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  • Brothers and Sisters of the Eternal Son Brothers and Sisters of the Eternal Son Quick View

    $16.99
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    Brothers and Sisters of the Eternal Son

    Damien is out of his goddamn mind.


    This isn't a recent development, but it's an important aspect of his work that often goes ignored. In place of
    this key element is the idea that his music is a sober and in-depth excavation of the American landscape and
    rural psyche. Well, folks,I'm sorry, but it's not.


    Damien Jurado is every character in every Damien Jurado song. He is the gun,the purple anteater,the paper
    wings, the avalanche, the airshow disaster, Ohio, the ghost of his best friend's wife. It is a universe unto its
    own,with it's own symbolism, creation myth, and liturgy. You might go as far as to call it a religion, and your
    religion is a character in his religion.


    Level with me. You're reading this because of Damien Jurado's new album,Brothers and Sisters of the Eternal
    Son (produced by Richard Swift). You are a progressive minded, left-leaning person who in parlor-style
    conversation regarding the globo-political ramifications of Sky Person relationships laughs knowingly so as
    not to be judgmental and very reasonably concedes "Well, I don't believe He's some old man with a beard
    sitting up in the clouds" at which point everyone agrees on [insert benign middle-ground] and moves on.


    Consider this:What if the only way to understand a religion is to create your own?


    Who is this Silver community? Where the hell are they in the Bible? Is this heresy? Agnostic reference? Isn't
    this sun business a little, I don't know, animistic? Pagan? Go ahead and answer that question for yourself. I'll
    give you a second.


    Do you understand the music any better?


    You know that adage we all use so we have something to say while we shrug our shoulders? "People change"?
    That one. Is that applicable to Jesus Christ? Maybe he's been on a personal journey of discovery since he
    ascended. He went through the 60's, 70's,he turned on,tuned out, got disillusioned. Why can't we talk about
    that Jesus? Does it have to be the old-timey one all the time? American folk Jesus,ugh. The one who's always
    winning Best Soundtrack Oscars for people. Rarely do stories of faith make us identify with Jesus. It's
    Abraham, Satan, Silver Timothy, Salome, Dr.J, Saul of Tarsus; divinely imperfect brothers and sisters who give
    Gawd something to do.


    Damien Jurado made up his own Jesus because a Damien Jurado album needs a beautiful Jesus. Some freaky
    space Jesus that I don't recognize. The name is the same, a lot of the imagery is the same, but he's reborn.
    Born again,I mean. Yeah, as if Jesus got born again. That's what this album sounds like.


    Jesus is out of his goddamn mind and I want to live in Damien's America.


    Sign me up.


    --- Father John Misty; 09-20-2013

    1. Magic Number
    2. Silver Timothy
    3. Return To Maraqopa
    4. Metallic Cloud
    5. Jericho Road
    6. Silver Donna
    7. Silver Malcolm
    8. Silver Katherine
    9. Silver Joy
    10. Suns In Our Mind
    Damien Jurado
    $16.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Scott Scott Quick View

    $37.99
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    Scott

    Import


    No one could deny Scott Walker is an unpredictable artist. Once the lead singer for the Walker Brothers (famous for their string laden Sixties defining hits Make It Easy On Yourself and The Sun Ain't Gonna Shine Anymore) he released his first solo album Scott in 1967. Eschewing all Pop trends at the time, Walker stepped it up a notch, crooning with a nod to Frank Sinatra, Tony Bennett and chansonnier Jacques Brel. A pretty bold move indeed, in a time when Pop music sounded psychedelic, bare and up-tempo.


    His philosophical lyrics are accompanied by lavishly orchestrated tracks making Scott a wildly interesting listen. His approach paid off: the album reached the Top 3 in Great Britain and was the first in a string of very successful solo albums. One of the songs on this album (The Lady Came from Baltimore) was written by Tim Hardin, whose Bird On A Wire is released on March 4.

    1. Mathilde
    2. Montague Terrace (In Blue)
    3. Angelica
    4. The Lady Came From Baltimore
    5. When Joanna Loved Me
    6. My Death
    7. The Big Hurt
    8. Such A Small Love
    9. You're Gonna Hear From Me
    10. Through A Long And Sleepless Night
    11. Always Coming Back To You
    12. Amsterdam
    Scott Walker
    $37.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Prestige Series SR225e Headphones Prestige Series SR225e Headphones Quick View

    $200.00
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    Prestige Series SR225e Headphones


    Have a question about this product? Please email our audio advisor or call 1-877-929-8729 with any questions or concerns regarding your equipment purchase.


    Love And Fidelity


    Let your spouse know you honor fidelity give them a pair of Grado SR225e headphones to enjoy their favorite music the way it was meant to be heard. Our traditional open-back design features enhanced airflow through the rear metal grill, and reproduction that is the definition of high fidelity, with crystal clear spatial placement. Allow yourself to experience true intimacy with your favorite artists.


    This headphone has sizable rear air flow through a metal screen, while utilizing Grado's larger ear cushion and closely matched drivers. The result is a broad soundstage free from colorations. The way the SR225e's new driver, cable and plastic housing move air and react to sound vibrations is virtually unaffected by transient distortions. Bass, midrange and treble are all more wide open and you will enjoy the fine tonal spread and balance. The SR225e will produce a sound that is pure Grado, with warm harmonic colors, rich full bodied vocals, excellent dynamics, and an ultra-smooth top end.


    ... What these 'phones do surpassingly well is present each track in its own volume of air so that the character of the voice or instrument is timbrally distinct in the mix. I can almost picture the engineer pushing the fader up to isolate the part I'm focused on. I understand that one part of the Grado magic is building a rigid structure around the dynamic driver to damp resonances.

    - Listener Magazine, Lang Phipps


    This product is not eligible for discount.


    Grado Headphones
    $200.00
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  • Tides End Tides End Quick View

    $19.99
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    Tides End

    "Tides End" is the second Minks album, but you could say it's a world away from the first. Moving out of New York City to try and cure a bout of writer's block, frontman/songwriter Sonny Kilfoyle wound up in the East End of Long Island. Surrounded by water on three sides, it's the same place that drew Warhol, Pollock, de Kooning, Steinbeck and more to escape the constant barrage of information of the urban landscape.


    The result is not just a romantic trip into isolation, but a melodic and warm experience to immerse yourself in. It's a pop record, with all the hooks and harmonies you'd expect from that, delivered with experience, depth and hope.


    The escapist mentality of the location directly and literally affected "Tides End," as the LP is named for a beachfront estate Sonny had wandered upon one day while out for a drive. Occupied by one family for generations, who after financial decline, are now forced to sell all they own. The experience of seeing old East Coast wealth, surrounded by beautiful Rococo paintings yet no modern appliances was the initial spark to record the LP. Kilfoyle
    himself purchased a portrait "Margot," which inspired and named one of the LP's catchiest tracks.Visions of sipping gin and lemonade's on the dunes with their future in peril could be something clearly reflected in the choruses of "Everything's Fine" and "Playboys of the Western World." Themes of affluence, decadence and eventual decay in spite of the outside world are everywhere, even by the skull and shells amidst an explosion of color in the Everest Hall painting that graces the cover. This is "Tides End," indeed.


    Armed with a new arsenal of material, Sonny connected with producer and engineer, Mark Verbos, who had moved to New York from Berlin after a prolific career in techno and electronic music. The entire album was recorded at Mark's studio, a former electric room in the base of the Brooklyn side of the Williamsburg Bridge. "It was actually a very uninspiring and uncreative but it forced us to use our imagination and find new ways to work together,"says Kilfoyle. So when they encountered a creative impasse they would consult The KLF's
    "manual" or Verbos would choose a card from Brian Eno's "Oblique Strategies." To clear the cobwebs of influence, the producer chose to only allow Sonny to listen to Seal, Simply Red, Enigma, and early Chicago house music during the recording process. This helped build texture and depth in a recording that blended ambiance and immediacy to the established foundation of all the of Minks' previous work.

    1. Romans
    2. Everything's Fine
    3. Margot
    4. Playboys of the Western World
    5. Weekenders
    6. Painted Indian
    7. Hold Me Now
    8. Doomed and Cool
    9. Ark of Life
    10. Tides End
    Minks
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • I'm New Here I'm New Here Quick View

    $21.99
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    I'm New Here

    Gil Scott-Heron is one of the most influential and important singer/songwriters to have come out of America in the second half of the last century. Much can be said about why Gil's lyrics are so original and powerful, but it is important not to overlook his utterly singular voice which is so distinctive and rough and tender. It's a voice of experience and the way his voice floats over the shifting funk rhythms and the deep jazz, soul and blues melodies is nothing short of sublime. It's also what enables him to draw you in to the difficult issues he does not shy away from dealing with. His sound is intimate and warm and direct and consequently it is hard to resist being moved and inspired by his message. Gil has been consistently relevant whether it be on a personal or political canvas.


    Early on in his career he wrote and recorded the song that for many is regarded as one of the first great rap tracks,The Revolution Will Not Be Televised. From its opening lines which turn Timothy Leary on his addled head (You will not be able to stay home brother. You will not be able to plug in, turn on and cop out. You will not be able to lose yourself on scag brother, because the revolution will not be televised.), Gil threw down the gauntlet, challenging us to get involved, be informed, retain a sense of humour and do the right thing. He was angry, politically savvy, compassionate and very funny. When he was brought to Arista by Clive Davis in 1975, he was billed by the label as the black Bob Dylan, and whilst this reductive and over simplistic description is typical marketing bullshit, there is some raison d'etre for this moniker. For Gil is a protest poet of enormous subtlety who has railed against those things in the world that he believes are wrong. And like Dylan he has often used humour as a powerful weapon.


    A new record from Gil Scott-Heron, 40 years after his first solo album, is a cause for major celebration and something that the world needs now more than ever.

    1. On Coming From A Broken Home (Pt. 1)
    2. Me And The Devil
    3. I'm New Here
    4. Your Soul And Mine
    5. Parents (Interlude)
    6. I'll Take Care Of You
    7. Being Blessed (Interlude)
    8. Where Did The Night Go
    9. I Was Guided (Interlude)
    10. New York Is Killing Me
    11. Certain Things (Interlude)
    12. Running
    13. The Crutch
    14. I've Been Me (Interlude)
    15. On Coming From A Broken Home (Pt. 2)
    Gil Scott-Heron
    $21.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Professional Series PS1000e Headphones Professional Series PS1000e Headphones Quick View

    $1,695.00
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    Professional Series PS1000e Headphones


    Have a question about this product? Please email our audio advisor or call 1-877-929-8729 with any questions or concerns regarding your equipment purchase.


    You Can See Yourself In These Headphones


    By using tone-wood clad with metal alloy we've obliterated two of the most vexing issues in headphone design: ringing in the chamber, and transient distortion. This gives audio professionals the security of consistent response throughout the frequency range. Did we mention they look awesome? You could pay more for headphones, but you can't afford anything less.


    This hybrid design has an inner sleeve of hand-crafted mahogany made by using the new series 'e' curing process. Its outer housing, machined from chrome-plated aluminum, utilizes a special processing and casting method to increase the porosity of the alloy. This combination of wood and metal insures that the earphone chamber has no 'ringing' which might obscure detail or add coloration. The way the wood and metal housing moves air and reacts to sound vibrations is virtually unaffected by transient distortions. Grado has also designed the cable for the PS1000e; the twelve-conductor cable design uses UHPLC (Ultra-High Purity, Long Crystal) copper, improves control and stability of the total range of the frequency spectrum. The PS1000e also has a new 50mm driver and a newly re-configured voice coil and diaphragm design, resulting in unsurpassed speed and accuracy responses.


    The cushion design creates the correct balance between the driver and housing to support the desired musicality. The cushion design also makes the PS1000e one of the most comfortable headphones in the world. Grado has taken all of our knowledge and over 60 years of experience in controlling resonances and eliminating distortions, and put them into our finest headphone ever, the PS1000e. Grado is unbelievably proud of this flagship product listen and enjoy.


    ...the Grado PS1000 doesn't have few peers - it has none - at least none that I've ever heard in my home, other audiophile's homes, in audio salons, or in professional recording studios.

    - Enjoy the Music, Tom Lyle


    This product is not eligible for discount.


    Grado Headphones
    $1,695.00
    Headphones Buy Now
  • Let's Be Still Let's Be Still Quick View

    $19.99
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    Let's Be Still

    It wasn't that long ago that the members of Seattle's The Head and the Heart were busking on street corners, strumming their acoustic guitars, stomping their feet and singing in harmony as they attempted to attract the attention of passersby. After capturing that unbridled energy on the band's 2011 debut album for hometown label Sub Pop, the band went from playing open mic nights to selling out headlining shows in prestigious venues. The album became one of Sub Pop's best-selling debut releases in years. And, slowly but surely, ideas began to form for the band's second album, imbued with the experiences of traveling the world and playing to ever-growing crowds.


    The Head and the Heart's new album, Let's Be Still, is a snapshot of a band that didn't exist four years ago. Virginia native Jonathan Russell and California transplant Josiah Johnson formed the core songwriting partnership, which was rounded out by drummer Tyler Williams, keyboardist Kenny Hensley, vocalist/violinist Charity Rose Thielen and bassist Chris Zasche, who'd met Russell and Johnson while tending bar at an open mic they frequented. The nascent group dove headrst into writing, recording and performing, and even moved into the same house.


    After the breakaway success of their debut and countless shows on the road, the band is in a distinctly different situation. "There is a condence gained from having such an amazing fan base," says group member Jonathan Russell. "You start to trust yourself more. When we were busking, we were lling so much space to keep the listener from walking away." Says Johnson, "We wanted to write songs that felt bigger, and didn't need to be so frantic. I think for the most part we wanted to record an album that sounds like the way we play now."


    Adds Russell, "Has there been an impact on our lives since we have become full-time musicians? Sure. On one hand, it's everything you have ever wanted. On the other hand, you start to miss the things you've lost and had to give up. And that's just life. My job is to write about it."


    Let's Be Still was recorded at Seattle's Studio Litho with assistance from prior production collaborator Shawn Simmons, and mixed in Bridgeport, Conn., with Peter Katis, revered for his work with bands such as the National, Interpol and the Swell Season.

    1. Homecoming Heroes
    2. Another Story
    3. Springtime
    4. Summertime
    5. Josh McBride
    6. Shake
    7. Cruel
    8. Let's Be Still
    9. My Friends
    10. 10,000 Weight in Gold
    11. Fire/Fear
    12. These Days Are Numbered
    13. Gone
    Head and the Heart
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Negotiations Negotiations Quick View

    $19.99
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    Negotiations

    Negotiations, the fifth full-length album written, recorded, and produced by The Helio Sequence, would sound different had it not been for a flood. In 2009, while touring in support of Keep Your Eyes Ahead, singer-guitarist Brandon Summers got an unexpected phone call in the middle of the night. Back home in Portland, OR, the band's studio/practice space was under nearly a foot of water. Heavy rains had caused the building's plumbing to overflow like a geyser. But Summers and drummer-keyboardist, Benjamin Weikel, were lucky: All of their best equipment was either on tour with them, or racked high enough off the studio floor to be spared.



    Still, the band needed a new home. After three months of searching, Summers and Weikel settled into a 1500-square-foot, former breakroom-cafeteria in an old warehouse. They no longer had to work their recording schedule around loud rehearsals by neighboring bands, but were free to create late into the night in uninterrupted seclusion. With twice the square footage, the space also had room for more gear, a lot more gear. They decided to use this opportunity to try something different.



    Summers and Weikel, who started playing together in 1996 and self-produced their first EP in 1999, have always been gearheads. But it wasn't until the success of Keep Your Eyes Ahead that they could afford to step things up: The duo spent months (and many hard-earned dollars) retooling their studio. They left behind much of the cleaner-sounding modern digital studio equipment and instruments they'd always relied on, and embraced vintage gear that would color their recordings with a warmer, deeper sound: Tape and analog delays, spring and plate reverbs, tube preamps, ribbon microphones, and analog synths.



    As the new studio came together, so did the songwriting. It proved to be the most spontaneous, open, and varied writing process they had ever experienced. Weikel, who was listening to minimalist/ambient composers like Roedelius and Manuel Goettsching, had created dozens of abstract synth loops of chord progressions and arpeggios. The two would put a loop on and improvise together with Summers on guitar and Weikel on drums, recording one take of each jam. Other songs like "One More Time", "October" and "The Measure" quickly formed from rough one-minute sketches by Summers, while the down tempo "Harvester of Souls" was completely improvised musically and lyrically in a single take.



    Tempering the free form approach to writing was Summers and Weikel's meticulous attention to production and arrangement. Taking cues from the spaciousness, subtlety, and detail of Brian Eno and late-era Talk Talk records, they moved forward. Listening to the recorded live jam sessions, they set to work transforming the ditties into actual songs. "Open Letter," "Silence on Silence", "Downward Spiral" and the title track - some of the spacier, mesmerizing songs on Negotiations - came together in this way. Summers' one-minute demos were brought to life in collaboration by Weikel spending weeks working on sound treatments and synth landscapes to enhance the songs.



    Lyrically, Summers affirmed the improvised ethos, working deep into the night ad-libbing alone in front of the mic, abandoning pre-written lyrics and instead preferring to create in the moment. His delivery was largely inspired by the starkness and understated romanticism of Sinatra's Capitol era "Suicide Albums", imparting a more introspective and personal tone. "I used to view a lyric as a statement," he says, "Now, I see it more as a letter you're writing to yourself or a conversation with your subconscious."



    This collection of shimmering, reverb-heavy songs is a meditation on those inner dialogues (hence, Negotiations) with solitude, memory, misgivings, loss, atonement, acceptance and hope. Most of all, it's a record that serves as a testament to the beauty, blessing, and excitement of a fresh start.

    1. One More Time
    2. October
    3. Downward Spiral
    4. The Measure
    5. Hall of Mirrors
    6. Harvester of Souls
    7. Open Letter
    8. When the Shadow Falls
    9. Silence on Silence
    10. December
    11. Negotiations
    Helio Sequence
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Get Back Get Back Quick View

    $17.99
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    Get Back

    It's doubtful that Stephen McBean set out to make The Great Rock 'N' Roll Primer when he started conjuring the
    songs that would come to be Pink Mountaintops' Get Back.


    The record's beginnings were reasonably straightforward: McBean had moved to Los Angeles, taken a long hiatus
    from Black Mountain and an even longer one from Pink Mountaintops when he met producer Joe Cardamone, lead
    singer of Icarus Line at Valley Recording Company in Burbank,CA.The two bonded quickly over Flying Nun bands,
    Television Personalities, Roxy Music, Johnny Thunders, and Born Against. Joe was excited to meet someone he
    actually liked. Stephen was excited to work with someone who said Sing it like you would've sung it when you were
    21. Simple enough,right?


    But ask him to set the scene and you'll hear about a motorcycle shop owned by Michael Barragan, former member
    of Los Angeles noise rock band Plexi. You'll hear about an endless supply of rock 'n' roll video documentation for
    last minute inspiration or de-evolution in the living room.Ask who's on the record and you'll get a constellation of
    greats:J Mascis(DinosaurJr &Witch),Rob Barbato (Darker My Love,The Fall & Cass McCombs), Steve Kille (Dead
    Meadow), Daniel Allaire (Brian Jonestown Massacre, Cass McCombs & Darker My Love), Annie Hardy (Giant
    Drag), Jon Wahl(Clawhammer), and Gregg Foreman (Cat Power & Delta 72).Randal Dunn (Sunn O))),Earth, Sun
    City Girls, Boris) mixed Get Back at Avast! Studios (Bikini Kill, Mudhoney, Christ On A Crutch, Soundgarden) in
    Seattle. Howie Weinburg (Nirvana, Beastie Boys, Danzig, Ramones, Slayer) mastered it in Laurel Canyon.


    Ask about the record itself and McBean will tell you about Alleys, curbs, walls, and cigarette stained gig flyers.An
    island on the Pacific coast. Fake British towns. Slayer posters.The beauty of youth.It's about listening to Driver's Seat
    and 'Guns of Brixton' and hotboxing The Duster. And suddenly it becomes clear: when the aliens do touch down
    and they don't know rock 'n'roll, you can play them Get Back start to finish, and that'll be all they need.


    Get Back comes out swinging with Ambulance City, a head-trip of a song with a chugging, insistent, oddly timeless
    guitar riff sitting front and center.The Second Summer of Love needs almost no explanation; it dives into 80s VHS
    saturation and never comes up for air. Sell Your Soul is a deep sigh and a motorcycle ride, a roll in the grass
    lamenting summertime blues with a little grit and a little harmony. And North Hollywood Microwaves is
    downright obscene. But what better way to start Side B than this? You can listen at hushed volumes so your parents
    don't hear, you can crank it in a dorm room, you can smirk to yourself from the safety of rock 'n'roll's old age.You
    start to wonder- why don't all Side Bs start with a song like this one


    The number of platitudes in music hit critical mass years ago, and among those tropes is that annoying, inescapable
    mantra:rock 'n'roll is undefinable.And yeah,sure, that's true. It's different things to different people. It starts with
    guitars, maybe, and ends with a stage-dive, or spit, or feedback. Rock 'n'roll is drugs, is rebellion, is youth, is sex, is
    cosmic. It's wanting more than you have.Rock 'n'roll is butts and cigarette butts.And Pink Mountaintops might not
    be the best-known band ever to make rock 'n' roll, but in Get Back they just might have written its scripture -- an
    exploration and celebration of what, exactly,rock 'n'roll can be.

    1. Ambulance City
    2. The Second Summer of Love
    3. Through All The Worry
    4. Wheels
    5. Sell Your Soul
    6. North Hollywood Microwaves
    7. Sixteen
    8. New Teenage Mutilation
    9. Shakedown
    10. The Last Dance
    Pink Mountaintops
    $17.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Conversations Conversations Quick View

    $18.99
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    Conversations

    Woman's Hour are not your average band. The first clue comes in the name of the London-based swoon-pop four-piece, taken from a beloved female-focussed news and culture show on BBC Radio 4. The second is in their graphic, striking monochrome visuals, meticulously curated in collaboration with TATE and MOMA certified fine artists Oliver Chanarin and Adam Broomberg. These play with shape and texture, much like their powerful, iridescent music. On their excellent debut album 'Conversations', this has the intricate construction and intimacy of The xx and the iridescent shimmer of summer-defining indie pop. Pay attention now, or regret it later.


    In a sense, we feel like the odd ones out, explains frontwoman Fiona Burgess of their nose-to-tail approach to their visuals, performance and songcraft. It's quite empowering that we're doing it as four people but we're not part of a bigger collective. Indeed, their 360º approach is closer to the art/music crossover of acts such as Throbbing Gristle, Yoko Ono or Factory Floor than most of this year's indie hopes. Their music - as poignantly personal as pop gets - has a rare singularity and purpose.


    Take single Her Ghost, which layers a breezy guitar hook with Fiona's beautiful, sighing lyric of inner turmoil. I'm interested in the idea of memory and how powerful memories can be, and how powerful some things can be to let go of, she says. A lot of my writing is me trying to understand an emotion or situation. The track's melody and a message lingers in the recesses of the mind like a box of treasured letters.


    Woman's Hour started to come together one summer, when Fiona started collaborating with her brother, guitarist William Burgess. I had been to a couple of rehearsals with other bands and it wasn't very much fun, says William. I mentioned to Fiona that I'd like her to sing and we decided to have a go. I went round to her place one day and it turned our that she had a pretty nice voice! The two recruited bassist Nicolas Graves, who was William's friend from back home (the pair had played in a couple of local guitar bands back in Kendal) and the three began creating their music. Nicolas explains: We just messed around in each other's houses for a bit and tried to get a few songs together.


    We played our first gig in 2011, Nicolas continues. It was at Fiona's house in Camden. It was a hat-themed party. I remember wearing a beret. Fiona was wearing a trilby, and Will had a sombrero on. It was incredibly nerve-racking for the trio despite the jolly occasion (I almost froze with fear at one point laughs Nicolas), but the gig was a runaway success, and it was there that they all met keyboardist Josh Hunnisett, who was already a friend of Fiona's and happened to be doing the sound at the event. Even in the shambolic situation, the band were meticulous perfectionists.


    The quartet had their first rehearsal in an old vicarage in Dalston. It just felt really honest, says Josh. There was no 'you can't do this, you can't do that, don't try that - the style of music felt pure and everyone was expressing themselves in the way they wanted. We've tried to think about this as a collaboration between four different creative people. Each band member brings a wholly distinct set of influences to the band - from German cold wave to pop rarities and uncompromising singer/songwriters. Their website even has a section dedicated to recommended reading.


    But it was their favourite radio show that was to be have most prominent effect on the band. When we were first doing demos we named them all after BBC Radio 4 programmes, explains Nick. The World at One, Afternoon Play, that kind of thing. I think Woman's Hour might have been one of them, and when it came to play our first gig (at The Queen's Head in London) one of our friends suggested using it and it stuck. Indeed, their jangle-pop first single Jenni, which is quite different to their current material, was named after Radio 4 stalwart Jenni Murray. The band's first 7, Jenni/ Human, was released through London label Dirty Bingo after the label head tracked them down on online and interviewed them for beloved London zine Loud And Quiet.


    Although the single made a splash, things were moving too fast for the band. Suddenly we thought, 'should we have had something to back this up?, says William. 'We didn't have any more songs, so we took a year and a half off to write and develop the sound. That's also when we met Tom Morris, our producer. The band hibernated, starting from the bottom up. Let's get everything fucking slick, how we want it, let's do everything exactly how we want it ourselves - don't compromise.


    It was worth the wait. When the band put their gorgeously lilting comeback single Our Love Has No Rhythm online in 2013, the blogs exploded, in part due to the glossy monochrome video depicting Fiona's face in close-up, and also the stunning single artwork - an uneasy found image of a suited gentleman falling over. We've been using images that are taken from manuals, explains Fiona. Lots of different 'How To' manuals from How to Train a Chihuahua to How to Fall Over Without Hurting Yourself. We like the idea of how to look after yourself physically paired with the music, which is a lot less direct.


    Perhaps Woman's Hour's music does not hammer its message home, but there's a nuance and craft that's scarcely found in today's industry. They followed Our Love Has No Rhythm, with the cooing, Beach House-esque Darkest Place in which Fiona implores I don't understand why you're not around over swooning keyboards, with a cooing ooooh-ooooh hook. For the track's striking video, she'd is depicted in close crop with her eyes closed as an unknown figure attempts to prise them open. I was finishing a degree in performance studies at the time, and I came across this particular piece by Vito Acconci, she says of the inspiration for the video. The original piece is about 20 minutes long, and it's absolutely gruelling, there's no soundtrack to it and it's a piece where you can hear the sound in the room of two people in a physical struggle. You can hear the heavy breathing, the feet, the occasional sounds of resistance. She endured a restaging of the piece, which she found very intense and intimate.


    Woman's Hour have an uncompromising commitment to the unconventional. For them, music does not exist as merely a hummable soundtrack but as a wider and more artistic proposition. As Fiona continues: A lot of music videos are not very challenging, and I like the idea of them being quite confronting. Our album artwork is inspired by a picture of a woman surrounded by pyramids that was part of a magazine article called The Start of an Era. It was a 1970s performance piece that was performed at the Whitney Museum in New York, and we've also designed nine of these pyramids with Oliver Chanarin that we'll incorporate into our live show when possible. The Start of an Era? We couldn't have said it better ourselves.

    1. Unbroken Sequence
    2. Conversations
    3. To The End
    4. Darkest Place
    5. In Stillness We Remain
    6. Our Love Has No Rhythm
    7. Her Ghost
    8. Two Sides of You
    9. Devotion
    10. Reflections
    11. The Day That Needs Defending
    Woman's Hour
    $18.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • I'm Not The Devil I'm Not The Devil Quick View

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    I'm Not The Devil

    Cody Jinks was raised on country music but he cut his teeth on metal. "Metallica was king. They set the tone for me and I spent a good part of my youth wanting to be James Hetfield." After a dedicated stint as a frontman in a thrash metal band, Jinks willingly found himself back to where it all began. "My dad loved the outlaw country icons, Johnny Cash, Waylon Jennings and Merle Haggard. That never ending consistency of incredible music growing up laid some very deep seeds. I'm mean, come on nothing better than mentally diving into 'The Hag' and metal when it comes time for me to write songs."


    Always avoiding trends and ferociously choosing his direction was the only option from day one, even though that very path could have prevented success. "What is success if you can't wake up everyday being who you really are. In the end, that will catch up with you." Jinks has been tested countless times by his career choices. The better part of the last 15 years have included numerous empty bar rooms and a never ending financial loss. "Yeah, I've been pretty good at losing money. Not the greatest feeling in the world to be gone from home for long stretches of time, only to walk in the door broke. Luckily I've got a damn good woman in my life. She has stood by me with unmeasurable strength to say the least and it is an absolute fact that I seriously overplayed my hand when landing her."


    His long, dark beard and endless array of tattoos are no fad. They unquestionably define Cody Jinks. His prototypical metal/hard rock band frontman look is not a well orchestrated image, but again, define Cody Jinks. Diving into to his album, I'm Not the Devil is the perpetual truth of who he is and where he has found himself at this point in his career. "I'm just glad that I ended up where I am now," Jinks said. "It makes complete sense that I'm at this place in my life. Country music found me when I was young and chased me down as I grew older"


    Jinks' latest project is his deepest, darkest and most provocative album to date, with a metal common denominator, the apocalypse, running throughout the record. "It's a pretty scary time," Jinks said. "There are some evil people running things in the world. It hits me since I have a six and three-year old."
    There's not a weightier song than the aptly titled "Heavy Load." It's the most apocalyptic song on the album but the dense cut, with a pretty violin break, is a gorgeous tune. The vocal hook grabs ears when Jinks croons "Train Jumps Tracks Some Time Ago/You Can't Root That Heavy Load." "That was the last song I wrote on the record," Jinks said. "I couldn't be happier how that one turned out."


    "All You Can" features a pretty piano line and sobering wordplay. When Jinks belts out 'What Are You Living For," you can't help but think about the serious question posed in what is becoming an increasingly shallow existence. "I was really tired when I wrote that song," Jinks said. "We had been on the road for awhile. The bottom line is that if you're not helping people, you're not doing your job as a human being. It's time to quit feeling sorry for yourself and do something."
    One of Jinks' favorite songs on the album is "The Way I Am," a cover of a Merle Haggard classic. "I love that song," Jinks says. "I wrapped it up just before Merle died. The song always resonated with me. I relate to that one since there are times I would rather be out fishing."


    "No Words" is a stunner of a gritty, autobiographical love song, which is a throwback to how songs used to be written. It is a tuneful gem, inspired by reality. Jinks starts out dark as night. "My Whole View of the World has Changed/ I Guess that Comes with Age/I Don't Believe there is Good in Every Man Like I Did Back Then/I May Drink More Than I Should/You've Seen Me on the Floor/I Spent my Lifetime in this Cage I Built Around Me." But the song is actually a tip of the hat to his beloved wife of 19 years. "There Aint' No Words/ To Say How Much I Need You/With You Here/ You Make This Life I Lead Worth Living." "It's about my wife," Jinks says. "But the funny thing is that she doesn't like it. She thinks it sounds too sad."


    With the title track "I'm Not the Devil," Jinks wakes us all up to the realities of mistakes and the heartfelt desire to be forgiven. "We are all guilty of mistakes and very guilty of pointing out the mistakes of others. Forgiveness feels so much better or so I think."


    It's impressive how Jinks is getting his message across. Jinks utilizes space well in his songs. Notes aren't crammed in. Jinks lets his songs breathe. "After all I've experienced, I think I've matured," Jinks says. "I think you can hear it in the music. I've grown up."


    Even though he still looks the part of the headbanger he was back in the day, he has moved on. "It's all for the best, Jinks says. "I'm where I was meant to be."


    It's all about the music and the fans, who are the fuel that drives Jinks. "They come out night after night giving up hard earned money and precious time to see me play," Jinks says. " It's truly is amazing when you really think about it. The best way I can say thanks is by giving back with effort and gratitude."

    1. The Same
    2. I'm Not the Devil
    3. No Guarantees
    4. No Words
    5. Give All You Can
    6. She's All Mine
    7. The Way I Am
    8. Chase That Song
    9. Heavy Load
    10. Grey
    11. Church at Gaylor Creek
    12. Vampires
    13. Hand Me Down
    Cody Jinks
    $24.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Wildness Wildness Quick View

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    Wildness

    Snow Patrol is set to return with Wildness, their first album in seven years, which finds the band searching for clarity, connection, and meaning, while staying true to the melodic songwriting prowess that brought them to prominence. Wildness taps into something raw and primitive, and lead-singer and songwriter Gary Lightbody says of the album: "There are many types of wildness, but I think it can be distilled into two: the wildness of the modern age, all it's confusion, illogic and alienation and a more ancient wildness. Something primal, alive and beautiful that speaks to our true connectivity, our passion, our love, our communion with nature and each other. This is the kind of wildness the album is centered around. The loss of it. Trying to reconnect with it. To remember it."


    Since their 1998 debut, Songs for Polarbears, Snow Patrol have racked up an impressive number of critical and commercial accolades, including 15 million global album sales, 1+ billion global track streams, 5 UK Platinum Albums, and are Grammy and Mercury Music Prize nominated. After their Fallen Empires tour ended in 2012, band members -which also include multi-instrumentalist Johnny McDaid, guitarist Nathan Connolly, bassist Paul Wilson, and drummer Jonny Quinn - decided to take a step back from the band, and focus on their own projects. Gary Lightbody continued his work with his Tired Pony side project with members of Belle and Sebastian, R.E.M, Reindeer Section and Fresh Young Fellows and moved to Los Angeles to begin writing songs for movies (including "This Is How You Walk On" for 2017's Gifted), and doing a number of high-profile co-writes with Ed Sheeran, Taylor Swift and One Direction. Taking this extended break from Snow Patrol proved to be a source of inspiration, and writing songs that were not pulled directly from his own psyche helped heal what Lightbody considered to be not so much writer's block as life block.


    It's in this search for clarity and connection that these songs were written and refined. "I think it's the first record I've ever written that I haven't just asked a bunch of questions. I actually tried to figure out why I was unhappy, why I feel out of place, why I'm afraid," says Lightbody. "There's nothing really to protect myself for-- it's all in the album. I want to remember." This impulse was partially inspired by Lightbody's father, who is suffering from dementia. "I think the album is defined by memory in a lot of ways," says Lightbody, "including my father's loss of memory."


    The songs are surefooted, displaying a newfound sense of self and purpose, and the rest of the band members rose magnificently to the occasion. The album is produced once more by the great Jacknife Lee, Snow Patrol's longtime producer and collaborator. "Life on Earth" opens the album with its mission statement, "this is something else, this is something else." "Heal Me" feels like an ancient hymn: "Finally, after way too many years of smashing my body to bits with booze, I met someone who helped me find my way back to health and clarity, says Lightbody. "This song is about her, that journey and is dedicated to her." "Empress," written for Lightbody's goddaughters, is fierce and heartfelt, with runaway drums and keen words of wisdom. "What If This Is All The Love You Ever Get?" is a heartstring-puller, posing the question nobody wants to ask. The last track, "Life and Death," is a rumination, and a human story of love and forgiveness- mostly self-forgiveness for Lightbody, demonstrating that perhaps everyone ought to take this long between albums to reflect long and hard before they write.


    "Seamus Heaney, my favorite poet of all time, said at 71 that he was only discovering what some of his poetry means, and this is coming from a Nobel Prize-winning poet. It's a great testament to inspiration," says Lightbody. "Sometimes it takes you five years to write the thing. Like now. And you know for sure when you finish an album like that, where you've poured over every detail and put every atom of yourself into it, everything makes sense and I bet you I'm never not proud of this record."

    1. Life On Earth
    2. Don't Give In
    3. Heal Me
    4. Empress
    5. A Dark Switch
    6. What If This Is All The Love You Ever Get?
    7. A Youth Written In Fire
    8. Soon
    9. Wild Horses
    10. Life And Death
    Snow Patrol
    $29.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Future Future Quick View

    $19.99
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    Future

    It's something we all want the answers for. It's something we fear. It's something we want to have a grip on.


    The future.


    So we ask for clearcut forecasts, desperately seeking security in precise, defined direction. Tossing and turning, we think if we could just glimpse the end of the book, we'd rest easy. We make plans and maps, charting out our lives and where we want them to go. We find ourselves filled with anxieties, pressure, worries


    Jordan Feliz knows the feeling.


    But he didn't write his newest album, Future, because he figured out all the answers to his path. Quite the opposite. This record was born out of Feliz making peace with the fact that he doesn't, none of us can, know what his future holds. Cling to your best-laid plans until your knuckles turn white, mark your calendar up and down, worry yourself dizzy But the real answer is accepting that we do not hold the future in our own two hands. And thank goodness, because the One who does has already written better stories for us than we ever could.


    The past:


    Following widespread acclaim for his first album, The River, Jordan Feliz began the journey of recording a new one. But the process didn't start how he expected or hoped.


    "I started going through anxiety and honestly didn't know how to begin, because I felt like 'Everything I create isn't going to be good enough.'" Jordan remembers.


    He was on tour, trying to write for the album, but experiencing panic attacks. He found himself unable to connect with the songs he'd been working on.


    "My head wasn't in the right spot. My heart wasn't either. it was more focused on appeasing people. It was listening to myself and not to God."


    Then back home with friends and co-writers Paul Duncan and Colby Wedgeworth, he marched not around the fear, but through it. And on the other side was solid ground.


    "I said 'What if I just can't do it?' but then Paul says to me 'Look man, there's no pressure. Everything in your future has already been plotted by Jesus. He has paved every step of the way for you, in a way to have favor on your life. Our future is not wound up in our success, but in the inheritance of God.'"


    With those words, something clicked for Jordan. He took a breath. He let go. He remembered that his future is held by the strong, kind hands of the Father.


    "Sometimes it's really hard to silence out the world and just listen to the small, still voice. But once I refocused and listened to Him, He had a message for me," Feliz shares. "A fire was set in me to write a song about freedom. A song we can sing to be stoked that every single day there's a God that loves us, never ceases, and never fails."


    That day they wrote "Witness," which would go on to be Feliz's first single for Future, in only 45 minutes.


    "And that's when the record started."


    It's certainly not the first time Jordan's had to rely on faith. Six years ago, following much prayer, he and his wife ventured to Nashville after feeling called to make the move; the only catch: they didn't even have enough money to make it all the way from California to Music City. They were depending on a few performance gigs Jordan had along the route.


    "But all the shows I was scheduled to play got cancelled. At first we were stressed and asking 'What do we do?'. We just felt like the Lord was saying 'You need to go.You just need to trust me.' We had to decide to think about what the Lord has for us, instead of what we have for ourselves. Watch and prepare for what He can do, not what we think we can do."


    He ended up with a spontaneous opportunity to perform for less than 30 people, who bought more than enough merchandise to get the Felizes to Nashville.


    "We sobbed in the car," he reflects. "For God to show us that He gives us more than we even need "


    Jordan tells that story in the album's track "All Along," his most personal song to date. With the first lyric describing his literal first moment of breath, Feliz goes on to tell some of his life's highlights, revealing God's presence through each moment of every season.


    And that's what marks this album as a mature step forward for the singer-songwriter. The vibrant pop melodies are not only infectious, but deep-rooted in the vulnerable walks of faith he's ventured through in the past year.


    "This record is just chock-full of story. Every single song," Jordan says. "It's kind of me taking a piece of my life, my heart, my beliefs, and my trust in God and just giving them to people. And hopefully they'll hold onto the message and learn to trust God even more through it."


    He wrote most of the album on the road with a hectic tour schedule and only eight other writers. Feliz was surprised to find that he loved this unorthodox writing process, saying it allowed for him and cowriters to spend more time simply experiencing life together, then reflect on it through creating music. Gone was the pressure to sit in a room and crank out a hit song. The result: more authentic songs that come from inspiration found in everyday life. Songs the musicians poured themselves into- including one of Jordan's favorites, "Faith," which came about from a middle-of-the-night writing session.


    "That never would've happened back home," Jordan laughs.


    And as Feliz and his team were wrapping up, something incredible happened for an album that began from a place of insecurity. When it came time to make the final song decisions, typically a stressful and challenging process, Jordan felt an unexpected peace.


    "Not even kidding, the day we left that meeting, we all just kind of knew those were the songs. With The River, we thought through every little thing, but this time it feels like the Lord just gave us these songs and was like 'This is it. You don't need anything other than these.' And we still wrote over 40 songs, but it was so clear that these were the ones that were going to be recorded. We hadn't even heard them produced yet, so we were just hoping it was all going to turn out right and it did. These songs were gifted to me by the Lord."


    The present:


    Jordan Feliz belts out "Witness" to a roaring crowd.


    "Your love is moving mountains every day of my life. Can I get a witness?"


    Hands shoot up, voices join in, souls worship. Jordan beams. It's the smile of a heart that knows it's landed in the hands of its Protector. The smile of a heart, fearlessly honest, that is connecting with others. A heart that's traveled through uncertainty, and probably will again, but will always find home in the story already written for it.


    Jordan listens to the new record, the latest season of his life in musical form. Those early doubts have transformed into peace. The shame into compassion. The worry into joy, and the fear into excitement.


    "Probably craziest of all is that I didn't see any of it coming together at beginning. I thought 'There's no way this is going to get done and I'm going to be able to handle it,' and it just happened. This entire project comes down to the fact that every day I'm learning how to trust God more and more and more."


    He doesn't know how the next chapter reads. But he knows something more important: the Author.


    "Every time I think about the concept of this record, it feels like it's purposeful for people to grab onto the idea of a song and hold onto it for a very long time. That's what it stands for. It stands for what's coming. It stands for what God has for our life."


    The future:


    Written. Held.

    1. Witness
    2. Count That High
    3. Faith
    4. Streets Of Gold
    5. Pages
    6. Lay It Down
    7. Future
    8. All Along
    9. Changed
    10. 180
    11. That's The Life
    12. My Shelter
    13. Blank Canvas
    Jordan Feliz
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Close Ties Close Ties Quick View

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    Close Ties

    Rodney Crowell's new album, Close Ties, demonstrates his strengths as a songwriter and illustrates how he has learned to balance personal recollection, literary sophistication, and his profound musical reach. Close Ties is at once his most intimate record and his most accessible, the product of years of understanding the ways songs can enter-and be entered by-life. "It's a loose concept album, you could say," Crowell says. "And the concept is related to how you tell stories about yourself. Having a few years ago written a memoir, my sensibilities toward narrative-especially trying to find a common thread in different pieces of writing-had become a part of my songwriting process."


    Close Ties is a roots record, in the sense that Crowell himself has deep roots that stretch back into the alternative country scene of the early seventies. The rise of Americana music has struck a nerve with Crowell. "I have declared my loyalty to Americana. It's a hard category for people to get their heads around, or at least the terminology is. But all the people who represent it-Townes van Zandt, Guy Clark, Lucinda Williams, Steve Earle and more recent stars like John Paul White and Jason Isbell-share a common thread, and that thread is poetry. Whether they are actual poets or their music exemplifies a poetic sensibility, generally speaking, the Americana artist shuns commercial compromise in favor of a singular vision. Which resonates with me." There is also a powerful undercurrent of the blues running through the record. "Recently, I think-I hope-that my study of the blues is starting to show up in my music. Those artists, whether it's Lightnin' Hopkins or John Lee Hooker or the acoustic Delta players, connected to something fundamental. With that in mind, I'm trying to move forward but also get back there."

    1. East Houston Blues
    2. Reckless
    3. Life Without Susanna
    4. It Ain't Over Yet (feat. Rosanne Cash & John Paul White)
    5. I Don't Care Anymore
    6. I'm Tied To Ya' (feat. Sheryl Crow)
    7. Forgive Me Annabelle
    8. Forty Miles From Nowhere
    9. Storm Warning
    10. Nashville 1972
    Rodney Crowell
    $24.99
    150 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Beulah Beulah Quick View

    $15.99
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    Beulah

    Beulah. It's a small, complicated word with a tangle of meanings.


    It's the title of John Paul White's new album, his first in nearly a decade, a remarkably and assuredly diverse collection spanning plaintive folk balladry, swampy southern rock, lonesome campfire songs, and dark acoustic pop. Gothic and ambitious, with a rustic, lived-in sound, it's a meditation on love curdling into its opposite, on recrimination defining relationships, on hope finally filtering through doubt.


    Beulah is also a White family nickname. "It's a term of endearment around our house," White explains, "like you would call someone 'Honey.' My dad used to call my little sister Beulah, and I call my daughter Beulah. It's something I've always been around."


    Beulah is also something much loftier. For the poet and painter William Blake, Beulah was a place deep in the collective spiritual unconscious. "I won't pretend to be the smartest guy in the world," says White, "but I dig a lot of what he's written. Beulah was a place you could go in your dreams. You could go there in meditation, to relax and heal and center B photo credit: Allister Ann 119 west 57th street, penthouse north, new york, ny 10019 t 212.741.1000 www.sacksco.com SACKS A CO. N D yourself. It wasn't a place you could stay, but you came back to the world in a better state."


    And perhaps the music on this album originated in that "pleasant lovely Shadow where no dispute can come." According to White, the songs came to him unbidden-and not entirely welcome. "When these songs started popping into my head, I had been home for a while and I was perfectly happy. I wasn't looking for songs. I didn't know whether any would pop back in my head again, and I was honestly okay with that. I'm a very happy father and husband, and I love where I live. I love working with artists for a label that I think is doing good work."


    Far from the grind and glamour of Nashville-where he worked for years as a working songwriter before stepping into the spotlight himself-White settled in his hometown of Muscle Shoals, Alabama, a wellspring of gritty Southern rock and soul since the 1960s. Together with Alabama Shakes keyboard player Ben Tanner and Shoals native Will Trapp, he founded and runs Single Lock Records, a local indie label that has released records by some of the Yellowhammer State's finest, including Dylan LeBlanc, St. Paul & the Broken Bones, and legendary songwriter and keyboard player Donnie Fritts. The label is based in a small ranch house a stone's throw from White's own home, which would come in handy when those songs started invading his head.


    "Honestly, I tried to avoid them, but then I realized the only way I was going to get rid of them was if I wrote them down. I got my phone out and I'd sing these little bits of melody, then put it away and move on. But eventually I got to a place where it was a roar in my head, and that pissed me off." Due to his experiences as a gun-for-hire in Nashville, White was reluctant to romanticize the creative process, to turn it into a spiritual pursuit. "Then one day I told my wife I think I'm going to go write a song. She was as surprised as I was. I went and wrote probably eight songs in three days. It was like turning on a faucet."


    Most artists would kill for such a downpour, but White was wary of the consequences. He knew that writing songs would lead to recording them, which would result in releasing them, and that means touring and leaving home for weeks at a time. "As soon as I write a song, I start thinking what other people might think of it. I've talked to friends about this: What is it about us that makes us do that? Why can't I just sit on my back porch and sing these songs out into the ether? I don't have an answer for it yet, but I think it's just part of who I am. I need that reaction. I need to feel like I'm moving someone in a good way or in a bad way. I need to feel like there's a connection."


    White threw himself into the project, no longer the reluctant songwriter but a craftsman determined to make the best album possible-to do these songs justice. He cut several songs at the renowned FAME Studios in his hometown, where Aretha Franklin, Wilson Pickett, the Allmans, the Osmonds, Bobbie Gentry, Arthur Conley, and Clarence Carter recorded some of their most popular hits.


    One product of those sessions is "What's So," which introduces itself by way of a fire-andbrimstone riff, as heavy as a guilty conscience-the kind of riff you wouldn't be surprised to hear on a Sabbath album. But White's vocals are gritty and soulful, a product of the Shoals, almost preacherly as he sings about earthly and eternal damnation: "Sell your damn soul or get 119 west 57th street, penthouse north, new york, ny 10019 t 212.741.1000 www.sacksco.com SACKS A CO. N D right with the man, keep treading water as long as you can," he exhorts the listener. "But before you do, you must understand that you don't get above your raisin'." It's the heaviest moment on the record, perhaps the darkest in White's career.


    At the other end of the spectrum is "The Martyr," one of the catchiest tunes White has ever penned. The spryness of the melody imagines Elliott Smith wandering the banks of the Tennessee River, yet the song is shot through with a pervasive melancholy as White wrestles with his own demons. "Keep falling on your sword, sink down a little more," he sings over a dexterous acoustic guitar theme. This is not, however, a song about some unnamed person, but rather a pained self-diagnosis: "These are the wounds that I will not let heal, the ones that I deserve and seem so real." White knows he's playing the martyr, but he leaves the song hauntingly open-ended, as though he isn't sure what to do with this epiphany beyond putting it in a song.


    The rest of Beulah was recorded in the Single Lock offices/studio near White's home. "I can be more relaxed about the process. We can all just sit there and talk about records or baseball without feeling like someone's standing over our shoulders. That's a big deal to me, not to feel pressured. And I'm only about twenty yards away from home, so I can walk over and throw a baseball with my kids or make dinner with my wife."


    Some of the quieter-but no less intense-songs on Beulah were created in that environment, including the ominously erotic opener "Black Leaf" and the Southern gothic love song "Make You Cry." As he worked, a distinctive and intriguing aesthetic began to grow clearer and clearer, one based in austere arrangements and plaintive moods. These are songs with empty spaces in them, dark corners that could hold ghosts or worse. "There were certain moments when Ben and I would finish up a song, listen back to it, and think how in the world did we get here. But that's just what the songs ask for. These are the sounds in my head. This is the sound of me thinking and living and breathing and doing."


    Once White had everything assembled and sequenced, it was time to give the album a title, to wrap everything up for the listener. Beulah stuck-not only because of family history or Blake, but because White realized that making music was his own trip to Beulah. "If you had to sum up what music is for most people in this world, it's that. It's that escape. It's that refuge. You go there and you come back and you use that to help you with your life. You always have that as a place to go."

    1. Black Leaf
    2. What's So
    3. The Once And Future Queen
    4. Make You Cry
    5. Fight For You
    6. Hope I Die
    7. I've Been Over This Before (Feat. The Secret Sisters)
    8. The Martyr
    9. Hate The Way You Love Me
    10. I'll Get Even
    John Paul White
    $15.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Phonography Phonography Quick View

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    Phonography

    Phonography was lo-fi legend R. Stevie Moores first vinyl release only 100 copies were pressed in 1976. The album (including a slightly larger 1978 pressing) barely earned the artist lunch money. But Phonography has since become the cornerstone of the Do-It-Yourself movement, while establishing Moore as the Granddaddy of home recording. Both Rolling Stone and Spin have proclaimed it one of the most influential independent releases of the past 50 years. Phonography was recorded by a self-taught control-freak, using cheap, malfunctioning analog equipment. Robert Steven Moore was born in 1952, in Nashville. His dad, veteran bassist/producer Bob Moore, taxied between sessions for major stars (including Elvis Presley). But Stevie preferred Brit Invasion, Zappa, Brian Wilsons idiosyncratic arrangements, and outliers like the Shaggs. At the urging of his supportive uncle, Harry Palmer, he moved to New Jersey in 1976.


    The Phonography material was recorded by this one-man virtual band at home between 1974 and 1976 with a pair of analog open-reel stereo decks and no multi-tracking equipment. Moore built songs starting with a rhythm track (e.g., played on drums, furniture, or boxes), upon which he layered instrumental and vocal tracks in a primitive sound-on-sound technique. Multiple generations of sound caused frequency loss and sonic distortion the embodiment of lo-fi but these are charming artifacts that dont obscure the brilliance of the compositions and Moores masterful music eccentricities. Moore and Palmer culled the top-tier songs, which were interspersed with spoken word, audio veritÉ, and radio snippets to create a program effect. The song styles were eclectic, reflecting Stevies omnivorous music appetite: hard rock, sweet ballads, Britpop, guitar raves, glam, and Zappa-esque weirdness. The album laid the foundation for Moores four-decade underground career.


    He has self-released hundreds of albums on each successive eras format du jour (cassette, LP, CD, digital download). Hes had vinyl and CD compilations produced worldwide on two dozen indie labels. For a songwriter with a massive catalog of prime material, Moores revenue stream has barely afforded him the luxury of replacing gear plagued by worn-out switches. Yet most of the surviving labels who turned deaf ears to R. Stevie Moore are now, like him, struggling to make a buck on their catalogs. Their corner-office execs come and go. R. Stevie Moore is still here. And Phonography is back.

    1. Melbourne
    2. Explanation of Artist
    3. Goodbye Piano
    4. Explanation of Listener
    5. California Rhythm
    6. I've Begun to Fall in Love
    7. The Spot
    8. I Want You in My Life
    9. I Wish I Could Sing
    10. Theme From A.G.
    11. The Voice
    12. Showing Shadows
    13. She Don't Know What to Do With Herself
    14. The Lariat Wressed Posing Hour
    15. I Not Listening
    16. Mr. Nashville
    17. Moons
    R. Stevie Moore
    $24.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
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