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Neil Diamond The Jazz Singer

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  • The Jazz Singer - Original Songs From The Motion Picture The Jazz Singer - Original Songs From The Motion Picture Quick View

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    The Jazz Singer - Original Songs From The Motion Picture

    The mega-selling soundtrack to Neil Diamond's 1980 screen debut, which grossed more at the box office than Raging Bull. includes the hits America; Love on the Rocks and Hello Again .
    1. America
    2. Adon Olom
    3. You Baby
    4. Love On the Rocks
    5. Amazed and Confused
    6. On the Robert E. Lee
    7. Summerlove
    8. Hello Again
    9. Acapulco
    10. Hey Louise
    11. Songs of Life
    12. Jerusalem
    13. Kol Nidre / My Name is Yussel
    14. American (reprise)
    Neil Diamond
    $24.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Is That All There Is? (Pure Pleasure) Is That All There Is? (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Is That All There Is? (Pure Pleasure)

    When Peggy Lee became well-known in the 1940s, swing and jazz-influenced pop dominated the musical landscape. In the 1960s, however, it was a whole new world in popular music. The British Invasion and Motown - not big bands - were mainstream, and to the Baby Boomer youths of the 1960s, Lee was part of 'our parents' music'. But the singer had a major hit with 1969's Is That All There Is?, one of the best-selling albums of her career. While this isn't a rock album per se - Lee's foundation was still jazz-influenced pop - it acknowledges pop-rock tastes of the 1960s without being unfaithful to her history. Everything on this LP is a gem, and that includes a moody remake of Lee's 1940s hit Don't Smoke in Bed as well as classic arrangements of George Harrison's Something, Neil Diamond's Brother Love's Traveling Salvation Show, Leiber & Stoller's I'm a Woman, and Randy Newman's Love Story. The LP's centerpiece, however, is Newman's hit arrangement of Leiber & Stoller's title song, which was covered by P.J. Harvey in the 1990s. Influenced by German cabaret, this half-spoken, half-sung treasure is as hauntingly soulful as it is maudlin. The song's outlook is far from optimistic; essentially, it's saying that we might as well grab our moments of pleasure and enjoyment where we can find them because ultimately, life is nothing more than a meaningless series of disappointments. But there's nothing disappointing about Is That All There Is?, an LP that is most certainly among Lee's finest accomplishments.



    Musicians:



    • Peggy Lee (vocal), and orchestra





    Recording: November 1962, January / February / April / October 1969 at Capitol Tower, Hollywood, CA

    Production: Lieber & Stoller / Phil Wright / David Cavanaugh




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Is That All There Is?
    2. Love Story
    3. Me and My Shadow
    4. My Old Flame
    5. I'm a Woman
    6. Brother Love's Travelling Salvation Show

    7. Something
    8. Whistle for Happiness

    9. Johnny (Linda)
    10. Don't Smoke in Bed
    Peggy Lee
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Is That All There Is? Is That All There Is? Quick View

    $24.99
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    Is That All There Is?

    Peggy Lee was 49 years old when Capitol Records released Is That All There Is? in 1969. It was her 42nd album, and it had been over 10 years since the singer born Norma Deloris Egstrom, in 1920, had last graced the US Top 40 with her presence; her sultry take on Little Willie John's 'Fever' scaled the upper echelons of the American hit parade in 1958.


    But Lee, a country girl with Scandinavian ancestry who hailed from the plains of North Dakota, had more in the tank. The haunting and idiosyncratic 'Is That All There Is?' (inspired by a short story called Disillusionment from German writer Thomas Mann) captured the public imagination when it was released as a single in the States and started climbing the pop charts, where it peaked at No.11. Such was the song's impact that it won Lee a Grammy Award in the category of Best Contemporary Female Vocal Performance in 1970. Its success was a surprise to Capitol, who thought the song was too odd and esoteric to be a hit.


    The song opens Lee's album of the same name and, even today, remains a profoundly potent piece of music. It has the ability to simultaneously provoke conflicting emotions, eliciting both laughter and pathos. Combining a spoken narrative with a plaintive refrain sung over a jaunty rhythm, it evokes the Berlin cabaret scene of the 1920s and the spirit of German composer Kurt Weill. The song was penned and produced by noted hitmakers Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller, and it's unlike anything else they wrote: a philosophical rumination that questions the meaning of things.


    Arranged and conducted by a young Randy Newman, 'Is That All There Is?' is beautifully delivered by Lee in plangent tones, mixing a droll, ironic humour with a poignant reflection on the absurdity and, indeed, disappointments of life. Despite the song's somber mood and theme of disillusionment, the chorus is gloriously carefree: "Let's keep dancing/Let's break out the booze and have a ball," Lee sings, and she sounds like she means it. (Understandably, the song - which was originally written for, and turned down by, Marlene Dietrich - has inspired many covers over the years, including notable versions by Tony Bennett and PJ Harvey with John Parish.)


    Though it was the undoubted cornerstone of Lee's 1969 album, there was much more to enjoy besides the title song. Another Leiber and Stoller composition, 'Whistle For Happiness', is stylistically similar to 'Is That All There Is?' while their 'I'm A Woman' is a swaggering, sassy blues that was first cut by Lee on her 1963 album of the same name and was a minor US chart hit at the time.


    Peggy Lee Is Love Story Single Label - 300Elsewhere, Lee deconstructs the Al Jolson-associated 'Me And My Shadow' and imbues it with a languorous sensuality, while the Nancy and Frank Sinatra duet 'Something Stupid' is reconfigured into a breezy bossa nova. Another highlight is her take on Randy Newman's 'Love Story (You And Me)', the opening cut on the singer-songwriter's 1968 debut album for Reprise, which is arranged and conducted by the composer himself. Newman's 'Johnny (Linda)' is also included and has an arrangement that recalls the vaudevillian quirkiness of the album's title track.


    Lee also embraced the rock music zeitgeist by tackling The Beatles' George Harrison-penned 'Something' and Neil Diamond's gospel-flavoured 'Brother Love's Travelling Salvation Show', though she does them in her own inimitable way.


    Is That All There Is? dared to be different and showed that, though Peggy Lee was often typecast as a stereotypical jazz chanteuse, she was a much more versatile performer than had hitherto been revealed. Though its title song is an ode to coping with disappointment, that particular emotion is the last thing that you feel when listening to this classic album, which is a life-affirming delight from beginning to end.

    1. Is That All There Is?
    2. Love Story
    3. Me And My Shadow
    4. My Old Flame
    5. I'm A Woman
    6. Brother Love's Travelling Salvation Show
    7. Something
    8. Whistle For Happiness
    9. Johnny (Linda)
    10. Don't Smoke In Bed
    Peggy Lee
    $24.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
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