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  • American Epic: The Best of Mississippi John Hurt American Epic: The Best of Mississippi John Hurt Quick View

    $19.99
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    American Epic: The Best of Mississippi John Hurt

    Blues fingerpicking guitarist, singer and sharecropper Mississippi John Hurt was born in the heart of Mississippi Hill Country, along the veiny tributaries of the great American river. His moving renditions of "Frankie" and "Spike Driver Blues" were included in Harry Smith's American Anthology of Folk Music in 1952 and were vitally influential on the Greenwich Village folk music revival of the 1960s as well as John Fahey's development of the American Primitive Guitar genre.


    Single LP with single pocket tip-on jacket with soft touch finish.

    1. Frankie
    2. Ain't No Tellin'
    3. Spike Driver Blues
    4. Avalon Blues
    5. Louis Collins
    6. Candy Man Blues
    7. Stack O' Lee Blues
    8. Praying On The Old Camp Ground
    9. Blue Harvest Blues
    10. Got the Blues Can't be Satisfied
    11. Big Leg Blues
    12. Nobody's Dirty Business
    13. Blessed Be The Name
    Mississippi John Hurt
    $19.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Today! (Pure Pleasure) Today! (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Today! (Pure Pleasure)

    The '60s revived the careers of many early bluesmen, but none so dramatically as that of Mississippi John Hurt. Hurt recorded a few brilliant sides in the '20s, then ostensibly disappeared off the face of the Earth until folk musician Tom Hoskins went looking for him in 1963. At the age of 70, Hurt began one of the greatest comebacks in music history. From his first '60s shows until his death in 1966, Hurt was a popular mainstay of the folk-music circuit. TODAY! demonstrates why the audiences loved him so. More a melodic songster than a traditional bluesman, Hurt has a great deal in common with '60s folk musicians - many of whom he inspired. Hurt's dexterous and beautiful finger-picking style provided aspiring folk performers with a template, as did his warm and gentle stage presence. All these elements are amply evident on TODAY!, on which Hurt turns in definitive performances of Pay Day, Louis Collins, Spike Driver's Blues, and Make Me a Pallet on Your Floor. He even takes a rare (and successful) turn at slide guitar on Talking Casey. Like all of Hurt's Vanguard albums, TODAY! is an absolutely essential document of a great American artist.




    Musicians:



    • Mississippi John Hurt (vocal, guitar)




    Recording: 1966




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.




    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Payday
    2. Im Satisfied
    3. Candy Man
    4. Make Me A Pallet On The Floor
    5. Talkin Casey
    6. Corrina, Corrina
    7. Coffee Blues
    8. Louis Collins
    9. Hot Time In The Old Town Tonight

    10. If You Dont Want Me Baby
    11. Spike Driver's Blues
    12. Beulah Land
    Mississippi John Hurt
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Rough Guide To The Blues Songsters Rough Guide To The Blues Songsters Quick View

    $19.99
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    Rough Guide To The Blues Songsters

    Before there was the bluesman there was the songster and it was these traveling troubadours who helped lay the foundations for the development of the blues. In the decades preceding the phonograph and radio and before the American national entertainment industry had reached into the deepest parts of the South, it was these wandering musicians who provided the musical entertainment for all manner of social events.


    In order to be able to scrape a living together, the songster had to be incredibly versatile and come up with something for everyone. Armed with a banjo or guitar they performed every form of popular music of the day from folk songs and ballads to rags and spirituals. Priding themselves on their huge repertoires, they could be described as the human jukeboxes of their time.


    Along with the many musicians shrouded in mystery, this collection boasts tracks by legendary bluesmen such as Leadbelly, Charley Patton, and Mississippi John Hurt. Aside from the blues, these great performers would have been able to play everything asked of them at local bars and rural dances, and it is said that Leadbelly could draw on a repertoire of over 500 songs from many different genres. Likewise, the 'Father of the Delta Blues', Charley Patton left glimpses into his songster roots and true musical versatility with songs such as the featured 'Mississippi Boweavil Blues'. Henry Thomas's projected birthdate of 1874 predates that of Charley Patton by a good 17 years and gives us an idea of what rural black music sounded like before the turn of the twentieth century. He was 53 years old during his first recording session in 1927 by which point much of his music was already a representation of a bygone era. The same could be said of Richard 'Rabbit' Brown from New Orleans who worked as a ferryman on lake Pontchartrain and whose recorded legacy of just five songs includes 'James Alley Blues' which has been covered by Bob Dylan. Also from New Orleans, Papa Charlie Jackson accompanied himself with a banjo guitar and became one of the first songsters to record from the mid-1920s. His unique brand of hokum, used comic, often sexually suggestive lyrics and lively, danceable rhythms.


    This selection features several variations on traditional ballads about legendary characters such as Frankie and Johnny, Stagger Lee, John Henry and Railroad Bill. These became standards in the repertoires of songsters, both black and white, who shared a similar colour-blindness when it came to the racial origins of a tune. Frank Hutchison and Dick Justice were both white performers whose styles were heavily influenced by black musicians, in particular, Luke Jordan whose featured track 'Pick Poor Robin Clean' is a gambling song masterpiece. Like Jordan, many other well-known East Coast songsters such as Blind Blake, Pink Anderson, and Peg Leg Howell worked with traveling shows, which became a major factor in the spreading of the blues. Many of these shows were operated by vendors of patent medicines who would attract crowds by putting on a performance.


    As these shows began to disappear and recorded music and dancing in juke joints became popular, so the older songster style became less fashionable. Apart from the few waxed recordings which leave a tempting glance into a world before the blues, many of the featured artists faded into obscurity, as the songsters were overtaken by blues singers whose music was heavily promoted by record companies. Those songsters who were able to embrace this new music such as Charley Patton and Leadbelly became seminal figures and the rest is history.

    1. Pick Poor Robin Clean - By Luke Jordan
    2. Don't Leave Me Here - By Henry Thomas
    3. The Spasm - By Daddy Stovepipe & Mississippi Sarah
    4. Your Baby Ain't Sweet Like Mine - By Papa Charlie Jackson
    5. John Henry (The Steel Driving Man) - Part 1 - By Furry Lewis
    6. Mississippi Boweavil Blues - By Charley Patton
    7. Cocaine - By Dick Justice
    8. Midnight Special - By Leadbelly
    9. Come On Boys Let's Do That Messin' Around - By Blind Blake
    10. Stackalee - By Frank Hutchison
    11. James Alley Blues - By Richard 'Rabbit' Brown
    12. Going To Germany - By Cannon's Jug Stompers
    13. Coal Man Blues - By Peg Leg Howell
    Various Artists
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • American Epic: The Soundtrack American Epic: The Soundtrack Quick View

    $19.99
    Buy Now
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    American Epic: The Soundtrack

    American Epic: The Soundtrack leads the way for a series of album releases accompanying the Lo-Max/PBS/BBC Arena film project American Epic created by Allison McGourty, Duke Erikson and Directed by Bernard MacMahon.


    American Epic is a journey across time to the birth of modern recording, when music scouts armed with cutting-edge recording technology captured the breadth of American music and discovered the artists that would shape our world.


    The recordings they made of all the ethnic groups of America democratized the nation and gave a voice to everyone. Country singers in the Appalachians, Blues guitarists in the Mississippi Delta, Gospel preachers across the south, Cajun fiddlers in Louisiana, Tejano groups from the Texas Mexico border, Native American drummers in Arizona, and Hawaiian musicians were all recorded. It was the first time America heard itself.


    American Epic: The Soundtrack highlights recordings from the three-part documentary on one 150g LP, including original recordings by The Carter Family, Mississippi John Hurt, Charley Patton, Sister Rosetta Tharpe and more all restored to unprecedented levels of sonic fidelity.

    1. Gonne Die with My Hammer in My Hand - Williamson Brothers & Curry
    2. On the Road Again - Memphis Jug Band
    3. Frankie - Mississippi John Hurt
    4. Bury Me Under the Weeping Willow - The Carter Family
    5. Mal Hombre - Lydia Mendoza
    6. Peg and Awl - Carolina Tar Heels
    7. Tomi Tomi - Sol K. Bright with The Aloha Serenaders
    8. The Indian Tom Tom - Big Chief Henry's Indian String Band
    9. Cocaine Habit Blues - Hattie Hart & The Memphis Jugband
    10. Up Above My Head - Sister Rosetta Tharpe
    11. Down the Dirt Road Blues - Charley Patton
    12. Allons A Lafayette - Joseph Falcon
    13. Stackalee - Frank Hutchison
    14. Waiting for a Train - Jimmie Rodgers
    15. Jole Blon - The Breaux Brothers with Louis Michot
    Various Artists
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Richland Woman Blues (Pure Pleasure) Richland Woman Blues (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Richland Woman Blues (Pure Pleasure)

    Best known for that ditty about camels, Maria Muldaur has since established herself as one of the finest folk/country/jazz/blues/gospel interpreters ever to have a Top Five single. After 26 years and 24 solo albums, Muldaur -- inspired by a trip to Memphis' Beale Street -- digs deep into her roots and pays tribute to the classic blues women of the '20s and '30s. Aided by the similarly inclined Bonnie Raitt, Taj Mahal, and Alvin 'Youngblood' Hart, Muldaur breezes through 14 tunes from icons Bessie Smith and Memphis Minnie, as well as obscurities from the Reverend Gary Davis, Mississippi John Hurt, and Blind Willie Johnson. Keeping the unplugged accompaniment stripped way down to a single guitar or piano and occasional bass, Muldaur has room to maneuver her evocative vocals that shift from gritty groans to a high-pitched edgy trill. Far from a dry history lesson, these songs are performed with the strength and tenacity of the women who originally sang them. Whether spinning saucy, double entendre lyrics in Me And My Chauffeur Blues (»the way you ride so easy, I can't turn you down«) or longing for her Southern home after moving north during the Depression in Bessie Smith's Far Away Blues, the singer remains invigorated and inspired throughout. By returning to her late-'60s Jim Kweskin Jug Band coffeehouse days, Maria Muldaur has discovered her middle-aged oasis with Richland Woman Blues. And there's not a camel in sight.



    Musicians:



    • Maria Muldaur (vocal)

    • Alvin Youngblood Hart (guitar, vocal)

    • Bonnie Raitt, John Sebastian (guitar)

    • David Wilkie (mandocello)

    • Dave Mathews (piano)

    • Roly Salley (bass)

    • Angela Strehli, Tracy Nelson (vocal)




    Recording: 2001 by John Jacob

    Production: John Jacob & Maria Muldaur



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. The One To Sing The Blues
    2. I'm So Bad (Baby I Don't Care)
    3. No Voices In The Sky
    4. Going To Brazil
    5. Nightmare/Dreamtime
    6. Love Me Forever
    7. Angel City
    8. Make My Day
    9. R.A.M.O.N.E.S.
    10. Shut You Down
    11. 1916
    Maria Muldaur
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Celestial Explosion Celestial Explosion Quick View

    $19.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Celestial Explosion

    Don Bikoff released one lone, rare solo album, Celestial Explosion, on Keyboard Records in 1968, now reissued by Tompkins Square. A kid from Oyster Bay, Long Island, Bikoff got his start in Greenwich Village, annoying Dave Van Ronk and playing the folk/blues circuit where he met Sonny Terry and Brownie McGhee, Jesse Fuller and Mississippi John Hurt. In spite of this wide range of influences, Bikoff definitely has his own approach. Don is only 65 years old, and he's still playing strong.
    1. Rindler's Metamorphosis
    2. My Baby's Bass
    3. To Ellen
    4. Riverside Park Blues
    5. Bathing Prohibited In The River
    6. The Ellipses Of Your Mind
    7. Earth (Revisited)
    8. Sonata #7, Opus 11
    9. Today Was No Tomorrow
    10. The Formentera Moors Are Stomping Tonight
    11. Crystal Lakes of Frangipani
    12. Celestial Explosion
    Don Bikoff
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Rooster Rag Rooster Rag Quick View

    $24.99
    Buy Now
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    Rooster Rag

    Easily one of the hardest working bands in showbiz, the present incarnation of Little Feat is a seven-member powerhouse that ably carries on the group's tradition of deftly blending rock, R&B and blues to create a jammin' blend of Americana that has earned accolades from critics, fellow musicians and fans alike for over four decades.


    Rooster Rag, their new album and first with original material since 2003's Kickin It at the Barn, features 10 brand new songs including four co-writes with Grateful Dead lyricist Robert Hunter (Rooster Rag, Way Down Under, Rag Top Down, Salome) plus two blues classics, one from Mississippi John Hurt (Candyman Blues) and one from Willie Dixon (Mellow Down Easy). The result is a compelling album of funkified Little Feat fare guaranteed to please longtime fans while simultaneously attracting new eyes and ears!

    1. Candyman Blues
    2. Rooster Rag
    3. A Church Falling Down
    4. Salome
    5. One Breath At A Time
    6. Just A Fever
    7. Rag Top Down
    8. Way Down Under
    9. Jamaica Will Break Your Heart
    10. Tattooed Girl
    11. The Blues Keep Coming
    12. Mellow Down Easy
    Little Feat
    $24.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • The Gospel According To Sam The Gospel According To Sam Quick View

    $13.99
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    The Gospel According To Sam

    Sam Langhorn (1933-2007) was known among locals as the best blues guitarist to come out of Oxford, Mississippi, but he somehow eluded the blues mafia who scoured the state looking for talent. The recordings here are the first ever issued by Langhorn, who demonstrates his skills performing traditional gospel in a style remarkably similar to Mississippi John Hurt. He learned guitar from his mother Camilla, who played at sanctified church services, but eventually chose the blues lifestyle.


    The recordings were made around 1963 by two former Ole Miss football stars who befriended Langhorn and simply made the recordings for fun before putting them aside for half a century. Jimmy Hall went on to pursue a career of acting in New York City and L.A., and Robert Khayat a Pro Bowl career with the Washington Redskins then later returning to the University of Mississippi, where he became a celebrated Chancellor.

    1. Introduction
    2. Keep Your Hands On the Plow
    3. Jesus, Won't You Stop by Here
    4. I Shall Not Be Moved
    5. Will the Circle Be Unbroken?
    6. If I Could Hear My Mother Pray Again
    7. When the Saints Go Marching In
    8. When the Saints Go Marching In
    Sam Langhorn
    $13.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Some Cold Rainy Day Some Cold Rainy Day Quick View

    $18.99
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    Some Cold Rainy Day

    Eden & John's East River String Band are a contemporary acoustic duo that play country/blues classics from the 1920s and 1930s. The band consists of Eden Brower on ukulele and vocals with John Heneghan on guitar and vocals, including special guest Terry Waldo (legendary ragtime piano player who has recorded and toured with Leon Redbone and Woody Allen).


    The duo try to keep alive the rural music tradition that existed before the Great Depression of the '30s, playing primarily country blues covers including classics by such greats as Skip James, Mississippi John Hurt, Lottie Kimbrough and Blind Lemon Jefferson.


    Some Cold Rainy Day is by far one of the most enjoyable contemporary recordings of early pre-war blues music I have ever heard. Eden and John stay true to the original arrangements and vocals that these songs had when they were first released. I would call this a MUST-own for fans young and old of blues music and even those who want a modern introduction to the great old music of the 1920s and 1930s. PLEASE NOTE: Crumb not only did the cover for this album; he loves the music on it, too. Crumb collectors know that he does very little commercial work now with his busy schedule and will only illustrate items he himself loves. What better endorsement is there than that? - Ralph Deluca

    1. Ain't No Tellin'
    2. Nobody's Business If I Do
    3. One Dime Blues
    4. Slidin' Delta
    5. Every Day In The Week
    6. Some Cold Rainy Day
    7. Bye Bye Baby Blues
    8. Future Blues
    9. I Had To Give Up Gin
    10. Rolling Log Blues
    11. Crow Jane
    12. Do Dirty Jane
    13. On Our Turpentine Farm
    Eden & John's East River String Band
    $18.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Riverman's Daughter Riverman's Daughter Quick View

    $17.99
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    Riverman's Daughter

    The Grahams, the creative union of lifelong romantic partners Alyssa and Doug Graham, combine soulful bluegrass with hints of earthy Americana, adding colors from traditional folk and country blues, into an infectious blend of storytelling that results in songs of love, loss, yearning, and the view from rural American roads less traveled.


    While the duo first met in grade school -- a trait shared by previous musical trail-blazers, from Lennon/McCartney to Jagger/Richards - the Grahams' journey together began when they were teenagers in the shadow of New York City. There, Alyssa, the impassioned troubadour, and Doug, the guitarist extraordinaire, shared a mutual love for the music of the Woodstock era and the adventures of the great outdoors. Over the ensuing years many a campfire lit acoustic jam would include the best of roots renegades like Neil Young, The Band, Gram Parsons, Janis and Emmylou along with more than a few Jerry Garcia and Johnny Cash nuggets. Later, spending much of their time in the secluded Adirondack Mountains at the Graham family fold, Alyssa and Doug learned the time-honored craft of songwriting. Here, their ongoing interests in traditional country, mountain bluegrass and folk legends such as The Carter Family and Mississippi John Hurt would blossom. Hoping to share their stories on a wider stage, the couple eventually settled in New York City, where they performed, collaborated and recorded a variety of acclaimed material before adopting The Grahams moniker.


    While the duo had written music together before, in the summer of 2012 new writing sessions yielded a different approach. Something magical was happening between Alyssa and Doug. A catalyst was born in the new song Riverman's Daughter, a tale of love, loss, and hardship on the river that showcases Alyssa's bountiful voice. Backed by her own rhythm guitar, along with the strong current of Doug's cascading accompaniment on the six string, and traditional vocal harmonies, the track came in a lightning bolt of inspiration. A vision and calling to write more songs of its kind took hold.


    Alyssa and Doug had an idea: What if they put their city lives on hold and, armed with just guitars and backpacks, traveled the 2,500 miles of highways and byways of the Mississippi River from Minnesota to Louisiana. Light out for the territory, so to speak, like Huck and Jim. There, the duo could follow the Great River Road (GRR) that parallels the waterway, meet the people, and hear first-hand where European folk music, brought to these shores generations ago, took root alongside rhythms and chants from Africa, and how these polarizing sounds formed the backbone of our 20th Century American musical heritage. And so The Grahams did just that, and in the process created their debut album, Riverman's Daughter. Along the way The Grahams played gigs at the various gin and juke joints that dotted the GRR, and met a colorful cast of characters and genuine music makers with whom the duo shared and exchanged stories through the common bond of song.


    Eventually Alyssa and Doug ended up intentionally isolated on an old houseboat in rural Louisiana where the Mississippi spills into the Atchafalaya swamp. There, The Grahams prolifically stockpiled songs, enjoyed the simplicity of living off the grid, and for a spell, invited onboard friends and musicians including their longtime collaborator Bryan McCann, a wordsmith who aids with lyrical inspiration. Yet perhaps the biggest inspiration on Riverman's Daughter was Doug's own mother, Gigi, the matriarch of the Graham family clan, and a true fan of the duo who had been diagnosed with cancer earlier that year. As her condition worsened, the Grahams packed up their guitars and newly minted collection of songs to become Gigi's angel band, and played by her side until she passed away.


    As recording of the new album began, The Grahams found a true kindred spirit in Grammy-winning producer Malcolm Burn, who brought a magical touch and inspired ideas into the studio. It was Burn's idea to record both Alyssa and Doug's parts live to tape without the assistance of headphones or isolation -- in the way they were written. This process gives the album a natural aura that harkens back to an era when this practice was commonplace. Along the same lines, The Grahams chose to record the album in Nashville, the longtime epicenter of country music. While the album's foundation is simple and acoustic, The Grahams are backed on a few tracks by stellar accompaniment including the Grammy-nominated North Mississippi Allstars. Along with the title song the album is highlighted by the 70's country rock flavored Carrying The Torch, the spirited traditional vibe of The Piney River, and the riveting upbeat barn dance playfulness of Revival Time.


    Ultimately, the album is a winning culmination of The Grahams' long journey into the heart of America, the inspiration they derived from immersion into classic American music, and the natural and honest talent they have for bringing forth a modern musical idiom steeped in tradition.

    1. Revival Time
    2. Riverman's Daughter
    3. Carrying the Torch
    4. You Made Me Love You
    5. Cathedral Pines
    6. If You're in New York
    7. The Piney River
    8. A Good Man
    9. Marnie Hawkins
    10. Heaven Forbid
    11. Lonesome Child
    12. Jericho
    13. Goodbye Babe (B.C.)
    14. Lay Down Delilah
    The Grahams
    $17.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Mama Says I'm Crazy Mama Says I'm Crazy Quick View

    $16.99
    Buy Now
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    Mama Says I'm Crazy

    Since no one could copyright Mississippi, two major blues performers, Fred McDowell and John Hurt, adopted the state as part of their name. To confuse matters more, both performers made comebacks during the late '50s/early '60s and both specialized in prewar acoustic blues. While a blues novice might find such similarities confusing, the two men's singing and guitar styles are polar opposites. Whereas Hurt's smooth, deep vocals and Piedmont fingerpicking made him easily accessible to the folk revival crowd, McDowell's soulful vocals and forcefully rhythmic guitar represented something more primitive. In 1967, producer George Mitchell brought together McDowell and harp player Johnny Woods for an off-the-cuff session not unlike what one might have heard at a Como, MS, house party. Interestingly, the two men hadn't played together in eight years, but on songs like Standing at the Backdoor and the title track, one would never guess it. This isn't a polite affair, with one player holding back while the other solos. Instead, McDowell and Woods trade notes, overlap, and rush forward on Long Haired Doney and Shake Em' on Down as though they had an unlimited supply of energy. While McDowell's vocals and slashing guitar propel Goin' Away and I Got a Woman forward, Woods' harp adds pizzazz. Acoustic blues fans will warmly embrace Mama Says I'm Crazy and be thankful that Mitchell went to the trouble required to track down Woods for this earthy set.


    - Ronnie D. Lankford, Jr., Allmusic

    1. Shake Em' On Down
    2. Goin' Away
    3. Mama Says I'm Crazy
    4. I Got A Woman
    5. Red Cross Store
    6. Going Down To The River
    7. Standing at the Back Door
    8. What's Going to Become of Men
    9. Long Haired Doney
    10. John Henry
    11. I Walked All Night Long
    Fred McDowell
    $16.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Candy Man Blues (Out of Stock) Candy Man Blues (Out of Stock) Quick View

    $28.99
    x

    Candy Man Blues (Out of Stock)


    180 Gram Blue Vinyl Albums From Original Blues Artists


    Remastered with printed inner bags and sleevenotes


    Thirteen tracks from the 1928 sessions from the folk-blues legend, including "Candy Man Blues", "Stack O'Lee Blues" and "Louis Collins".

    1. Frankie
    2. Louis Collins
    3. Nobody's Dirty Business
    4. Aint' No Tellin'
    5. Stack O' Lee
    6. Avalon Blues
    7. Big Leg Blues
    8. Praying On The Old Camp Ground
    9. Candy Man Blues
    10. Blessed Be Thy Name
    11. Blue Harvest Blues
    12. Spike Driver Blues
    13. Got The Blues (Can't Be Satisfied
    Mississippi John Hurt
    $28.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Temporarily out of stock
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