs Quick View

    $42.99
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    Louder Than Bombs

    Ranked 365/500 on Rolling Stone Magazine's 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.


    Import


    Originally released as a U.S.-only compilation in 1987, the expansive 24-track Louder Than Bombs collects The Smiths' stray early singles, B-Sides, John Peel sessions and cuts from the 1984 U.K.-only compilation Hatful of Hollow. Featuring a wealth of material like the non-album singles Sheila Take a Bow, Shoplifters of the World Unite, Panic, Shakespeare's Sister and Ask as well as B-sides that are virtually unavailable elsewhere in Half a Person, Stretch Out and Wait, Unloveable and Asleep, Louder Than Bombs is an essential and revelatory Smiths document now reissued on double 180g audiophile vinyl!

    LP1
    1. Is It Really So Strange? (B-Side, John Peel Session)
    2. Sheila Takes a Bow (Non-Album Single)
    3. Shoplifters of the World Unite (Non-Album Single)
    4. Sweet and Tender Hooligan (B-Side, John Peel Session)
    5. Half a Person (B-Side)
    6. London (B-Side)
    7. Panic (Non-Album Single)
    8. Girl Afraid (B-Side)
    9. Shakespeare's Sister (Non-Album Single)
    10. William, It Was Really Nothing (Non-Album Single)
    11. You Just Haven't Earned It Yet, Baby (B-Side)
    12. Heaven Knows I'm Miserable Now (Non-Album Single)


    LP2
    1. Ask (Non-Album Single)
    2. Golden Lights (B-Side)
    3. Oscillate Wildly (B-Side)
    4. These Things Take Time (B-Side)
    5. Rubber Ring (B-Side)
    6. Back to the Old House (B-Side)
    7. Hand in Glove (Single Version)
    8. Stretch Out and Wait (B-Side)
    9. Please, Please, Please Let Me Get What I Want (B-Side)
    10. This Night Has Opened My Eyes (John Peel Session)
    11. Unloveable (B-Side)
    12. Asleep (B-Side)

    The Smiths
    $42.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Louder Than Bombs (Awaiting Repress) Louder Than Bombs (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $31.99
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    Louder Than Bombs (Awaiting Repress)

    Ranked 365/500 on Rolling Stone Magazine's 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.


    Remastered On 180 Gram Vinyl


    Originally released as a U.S.-only compilation in 1987, the expansive 24-track Louder Than Bombs collects The Smiths' stray early singles, B-Sides, John Peel sessions and cuts from the 1984 U.K.-only compilation Hatful of Hollow. Featuring a wealth of material like the non-album singles Sheila Take a Bow, Shoplifters of the World Unite, Panic, Shakespeare's Sister and Ask as well as B-sides that are virtually unavailable elsewhere in Half a Person, Stretch Out and Wait, Unloveable and Asleep, Louder Than Bombs is an essential and revelatory Smiths document now reissued on double 180 Gram audiophile vinyl!

    LP 1
    1. Is It Really So Strange? (B-Side, John Peel Session)
    2. Sheila Takes a Bow (Non-Album Single)
    3. Shoplifters of the World Unite (Non-Album Single)
    4. Sweet and Tender Hooligan (B-Side, John Peel Session)
    5. Half a Person (B-Side)
    6. London (B-Side)
    7. Panic (Non-Album Single)
    8. Girl Afraid (B-Side)
    9. Shakespeare's Sister (Non-Album Single)
    10. William, It Was Really Nothing (Non-Album Single)
    11. You Just Haven't Earned It Yet, Baby (B-Side)
    12. Heaven Knows I'm Miserable Now (Non-Album Single)


    LP 2
    1. Ask (Non-Album Single)
    2. Golden Lights (B-Side)
    3. Oscillate Wildly (B-Side)
    4. These Things Take Time (B-Side)
    5. Rubber Ring (B-Side)
    6. Back to the Old House (B-Side)
    7. Hand in Glove (Single Version)
    8. Stretch Out and Wait (B-Side)
    9. Please, Please, Please Let Me Get What I Want (B-Side)
    10. This Night Has Opened My Eyes (John Peel Session)
    11. Unloveable (B-Side)
    12. Asleep (B-Side)

    The Smiths
    $31.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Killed By Deathrock Vol. 2 Killed By Deathrock Vol. 2 Quick View

    $19.99
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    Killed By Deathrock Vol. 2

    After the initial blast of punk rock bands made their impression on the youth of the late 1970s, subgenres quickly emerged. Some preferred the faster, louder aggression of hardcore, others the angular danceability of post-punk, some the raw and more personal home-made sound of DIY, and so on. Looking back among and between these genres we now recognize various blends of punk, post-punk, goth rock, industrial, and DIY as deathrock. In 2014, Sacred Bones Records launched the series Killed By Deathrock to document an entire scene of bands that haven't yet received proper recognition. This is the second volume of that series.
    1. Spectator (Gatecrashers)
    2. A Skeleton at the Feast (Middle Class)
    3. Waiting for the War (ADS)
    4. Whiplash (Veda)
    5. Promised Land (Skeletal Family)
    6. The Freedom Curse (Flowers for Agatha)
    7. Dark Spirits (Red Temple Spirits)
    8. What's Wrong Yvette (Crank Call Love Affair)
    9. I Can't Live in a Living Room (Red Zebra)
    10. Hade (Vita Noctis)
    Various Artists
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Bulls and Roosters Bulls and Roosters Quick View

    $20.99
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    Bulls and Roosters

    Deluxe Gatefold

    Colored Vinyl

    Propulsive, Powerful Riffs with Chanting Hooks, Surf-Inspired Leads, and Jangly Swagger -Bulls and Roosters Represents Together Pangea At Their Boldest, Brightest, and Best To Date

    You don't have to grow up all the way, do you? On their latest album Bulls and Roosters, Together Pangea managed to hit a sweet spot between writing rock 'n' roll songs worthy of being hummed twenty years from now and maintaining the brash and ballsy bite fans know and love. The Los Angeles quartet-William Keegan [guitar, vocals], Danny Bengston[bass], Erik Jimenez [drums], and Roland Cosio [guitar]-essentially get louder by dialing the volume down. Together Pangea co-produced the album with longtime friend and collaborator Andrew Schubert, and it was mixed by Chris Coady(TV On The Radio, Beach House.)

    1. Sippy Cup
    2. The Cold
    3. Kenmore Ave.
    4. Money on It
    5. Better Find Out
    6. Peach Mirror
    7. Gold Moon
    8. Friend of Nothing
    9. Stare at the Sun
    10. Southern Comfort
    11. Bulls and Roosters
    12. Is It Real?
    13. Alison
    together PANGEA
    $20.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Pandemonium Shadow Show Pandemonium Shadow Show Quick View

    $28.99
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    Pandemonium Shadow Show

    180 Gram Pressed At RTI


    Mono


    Nilsson's first true album, 1967's Pandemonium Shadow Show, is an astonishing collection that announces the artist's unique vaudevillian take on 1960s pop music-a style that brought him to the attention of the Beatles by way of their press agent Derek Taylor. Produced by Rick Jarrard (Jefferson Airplane, JosÉ Feliciano) and primarily arranged by George Tipton, the set strikes a balance between Harry's breathtaking originals (the autobiographical "1941," the melancholy "Without Her" and the playful "Ten Little Indians") and a tasteful array of covers (the Beatles' "You Can't Do That" and "She's Leaving Home," as well as Phil Spector's gargantuan "River DeepMountain High"), all the while showcasing the vocal prowess of the True One. Plus, the usual benefits of a vintage mono mix are here-a louder rhythm section, more present bass, and an overall sense of ensemble that stereo of the era could rarely capture. A stunning work, pressed at R.T.I., now available from Sundazed in a 180 gram edition with restored artwork.

    1. Ten Little Indians
    2. 1941
    3. Cuddly Toy
    4. She Sang Hymns Out Of Tune
    5. You Can't Do That
    6. Sleep Late, My Lady Friend
    7. She's Leaving Home
    8. There Will Never Be
    9. Without Her
    10. Freckles
    11. It's Been So Long
    12. River Deep Mountain High
    Nilsson
    $28.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP Mono - Sealed Buy Now
  • Total Strife Forever Total Strife Forever Quick View

    $22.99
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    Total Strife Forever

    The lead single, and the accompanying video, from East India Youth's debut album Total Strife Forever really tells you all you need to know about the record. 'Looking For Someone' opens like a familiar, albeit electronic, ballad with East India Youth (otherwise known as William Doyle) emoting directly into camera in a way reminiscent of Sinead O'Connor. Then he begins to ascend, the London skyline now whizzing past Doyle as the elevator he's in climbs the Heron Tower. Almighty, booming drums signalled the ascension; humming synths join the journey to the top before the music is stripped away and the camera pans away, twisting as the elevator descends. We are then shown a vertigo-inducing journey back to street level and a trip through the shaft of an elevator. Abrasive synthesisers and what sounds like a distorted church organ are the soundtrack for this dizzying descent. It's no longer a simple plea to a lost lover, but a rallying cry against loneliness in the midst of huge, anonymous monuments.


    Total Strife Forever is a brutal electronic album, but one that still retains a very humanistic core - this juxtaposition is a thematic thread which runs throughout the album. Doyle then sculpts and defines the music in order to create tension between these two disparate elements, or else uses their differences in order to surprise and engage the listener. This is done within individual songs and across the record: over 11 tracks you'll hear acid beats, euphoric electronic pop, ambient passages, drone, krautrock and more. What's incredible is how East India Youth has managed to bring all of these elements together and construct a cohesive record.


    The album opens with 'Glitter Recession'. Soft piano meets a twinkling keyboard melody and then heavy bass stabs. The piano becomes louder and deeper, the keyboard softer, and swirling synths enter the mix. It's a beautiful, optimistic opening, the instruments all layered so that they never feel like they are jostling for attention, but rather adding details and intricacies to make the piece more alive. 'Glitter Recession' is followed by the first of four 'Total Strife Forever' pieces, this one built around a steady sawtooth bass line that grows in intensity as a pounding kick drum appears and echoing synths wash in and out of audible range. It feels like it is building towards heavy electronic noise, of the kind bands like Fuck Buttons are renowned for. But instead 'Total Strife Forever I' is more restrained as sustained chords create a stunning euphoric ending.


    The third track 'Dripping Down' is the first to feature vocals. If you've previously heard the singles leading into this album, or the Hostel EP from last year, you might be surprised by the fact that Total Strife Forever is largely instrumental, yet it makes the rare appearance of vocals all the more effective. 'Dripping Down's harmonies are beautiful, particularly in the closing moments of the track when they sound as though they've been recorded in a grand cathedral (most of this album was in fact recorded at home over the course of three years).


    With clear percussion and shimmering synthesiser riffs, 'Dripping Down' is the first dance track on the album, yet what follows takes things up a notch. 'Hinterland' is an out and out acid track. It starts with an echoing, sonar-like melody, ambient chords and a quick snare/kick beat. The bass drops and we're given an infectious, shuffling four-to-the-floor beat; what follows deserves to be a staple in any self-respecting DJ's club mix. 'Hinterland' is phenomenal, yet somehow East India Youth manages to go beyond that on the next track.


    'Heaven How Long' is easily the album's highlight and arrives just around the mid-point of the album. It's euphoric electronica at its best, and features one of the record's most delicate sections in the second verse. Doyle's vocals, hushed during the verses, soar for the chorus and the whole song ends with a krautrock inspired instrumental, marrying looped synthesisers to heavy bass guitar riffs.


    The second half of the Total Strife Forever is just as strong and rewarding as the first half. There's the aforementioned lead single 'Looking For Someone', as well as three more 'Total Strife Forever' pieces. The second of those tracks, which immediately follows 'Heaven How Long', is easily one of the most meditative tracks on the album, solely comprising an organ, haunting choral vocals and a deep electronic buzzing. In many ways it's similar to Tim Hecker's most recent work which used church organs and filters to blur the lines between what's real and what's synthetic. Meanwhile, 'Midnight Koto' is perhaps the album's most atmospheric track. Distant loops, heavily distorted and sounding like a terrifying rush of traffic, play under the koto melody. It's heavily inspired by Brian Eno, particularly his work with Bowie on tracks like 'Moss Garden'.


    Whilst these references are clear, at no point does it seem like East India Youth is just trying to replicate his idols. Total Strife Forever pulls together these influences and creates something truly extraordinary. This is an album firmly rooted in a decade where technology blurs the lines between fact and fiction, where we 'socialise' with brands and it's possible to feel hopelessly alone amidst the towering skyscrapers of a city. The final track 'Total Strife Forever IV' opens with static that eventually fades away to reveal grand synthesiser melodies before disintegrating once more. The beauty of those melodies is only enhanced by their temporary nature. Amidst the machinery there's a realisation that whilst the buildings, the brands and digital world might live on, it's reality and our fellow human beings that are truly beautiful and deserving of our attention.


    - Robert Whitfield (The 405)

    1. Glitter Recession
    2. Total Strife Forever I
    3. Dripping Down
    4. Hinterland
    5. Heaven, How Long
    6. Total Strife Forever II
    7. Looking For Someone
    8. Midnight Koto
    9. Total Strife Forever III
    10. Song For Granular Piano
    11. Total Strife Forever IV
    East India Youth
    $22.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Culture Of Volume Culture Of Volume Quick View

    $24.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Culture Of Volume

    The lead single, and the accompanying video, from East India Youth's debut album Total Strife Forever really tells you all you need to know about the record. 'Looking For Someone' opens like a familiar, albeit electronic, ballad with East India Youth (otherwise known as William Doyle) emoting directly into camera in a way reminiscent of Sinead O'Connor. Then he begins to ascend, the London skyline now whizzing past Doyle as the elevator he's in climbs the Heron Tower. Almighty, booming drums signalled the ascension; humming synths join the journey to the top before the music is stripped away and the camera pans away, twisting as the elevator descends. We are then shown a vertigo-inducing journey back to street level and a trip through the shaft of an elevator. Abrasive synthesisers and what sounds like a distorted church organ are the soundtrack for this dizzying descent. It's no longer a simple plea to a lost lover, but a rallying cry against loneliness in the midst of huge, anonymous monuments.


    Total Strife Forever is a brutal electronic album, but one that still retains a very humanistic core - this juxtaposition is a thematic thread which runs throughout the album. Doyle then sculpts and defines the music in order to create tension between these two disparate elements, or else uses their differences in order to surprise and engage the listener. This is done within individual songs and across the record: over 11 tracks you'll hear acid beats, euphoric electronic pop, ambient passages, drone, krautrock and more. What's incredible is how East India Youth has managed to bring all of these elements together and construct a cohesive record.


    The album opens with 'Glitter Recession'. Soft piano meets a twinkling keyboard melody and then heavy bass stabs. The piano becomes louder and deeper, the keyboard softer, and swirling synths enter the mix. It's a beautiful, optimistic opening, the instruments all layered so that they never feel like they are jostling for attention, but rather adding details and intricacies to make the piece more alive. 'Glitter Recession' is followed by the first of four 'Total Strife Forever' pieces, this one built around a steady sawtooth bass line that grows in intensity as a pounding kick drum appears and echoing synths wash in and out of audible range. It feels like it is building towards heavy electronic noise, of the kind bands like Fuck Buttons are renowned for. But instead 'Total Strife Forever I' is more restrained as sustained chords create a stunning euphoric ending.


    The third track 'Dripping Down' is the first to feature vocals. If you've previously heard the singles leading into this album, or the Hostel EP from last year, you might be surprised by the fact that Total Strife Forever is largely instrumental, yet it makes the rare appearance of vocals all the more effective. 'Dripping Down's harmonies are beautiful, particularly in the closing moments of the track when they sound as though they've been recorded in a grand cathedral (most of this album was in fact recorded at home over the course of three years).


    With clear percussion and shimmering synthesiser riffs, 'Dripping Down' is the first dance track on the album, yet what follows takes things up a notch. 'Hinterland' is an out and out acid track. It starts with an echoing, sonar-like melody, ambient chords and a quick snare/kick beat. The bass drops and we're given an infectious, shuffling four-to-the-floor beat; what follows deserves to be a staple in any self-respecting DJ's club mix. 'Hinterland' is phenomenal, yet somehow East India Youth manages to go beyond that on the next track.


    'Heaven How Long' is easily the album's highlight and arrives just around the mid-point of the album. It's euphoric electronica at its best, and features one of the record's most delicate sections in the second verse. Doyle's vocals, hushed during the verses, soar for the chorus and the whole song ends with a krautrock inspired instrumental, marrying looped synthesisers to heavy bass guitar riffs.


    The second half of the Total Strife Forever is just as strong and rewarding as the first half. There's the aforementioned lead single 'Looking For Someone', as well as three more 'Total Strife Forever' pieces. The second of those tracks, which immediately follows 'Heaven How Long', is easily one of the most meditative tracks on the album, solely comprising an organ, haunting choral vocals and a deep electronic buzzing. In many ways it's similar to Tim Hecker's most recent work which used church organs and filters to blur the lines between what's real and what's synthetic. Meanwhile, 'Midnight Koto' is perhaps the album's most atmospheric track. Distant loops, heavily distorted and sounding like a terrifying rush of traffic, play under the koto melody. It's heavily inspired by Brian Eno, particularly his work with Bowie on tracks like 'Moss Garden'.


    Whilst these references are clear, at no point does it seem like East India Youth is just trying to replicate his idols. Total Strife Forever pulls together these influences and creates something truly extraordinary. This is an album firmly rooted in a decade where technology blurs the lines between fact and fiction, where we 'socialise' with brands and it's possible to feel hopelessly alone amidst the towering skyscrapers of a city. The final track 'Total Strife Forever IV' opens with static that eventually fades away to reveal grand synthesiser melodies before disintegrating once more. The beauty of those melodies is only enhanced by their temporary nature. Amidst the machinery there's a realisation that whilst the buildings, the brands and digital world might live on, it's reality and our fellow human beings that are truly beautiful and deserving of our attention.


    - Robert Whitfield (The 405)

    1. The Juddering
    2. End Result
    3. Beaming White
    4. Turn Away
    5. Hearts That Never
    6. Entirety
    7. Carousel
    8. Don't Look Backwards
    9. Manner Of Words
    10. Montage Resolution
    East India Youth
    $24.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Goodbye Terrible Youth Goodbye Terrible Youth Quick View

    $17.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Goodbye Terrible Youth

    How do you improve an already striking set of stripped-down, homemade pop? Gary McClure, the St. Louis-by-way-of Scotland songwriter behind American Wrestlers, a once anonymous project that became one of the year's best new bands, believes it's about being true to the basics.


    "It's truly about becoming good enough to write the album you wanted to listen to when you were 15," he says. "Every time I make a new record, I feel like I'm getting closer."


    Goodbye Terrible Youth (November 4, Fat Possum) shows McClure taking bedroom recordings onto a bigger stage without sacrificing the intimacy that makes them so attractive. If his self-titled album showed his knack for stringing together addictive guitar lines-the shimmer of shoegaze mixed with the emotional fist pump of power pop-Goodbye Terrible Youth amplifies that energy with a road-tested band. Literally breaking out of the home studio-the Tascam mixer McClure had been recording on has fallen apart from overuse-he's embraced a bigger sound and stage on Goodbye Terrible Youth, his rueful yet propulsive songwriting only becoming sharper.


    "I wanted to write songs that bridged the gap better between audience and stage," he says. "Faster, louder more distortion. Something you can do handstands and backflips and start small fires to."


    Building on the dreamy haze of previous recordings, McClure's music on GTY often crackles with energy. Lead song "Vote Thatcher" flips a switch between propulsive, jangly guitar lines and bright, boisterous, choruses, a fitting backdrop for lyrics imploring listeners not to let their youth slip through their fingers. "Someone Far Away," propelled by a massive, fuzzy bassline, makes a perfect soundtrack for a long desert drive, while the angular and angsty, while "Terrible Youth" opens with a muscular take on the midsection riff of Marquee Moon, than fuzzes into grunge over a Stone Roses bass line along with a bit of Big Star swagger.


    When McClure's homemade recordings surfaced in late 2014, they featured the kind of lo-fi charm you'd expect from a lost classic, like a long-lost mixtape rediscovered under the seat of your car. Self-released on Bandcamp, the earnest and effortless album reflects McClure at his best.


    "It's this weird kind of thing happens where the music kind of constructs itself," he says. "My music making process is always happening, always going on in my head. It's almost like anti-virus software in my computer. It's always plugging away in the background."


    McClure's career may be the definition of plugging away, enough so that he has the unique distinction of being "discovered" twice. Before starting American Wrestler, he was one-half of Working For a Nuclear Free City, a shoegaze-inspired band out of Manchester, England. By 2013, McClure and bandmate Phil Kay decided to wind the project down. As McClure weighed next move, he started playing around and posting demos online. The tracks caught the attention of Bridgette Imperial, an American who was studying overseas, and sparked more than just a meeting of musical minds. They began dating, and a year later, McClure had moved to St. Louis to marry her.


    The midwest move has been a key influence for the restless musician, a more open music scene than he was accustomed to in Manchester. While working a warehouse job for UPS in Missouri, McClure began experimenting and recording what would become the first American Wrestlers album, and the momentum and reception built since then has allowed him to stretch out and refine a new album of songs with a full band, which includes Imperial, who plays keyboard, as well as Ian Reitz on bass and Josh Van Hoorebeke on drums. McClure's new set of bouncing, well-crafted songs shows that musical youth is not always wasted on the young.


    "I'm always surprised by how each record brings me closer to writing simpler, heavier, catchier songs like those bands who gave me my musical epiphany: Nirvana, the Smashing Pumpkins, Hole and that first Foo Fighters record," he says. "I first learned how to write by copying them and got lost for a decade in intricacy and experimentation. Now, it feels like I'm heading back."

    1. Vote Thatcher
    2. Give Up
    3. So Long
    4. Hello, Dear
    5. Amazing Grace
    6. Terrible Youth
    7. Blind Kids
    8. Someone Far Away
    9. Real People
    American Wrestlers
    $17.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Heavy Blanket Heavy Blanket Quick View

    $21.99
    Buy Now
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    Heavy Blanket

    J Mascis rounds up a couple partners-in-crime from his adolescence with an eye and ear towards shredding harder, wailing louder, and generally melting faces even more brutally than ever before. Stoner dirtbags cloaked in mystery, J's longtime buddies Pete Cougar and Johnny Pancake lay down the heavy rhythm base for J's massive licks and blistering guitar mastery. Ever wondered what Band of Gypsies would sound like if you mixed it up with Japanese hard psych and smoked it through a giant power bong? Well, now you know. Don't say we didn't warn you.
    1. Galloping Toward The Unknown
    2. Spit In The Eye
    3. Blockheads
    4. Corpuscle Through Time
    5. Dr. Marten's Blues
    6. No Telling No Trails
    Heavy Blanket
    $21.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • La Vie Est Belle La Vie Est Belle Quick View

    $23.99
    Buy Now
    x

    La Vie Est Belle

    Yannick Ilunga AKA Petite Noir doesn't mince words when he outlines the message woven into his debut album La Vie Est Belle / Life Is Beautiful: STAY POSITIVE. Yannick is half-Congolese, half-Angolan and was raised in South Africa. His musical background ranges from metal to nu-disco. He's since developed into a confident, singer and songwriter with a wide palette reflecting all the cultural dimensions of his life. Earlier 2015's EP The King of Anxiety blended raw angular energy, bright African rhythms and subtle R&B into his alt guitar sound, and now La Vie Est Belle / Life Is Beautiful takes that sound to louder, more defiant places. It's what Ilunga calls Noirwave, which is more of a concept than a specific sound. Inspired by innovators like Mos Def and Kanye and legends like Fela Kuti and Tabu Ley, Noirwave encompasses a new African aesthetic, plain and simple.
    1. Intro Noirwave
    2. Best
    3. Freedom
    4. Seventeen (Stay)
    5. Just Breathe
    6. La Vie Est Belle / Life Is Beautiful ft. Baloji
    7. MDR
    8. Colour
    9. Down
    10. Inside
    11. Chess
    Petite Noir
    $23.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Last Dawn The Last Dawn Quick View

    $19.99
    Buy Now
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    The Last Dawn

    When MONO began in 1999, they set out with a simple mission:
    From bliss to bludgeon, no matter how long or winding the path
    may be. Their debut album, Under The Pipal Tree, outlined that
    mission in twisted, psychedelic fury. Subsequent albums would see
    the band honing their craft, mastering their mission, and ultimately
    abandoning that path in favor of more grandiose pursuits. Flanked
    by increasingly larger orchestras, MONO performed live at some of
    the most prestigious venues in New York City, London, Tokyo, and
    Australia. MONO had become an orchestral rock band, a spectacle
    of extreme melancholy and melodrama. By 2012's For My Parents,
    the band had finally reached the logical conclusion of that era; it
    was time to remember where they started, and to rethink where
    they were heading. Less strings? No strings? Louder? Quieter?
    Lighter? Darker? Yes.


    The Last Dawn and Rays of Darkness are a pair of new albums by
    MONO. Recorded simultaneously yet conceptually and creatively
    disparate, the two act as both opposing and complementary sides
    to a story. No strangers to narratives, the twin albums explore
    familiar themes for the band: Hope and hopelessness, love and
    loss, immense joy and unspeakable pain. Those elemental parts of
    life and the complicated relationships they create have never been
    more resonant through MONO's music than they are here.


    The Last Dawn is the first of these two companion albums, and is
    the lighter of the two, thematically and melodically. It contains
    undoubtedly some of MONO's strongest songs ever, drawing on an
    array of influences from minimalist film score to vintage shoegaze.
    It is MONO at their absolute purest, executing an uncanny,
    unspoken dialogue with each other without the dozens of stringed
    instruments that have been so prominent throughout their catalog
    in recent years. The songs are also noticeably more efficient -
    MONO have always been masters of telling compelling stories
    without words. But now they've proven they can do it without frills,
    too.

    1. The Land Between Tides / Glory
    2. Kanata
    3. Cyclone
    4. Elysian Castles
    5. Where We Begin
    6. The Last Dawn
    Mono
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Rays of Darkness Rays of Darkness Quick View

    $19.99
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    Rays of Darkness


    "One of the most distinctive bands of
    the 21st Century." - Pitchfork


    "MONO have now well and truly
    sealed their place in the pantheon of
    rock history." - Rock Sound


    When MONO began in 1999, they set out with a simple mission:
    From bliss to bludgeon, no matter how long or winding the path
    may be. Their debut album, Under The Pipal Tree, outlined that
    mission in twisted, psychedelic fury. Subsequent albums would see
    the band honing their craft, mastering their mission, and ultimately
    abandoning that path in favor of more grandiose pursuits. Flanked
    by increasingly larger orchestras, MONO performed live at some of
    the most prestigious venues in New York City, London, Tokyo, and
    Australia. MONO had become an orchestral rock band, a spectacle
    of extreme melancholy and melodrama. By 2012's For My Parents,
    the band had finally reached the logical conclusion of that era; it
    was time to remember where they started, and to rethink where
    they were heading. Less strings? No strings? Louder? Quieter?
    Lighter? Darker? Yes.


    The Last Dawn and Rays of Darkness are a pair of new albums by
    MONO. Recorded simultaneously yet conceptually and creatively
    disparate, the two act as both opposing and complementary sides
    to a story. No strangers to narratives, the twin albums explore
    familiar themes for the band: Hope and hopelessness, love and
    loss, immense joy and unspeakable pain. Those elemental parts of
    life and the complicated relationships they create have never been
    more resonant through MONO's music than they are here.


    Rays of Darkness is the first MONO album in 15 years to feature
    no orchestral instruments whatsoever. That fact alone is
    remarkable given the band's reputation for sweeping, dramatic
    instrumentals that recall Oscar-worthy film scores. Instead, Rays of
    Darkness more closely resembles a jet engine taking off inside a
    small, crowded auditorium. It is MONO's blackest album ever, a
    collection of scorched riffs, doom rhythms, and an unexpected
    contribution from post-hardcore pioneer Tetsu Fukagawa of Envy.
    The album ends with the smoldering wreckage of distorted guitars
    and ominous drones playing out a eulogy to the days when MONO
    shot blinding rays of light through seemingly endless darkness.

    1. Recoil, Ignite
    2. Surrender
    3. The Hand That Holds The Truth
    4. The Last Rays
    Mono
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Return Of The Giant Slits Return Of The Giant Slits Quick View

    $27.99
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    Return Of The Giant Slits

    Pressed On Fluorescent Yellow Vinyl

    Limited To 1000 Copies

    Labeling The Slits groundbreaking just doesn't (pardon the pun) cut it. No other post-punk band was as confrontational-an all-female trio calling themselves The Slits and posing muddily topless on their debut album cover was about as in-your-face as a feminist statement gets-or as determinedly uncommercial. Indeed, after being dropped by their label, Island, despite having made Cut, of the signature albums of the era, Viv Albertine, Tessa Pollitt, and Ari Up treated Sony, their new label, to an even more radical record, 1981's Return of the Giant Slits.

    Already far removed from the male-dominated, louder-faster ethos of punk rock, The Slits, with new drummer Bruce Smith of The Pop Group and multi-instrumentalist Steve Beresford in tow, added world music and free jazz to Up's Ono-esque ululations, Albertine's skittering guitar, and Pollitt's dubwise bass riddims.

    Predictably, Sony dropped the record like a hot potato, not even bothering to release it in the U.S., and it has only been intermittently available on CD in the 35-plus years since.

    But the reputation of Return of the Giant Slits has continued to grow, with Albertine herself recently commenting, It's more experimental than Cut and brings in even wider musical influences. In some ways, I think it's a better record.

    Now, Real Gone Music is returning Return of the Giant Slits to availability in a fluorescent yellow vinyl edition limited to 1000 copies that includes the original printed inner sleeve. Either way, this record demands to be in your collection you can trace the beginning of the whole riot grrrl movement to right here.

    1. Earthbeat
    2. Or What It Is?
    3. Face Place
    4. Walk About
    5. Difficult Fun
    6. Animal Space/Spacier
    7. Improperly Dressed
    8. Life On Earth
    The Slits
    $27.99
    Colored Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Lost In The Dream Lost In The Dream Quick View

    $21.99
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    Lost In The Dream

    Lost In The Dream is the third album by Philadelphia band The War on Drugs,but in many ways,it feels
    like the first. Around the release of the 2011 breakthrough Slave Ambient,Adam Granduciel spent the
    bulk of two years on the road, touring through progressively larger rock clubs, festival stages and late night television slots. As these dozen songs shifted and grew beyond what they'd been in the studio, The War on Drugs became a bona fide rock 'n'roll band.


    That essence drives Lost In The Dream, a 10-song set produced by Granduciel and longtime engineer Jeff
    Zeigler. In the past, Granduciel built the core of songs largely by himself. But these tunes were played
    and recorded by the group that had solidified so much on the road: Dave Hartley, (his favorite bassist
    in the world), who had played a bit on The War on Drugs' 2008 debut Wagonwheel Blues, and pianist
    Robbie Bennett, a multi-instrumentalist who contributed to Slave Ambient. This unit spent eight
    months bouncing between a half-dozen different studios that stretched from the mountains of North
    Carolina to the boroughs of New York City. Only then did Granduciel-the proudly self-professed
    gearhead, and unrepentant perfectionist-add and subtract, invite guests and retrofit pieces. He
    sculpted these songs into a musical rescue mission, through and then beyond personal despair and
    anxiety. Lost In The Dream represents the trials of the trip and the triumphs of its destination.


    "I wanted there to be a singular voice, but I wanted it to be a project of great friends. Everyone in the
    band cares about it so much,"he says."That is the crux of it-growing up,dealing with life,having close
    friends, helping each other get by. That is what the record's all about.


    As such, these tunes reveal a careful and thrilling reinvention of the sound that's become The War on
    Drugs' trademark. The signature meld of long tones and scatter shot layers still stands, with phantom
    drum machines and organ lines dotting the musical middle distance all across Lost In The Dream.Note
    the way the keys whisper against the guitar's growl as the tempestuous"An Ocean in Between the Waves"
    approaches pentecostal heat. Hear how,when a sharp and hard riff cuts into the inescapable chorus of
    "Red Eyes," synthetic strings and baritone saxophone shape a soft, infinite bed beneath it. But there's a
    new found directness to these tunes, too. Granduciel's voice steps out from behind its typical web of
    effects-louder now, with more experiences to share and more steel from having survived them. He
    sounds less like a prismatic reflection of a rock bandleader, more like the emboldened actualization of
    that idea. With its crisp, unencumbered delivery, "Eyes to the Wind" becomes the album's centerpiece
    and the group's new anthem.This is Granduciel's to-date triumph and the exact moment where Lost In
    The Dream moves from a tale of confusion to one of resolve. Throughout most of the record, grips
    loosen and senses fail, memories are mourned and expectations are abandoned. But after the Rolling
    Thunder lift of "Eyes to the Wind," Granduciel finds new contentment and direction. Anguish
    sublimates into deliverance. Backed by his bros, Granduciel becomes a preacher in a new pulpit.

    1. Under The Pressure
    2. Red Eyes
    3. Suffering
    4. An Ocean In Between The Waves
    5. Disappearing
    6. Eyes To The Wind
    7. The Haunting Idle
    8. Burning
    9. Lost In The Dream
    10. In Reverse
    The War On Drugs
    $21.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
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