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  • Four Sail Four Sail Quick View

    $24.99
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    Four Sail

    Arthur Lee opened many eyes when he cut 1969's uniformly wonderful Love album, Four Sail, with an entirely new supporting cast. The band's final record for Elektra features such delights as The Singing Cowboy, a loping, locoweed-dusted trail ballad, Robert Montgomery, Lee's assimilation of Eleanor Rigby's-style magic, and the band's heartfelt show-closer at the time, I'll Pray For You.
    1. August
    2. Your Friend And Mine-Neil's Song
    3. I'm With You
    4. Good Times
    5. Singing Cowboy
    6. Dream
    7. Robert Montgomery
    8. Nothing
    9. Talking In My Sleep
    Love
    $24.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Black Beauty Black Beauty Quick View

    $26.99
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    Black Beauty

    28-page, full-color book (11" x 11")


    Extensive essay by Ben Edmonds (Creem, Rolling Stone, Mojo) featuring all-new interviews


    Abundant, never-before-seen photographs by Herbert Worthington (Fleetwood Mac's Rumours)


    Brilliantly mastered by multi-GRAMMY® nominee Dan Hersch (Paul Simon, Kinks, Cars,The Band)


    Mastered for vinyl by multi-GRAMMY® winner Doug Sax (The Who, Rolling Stones, Pink Floyd)


    Black Beauty, the never-before-released masterpiece by Arthur Lee's legendary psychedelic rock band Love, is available on 180-gram vinyl LP. Recorded in 1973 for the ambitious new label Buffalo Records,
    the album remained unreleased when the company folded. Finally, after 39 years High Moon Records is honored to fulfill Arthur Lee's wish that Black Beauty be heard by music fans worldwide. Black Beauty is making its first-ever official release
    in any format, anywhere! With unparalelled sound and state-of-the-art packaging, critics are hailing Black Beauty as an instant classic. Black Beauty is that rarest of rock artifacts: an unreleased,
    full-length studio album, from an undisputed musical
    genius. Black Beauty is the missing link in a catalog that includes Forever Changes, the classic 1967 Love album the New York Times called "one of the most affecting and beguiling albums of all time. With Black Beauty, Arthur Lee manages to combine searing 70's-rock with gorgeous melodies and stellar songwriting - topped off by his most distinctive, snarling, soulful vocals ever. With its wonderfully eclectic collection of songs, the
    album offers Love fans a rare glimpse into a previously undocumented phase of Arthur Lee's fabled career, while shining a light for new fans to discover the unique genius that is the music of Arthur Lee and Love.



    It's tempting to play what-if with Love's lost labor, Black Beauty, which was recorded in 1973 but shelved for nearly four decades. What if Buffalo Records hadn't gone out of business just prior to the album's release? What if Black Beauty had actually hit stores? What if it hadn't languished in limbo until years after Arthur Lee's death? Would it have stopped Love's slide into obscurity? Would it have signaled a comeback for the man who masterminded Forever Changes, still one of the most complex and compelling artifacts of 1960s Los Angeles? Would his life and career have played out any differently? Would we think of him today as something other than a cult artist, inspired as well as damned by his era?


    It's difficult to imagine any answers to those questions, but it says a lot about Lee that the album even raises these what-ifs and coulda-beens. The very qualities that made him such a fascinating voice-- restlessness, excitability, paranoia, perfectionism, single-mindedness-- may have doomed any commercial prospects more than his notorious fear of travel ever did. After recording Forever Changes, he fired the band and hired new musicians to take their places. Every subsequent album featured a different line-up, although the changes seem based more on personality than on musical direction or ability. Never stagnant, Love was in constant flux, always in a state of development but never quite arriving. So the operative question becomes: Was this the version of Love that Lee had been working toward?


    For Black Beauty-- which is finally seeing release via High Moon Records, although the reissue has been delayed for two years-- Lee assembled guitarist Melvan Whittington, bass player Robert Rozelle, and drummer Joe Blocker. This may be the hardiest and most muscular of Love's post-Changes rosters, with remarkable force and range. With crisp production by Paul Rothchild, best known for his work with the Doors, Love build from a potent blues rock foundation not dissimilar to that of Jimi Hendrix, but without the distracting shamanistic persona and guitar pyrotechnics. "Walk Right In" struts into country rock territory, rewriting Cannon's Jug Stompers 1929 hit into a plea for empathy, and "Beep Beep" attempts a sort of pop reggae, albeit not entirely convincingly.


    On the whole, this particular line-up sounds perfectly rough and unrehearsed, generating a tense energy on "Skid" and "Stay Away" even as they suggest a band still figuring out exactly what they can do together. It's a strong album, but it's not another Forever Changes, whose accomplishments in retrospect were unrepeatable, or even another Four Sail. On the other hand, Lee wasn't aiming to craft something in that vein. Still, especially considering the professional setbacks he had faced in the years leading up to Black Beauty-- which includes being dropped by Elektra and shuffling through a series of independent labels-- Lee sounds engaged and invigorated, forgoing the bitterness that had rankled the band for a slightly more hopeful outlook. On stand-out "Can't Find It", he sings, "Every time I cry my heart out, and every time I play the fool, but there's gotta be something in this lonely world for me." The confession is all the more bittersweet for being capped with the line, "but I can't find it without you." It's ostensibly a love song, but could just as easily be addressed to his audience. His creative satisfaction relies on having a listener to complete the circuit, which makes this album's long shelf life all the sadder.

    -Stephen M. Deusner (Pitchfork, May 15, 2013)

    1. Young & Able
    2. Midnight Sun
    3. Can't Find It
    4. Walk Right In
    5. Skid
    6. Beep Beep
    7. Stay Away
    8. Lonely Pigs
    9. See Myself In You
    10. Product Of The Times
    Love
    $26.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Does Led Zeppelin II Does Led Zeppelin II Quick View

    $19.99
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    Does Led Zeppelin II

    Multi-platinum and Grammy winning San Francisco band TRAIN is set to pay homage to one of their biggest musical inspirations with the release of the first cover album of their career, LED ZEPPELIN II. The 9-track album follows the original Led Zeppelin II track listing including classic hit songs such as Ramble On and Whole Lotta Love. The band has famously covered Zeppelin their entire career in live shows. All of the band's proceeds from this album will go to their charity of record, Family House in San Francisco, of which they've been huge supporters for years.


    The decision to do a Led Zeppelin cover album took shape when the band recently performed the complete Led Zeppelin II album on this year's annual Sail Across the Sun cruise. Our favorite band is Led Zeppelin, we love the band, they made a huge impression on our lives musically. So I thought, why don't we record an album just for the fun of it for our fans, said lead singer Pat Monahan. The hard part was deciding which one.

    Train
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Rarities Vol. 1: The Covers Rarities Vol. 1: The Covers Quick View

    $15.99
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    Rarities Vol. 1: The Covers

    No Use For A Name is one of THE most successful and prolific acts to come out of the 90's skate-punk scene. But there's a lot more to it than that. Just have a look at their family tree, it has bands like Spazz, Foo Fighters, and Suicidal Tendencies to count among its branches. No really, think about that: the dude from that infamous grindcore band was in NUFAN?!? Their long, unpredictable journey has been full of twists, turns, and alternate routes that led them to be one of the best-selling outfits of their genre. They've done it all: Warped Tour's main stage, MTV, a live record, and an even a recent greatest hits album entitled, All The Best Songs. Hey, you know you've made it when you finally get a greatest hits collection! Not bad for some goofy kids from San Jose who started out with a couple hardcore 7s

    Early No Use releases appeared on New Red Archives, a San Francisco punk label operated by Nicky Garratt of the UK Subs. Believe it or not, in the late 80's it actually made sense that they would be labelmates with Reagan Youth, Social Unrest, and Christ On A Crutch. An AllMusic review describes their early material as, hulking hardcore with mighty fists full of metal. Angry and Threatening. This was a gritty, hardcore punk band, known mostly for their growling vocals and dark lyrical themes. Then came the first unforeseen occurrence: frontman Tony Sly unexpectedly developed into a proficient songwriter and mastered melody like few punk bands can ever do. Nobody knows where those gifts come from and you never see it coming, but suddenly No Use For A Name was starting to make music that people actually liked.

    As is natural, the band kept evolving, and things changed in a major way for the band when they signed to Fat Wreck Chords in the mid-90's. Their 8-song Fat debut, The Daily Grind EP, drew comparisons to Bad Religion and was a marked step up, but it was 1995's, ¡Leche con Carne!, that would cement No Use For A Name as a successful band for years to come. The album was their best yet and bore a hit song (Soul Mate) that landed them on alternative radio charts, which, for a scrappy punk band, was a complete deviation from industry norms. Stranger yet, was that they made a music video and MTV even played the damn thing! What followed obviously was commercial success in the form of six-figure album sales, another anomaly in the world of indie-punk bands and something that would set the stage for later melodic punk bands like Blink 182, et al. From then on it was steady sailing with a string of successful records and tours from the band. Most notably was 1997's darker, and somehow faster, Making Friends; followed by 1999's hyper-catchy More Betterness!. It was during these halcyon days that Chris Shiflett held down 6-string duties for NUFAN before accepting an offer to join Foo Fighters on lead guitar.

    The years went by for the perennial punk powerhouse and the band did numerous world tours, amassing album sales that would eventually total in the 7 figures. Pretty remarkable when you think about it. The new millennium was also a fruitful time for the boys. It started in 2001 with the release of their Live In A Dive album, which was very successful abroad where people were especially hungry for No Use's live performances. In 2002 they released their poppiest effort, Hard Rock Bottom, which was stocked with upbeat tempos and radio-friendly melodies. Their most recent and seemingly final studio album came in 2008. Ironically titled The Feel Good Album Of The Year, the album was a tinge darker and more aggressive than their recent releases and the band reminded us all that their songs still had urgency and bite.

    After 25 years, No Use For A Name disbanded in 2012 when frontman Tony unexpectedly passed away. Anthony J. Sly (November 4, 1970 - July 31, 2012) died at home, in his sleep on a Tuesday morning, at age 41. Fat Mike-label head and long-time friend to Tony-was staggered by the news and offered, One of my dearest friends and favorite songwriters has gone way too soon. Tony, you will be greatly missed. No one could've predicted his passing, and needless to say, it shook the very foundation of the Fat Wreck family and the underground music community as a whole. Tony was loved and respected by a wide variety of artists and musicians, and nowhere is that more evident than the roster of contributors to The Songs of Tony Sly: A Tribute; a compilation of NUFAN songs covered by bands like Bad Religion, Frank Turner, The Gaslight Anthem, Alkaline Trio, and many more. Bands from the Americas, Europe, Australia, UK, and even Israel contributed to this final chapter in the storied career of No Use For A Name. The collection will be released on October 29th, 2013, and all proceeds will go towards the Tony Sly Memorial Fund, which has been established to help Tony's wife Brigitte and their daughters, Fiona and Keira.

    1. Turning Japanese
    2. Hybrid Moments
    3. I've Heard
    4. Selwyn's Got a Problem
    5. Enjoy the Silence
    6. Badfish
    7. Dream Police
    8. Fairytale of New York
    9. Making Our Dreams Come True
    10. 1945
    11. Don't Cry for me Argentina
    12. The Munsters' Theme
    13. Beth
    No Use For A Name
    $15.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
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