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  • Big Band And Quartet In Concert (Speakers Corner) Big Band And Quartet In Concert (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Big Band And Quartet In Concert (Speakers Corner)

    Thelonious Monk could walk from his flat to New York's famous Philharmonic Hall on the corner of 64th Street and Broadway when he made his very first appearance there with his Big Band in December 1963. And the other musicians could get there on the underground: Phil Woods, Steve Lacy, Thad Jones - all of them were members of Monk's closest circle of collaborators. It is no wonder then that the well-known themes were highly agreeable and harmonious. I Mean You, Four In One and Epistrophy resounded through the auditorium, the audience was thrilled, Thelonious laughed and danced and a short while later fans could listen to parts of the concert on a recording released by Columbia Records. In a break for a smoke, Monk sat himself down at the piano and played Darkness On The Delta - nocturnal atmosphere pure.


    Does it bear the patina of times long past? Absolutely not! Thelonious Monk is as red-hot as he ever was.



    Musicians:



    • Thelonious Monk (piano)

    • Charlie Rouse (tenor saxophone)

    • Steve Lacy (soprano saxophone)

    • Phil Woods (alto saxophone, clarinet)

    • Gene Allen (bassoon, clarinet)

    • Eddie Bert (trombone)

    • Thad Jones (cornet)

    • Nick Travis (trumpet)

    • Butch Warren (bass)

    • Frank Dunlop (drums)


    Recording: December 1963 at Lincoln Center, Philharmonic Hall, New York

    Production: Teo Macero



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    1. I Mean You
    2. Evidence
    3. (When It's) Darkness On The Delta
    4. Oska T.
    5. Played Twice
    6. Four In One
    7. Epistrophy
    Thelonious Monk
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Big Band & Quartet In Concert (Awaiting Repress) Big Band & Quartet In Concert (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $45.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Big Band & Quartet In Concert (Awaiting Repress)

    Previously Out of Press for Over Two Decades


    Mastered from Original Analog Tapes by Grammy
    Award Winner Bernie Grundman


    Pressed on 180 gram Audiophile-Grade
    Vinyl at Pallas in Germany


    As Scott Yanow puts it in his five-star review for
    AllMusic, "This is one of pianist-composer Thelonious
    Monk's greatest recordings and represents a high point
    in his career... essential for all jazz collections." Big
    Band and Quartet in Concert, Monk's fifth album for
    Columbia records, was recorded live at Lincoln Center,
    Philharmonic Hall in New York City on December 30,
    1963. The album is coming back to vinyl for the first
    time in over two decades with this double LP 180gram
    reissue, which was mastered from original analog tapes
    by Bernie Grundman and pressed at Pallas in Germany
    for a true audiophile experience.

    1. I Mean You
    2. Evidence
    3. (When It's) Darkness On The Delta
    4. Oska T.
    5. Played Twice
    6. Four In One
    7. Epistrophy
    Thelonious Monk
    $45.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • Brilliant Corners Brilliant Corners Quick View

    $27.99
    Buy Now
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    Brilliant Corners

    Import


    Two superb piano trio albums of covers had set the stage for Monk the composer to re-emerge with horns, and the pianist responded with BRILLIANT CORNERS, one of his greatest recordings, featuring three classic new tunes and two formidable studio bands. The Sonny Rollins featured on BRILLIANT CORNERS is a far more imposing presence than the young acolyte of previous Monk sessions--just witness the title tune. With its multiple themes, quirky intervallic leaps, idiomatic rhythmic changes and tricky transitions in tempo, it is one of Monk's masterpieces--a miniature symphony. So daunting were its technical challenges, that the final ending was edited on from another take. Rollins begins his solo with swaggering composure, boldly paraphrasing Monk's vinegary intervals and trademark trills, before navigating the swift rapids of the double-time chorus with deft syncopations. Monk plies dissonance upon dissonance in his first chorus, playing rhythmic tag with Max Roach on the out chorus. Ernie Henry's slip-sliding bluesiness is followed by a brilliant rhythmic edifice from Roach, who maintains melodic coherence at a drowsy tempo, then explodes into the final chorus.Elsewhere, Ba-Lue Bolivar Ba-Lues-Are is a soulful, easygoing blues, and Monk's solo is a compendium of pithy rhythmic devices, bent notes and calculated melodic abstractions, played with enormous relaxation and swing. He concludes with heckling big-band figures that form the basis for Rollins' expressive rhythmic testimonies. Monk employs the bell-like timbre of a celeste to stunning effect on Pannonica, one of his loveliest melodies and improvisations. And in closing, Bemsha Swing is a hard-swinging, conversational performance, with fine contributions from trumpeter Clark Terry, bassist Paul Chambers and Roach on drums and timpani.

    1. Brilliant Corners
    2. Ba-Lue Bolivar Ba-Lues-Are
    3. Pannonica
    4. I Surrender Dear
    5. Bemsha Swing
    6. Pannonica (Thelonious Monk)(Alt. Take)*


    *Bonus Track

    Thelonious Monk
    $27.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Womanchild Womanchild Quick View

    $35.99
    Buy Now
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    Womanchild

    When CÉcile McLorin Salvant arrived at the Kennedy Center in Washington, DC to compete in the finals of the 2010 Thelonious Monk International Jazz Competition, she was not only the youngest finalist, but also a mystery woman with the most unusual background of any of the participants. When she walked away with first place in the jazz world's most prestigious contest, the buzz began almost immediately. If anything, it has intensified in the months leading up to the launch of her Mack Avenue Records debut, WomanChild.


    "She has poise, elegance, soul, humor, sensuality, power, virtuosity, range, insight, intelligence, depth and grace," Wynton Marsalis asserts. "I've never heard a singer of her generation who has such a command of styles," remarks pianist Aaron Diehl. "She radiates authority," critic Ben Ratliff wrote in The New York Times in response to one of her post-competition performances, and a few weeks later his colleague Stephen Holden announced that "Ms. McLorin Salvant has it all.... If anyone can extend the lineage of the Big Three-Billie Holiday, Sarah Vaughan and Ella Fitzgerald-it is this 23-year-old virtuoso."


    Yet at almost every step of the way, McLorin Salvant has followed a different path from her peers. Born in Miami to a French mother and Haitian father, McLorin Salvant's first language was French. She immersed herself in the classical music tradition, long before she turned to jazz-starting on piano at age five and joining the Miami Choral Society at age eight. When it came time for college, McLorin Salvant bypassed all the US conservatories and jazz schools, heading instead to Aix-en-Provence in France, where she continued to develop as a singer, but with an emphasis on classical and baroque vocal music as well as jazz.
    There, thousands of miles away from jazz's land of origin, McLorin Salvant entered into a fruitful partnership with reed player and teacher Jean-François Bonnel, first as a student and soon as a performer. Before returning to the US, she gave concerts in Paris, recorded with Bonnel's quintet, and immersed herself in the early jazz and blues vocal tradition. By the time she returned to her home country to take the stage in the Monk Competition, she had drawn on this unusual set of formative experiences in shaping a personal style of jazz singing, surprising and dramatic by turns, and very much in contrast to that of the other participants and McLorin Salvant's contemporaries.


    In the aftermath of McLorin Salvant's triumph at the Monk Competition, the jazz world eagerly awaited the winner's first US recording. Answering that call with WomanChild, McLorin Salvant draws on songs spanning three centuries of American music. "I like to choose songs that are a little unknown or have been recorded very few times," McLorin Salvant notes. "While these songs aren't recognized as standards, many should be because they are so beautifully crafted."


    On the album, her repertoire ranges from the 19th century ballad "John Henry," refreshed in a spirited up-to- date arrangement, to McLorin Salvant's own 21st century waltz "Le Front CachÉ Sur Tes Genoux" which draws on a poem by Haitian writer Ida Salomon Faubert for its lyric. She is joined by a world class band who share her concern for creating jazz of today by drawing on vibrant traditions of the past: pianist Aaron Diehl and bassist Rodney Whitaker (both of whom are Mack Avenue label mates), guitarist James Chirillo and master drummer Herlin Riley.


    The old and new rub shoulders throughout this album, but this singer's attitude is neither beholden to the past nor trying to anticipate the trends of the future. Her captivating singing is immersed in the immediacy of the present moment. So much so, that those who have seen McLorin Salvant in concert marvel at how she radiates the confidence and poise of a mature artist even though she is just at the dawn of her own career.


    McLorin Salvant may have the deepest roots of any singer of her generation. She knows the sounds and styles of modern jazz but also possesses complete command of the classic blues and early American vocal tradition. She has studied the entire recorded legacy of the great Bessie Smith (1894-1937), often called the Empress of the Blues, and also has deep familiarity with Valaida Snow, Bert Williams and other early masters of American music. For her, these musicians are exponents of living traditions that she has drawn into the orbit of her own work.


    However, McLorin Salvant can't be pinned down as a jazz traditionalist. Alongside fellow Monk Competition winner Jacky Terrasson, she has recorded works by John Lennon/Yoko Ono and Erik Satie, and can sing in French, Spanish or English as the mood and situation warrant. Knowledgeable jazz fans will identify the influence and inspiration from some of the most distinctive modern jazz stylists, such as Betty Carter, Carmen McRae and Abbey Lincoln. She is also currently continuing her studies of the classical and baroque tradition. In short, McLorin Salvant is a seeker and a creative spirit who is determined to push ahead, even while she shows an extraordinary command of the tradition that has preceded her.


    In his article in The New York Times, critic Stephen Holden listed some of the virtues of McLorin Salvant's singing: "perfect pitch and enunciation, a playful sense of humor, a rich and varied tonal palette, a supple sense of swing, exquisite taste in songs and phrasing, and a deep connection to lyrics." Her musical skills are considerable, but they are matched by an interpretive ability that is almost more akin to an actor's than a singer's. She draws out the story hidden inside the song, and can draw on the elements of her own personality and a full gamut of emotional stances-from the darkly troubling to the richly comic-in bringing lyrics to life.


    "I want to get as close to the center of the song as I can," McLorin Salvant explains. "When I find something beautiful and touching I try to get close to it, and share that with the audience."


    On WomanChild, McLorin Salvant gives music lovers the chance to hear why the illustrious judges at the Monk Competition gave her top honors. McLorin Salvant is still a bit of a mystery, but she will hardly be a secret any longer.

    1. St. Louis Gal
    2. I Didn't Know What Time It Was
    3. Nobody
    4. WomanChild
    5. Prelude/There's A Lull In My Life
    6. You Bring Out The Savage In Me
    7. Baby Have Pity On Me
    8. John Henry
    9. Jitterbug Waltz
    10. What A Little Moonlight Can Do
    11. Deep Dark Blue
    Cecile McLorin Salvant
    $35.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Coming Of Age Coming Of Age Quick View

    $21.99
    Buy Now
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    Coming Of Age

    Call it a generous fluency, an affable virtuosity. Call it a true band spirit. The best bands have all had something that can't be forced: A refined mastery of music and a willingness to converse through music. That's what you hear, above all, on bassist Ben Williams' sophomore recording, Coming of Age: The sound of a musician who's cultivated an authentic rapport with some of the best young players in New York City.


    We have these group texts that we send to each other all the time," Williams says of his band, Sound Effect. "We're just as entertaining to each other off stage as on. If there were ever a reality show about jazz, we'd be good candidates for it!"


    Coming of Age for the 30-year-old Williams means playing a lively role among his peers and a vital part in the music world at large. After winning the prestigious Monk Institute Competition in 2009, Williams got busy turning his youthful promise into real achievement. "My career as a bandleader and composer started from the moment I won," he says. "I had this opportunity to say something-and an obligation, too." In 2011 Williams delivered a debut album, State Of Art, to great critical acclaim and toured widely as a bandleader with Sound Effect. He became a sought after and beloved sideman, playing so many sets at one year's Winter Jazzfest that he rarely left the stage. Most impressively, he assumed a highly-coveted place in guitarist Pat Metheny's Unity Band. "Ben has a fearless and open-minded approach to what music can be," Metheny has said. "A wonderful combination of skills."


    For all his strides in bandleading and performing, on the track Coming of Age Williams shows his greatest growth as a composer. "Composing seems like a nebulous thing," he says. "But the ability to translate a feeling into actual music, takes a lot of doing it, a lot of practice. Which chord is going to invoke this feeling? What's the best key for this idea?" And Williams has some big ideas and feelings to convey, necessitating heavy skill in musical translation and storytelling. On "Toy Soldiers," for example, a martial rhythm and chantlike riff send a message about the sacrifices of war. He wrote the uplifting "Strength And Beauty" on the day of the 2012 Newtown school shooting.


    "The tragic news hit me hard, and this tune came to me as a way of feeling my way through the tragedy. The title was inspired later, when I saw how [jazz saxophonist] Jimmy Greene and his family responded to losing their daughter at Newtown. Their pain is something most of us can't even imagine, but the way Jimmy held it together and became a beacon of light and true strength was an inspiration to everyone."


    Williams takes a page from the Miles Davis school of bandleading by encouraging his band members to compose in the studio, too. For the R&B tribute anthem "Voice of Freedom (for Mandela)," Williams enlisted the smooth soulfulness of singer-songwriter Goapele-and then headed in to record the song with a characteristically open mind. In the studio, saxophonist Marcus Strickland contributed an on-the-spot horn arrangement with the sunny harmony of a South African choir.


    As much as Williams writes in response to politics and current events, his compositions are a respectful celebration of the musical past, too. The driving samba rhythms of "Forecast" are an homage to the jazz fusion group Weather Report, with the tune's melody inspired by Wayne Shorter's "Over Shadow Hill Way." Williams's fluid fretless grooves on "Half Steppin'" recall Jaco Pastorius's "Teen Town."


    Williams sees covers of pop tunes as a bestowal to the jazz canon. "I always like to contribute new repertoire to the jazz songbook," says Williams. "For me it's very important to shout out all the young, new songs coming out." His gift on this album is a moving instrumental version of Lianne La Havas' breakup ballad "Lost & Found." Guest trumpeter Christian Scott communicates the contained heartache of La Havas's song lyrics, with a lightly arranged string quartet adding the right amount of solace.


    Coming of Age concludes with the sweeping title tune, a showcase for Williams's broad stylistic range. "I wanted 'Coming of Age' to feel big," he says. "I was thinking of it in movements, as a kind of mini-symphony." In the final section of "Coming of Age," Williams picks up a bow for the only time on the record, filtering the sound to other worldly but soulful effect. "The vibe I was going for at the end was Prince," Williams says. "I wanted it to feel sonically transformed, tripped out." It's an auspicious end to an accomplished sophomore recording, with Williams' bowed strings sauntering off into the stars to explore for the next album.


    Whatever comes next for Ben Williams, it's sure to be as engaging as it is virtuosic. As an artist who's come of age, Williams' raw talent has evolved into musical grace, conviction, and power. He's a musician in meaningful dialogue with his band Sound Effect, with current events, with musical styles past and present, and finally, with his listeners.


    "My favorite thing is when someone comes up to me who's heard my music and they're singing one of my tunes," Williams enthuses. "Humming a melody! That's the best feeling in the world, when one of my tunes has stuck in someone's head."

    1. Black Villain Music
    2. Voice of Freedom (for Mandela) featuring Goapele
    3. Toy Soldiers
    4. Lost & Found
    5. Half Steppin'
    6. Smells Like Teen Spirit
    7. Toy Soldiers (Reprise)
    8. Coming of Age
    Ben Williams
    $21.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Golden Skies Golden Skies Quick View

    $24.99
    Buy Now
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    Golden Skies

    It speaks volumes for how long we've been waiting for the debut Brainfeeder album from Mono/Poly that when Flying Lotus first got in touch with him about doing something for the label, it was via Myspace. The wait, though, has been worth it. Specializing in a kind of beat-driven cosmic soundscape which he describes as "electronic-classical-alchemy music," Mono/Poly aka Charles Dickerson has drawn on the lessons he's learned from collaborating on last year's Thundercat album as well as the Flash Bang Grenada hip hop project with Busdriver and Nocando, and made a beautifully realized, endlessly expansive record.


    From the first orchestral trills of "Winds of Change" you know you're in for something special. As the track builds the listener notices not only the content but also the production chops - this is a record which sounds exactly as big, glossy and up front as its creator wants it to. Rebekah Raff adds scintillating harp work to "Transit to the Gold Planet," but it's the way Dickerson integrates it and builds on it which is really special. "Ra Rise" sounds like sunbathing in space, Niki Randa's abstracted topline vocal warming you right through. Title track, "Golden Skies" uses a looping piano riff reminiscent of Bach, Thelonious Monk and Wu Tang on E, all at once, without sounding like any of them. Add sternum- thrumming bass to that and you know exactly what's what. "Alpha & Omega" does something clever with slowed down d&b licks and tweaked vocal snips. "Empyrean" features Mendee Ichikawa (of the band Free Moral Agents), an ethereal, ghostly presence. "Night Garden" sounds like a drive through the dark streets of an alternate LA. "Euphoria" uses a simple, military-style snare and then twines keyboard lines over it until it's lifted into the sky. Thundercat joins in on last track, "Gamma," and adds some perfectly-judged low-end riffing to anchor Dickerson's keyboard swirls.


    Mono/Poly has been a name to watch since his debut, The George Machine, back in 2009. His 2011 EP release for Brainfeeder, Manifestations, was supported by artists as diverse as Radiohead and Erykah Badu and his work on Thundercat's Apocalypse established once and for all the quality of his productions. With Golden Skies he has laid down a marker to any other "beat maker" out there. Because with a genuine producer with this much talent, everyone else needs to aim a little bit higher - up towards the golden skies.

    1. Winds Of Change
    2. Transit to the Golden Planet
    3. Ra Rise
    4. Golden Gate
    5. Golden Skies
    6. Light Age
    7. Alpha & Omega
    8. Urania
    9. Empyrean (feat. Mendee Ichikawa)
    10. Dreamscape
    11. Night Garden
    12. Euphoria
    13. Gamma
    Mono/Poly
    $24.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Bright Mississippi The Bright Mississippi Quick View

    $29.99
    Buy Now
    x

    The Bright Mississippi

    Through his work as producer, composer, arranger and consummate session man, New Orleans native Allen Toussaint has truly earned living-legend status. He has collaborated on landmark recordings for such artists as Ernie K. Doe, Lee Dorsey, Dr. John, the Meters, the Pointer Sisters and Labelle and released acclaimed albums of his own. The 70 year-old pianist, already a Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Inductee, was the recipient, on the recent Grammy Awards telecast, of the Recording Academy's prestigious Trustee Award, honoring a lifetime in the studio, both behind the scenes and in front of the mic.


    On The Bright Mississippi, his Nonesuch debut, Toussaint continues to break new ground with his first jazz-oriented set, displaying the same effortless swing and relaxed charm he brought to his classic rock and roll sides. He salutes Big Easy stars of a previous generation, the jazz greats who, in the early 20th century, built the genre from the ground up and turned the ears of the world to New Orleans. Backed by an all-star combo that sounds like a group of old friends, Toussaint reinterprets classic jazz and blues tunes popularized or written by such New Orleans greats as Louis Armstrong, Sidney Bechet, Jelly Roll Morton and Joe King Oliver, as well as pieces composed by fellow travelers Django Reinhardt, Duke Ellington and Thelonious Monk. He accedes the producers chair to trusted friend Joe Henry, who sat behind the board for Toussaint's contributions to Our New Orleans, Nonesuch Records best-selling 2005 benefit release aiding hurricane victims on the Gulf Coast. Henry also produced The River In Reverse, Toussaint's 2006 post-Katrina collaboration with Elvis Costello.


    Henry assembled a decidedly non-traditional band of backing players for The Bright Mississippi, assuring a fresh take on such venerable tunes as West End Blues, St. James Infirmary, and Dear Old Southland. Joining Toussaint for four days of sessions at Manhattans Avatar Studio were guitarist Marc Ribot (Costello, Tom Waits), bassist David Piltch (k.d. lang), clarinetist Don Byron, trumpeter Nicholas Payton and drummer Jay Bellerose (Robert Plant /Alison Krauss, Sam Phillips). Nonesuch label-mates Brad Mehldau (piano) and Joshua Redman (saxophone) stopped by for one tune each.It was wonderful, says Toussaint of these convivial sessions.


    Everything is live, of course. This isn't the kind of assembly line music where somebody put the wheels on here and somebody put the top on there. Everything got done at the same time, so everybody fed on each other, their personality and tonality.

    LP 1
    1. Egyptian Fantasy
    2. A Dear Old Southland
    3. St. James Infirmary
    4. Singin the Blues
    5. Winin Boy Blues
    6. West End Blues


    LP 2
    1. Blue Drag
    2. Just a Closer Walk with Thee
    3. Bright Mississippi
    4. Day Dream
    5. Long, Long Journey
    6. Solitude

    Allen Toussaint
    $29.99
    140 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • The Sound Of Jazz (Pure Pleasure) (Awaiting Repress) The Sound Of Jazz (Pure Pleasure) (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    The Sound Of Jazz (Pure Pleasure) (Awaiting Repress)

    The Sound Of Jazz is a 1957 edition of the CBS television series Seven Lively Arts, and was one of the first major programmes featuring jazz to air on American network television.
    The one-hour program aired on Sunday, December 8, 1957, at 5 p.m. Eastern Time, live from CBS Studio 58, the Town Theater at 851 Ninth Avenue in New York City. The show was hosted by New York Herald-Tribune media critic John Crosby, directed by Jack Smight, and produced by Robert Herridge. Jazz writers Nat Hentoff and Whitney Balliett were the primary music consultants.
    The Sound Of Jazz brought together 32 leading musicians from the swing era including Count Basie, Lester Young, Ben Webster, Billie Holiday, Jo Jones and Coleman Hawkins; the Chicago style players of the same era, like Henry 'Red' Allen, Vic Dickenson, and Pee Wee Russell; and younger 'modernist' musicians such as Gerry Mulligan, Thelonious Monk, and Jimmy Giuffre. These players played separately with their compatriots, but also joined to combine various styles in one group, such as Red Allen's group and the group backing Billie Holiday on Fine and Mellow.
    The show's performance of Fine and Mellow reunited Billie Holiday with her estranged long-time friend Lester Young for the final time. Jazz critic Nat Hentoff, who was involved in the show, recalled that during rehearsals, they kept to opposite sides of the room. Young was very weak, and Hentoff told him to skip the big band section of the show and that he could sit while performing in the group with Holiday.




    Musicians:



    • Red Allen Stars

    • Billie Holiday & Band

    • Count Basie All Stars

    • The Jimmy Giuffre Trio

    • Mal Waldron

    • Pee Wee Russell




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Wild Man Blues - The Henry "Red" Allen All-Stars

    2. Rosetta -  Henry Allen And His Orchestra

    3. Fine And Mellow - Billie Holiday with Mal Waldron & The All Stars

    4. Blues - Jimmy Giuffre;Pee Wee Russell

    5. I Left My Baby - Count Basie with All-Stars featuring Jimmy Rushing

    6. The Train And The River -  The Jimmy Giuffre Trio

    7. Nervous - Mal Waldron

    8. Dickie's Dream - Count Basie with All-Stars

    9. Wild Man Blues (Alternate Take) - The Henry "Red" Allen All-Stars
    Various Artists
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
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