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  • Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap Quick View

    $24.99
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    Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap

    There's a real sense of menace to Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap, the title song of AC/DC's third album. More than most of their songs to date, it captured the seething malevolence of Bon Scott, the sense that he reveled in doing bad things, encouraged by the maniacal riffs of Angus and Malcolm Young who provided him with their most brutish rock & roll yet. But for as glorious as the title track was, the entire album served as a call to arms from a group that wanted nothing more than to celebrate the dirtiest, nastiest instincts humans could have, right down to the insurgent anti-authority vibe that runs throughout the record. Take Big Balls -- sure, it's a dirty joke, but it's a dirty joke with class overthrow in mind. There's a sense on Dirty Deeds that AC/DC is storming the gates -- they're problem children sick of waiting around to be a millionaire, so they're gonna make their own money, even if they take down others as they go. That's what gives Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap its supercharged, nervy pulse; there's a real sense of danger to this record, something that can't be hidden beneath the jokes. Maybe that's why the album wasn't released in the U.S. until 1981, after Bon's death, after AC/DC had become millionaires -- if it arrived any earlier, it would have been too insurrectionist for the common good.

    -Stephen Thomas Erlewine (All Music Guide)
    1. Dirty Deeds Done Dirt Cheap

    2. Love at First Feel
    3. Big Balls
    4. Rocker
    5. Problem Child
    6. There's Gonna Be Some Rockin'

    7. Ain't No Fun (Waiting Round to Be a Millionaire)

    8. Ride On
    9. Squealer
    AC / DC
    $24.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP -Sealed Buy Now
  • Brothers In Arms (Awaiting Repress) Brothers In Arms (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $49.99
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    Brothers In Arms (Awaiting Repress)

    Blockbuster Brothers In Arms Helped Define 80s, Catapulted Dire Straits to Arena Status


    The End-All-Be-All Ultimate-Sounding Version of This Audiophile Standard: Mobile Fidelity 180g 45RPM 2LP Captures Nuances, Textures, Finite Information


    1985's Brothers In Arms Has Sold More Than Nine Million Copies in U.S. Alone, Ranked #351 on Rolling Stone's List of the 500 Greatest Albums of All Time


    There are hit records. And then there are blockbusters. One of the world's best-selling records, a winner of two Grammy Awards, an era-defining reference statement, an MTV favorite, and a set that catapulted an already-acclaimed band to arena status, Dire Straits' Brothers In Arms is the kind of epic spectacular that comes around only once or twice a decade. Surpassed only in fame and visibility during the period by Michael Jackson's Thriller, the 1985 album remains idiosyncratic for its covetable combination of adventurous songwriting, precision-based performances, and reference-caliber fidelity.


    Mastered from the original master tapes, pressed on 45RPM LPs at RTI, and possessing a richness befitting the album's stellar reputation, Mobile Fidelity's numbered limited-edition 180g 45RPM 2LP set of Brothers In Arms breathes with transparent highs, atmospheric heft, and lifelike tonalities. This is the hand-down ultimate-sounding version of this audiophile favorite ever made.


    The sense of realism this edition delivers will leave slack-jawed even the most hard-to-please audiophiles. As the recipient of the Grammy for Best-Engineered Recording, the album has always been a go-to sonic standard, but never has it sounded so reach-out-and-touch-it realistic as it does on this analog pressing. All of the hallmark characteristics-ample spaciousness, ideal balances, widescreen dynamics, immersive depth, lush production-are here in spades. As is music-making of enviable proportions.


    While it's easy to speculate that the colossal success of Brothers In Arms relates to its timing-its release during an era obsessed with catchy singles, flashy MTV videos, and whistle-friendly melodies-reasons for the album's chart-busting success primarily owe to the expertly crafted songs and memorable playing turned in by a group hitting its creative peak. Not to mention the spatial dimensions that cause instruments and vocals to naturally float in a fixed area.


    Anchored by "Money for Nothing," a caustically themed smash immediately identifiable via Mark Knopfler's resonant finger-picked guitar riff and Sting's "I want my MTV" vocal refrain, Dire Straits' fifth album is stuffed with bluesy signatures, jazz-rock motifs, clever lyrics, and organic accents. Diversity and consistency also extend to the songs' moods. Singing with his trademark light-to-the-touch timbre, Knopfler conjures feelings of poignancy, peacefulness, and mellowness, channeling wistfulness on the Top 10 single "So Far Away" and somber assurance on "Why Worry."


    Perfection abounds, not only in the manner in which the band nails its pop hooks and uptempo boogies with debonair flair-but also in the control room. Iconic session jazz drummer Omar Hakim supplies fluid beats and solid rhythmic foundations while Knopfler and Co. comb over grooves so smooth it seems that they're made of honey butter. Dire Straits would never play with such effortless again.


    Experience this era-defining classic in the best-possible fidelity!


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. So Far Away
    2. Money for Nothing
    3. Walk of Life
    4. Your Latest Trick
    5. Why Worry
    6. Ride Across the River
    7. The Man's Too Strong
    8. One World
    9. Brothers in Arms
    Dire Straits
    $49.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP 45RPM - 2 LPs Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • We're Only In It For The Money We're Only In It For The Money Quick View

    $24.99
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    We're Only In It For The Money

    Ranked 297/500 on Rolling Stone Magazine's 500 Greatest Albums of All Time


    We're Only In It For The Money is one of the most essential rock albums of all time. With its scathing messages, use of parody, Musique Concrète & Dadaist tendencies, there truly is nothing like it. Rolling Stone ranks it among its 500 Greatest Albums Of All Time. The restored original 1968 mix is pressed on 180g vinyl.


    1. Are You Hung Up
    2. Who Needs The Peace Corps
    3. Concentration Moon
    4. Mom & Dad
    5. Bow Tie Daddy
    6. Harry, You're A Beast
    7. What's The Ugliest Part Of Your Body?
    8. Absolutely Free
    9. Flower Punk
    10. Hot Poop
    11. Nasal Retentive Caliope Music
    12. Let's Make The Water Turn Black
    13. The Idiot Bastard Son
    14. Lonely Little Girl
    15. Take Your Clothes Off When You Dance
    16. What's The Ugliest Part Of Your Body? (Reprise)
    17. Mother People
    18. The Chrome Plated Megaphone Of Destiny
    Frank Zappa & The Mothers Of Invention
    $24.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Brothers In Arms Brothers In Arms Quick View

    $34.99
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    Brothers In Arms

    Dire Straits' biggest selling album is, in fact, one of the biggest selling albums worldwide of all time. 1985's Brothers In Arms helped musically define a decade. A sophisticated rock masterpiece, it reached #1, stayed there nine weeks, and is nine times platinum. Contains Money For Nothing, the song that helped immortalize the phrase I want my MTV, hit #1, and won the Grammy for Best Rock Performance. Today Brothers In Arms remains a rock essential, and now is offered as a two-disc vinyl album.
    1. So Far Away
    2. Money For Nothing
    3. Walk Of Life
    4. Your Latest Trick
    5. Why Worry
    6. Ride Across The River
    7. The Man's Too Strong
    8. One World
    9. Brothers In Arms
    Dire Straits
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Kicks Soundtrack Kicks Soundtrack Quick View

    $39.99
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    Kicks Soundtrack

    First Pressing Of 500 Numbered Copies On Red Vinyl, Black Vinyl Thereafter


    180 Gram Audiophile Vinyl


    PVC Protective Sleeve


    Gatefold Sleeve


    Includes Insert



    Score By Brian Reitzell (Drummer For The French Band, Air)


    Featuring Tracks By Wu-Tang Clan, Charles Bradley, RJD2, Mac Dre And More


    In director Justin Tipping's feature debut Kicks, nothing is as simple as it seems. It's the story of fifteen-year-old Brandon, longing for a pair of the freshest sneakers that money can buy. Assuming that merely having them on his feet will help him escape the reality of being poor, neglected by the opposite sex and picked on by everyone - even his best friends. Working hard to get them, he soon finds that the titular shoes have instead made him a target after they are promptly snatched by Flaco, a local hood. Brandon goes on a mission to retrieve his stolen sneakers.


    The director intentionally derived local artists, including Roach Gigz, Dave Steezy, and NanosauR, as well as the late Dre and Iamsu! from the San Fransisco Bay Area where the film is set.


    I always knew I wanted to weave an eclectic soundtrack together that intertwined hip-hop and sweeping score to reflect the Bay Area sound, as well as the world inside the characters' imagination, said Tipping in a statement.


    Bay Area composer Brian Reitzell is notable for his soundtrack work on The Virgin Suicides, Lost in Translation (for which he was nominated for a BAFTA), Marie Antoinette, and The Bling Ring. He is also the drummer of French electronica duo, Air.


    We wanted the score to connect with the source music sonically, added Reitzell. I think that when you do that, the music as a whole -- both songs and score -- make for a more immersive/connective experience. The connection is evident in the beat-heavy track, 606 In The 510, from Reitzell's score.


    The soundtrack features previously unreleased tracks from Nanosaur, Jay Casio and Reitzell, as well as two dialogue interludes set to lyrics from Notorious B.I.G.'s 1993 single Party and Bullshit and tracks by Wu-Tang Clan, Charles Bradley, RJD2 and Mac Dre.

    LP 1
    1. Spaceship (Brian Reitzell)
    2. Party And Bs (Interlude 1) (Jahking Guillory)
    3. Friends Hanging Out (Brian Reitzell)
    4. The Sheboygan Left (RJD2)
    5. Cream (Wu-Tang Clan)
    6. Bbq Music (Marc E Bassy)
    7. Kitchen Astronaut (Brian Reitzell)
    8. Self-made (Keith Jenkins)
    9. Slow Trap (Nanasour)
    10. Travel To Oakland (Brian Reitzell)
    11. Sincerely Yours (Iamsu!)
    12. 37 (Roach Gigz)
    13. Super Hella High (YMTK)


    LP 2
    1. Wave Or Swim (Dave Steezy)
    2. Get Stupid (Remix) [Mac Dre]
    3. Aye (Jay Casio)
    4. In You (I Found A Love) [Charles Bradley & MSB]
    5. Slideshow (Blue Magic)
    6. Fireworks Went Off (Brian Reitzell)
    7. Flaco Arrives (Brian Reitzell)
    8. Flaco Chases Brandon (Brian Reitzell)
    9. Party And Bs (Dialog Interlude 2) [Jahking Guillory]
    10. 606 In The 510 (Brian Reitzell)

    Various Artists
    $39.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Black Bubblegum Black Bubblegum Quick View

    $19.99
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    Black Bubblegum

    Black Bubblegum is the newest LP from Eric Copeland,
    and we are not kidding when we emphasize it sounds like
    nothing he has done in the past. The title of the record
    says it all: chewy, sticky pop that doesn't taste quite like
    any chewy, sticky pop you've had before.


    Recorded at Copeland's old practice space in South
    Williamsburg, Black Bubblegum contains songs with
    more conventional sounds and songwriting than any of
    his previous releases. While there are similarities with
    Copeland's earlier work in the drum patterns, major
    scales and vocals, Black Bubblegum moves away from
    his trademark psychedelic dub towards strange and
    fantastical pop; imagine Arthur Russell going into the
    studio with the Ramones. Wanting to take a more "handson"
    approach to these recordings, Copeland exchanged
    sample-driven tech and hardware for keyboards, guitars
    and effect pedals, creating a new sound that is oddly
    easy to digest despite its rejection of melody in favour of
    discord and dissonance.


    For a long time, Copeland considered this collection of
    songs to be recordings which would never be heard. This
    invariably influenced certain decisions made during the
    creation of Black Bubblegum, blessing Copeland with
    the unique freedom that comes from making music never
    intended to be heard, let alone released.


    When asked to please jot down what influenced this new
    album and sound, Eric replied "glam holes, glitter dreams,
    money troubles, apocalypse paranoia, one hit wonders,
    manifest destiny, my family's westward migration, body
    troubles (was passing kidney stones almost the entire
    time), LGBT disco parties, Jonathan Richman, Missing
    Foundation, Neil Diamond, New Orleans, poverty, getting
    pushed out of another Brooklyn neighbourhood... No
    Beach Boys, no Beatles, no Buddha... More Bad News
    Bears."


    Eric Copeland has been sound clashing at full volume for
    over twenty years, first carving out a named for himself as
    one third of the legendary NY-via-Providence band Black
    Dice. A wildly prolific solo artist, Copeland has played
    shit houses, party palaces and seemingly everything in
    between all over the world.


    A long time Brooklyn, resident, Eric recently relocated
    to where the L Train does not run - Palma de Mallorca,
    Spain. While maintaining a relatively humble and low key
    presence in a highly competitive musical world, he has
    releases a prolific amount of music every year through
    indie labels such as L.I.E.S., Escho (Iceage), PPM (No Age), Paw Tracks (Animal Collective) and DFA.

    1. Kids In A Coma
    2. Rip It
    3. Fuck It Up
    4. Honorable Mentions
    5. Blue Honey
    6. On
    7. Cannibal World
    8. Don't Beat Your Baby
    9. Radio Weapons
    10. Get My Own
    Eric Copeland
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Cope Cope Quick View

    $25.99
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    Cope

    Manchester Orchestra is an American indie rock band from Atlanta, GA, formed in 2004. The group has released serveral EPs and three studio albums:
    'I'm Like a Virgin Losing a Child' (2006), 'Mean Everything to Nothing' (2009) and 'Simple Match' (2011).


    Cope, to me, means getting by. It means letting go, and being OK with being OK, says Manchester Orchestra's Andy Hull. The Atlanta band found itself
    at a crossroads as they approached making their fourth studio album -- in between labels, uncertain of Manchester Orchestra's future for the first time
    since Hull started the band almost a decade ago. He was barely finished with high school back then, and now Hull and his bandmates were transitioning
    into the adult reality that shit happens. They'd learned a bit about letting go themselves.


    So Manchester Orchestra regrouped. They built a studio with their own hands, and spent month after month workshopping new tunes, writing and
    demoing together in a room -- a process that was completely new for them. The change did them good.


    For their previous LP, 2011's 'Simple Math', experimentation had been the goal. Hull conceived an epic, memoiristic concept album that featured
    elaborate arrangements including a string section and children's choir. Their highest charting album to date, 'Simple Math' also earned widespread critical
    acclaim, with American Songwriter noting They've perfected the balance of gorgeous songwriting and rabid musicianship, so we can't wait to see what
    they do next.


    For each of their first three albums, Manchester Orchestra had worked with producers Dan Hannon and Joe Chicarelli in established studios in Nashville
    and Atlanta. But they wanted to try something different this time. The band bought a house in Atlanta where some of them had previously lived as
    roomates, and spent money they'd saved to gut, renovate and soundproof the whole building, turning it into the studio where they would record COPE.
    They eventually did hire John Agnello (Dinosaur, Jr., Kurt Vile, Sonic Youth) to mix COPE.

    1. Top Notch
    2. Choose You
    3. Girl Harbor
    4. The Mansion
    5. The Ocean
    6. Every Stone
    7. All I Really Wanted
    8. Trees
    9. Indentions
    10. See It Again
    11. Cope
    Manchester Orchestra
    $25.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • I'm Not The Devil I'm Not The Devil Quick View

    $24.99
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    I'm Not The Devil

    Cody Jinks was raised on country music but he cut his teeth on metal. "Metallica was king. They set the tone for me and I spent a good part of my youth wanting to be James Hetfield." After a dedicated stint as a frontman in a thrash metal band, Jinks willingly found himself back to where it all began. "My dad loved the outlaw country icons, Johnny Cash, Waylon Jennings and Merle Haggard. That never ending consistency of incredible music growing up laid some very deep seeds. I'm mean, come on nothing better than mentally diving into 'The Hag' and metal when it comes time for me to write songs."


    Always avoiding trends and ferociously choosing his direction was the only option from day one, even though that very path could have prevented success. "What is success if you can't wake up everyday being who you really are. In the end, that will catch up with you." Jinks has been tested countless times by his career choices. The better part of the last 15 years have included numerous empty bar rooms and a never ending financial loss. "Yeah, I've been pretty good at losing money. Not the greatest feeling in the world to be gone from home for long stretches of time, only to walk in the door broke. Luckily I've got a damn good woman in my life. She has stood by me with unmeasurable strength to say the least and it is an absolute fact that I seriously overplayed my hand when landing her."


    His long, dark beard and endless array of tattoos are no fad. They unquestionably define Cody Jinks. His prototypical metal/hard rock band frontman look is not a well orchestrated image, but again, define Cody Jinks. Diving into to his album, I'm Not the Devil is the perpetual truth of who he is and where he has found himself at this point in his career. "I'm just glad that I ended up where I am now," Jinks said. "It makes complete sense that I'm at this place in my life. Country music found me when I was young and chased me down as I grew older"


    Jinks' latest project is his deepest, darkest and most provocative album to date, with a metal common denominator, the apocalypse, running throughout the record. "It's a pretty scary time," Jinks said. "There are some evil people running things in the world. It hits me since I have a six and three-year old."
    There's not a weightier song than the aptly titled "Heavy Load." It's the most apocalyptic song on the album but the dense cut, with a pretty violin break, is a gorgeous tune. The vocal hook grabs ears when Jinks croons "Train Jumps Tracks Some Time Ago/You Can't Root That Heavy Load." "That was the last song I wrote on the record," Jinks said. "I couldn't be happier how that one turned out."


    "All You Can" features a pretty piano line and sobering wordplay. When Jinks belts out 'What Are You Living For," you can't help but think about the serious question posed in what is becoming an increasingly shallow existence. "I was really tired when I wrote that song," Jinks said. "We had been on the road for awhile. The bottom line is that if you're not helping people, you're not doing your job as a human being. It's time to quit feeling sorry for yourself and do something."
    One of Jinks' favorite songs on the album is "The Way I Am," a cover of a Merle Haggard classic. "I love that song," Jinks says. "I wrapped it up just before Merle died. The song always resonated with me. I relate to that one since there are times I would rather be out fishing."


    "No Words" is a stunner of a gritty, autobiographical love song, which is a throwback to how songs used to be written. It is a tuneful gem, inspired by reality. Jinks starts out dark as night. "My Whole View of the World has Changed/ I Guess that Comes with Age/I Don't Believe there is Good in Every Man Like I Did Back Then/I May Drink More Than I Should/You've Seen Me on the Floor/I Spent my Lifetime in this Cage I Built Around Me." But the song is actually a tip of the hat to his beloved wife of 19 years. "There Aint' No Words/ To Say How Much I Need You/With You Here/ You Make This Life I Lead Worth Living." "It's about my wife," Jinks says. "But the funny thing is that she doesn't like it. She thinks it sounds too sad."


    With the title track "I'm Not the Devil," Jinks wakes us all up to the realities of mistakes and the heartfelt desire to be forgiven. "We are all guilty of mistakes and very guilty of pointing out the mistakes of others. Forgiveness feels so much better or so I think."


    It's impressive how Jinks is getting his message across. Jinks utilizes space well in his songs. Notes aren't crammed in. Jinks lets his songs breathe. "After all I've experienced, I think I've matured," Jinks says. "I think you can hear it in the music. I've grown up."


    Even though he still looks the part of the headbanger he was back in the day, he has moved on. "It's all for the best, Jinks says. "I'm where I was meant to be."


    It's all about the music and the fans, who are the fuel that drives Jinks. "They come out night after night giving up hard earned money and precious time to see me play," Jinks says. " It's truly is amazing when you really think about it. The best way I can say thanks is by giving back with effort and gratitude."

    1. The Same
    2. I'm Not the Devil
    3. No Guarantees
    4. No Words
    5. Give All You Can
    6. She's All Mine
    7. The Way I Am
    8. Chase That Song
    9. Heavy Load
    10. Grey
    11. Church at Gaylor Creek
    12. Vampires
    13. Hand Me Down
    Cody Jinks
    $24.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Teacher Don't Teach Me Nonsense Teacher Don't Teach Me Nonsense Quick View

    $19.99
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    Teacher Don't Teach Me Nonsense

    Teacher Don't Teach Me Nonsense: Fela explains the role of the teacher in any society with the concept that: all the things we consider as problems, and all the good things we accept from life as good, begin with what we are taught. The individual teaching begins with when we are children - our mother is our teacher. When we come of school age, our teacher is the school-teacher. At the university, the lecturers and professors are our teachers. After university-when we start to work, government becomes the individual's teacher. When then is government's teacher? 'Culture and Tradition' says Fela. This is the order of things everywhere in the world. However, it is the problem side of teacher and student that interests Fela in this song. Because every country in this world except in Africa, it is the respective culture and tradition of that country that guides the government on how to rule their people. Going for specifics, Fela mentions France, Germany, England, Korea, Japan, Syria, Jordan, Iran, Etc., it is the culture of these countries that shapes and guides their respective government's decisions. The culture and traditions of these countries serve as a teacher to their respective governments. Turing his attention to Africa and her problems. Problems which he had sang about: corruption, inflation, mismanagement, authority stealing, electoral fraud, the latest addition which even makes him laugh is -austerity. Fela says if you ask him why 'austerity makes him laugh? The answer is that it is beyond crying. The government steals money from the country, the same government is introducing austerity measures-forcing the poor people to pay for their own greed and calling it 'austerity measures'. How funny if to say the least. Who taught African 'leaders' to rule the way they do today? 'Na the oyinbo' (meaning in Yoruba language: 'it is them white folks') referring to ex-colonial ruler of each country. Take electoral fraud, which is a true test of our democracy. Many African leaders rig elections with impunity and their respective ex-colonial rulers say nothing against this form of 'democracy'. While the same 'white folks' are quick to claim credit for Africa's 'civilization'-which Fela disputes in this song. Is this democracy? , he asks. Turning to other problems like the ever-growing gap between the rich and the poor. Particularly, since the rich are the rules, and also the people stealing the country into poverty. Is this democracy? Or dem-all-crazy? In conclusion, as an African personality, Fela says he is not in the same league as those who believe in dem-all-crazy, so he calls on the Western powers who claim to be Africa's teachers not to teach him nonsense-Teacher Don't Teach Me Nonsense.


    Look and Laugh: By 1981 when Fela wrote and started to perform live the song Look And Laugh, he was living a life that could be described as a recluse. Fela, who loved to go out in public places, clubs, etc. Suddenly, was always found sleeping or playing sax at home with women around him, or performing at the Africa Shrine. His old attitude of keeping abreast of events, giving lectures at universities and institutions of higher learning stopped. He rarely gave press conferences or press releases, like he used to do. Finally he wrote the song to explain what was going-on with him. He sang: ' many of you go dey wonder why your man never write new song! wetin I dey do be say I dey look and laugh.' Meaning: many of you must have been wondering why, your man has not written new songs! what I am doing is just look and laugh! Fela went on to explain his contributions and sacrifices for the cause of black emancipation, the countless beatings and arrests from the Nigerian police and army, his trials and tribulations, his ultimate sacrifice being the burning down of Kalakuta by the Nigeria army. But despite his sacrifices and sufferings like millions of other Africans, it was obvious that things were not getting better for the average man on the street. There is still injustice everywhere, no freedom, no happiness. All these made him feel disillusioned and all he could do about the situation is to Look and Laugh.


    Just Like That: This song is a call to arms from Fela to all Africans to rise up and do something about the political, economic, social and cultural retrogression that has plagued Africa since independence. For more than three decades of independence, there is glaring mismanagement of people's lives, corruption in the highest echelon of government-all these carried out with impunity-'Just Like That' he sings. Using the Nigerian experience as an example of the 'lack of maintenance culture', in Africa's present day neo-colonial administrations, he says: 'White man ruled us for many years, we had electricity constantly, our leaders take over! No electricity in town-Just like that!' Fela explains that the attempt to transplant 'Western style democracy' in an African society is the cause of all the problems. Despite calls for African Unity from leaders like Kwame Nkrumah, who said: '..Until all foreign institutions and culture are removed from the African land, that is when the African genius will be born and African personality will find its fulfillment..'. Instead of heeding Nkrumah's call, Nigeria's political founding fathers, like most African leaders at independence, chose the option of fashioning the constitutions of their respective countries after those of the departing colonial 'masters'-Just Like That. The ambiguity of such decisions can be seen in the poor imitation we make of our attempt at 'Western style democracy'. Persistent political gangsterism, military coups, and sometimes wars, are means used to enforce the already compromised constitutions. As another example of enforcing a fragile constitution, Fela stresses the face that in 1966, Nigeria for a civil war to keep the country ONE. General Gowon, the military head of state, divided Nigeria into twelve administrative regions, subsequent administrations divided the regions into more-Just Like That. He adds that if the idea of the civil war was to keep the country ONE, sub-dividing Nigeria into more regions would separate rather than unite the country. Turning to the position of traditional rulers in the mess called government, Fela sings: ' nothing good for town to give the youths good examples, how our traditional ruler they do, them come make youths look-up to Europe and USA, in those places them don lose them common sense, na the number of Nuclear weapons you get, na him give you power pass! Right now! Fight now! Suffer must stop! Just Like That". Therefore, calling on the people to fight now for a better society.

    1. Teacher Don't Teach Me Nonsense
    2. Look and Laugh
    3. Just Like That
    Fela Kuti
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Last Days of Oakland The Last Days of Oakland Quick View

    $23.99
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    The Last Days of Oakland

    Fantastic Negrito is the incarnation of a musician who is reborn after going through a lot of awful shit. In fact, the name Fantastic Negrito represents his third rebirth, literally coming back from death this time. The narrative on this man is as important as the sound, because the narrative is the sound. Songs born from a long hard life channeled through black roots music. Slide guitar, drums, piano. Urgent, desperate, edgy. Fantastic Negrito is the story of a man who struggled to make it, who got it, and who lost it all. For anyone who ever felt like it was over yet hoped it wasn't, this is your music; blues harnessed, forged in realness. For anyone who ever considered getting their old high-school band back together, this is your inspiration. These are singular songs by a true musician who writes and produces. They are his fuel as he embarks on the third comeback of his life.

    The first life ('who am I and where am I going?'). Fantastic Negrito was raised in an orthodox Muslim household. His father was a Somali-Caribbean immigrant who mostly played traditional African music. When, at the age of 12, Negrito's family moved from Massachusetts to Oakland, he was hit with an intense culture shock. Oakland in 1980s was a million miles from Negrito's conservative childhood. He went from Arab chants to Funkadelic in one day, living in the heart of one of the wildest, most infamous, most vibrant black communities in the nation. Shit was extra real in Oakland.

    By the time he was 20, Negrito had taught himself to play every instrument he could get his hands on. He was recording music, but he was also caught up in street shit. This went on for several years until a near death encounter with masked gunmen. After that Negrito packed his bags and headed to LA, armed with a demo on cassette.

    The second life ('I want to be a star I think'). It didn't take long for Negrito to find himself entrenched in the 'Hollywood' lifestyle; clubs and bitches and bullshit politics that have nothing to do with great music. Negrito signed with a big time manager and soon after that, a million dollar deal at Interscope and soon after that, creative death.

    The record deal was a disaster. Gangsta rap was ruling the airwaves and Negrito was in the wrong place at the wrong era. Negrito came out of the deal with a failed album and his confidence gutted. He was infected by the constant emphasis on 'what would sell'; which looks, hooks and gimmicks would attract an audience. He lost all sense of himself. The songs stopped coming to him, so he quit. He sold all of his shit and he quit.

    In 2000, Negrito was in a near fatal car accident that put him in a coma. For four weeks it was touch and go. Because his muscles atrophied while bedridden, he had to go through months of frustrating physical therapy to regain use of his legs. Rods were placed throughout his body. And worst of all, his playing hand was mutilated. Though he rehabbed intensely for several years, the damage was permanent. In 2008, he returned home to Oakland.

    The third life (the birth of Negrito). Back in Oakland, Negrito forgot about life as a musician. He settled down, planted vegetables, raised his own chickens, and made money growing weed. He also settled into being a man, on his own, clear of the distractions of wanting to be a star. This is when his specific POV of the world came into focus. His conservative Muslim values melded with the liberal, multi-cultural world of Oakland. The cynicism that comes from struggle made room for the hope that comes from cheating death. He truly knew who he was. He was confident about his place in the world because he understood it as much as any man can. And then his son was born.

    With his son's entrance into the world, all the creative energy Negrito bottled for years came rushing out. His musical choices were sharp and without doubt. He began recording without the hindrances that come with chasing trends. Fuck what's hot now, what moves me? Negrito turned to the original DNA of all American music, the Blues. The beating life had given him primed him to channel his literal and musical forefathers: the Blues musicians of the Delta.

    For Fantastic Negrito, derivative is the devil so to ensure his sound is his own, every chord comes from a place of immediacy. Immediacy opens the door for instinct. Instinct is God's tool that makes an artist into an individual. Negrito leaves the original sounds of Lead Belly and Skip Woods intact and builds bridges to modernity by looping and sampling his own live instruments.

    When you listen to Negrito, you're invited to hear the story of life after destruction. Your dream can die. You probably will give up. But from there, you can start everything over.

    1. Intro - The Last Days of Oakland
    2. Working Poor
    3. About A Bird
    4. Scary Woman
    5. Interlude - What Would You Do?
    6. The Nigga Song
    7. In the Pines (Oakland)
    8. Hump Thru the Winter
    9. Lost In A Crowd
    10. Interlude 2 - El Chileno
    11. The Worst
    12. Rant Rushmore
    13. Nothing Without You
    14. Push Back
    15. The Shadows
    Fantastic Negrito
    $23.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Satanist (Awaiting Repress) The Satanist (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

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    The Satanist (Awaiting Repress)


    Exclusive Bonus Track


    Double Gatefold Jacket


    24-Page LP Sized Book


    "The Satanist is magic. It's dangerous. It's adventurous, and it's organic," states Nergal, the driving force behind Behemoth since their inception in 1991, and brief exposure to the band's tenth album more than supports this statement. While instantly recognizable as the work of the Polish blackened death quartet it takes their sound in previously unimagined and riveting directions. A writhing, densely layered, brutally violent and sinister record, it is quite unlike anything ever unleashed within the canon of heavy music. As such it demands attention, offering ever greater sonic and emotional depths with every listen. "You may hear the title and think it's very primitive and one-dimensional, and yes it is, but when you look beyond that it's as primitive as it is complex and multidimensional, and that applies to everything about the record."


    It has been a rocky road leading to the realization of the album. Having dropped 2009s Evangelion to almost universal critical acclaim they saw it top the chart in their native country and dramatically expand their following around the world, and playing some of the best shows of their lives the band seemed truly unstoppable. But, in August 2010 Nergal was diagnosed with leukemia, stopping them in their tracks. Forced to abandon their ongoing tour in support of Evangelion Nergal was hospitalized, and both he and Behemoth faced an uncertain future. With the search for a bone marrow donor ultimately successful Nergal underwent a transplant, leaving the hospital after six months and beginning down the long road to rehabilitation. "I knew I was pretty much fucked and there was a battle to be won, and I had no fucking idea if it was going to take six months or twelve months or maybe four years, because with cancer you never know. I learned from being in the hospital that there are things in life that you can control and things that you can't control. The sooner you realize which is which it's going to make your life so much easier, and since then I started to focus on the right things. I could be determined, I could have discipline, I could have faith, but everything else is not under my control, and it really was a case of just crossing fingers for the best possible outcome. I was fortunate enough that that recovery period was relatively fast, and that I was really strong and very determined to get back into shape made a real difference."


    Rather than immediately getting down to working on a new album, the band - also comprised of drummer Inferno, bassist Orion, and guitarist Seth - set out to complete the abandoned touring cycle for Evangelion, hitting the road for the aptly titled Phoenix Rising Tour. Wanting to prove they were stronger than ever the first show was the only time doubts crept into Nergal's mind. "I was a fucking wreck, and I almost didn't make it to the end of the set. The venue was really smoky, and that was stuffing my nose and my lungs, and physically I felt that I couldn't pull it off. I did, but I was close to passing out on stage. I was literally shocked by this, I remember thinking while we were playing shit, what if I can't do this anymore? I'm just a human being after all. Going into the next show I had no sleep because of all the nerves and anxiety, but it was fucking amazing. With every following show I would get stronger and stronger and grow more confident, and aware of the fact that yes, we will do this."


    Having returned to full force the band were ready to once more move forward, and they began work on what would become The Satanist. While many bands might be concerned with how to follow up a record as devastatingly powerful - and successful - as Evangelion Nergal faced no such doubts. "I don't race myself, and I don't need to prove anything to anyone. Evangelion was a very important record to us, and yes, it was very successful too, but in making The Satanist it wasn't a point of beating that. The point was to do what was organic, and make a natural and honest and sincere album, and that's it. Now the record is finished I like to think of it as an album that is just so different that you can't really compare it to our previous works, which is the best outcome I could hope for." One thing is inarguable, and that is the record is the most sonically rich and complex released under the Behemoth name. With layer upon layer of sound it has great sonic density, but there is intricacy to this, and nothing is forced or contrived. "I don't have a kid but I think the process of raising one is comparable: you invest a lot of your energy and effort and wisdom and money and you educate them, but there's never a one hundred percent guarantee he's going to become a lawyer and not a serial killer. It's the same story with the records - we supply the elements but we just don't know how these elements mixed together are going to come out, and I think it's fortunate that we don't have one hundred percent control over it! It makes for something special."


    The title of the record itself is undeniable in its power, and Nergal sees it as capturing the primal wisdom that the band have always tried to maintain. "To me it's not pretentious at all. It's very straight up, very sincere, and a devastating, conquering statement. There's no compromise or bullshit or gimmicks. What I love about it is that it just speaks for itself. On one hand it's a very black and white title: The Satanist is like a fucking nail through the hand of Jesus Christ, period. No more, no less. But then again, as with everything else you put a hundred people together and ask them what the name The Satanist means to them and you're going to hear a hundred different opinions, which they can then discuss and fight over." Likewise, Nergal views the lyrical content of the record as similarly open to interpretation, encouraging this. "There's a lot of symbolism and reflections and impressions in there, and it's using millions of metaphors to express a certain very sinister and very captivating atmosphere, but there are no answers. People always like to have a deeper insight into what we do, but that's not what we want to give with this record. The way I see it is that between us we can make a huge fucking pyre and set the world on fire, but what we're doing is just giving you the matches, giving you the spark, what you want to do with it is up to you. Personally, if I sat down with the lyrics in front of me I too would probably come up with a lot of different interpretations and concepts, it's a never ending process, and that's exciting to me."


    Twenty-three years and ten albums into their career, that Behemoth is still in the ascendant is a statement to their commitment, determination and capacity for writing such powerful music. If ever a band was to go out on a high The Satanist would make for one hell of a swan song, but don't expect them to disappear any time soon. "I remember before we we had a record deal I was having a conversation with Baal, the band's original drummer, and we said okay, if one day we manage to record an album and put it out how cool would it be to split up right after that? It would be one record and no more, and there was something about that that had an appeal, but y'know what, it doesn't work like that for individuals like myself. Hunger has always driven me through life, and I can never sit in one place and relax for too long because I have the need to explore this whole universe in every possible way. Now, over two decades later it's the same story. I can tell you I have no problems with finishing my career after this record. Just say the title itself: The Satanist. How the fuck am I gonna beat that title? It sounds like the ultimate definition of our art - but then again, I remember that conversation with Baal, and I know it doesn't work like that, so I know there will probably be other incarnations of our artistic identity, one way or another. All I know is I love being here and now, and I just want to underline that I couldn't be more proud and happy with my own music. It really drives me through the day, and now I just want to sit back and hear any and all opinions of it."

    1. Blow Your Trumpets Gabriel
    2. Furor Divinus
    3. Messe Noire
    4. Ora Pro Nobis Lucifer
    5. Amen
    6. The Satanist
    7. Ben Sahar
    8. In the Absence ov Light
    9. O Father O Satan O Sun!
    Behemoth
    $44.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • The Parallax II: The Further Sequence (Awaiting Repress) The Parallax II: The Further Sequence (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

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    The Parallax II: The Further Sequence (Awaiting Repress)

    Double gatefold marbled 2LP pressing with 2 x 4-color inserts from Metal Blade Records.

    Between the Buried and Me have not made a name for themselves through playing it safe. Pushing the envelope of heavy music with each successive release, they have continually evolved in thrilling new directions while maintaining the honesty and integrity that has connected with so many listeners. With The Parallax II: Future Sequence, the first concept album of their career, the North Carolina based unit have delivered their most complex, ambitious, and accomplished work to date. "We're certainly not the average metal band, we write what we want to write, and we've never really tried to fit in anywhere," states guitarist Paul Waggoner. "With this record we held nothing back. We were excited to experiment and see where it took us, and working with a concept was a really interesting new challenge."


    The concept was first introduced to the band's fans with 2011's The Parallax: Hypersleep Dialogues EP, which established the narrative's two characters, Prospect I and Prospect II, the story commencing with the events of Parallax II. Separated by millions of light years, the two men exist in ignorance of the other yet are intrinsically connected by a shared soul, which ultimately brings them together. "Both men exist in isolation, one because he runs away from the life that is his and the other when he leaves his dying planet in the hope of creating new life elsewhere, through the planting of souls," explains vocalist Tommy Rogers.


    "As the story progresses you realize they are actually the same person, and at the end of the journey they're responsible for destroying all life as they know it, reinforcing the idea that humanity is a destructive species, and that there's some kind of innate flaw about us that causes us to destroy everything we touch." While the story is very much based in fiction and grounded in the imagination of Rogers, it was important that the vocalist was able to emotionally connect with it, and relate it to his own life, thereby making it relatable for listeners. "That was probably the hardest thing for me, making sure I could find that connection. The main thing that these characters go through is confusion and isolation, and I think that's something every person deals with in their lives at some point. As a musician you spend a lot of time with your own thoughts, so despite the science fiction of it all it is still a very personal record."


    Produced by the band, which is rounded out by guitarist Dustie Waring, bassist Dan Briggs, and drummer Blake Richardson, alongside longtime collaborator Jamie King, the recording process was smooth, though labor intensive, if for no other reason than the sheer amount of material that had to be tracked. Stepping back from it, the band are proud of everything they have achieved. "This whole process was a lot of work, and it's definitely the most rewarding piece of music we've ever written," states Rogers. "It's a very coherent record, and I think nowadays records are getting thrown out there without much thought put into them. I like that what we've done is kind of bring back the whole album feel, which was really important once but doesn't seem to be any more." With plans to play Parallax II in its entirety on forthcoming tours, the band hope this album introduces new fans to their music, yet they maintain the humble aspirations that have always driven them.


    "I'm a firm believer that if you create something that's unique and different there's always going to be a niche market for that. Our mentality is to keep doing what we're doing, writing music that challenges both us and the listener, and to keep playing to everyone who wants to see us," Waggoner states. Rogers concurs with this, adding "I think what we do speaks loudly to people. We're a very genuine band, we do what we want because we love doing it, and I think that's what people want. They want honesty in their music, and they want music that comes from the heart rather than comes from a computer, or that is made by people motivated by making money. We're just going to keep writing the best songs we can and with that continue to grow, and hopefully through doing that more and more people will find us.

    1. Goodbye to Everything
    2. Astral Body
    3. Lay Your Ghosts to Rest
    4. Autumn
    5. Extremophile Elite
    6. Parallax
    7. The Black Box
    8. Telos
    9. Bloom
    10. Melting City
    11. Silent Flight Parliament
    12. Goodbye to Everything Reprise
    Between The Buried And Me
    $29.99
    Colored Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • Binary Binary Quick View

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    Binary

    "My last record was very inward-looking," says Ani DiFranco. "I was pregnant and then raising a screaming infant. But now that kid is about to turn four, so I got out of the weeds of personal space and started looking outward again, being more engaged, more big 'P' Political. As an artist, I like to be out in the world, and what initially compelled me was to try to push society to a better place. So when I'm not in heartbreak or motherhood mode, that's where you'll naturally find me."

    With her twentieth studio album, Binary, the iconic singer/songwriter/activist/poet/DIY trendsetter returns to territory that brought her to the world's attention more than twenty-five years ago. One of the first artists to create her own label in 1990, she has been recognized among the feminist pantheon for her entrepreneurship, social activism, and outspoken political lyrics. At a time of global chaos and confusion, DiFranco is kicking ass and taking names, with a set of songs offering a wide range of perspective and musical scope.

    She describes a moment during the writing of "Play God," an unblinking pro-choice battle cry, as a particular breakthrough. (A live version of the song was included in the anti-Trump "30 Days, 30 Songs" campaign alongside tracks from Death Cab for Cutie, Aimee Mann, Franz Ferdinand, and more.)

    "When I wrote the line 'You don't get to play god, man/I do,' I paused and thought, 'Can I say that?,' " she says. "It's not the first time I've thought that, but it's been a while. And in that moment, I thought, 'I'm back, mothafuckas!'"

    "When you make a record about family and relationships, people assume you're mommy now and you've lost your edge, and it's going to be all buttercups from here on. So that line had the feeling of 'Take that! My kid is sleeping right now and I want to talk about some shit!"

    On Binary, DiFranco tackles the challenge and necessity of teaching non-violence with "Pacifist's Lament" and the need for empathy in "Terrifying Sight." Remarkably, though, these songs-recorded, in her usual fashion, in a couple of short full-sprint sessions spread across several years-were all written prior to the 2016 elections and attendant political turmoil.

    "I'm not surprised," says DiFranco. "Over twenty-five years, I've found that my songwriting is often full of premonition. It shows me, in a deep and spooky way, how we know things on levels below consciousness. I write songs and then they happen, and later I realize what they're about. I'm just happy to have some good tools in my toolbox to address what's happening now-the feminist diatribes are turned up nice and high on this record!"

    She notes that Binary's title track is key to her intention on this project. "I always title a record from the song that seems to be at its core," she says. "An underlying theme in the songs, and in the feminism I want to engage society with, is the idea that autonomy is a fallacy-nothing exists except in relationship to something else. We are, in some senses individuals with individual liberties and unique powers, but that's only a surface story."

    Though this concept is closely tied up in our present-day obsession with technology ("Sitting alone at home, staring at a screen, you can't really know anything, because knowing is engaging," she says), DiFranco also reveals a growing connection to nature and the physical world.

    "Every year on Goddess' Green Earth, I understand my relationship to it more," she says. "My early songs were all human drama. I don't think I noticed the bigger picture at all-I was transfixed by power dynamics between people. Now I see that it's largely the providence of women to really embody nature, so I do think I'm getting back to basics, and it's a shift for me."

    The backbone of Binary's sound is DiFranco's long-time rhythm section of bassist Todd Sickafoose and drummer Terence Higgins, but on much of the album, the trio is augmented with some all-star guests. "I knew I wanted to involve some of my brilliant friends this time out," she says. "We made some calls and got a party going. That was the idea, to reach out and have some other spirits enter."

    Virtuoso violinist Jenny Scheinman and keyboard wizard Ivan Neville both join in for more than half of the record; "they are so captivating and they elevate my shit whenever they come near it," says DiFranco. Other contributors include the legendary Maceo Parker, Bon Iver's Justin Vernon, and Gail Ann Dorsey, longtime bassist for David Bowie. New Orleans resident DiFranco takes special pride in the Crescent City funk spearheaded by natives Higgins and Neville on a number of the tunes. "Their souls are of this place," she says. "The feel they bring is something they got in utero."

    For the better part of 2016, DiFranco beat the drum for voter turnout on her "Vote Dammit!" tour, focusing on registering and inspiring people to vote. In the days following the election, fans turned to her for guidance with renewed earnestness, anxious to hear music and wisdom from the longtime activist. Ani encouraged fans to take political action and did the same herself, participating in the Women's March on Washington and performing at the official Women's March after party benefitting Planned Parenthood with The National and Sleater-Kinney.

    Binary, of course, is being released into a world in which music distribution and consumption have transformed rapidly and dramatically. For DiFranco, a true pioneer in the music industry with her Righteous Babe label, it's a time to reconsider the possibilities and ambitions of her business.

    "While I was precedent-setting at one time with Righteous Babe and my indie crusade, I feel like, in the time it took me to nurse another baby into being, I've fallen behind," she says. "The universe and technology have continued to evolve, and the idea of harnessing technology and crowd-sourcing everything-money, knowledge, revolution-is a very powerful concept that I'm ready to get more involved with. Righteous Babe is starting to grow now into something that will hopefully become avant-garde once again- more of a collective, more dynamic."

    "I'm trying to figure it out daily," says Ani DiFranco. "Just like always."

    1. Binary
    2. Pacifist's Lament
    3. Zizzing
    4. Play God
    5. Alrighty
    6. Telepathic
    7. Even More
    8. Spider
    9. Sasquatch
    10. Terrifying Sight
    11. Deferred Gratification
    Ani DiFranco
    $24.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
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