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  • No Code No Code Quick View

    $33.99
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    No Code


    Mastered Specifically For Vinyl By Bob Ludwig


    Includes Nine Random Replica Polaroids/Lyric Cards


    To celebrate the 20th anniversary of No Code, Pearl Jam reissues No Code on 150-gram vinyl. This is the first time the album has been available on the format since its original release and the first time the album is being mastered specifically for vinyl, by Grammy Award-winning engineer Bob Ludwig. It features recreations of their original packaging, including the set of nine random replica Polaroids/lyric cards


    The 1996 sessions for No Code featured longtime producer Brendan OBrien (his third consecutive collaboration with the band) and drummer Jack Irons, who'd joined the band at the end of the Vitalogy sessions. They explored new approaches to writing and recording, developing songs out of jam sessions and eschewing their stadium-grunge style for self-examining ballads, garage rock and even psychedelic sounds. No Code became the band's third consecutive No. 1 album, with lead single Who You Aretopping Billboard's Modern Rock chart.

    1. Sometimes
    2. Hail, Hail
    3. Who You Are
    4. In My Tree
    5. Smile
    6. Off He Goes
    7. Habit
    8. Red Mosquito
    9. Lukin
    10. Present Tense
    11. Mankind
    12. I'm Open
    13. Around The Bend
    Pearl Jam
    $33.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Dvorak: Symphony No. 8 (Speakers Corner) Dvorak: Symphony No. 8 (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Dvorak: Symphony No. 8 (Speakers Corner)

    In comparison with Dvorák's cyclical Ninth Symphony, the Eighth always seems to fade into the background somewhat, although it is actually far more venturesome as regards its formal structure than its later sister-work. The wealth of poetic mood paintings, heartfelt melodies and seemingly improvisational episodes were described by the composer as unique ideas upon which he elaborated in a completely new way, and which were intentionally far removed from his other symphonies.



    In spite of the highly individual movements, the whole composition is full of airy, lyrical contrasts. The transitional passages are gentle and flowing, as for example in the chorale-like opening which leads into the disciplined, spirited main theme of the first movement. This is followed by a rhapsodic slow movement and a waltz-like Allegretto, and finally a strangely interwoven amalgamation of sonata form and set of variations.



    During the course of his short career, István KertÉsz championed Dvorák's Symphonies in that he was the very first to record the complete works for the DECCA label. For this reason alone, the recording constitutes an excellent performance by the London Symphony Orchestra led by its Hungarian principal conductor.



    Recording: February 1963 at Kingsway Hall, London, by Arthur Lilley

    Production: Ray Minshull



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.




    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Symphony No. 8 in G major, Op. 88
    2. Scherzo capriccioso Op. 66
    Antonin Dvorak
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Off He Goes / Dead Man Off He Goes / Dead Man Quick View

    $9.99
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    Off He Goes / Dead Man

    Off He Goes is a song by the American rock band Pearl Jam. Written by vocalist Eddie Vedder, Off He Goes was originally released in 1996 as the third single from the band's fourth studio album, No Code (1996). The song peaked at number 31 on the Billboard Modern Rock Tracks chart.
    1. Off He Goes
    2. Dead Man
    Pearl Jam
    $9.99
    7 Vinyl Single - Sealed Buy Now
  • Who You Are / Habit Who You Are / Habit Quick View

    $9.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Who You Are / Habit

    Who You Are is a song by American rock band Pearl Jam. Featuring lyrics written by vocalist Eddie Vedder and music co-written by drummer Jack Irons and guitarist Stone Gossard, Who You Are was originally released on July 30, 1996 as the first single from the band's fourth studio album, No Code (1996). The song topped the Billboard Modern Rock Tracks chart. It peaked at number 31 on the Billboard Hot 100.
    1. Who Are You
    2. Habit
    Pearl Jam
    $9.99
    7 Vinyl Single - Sealed Buy Now
  • Hail Hail / Black, Red, Yellow Hail Hail / Black, Red, Yellow Quick View

    $9.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Hail Hail / Black, Red, Yellow

    Hail, Hail is a song by the American rock band Pearl Jam. Featuring lyrics written by vocalist Eddie Vedder and music co-written by guitarist Stone Gossard, bassist Jeff Ament, and guitarist Mike McCready, Hail, Hail was released in 1996 as the second single from the band's fourth studio album, No Code (1996). The song managed to reach the number nine spot on both the Mainstream Rock and Modern Rock Billboard charts.
    1. Hail, Hail
    2. Black, Red, Yellow
    Pearl Jam
    $9.99
    7 Vinyl Single - Sealed Buy Now
  • Forever Forever Quick View

    $20.99
    Buy Now
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    Forever

    The follow up album to 2014's breakthrough I AM KING, FOREVER is heralded by the LP's title track and accompanying official music video. Rolling Stone exclaims, FOREVER captures some of the most punishing noise the band has recorded to date, featuring songs rife with sudden transitions to still-harsher textures.


    Code Orange drummer / co-vocalist Jami Morgan detailed the band's new LP in an exclusive interview with Rolling Stone stating, Everywhere we've turned, we've met a lot of 'You're not this enough for this, or that enough for that, FOREVER opens it up by saying, 'F*ck you, we're here. We're gonna do whatever the f*ck we wanna do, and there are no rules.'


    Recorded with producers Will Yip at Studio 4 in Conshohocken, PA and Kurt Ballou at GodCity Studios in Salem, MA, FOREVER is a jarring and experimental body of work, pushing the envelope with songs like; Bleeding In The Blur, Kill The Creator, and Spy.

    1. Forever
    2. Kill The Creator
    3. Real
    4. Bleeding In The Blur
    5. The Mud
    6. The New Reality
    7. Spy
    8. Ugly
    9. No One Is Untouchable
    10. Hurt Goes On
    11. dream2
    Code Orange
    $20.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • (I Can't Get No) Stevie Jackson (I Can't Get No) Stevie Jackson Quick View

    $17.99
    Buy Now
    x

    (I Can't Get No) Stevie Jackson

    Despite having been responsible for some of Belle and Sebastian's best known songs (Jonathan David, Chickfactor, Seymour Stein and I'm Not Living In the Real World), it has taken Stevie Jackson sixteen years for his first collection of solo recordings.


    Recorded over the last three years in Glasgow and Vancouver, (I Can't Get No) features a range of friends and musical collaborators including members of Belle and Sebastian, The Pastels, Trembling Bells and the songwriting triumvirate, The Company (Jackson, Roy Moller and Gary Thom), and the New Pornographers' rhythm section of Kurt Dahle and John Collins.


    Deluxe edition LP is pressed on heavyweight vinyl and is housed in a gatefold sleeve with download code. Released on Belle & Sebastian's Banchory record label.

    1. Pure of Heart
    2. Just, Just So To The Point
    3. Try Me
    4. Richie Now
    5. Dead Man's Fall
    6. Bird's Eye View
    7. Man of God
    8. Kurosawa
    9. Where Do All The Good Girls Go?
    10. Telephone Song
    11. Press Send
    12. Feel The Morning
    Stevie Jackson
    $17.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Tchaikovsky - Symphony No. 5 (Speakers Corner) Tchaikovsky - Symphony No. 5 (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Tchaikovsky - Symphony No. 5 (Speakers Corner)

    Recordings of Tchaikovsky's late symphonies with the Leningrad Philharmonic under Mravinskij were a legend even in the days of mono recording technique. It comes as no surprise therefore to learn that Tchaikovsky fans were overjoyed when these three great symphonies were released at last on the Yellow Label in top hi-fi quality at the beginning of the Sixties. Masterful performances, as thrilling as live recordings, now became available - recordings which were far superior to all others on the market. Even when the purported 'miracle' of digital recording technique began to take over and industrial record production had become a matter of course, Mravinsky's recordings were still available in a 2CD set. There are reasons enough to re-release the Fifth Symphony as an individual LP, without going into lengthy discussions about which of Tchaikovsky's late symphonies is the most important. Those who treasure a mono version or a Mravinsky recording from an unknown source in their collection are now given the opportunity to compare their version with the present re-release. All others can congratulate themselves on possessing a milestone recording, a true work of reference, for no other Mravinskij sounds better than this one.




    Musicians:



    • The Leningrad Philharmonic Orchestra

    • Jewgenij Mrawinskij (conductor)




    Recording: November 1960 at Musikverein Großer Saal, Vienna, by Harald Baudis

    Production: Karl-Heinz Schneider





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Satz: Andante - Allegro Con anima
    2. Satz: Andante cantabile, con alcuna licenza
    3. Satz: Allegro moderato
    4. Satz: Finale: Andante maestoso - Allegro vivace

    Pyotr Ilich Tchaikovsky
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Beethoven: Symphony No. 3 (Eroica) (Speakers Corner) Beethoven: Symphony No. 3 (Eroica) (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Beethoven: Symphony No. 3 (Eroica) (Speakers Corner)

    Recordings of classical repertoire in the Fifties and Sixties were made during a time of technical development, which is hardly given a thought in our day with its global digitization and mass reproduction. To appreciate the improvement offered by analogue recording technology as opposed to a high-quality mono reproduction, one can do no better than listen to the present rendition of Beethoven's Symphony No. 3. Bruno Walter and his handpicked Columbia Symphony Orchestra present this major orchestral work with its heroic, revolutionary character as a grand symphonic undertaking. Thanks to the new studio technology, Beethoven's 'new path', and his daring experiment with musical form and content is revealed with previously unheard of depth and amplitude. Just how prudently Walter approaches the score is shown again and again in the highly detailed reconstruction and finely chiseled rendition of passages for small ensembles. Instead of depending upon brusque contrasts of the elements, Walter's conducting concentrates on exposing the wealth of differing styles and tonality in the score. This strategy of balancing out the contrasts blazed a trail for today's unremitting search for the much-heralded original sound.

    This Speakers Corner LP was remastered using pure analogue components only, from the master tapes through to the cutting head. All royalties and mechanical rights have been paid.

    Musicians:

    • Ludwig van Beethoven (composer)
    • The Columbia Symphony Orchestra conducted by Bruno Walter

    Recording: January 1958 at Legion Hall, Hollywood (CA)

    About Speakers Corner

    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.

    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.

    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.

    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.

    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.

    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    Symphony No. 3 In E-Flat Major, Op. 55 ("Eroica")
    1. Allegro Con Brio
    2. Funeral March (Adagio Assai)
    3. Scherzo (Allegro Vivace) - Trio
    4. Finale (Allegro Molto - Poco Andante)
    Bruno Walter
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Plays Bach No. 1 (Speakers Corner) Plays Bach No. 1 (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Plays Bach No. 1 (Speakers Corner)

    As long as 40 years ago, at a time when Pop and Classical music were strictly separated from one another, Jacques Loussier's "Swinging Bach" thrilled both friends of Baroque music and jazz lovers alike. Other musicians have tried, and are still trying, to jump on this modern "Bach band wagon" - but not one of them has achieved anything like the international success of the French trio.



    "Play Bach" is to be taken at its word. If Prelude, Fugue or Toccata is on the label - then that's what one gets: the melodies and the harmonic structure of Johann Sebastian's original works are largely left untouched - you always know where counterpoint stops and groove sets in. Just as in Bach's day the keyboard is at the fore, but the double bass also has a good share of the polyphony, and the finely nuanced percussion swings along as though it has no cares in the world and adds its own sparks of fire to pearl-like scale passages.
    What better way to bring the Bach Year to an end than with the re-release of the first Loussier album? The first of Bach's 48 Preludes and Fugues shows how it began - just as they show how Jacques Loussier began.



    Musicians:



    • Jacques Loussier (arranger, piano)

    • Pierre Michelot (bass)

    • Christian Garros (drums, percussion)




    Recording: 1959




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    This title is not eligible for discount.

    Jacques Loussier
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Beethoven: Emperor; Concerto No. 5 (Speakers Corner) Beethoven: Emperor; Concerto No. 5 (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Beethoven: Emperor; Concerto No. 5 (Speakers Corner)

    The Concerto No. 5 in E flat major for Piano and Orchestra, composed in 1809 at the time of Napoleon's siege and occupation of Vienna, was Ludwig van Beethoven's last work in this form. The heroic optimism at the heart of the Concerto finds expression in the majesty of its design and the innovative virtuosity of the solo part. The dialect between piano and orchestra creates an electric atmosphere of brooding depth and sweeping grandeur. Beethoven's choice of key, the E-flat major, was not arbitrary but gave voice rather to the wild pathos in his own soul.



    Clifford Curzon's interpretation of the score is intelligent and refined, his execution characterized by introspective discipline.



    The exemplary interplay between Curzon and Hans Knappertsbusch evokes the chiaroscuro latent in each of the Emperor's three movements. The Vienna Symphony Orchestra displays its customary brilliance throughout.



    This DECCA recording, one of the very earliest in stereo, is convincing both musically and tonally. More than a document, it is a milestone in musical history.





    Musicians:



    • Sir Clifford Curzon

    • Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra

    • Hans Knappertsbusch (conductor)




    Recording: June 1957, Sofiensaal, Vienna by Gordon Parry

    Production: Erik Smith




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. First Movement - Allegro
    2. Second Movement: Adagio Un Poco Mosso
    3. Third Movement: Rondo (Allegro)
    Ludwig Van Beethoven
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Tchaikovsky:  Piano Concerto No. 1 (Speakers Corner) Tchaikovsky: Piano Concerto No. 1 (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Tchaikovsky: Piano Concerto No. 1 (Speakers Corner)

    By the end of February 1875, Tchaikovsky had completed the orchestration of his Piano Concerto No. 1 which was given its first performance in the same year in Boston by Hans von BÜlow. In St. Petersburg the composer himself conducted his concert on the first of December.



    The main theme of the first movement is based upon a Russian folksong, and the finale takes the form of a splendid "danse russe", while the middle section takes up motifs of a french chansonette from Bizet's Carmen.



    Among the many pianists who have recorded this piano concert, Clifford Curzon is remarkable for dispensing with exaggerations and mannerisms in his interpretation. His outstanding technique and analytic skills combine to produce a rendering of impeccable homogeneity.



    The fine sound quality is yet another attractive feature of this impressive recording.



    Recording: October 1958 at Sofiensaal, Vienna by James Brown / Production: John Culshaw




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    Tchaikovsky: Concerto No. 1 for Piano and Orchestra
    - Sir Clifford Curzon, Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Sir Georg Solti
    Clifford Curzon
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Corelli: Concerto Grosso No. 8 (Speakers Corner) Corelli: Concerto Grosso No. 8 (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Corelli: Concerto Grosso No. 8 (Speakers Corner)

    The musical press has showered praise upon the Stuttgarter Kammerorchester and its founder and conductor Karl MÜnchinger for their spectacular performances. This DECCA recording now presents a delightful choice of works performed by this South German ensemble.



    The programme opens in a splendidly festive Baroque spirit with Arcangelo Corelli's famous Christmas Concerto, a work which is typical for the concerto grosso form with its alternation of tutti and solo passages. The instrumental soloists in particular dazzle with their finely chiselled playing and ravishing tone over the gentle sway of the strings. MÜnchinger has achieved a veritable miracle with his arrangement of Johann Pachelbel's Canon, originally composed for the organ, for each and every instrument of the orchestra enhances the magic of this music. Carlo Ricciotti's Concertino No. 2 offers us an insight into the various musical forms of the early 18th century.



    The programme ends with Christoph Willibald Gluck's vigourous Chaconne whose splendour and pomp is taken to new dramatic heights by the Stuttgarter Kammerorchester.



    Light a candle and settle down for a delightful evening of entertainment: this excellent recording ensures that you will enjoy every minute to the full - and not just at Christmas time.



    Recording : October/ November 1960 at Victoria Hall, Geneva by Roy G. Wallace / Production: James Walker





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    Corelli: Concerto Grosso No. 8 / Pachelbel: Canon / Ricciotti: Concertino No. 2
    Gluck: Chaconne - Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra conducted by Karl MÜnchinger
    Karl Munchinger
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Shostakovich: Cello Concerto No. 2 (Speakers Corner) Shostakovich: Cello Concerto No. 2 (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Shostakovich: Cello Concerto No. 2 (Speakers Corner)

    The world of music expects something special from the dedicatees of major compositions, especially when the honoured person himself performs the work either on stage or in the recording studio. Among such personages is Mstislav Rostropovich, the great maestro of the cello, who studied and successfully collaborated with Dmitri Shostakovich while still a student at the Moscow Conservatory and who later gave the premiere performances of his Cello Concertos.



    The Cello Concerto No. 2 from 1966 was composed around the same time as the highly emotional choral Symphonies Nos. 13 and 14 and displays a similar character of gloom and grim drama. The soloist presents the dark theme out of the depths and soon enters into brighter regions full of aggressive layers of sound. A wild conflict between soloist and orchestra follows, whereby the forced gaiety of the cello rages.
    As a contrast, the soloist is in perfect harmony with the piano in Glazunov's Chant du MÉnestrel. Supported by warm chords, Rostropovich lets his instrument soar to the heights in a cultivated and thoughtful fashion and proves once again that he is truly a great interpreter of Russian music.




    Recording: August 1975 at Boston Symphony Hall by Hans-Peter Schweigmann

    Production: Thomas Mowrey




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    Dmitri Shostakovich: Concerto for Violoncello and Orchestra No. 2
    Alexander Glazounov: Chant du Menestrel - Mstislav Rostropovich and the Boston Symphony Orchestra conducted by Seiji Ozawa
    Dmitri Shostakovitch
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Prokofiev: Symphony No. 5 (Speakers Corner) Prokofiev: Symphony No. 5 (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Prokofiev: Symphony No. 5 (Speakers Corner)

    Prokofiev's Symphony No. 5 is one of just a handful of traditional Russian works that have advanced to become a celebrated repertoire piece in the area of conflict between socialist artistic realism and conservative modernism. Although, in contrast to his colleague Shostakovich, Prokofiev toed the party line and was highly privileged, which made it very difficult to believe his later claim that his art was free of politics, his music has touched the hearts of concertgoers all over the world.


    In the present recording, the cosmopolitan Leonard Bernstein and the New York Philharmonic present the whole beauty of the melodies that unfold in the first movement with full orchestral radiance. Cheerfulness as a »hymn to free and happy Man« is given voice in the clarinet theme of the burlesque second movement with its imaginative changes. Reminiscences of the Symphonie classique appear to be intentional. In the finale, Prokofiev proves himself to be a confident master of the classical-romantic canon form, which uses the theme of the first movement and new motifs to create far more than just a melodious apotheosis. Jagged, sharp and percussive final bars round off this supreme orchestral firework, which makes great demands on every single musician.sound of America.


    Musicians:



    • New York Philharmonic Orchestra

    • Sergei Prokofiev (composer)

    • Leonard Bernstein (conductor)




    Recording: February 1966 at the Philharmonic Hall of Lincoln Center, New York

    Production: John McClure



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    I. Andante
    II. Allegro Marcato
    III. Adagio
    IV. Allegro Giocoso
    Leonard Bernstein
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Beethoven: Symphony No. 9 (Speakers Corner) Beethoven: Symphony No. 9 (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $69.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Beethoven: Symphony No. 9 (Speakers Corner)

    It was clear from the start that Beethoven's Ninth Symphony, with its air of solemnity in the final chorus, which calls for brotherly love just as the New Year comes in, would become a musical part of our world's cultural legacy. Hundreds of minds, Beethoven researcher Karl Nef prophesied, have been set in motion by this music in the most varied ways, and it will continue not only to bestow pleasure upon countless thousands, but also to stimulate mental life right at the most fundamental level.



    There are certainly only a very few truly cerebral interpretations which stand out from the fathomless mass of recordings. One of those upon which "The Absolute Sound" journal has stamped its coveted seal of approval is the recording with Georg Solti and his perfectly honed symphony musicians from Chicago. Here, this usually somewhat daring baton-wielder plumbs the very depths of the score and allows Beethoven's rich abundance of ideas to ferment into a great whole.



    The four soloists prove their worth as first choice for the richly detailed and balanced synopsis of this fissured work. They captivate us as much in the solo as in the group singing with their natural and expressive intonation. The dry, very present sound highlights the fact that this is an artistic performance at the highest level.




    Musicians:



    • Pilar Lorengar, Stuart Burrows, and other soloists

    • The Chicago Symphony Chorus & Orchestra

    • Sir Georg Solti (conductor)




    Recording: May 1972 in the Krannert Centre of the University of Illinois, Chicago, by Kenneth Wilkinson and Gordon Parry

    Production: David Harvey



    Format: 2LPs 33rpm / gatefold sleeve



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    This title is not eligible for discount.

    Ludwig Van Beethoven
    $69.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Rachmaninoff - Concerto No. 2 (Speakers Corner) Rachmaninoff - Concerto No. 2 (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Rachmaninoff - Concerto No. 2 (Speakers Corner)

    The Second Piano Concerto represents Rachmaninoff's escape from a crisis lasting several years during which he experienced one catastrophe after another. At the suggestion of his psychiatrist, who had prophesied that he would write wonderful music, he turned once again to the work - and it brought him his greatest success to that date. Although the piano writing demands enormous technical dexterity, the composer was apparently not solely aiming at producing a virtuosic showpiece, since the piano part clings snugly to the orchestra like an accompaniment for long stretches, although it does triumph powerfully here and there for good measure.



    Once again, Byron Janis - whose brilliant interpretations of Rachmaninoff's repertory have influenced whole generations of pianists - has made a benchmark recording in which he alagamates tremendous energy with great tranquility. He revels in the late-Romantic ecstatic harmonies, dazzles us with his transparent presentation of the internal structures, and displays great vigour in the weighty themes. The emotional middle movement is also glorious in that Janis enjoys to the full the interplay of passion and reverie with expansive chords and dark-hued tonalities.




    Recording: April 1960 at the Northrop Memorial Auditorium, Minnesota, USA, by C.R. Fine and Robert Eberenz

    Production: Wilma Cozart-Fine and Harold Lawrence




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.




    This title is not eligible for discount.

    Piano Concerto No. 2 in C minor, Opus 18
    Two Preludes For Piano Solo
    E Flat Major, Opus 23, No. 6
    C Sharp Minor, Opus 3, No. 2
    Byron Janis and Minneapolis Symphony
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Shostakovich - Symphony No. 5 (Speakers Corner) Shostakovich - Symphony No. 5 (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Shostakovich - Symphony No. 5 (Speakers Corner)

    One of the most fascinating aspects of Dmitri Shostakovich's music was and still remains his aesthetic ambiguity, the likes of which is almost impossible to find in modern music. The Fifth Symphony in particular is regarded as an excellent example of how, during Stalin's regime, Shostakovich outwardly remained true to the regulations concerning art while still managing not to forfeit his own artistic freedom and identity. Conceived in a classical vein, the work is filled with powerful motion and Russian song, even going almost as far as late-Romantic transfiguration. But this idyll is deceptive. Again and again the apparent harmony is disrupted by biting sarcasm: the spirited main theme of the first movement soon stiffens into a march-like farce, while in the untroubled second movement a shrill motif in the winds tears apart the cheerful mood.



    Skrowacziewski amalgamates the contrasting tender sweetness of the violins and the violence of the attacking wind instruments in his precise and sparing interpretation, which is free of sugary expression and forced dynamics. His well-balanced conducting, combined with the wonderfully transparent recorded sound creates an ideal basis for identifying all the details which Shostakovich composed 'between the lines of the staff'.




    Recording: March 1961 at Northrop Memorial Auditorium, Minneapolis, USA, by C.R. Fine and Robert Eberenz

    Production: Wilma Cozart Fine




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.




    This title is not eligible for discount.

    Stanislaw Skrowaczewski
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Shostakovich: Symphony No. 10 (Speakers Corner) Shostakovich: Symphony No. 10 (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Shostakovich: Symphony No. 10 (Speakers Corner)

    Russia in the year 1953. After the October Revolution this was probably one of the most eventful epochs in the whole of the 20th century as far as social development and Art were concerned. When Stalin's reign of terror at last came to an end Shostakovich was able to realize his artistic ideas without fear of political persecution. And this is precisely the reason for regarding the premiere performance of his Tenth Symphony, in December 1953, as a gesture of freedom after years of discrimination. Shostakovich wanted his music to reflect human feelings and passions - and indeed the rugged first movement is filled with melancholy. Many biographers have identified a brutal portrait of the dictator Stalin in the strained mechanism and whip-lash rhythm of the following Allegro. The third and fourth movements take on a brighter character and are filled with song-like melody which leads to a splendid Finale.



    Herbert von Karajan and his Berlin orchestra made the present recording just a few years after the work's composition; even today it is still considered one of the very best performances of this unique work.




    Recording: November 1966 at Jesus-Christus-Kirche, Berlin, by GÜnter Hermanns and Hans Weber


    Production: Otto Gerdes





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    Dmitri Shostakovich (1906-1975)
    Symphony No. 10 in E minor, Op. 93
    1. Moderato
    2. Allegro
    3. Allegretto
    4. Andante - Allegro
    Herbert Von Karajan
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Elvis' Golden Records No. 1 (Speakers Corner) Elvis' Golden Records No. 1 (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Elvis' Golden Records No. 1 (Speakers Corner)

    Have we got the lot? The King of Rock'n'Roll certainly didn't need to ask whether his entourage had collected together all their favourite hits. They had gathered them all together - a collection of Golden Records, rather like a selection box of favourite chocolates, greedily swallowed down and enjoyed to the full. And how they loved them all - whether 'complete works' collectors or fans. To this very day, this collection from 1958 is quite set apart from the normal 'best of' collections. It shines out like a precious jewel among mere pebbles. This was the first of four Gold volumes, and it set the standard for those to come. Before any of the immemorable songs came to be included, they had to have sold at least a million copies and won an undeniable and unforgettable reputation as a heart-string plucker. To name a title is more than superfluous. It's quite enough just to listen and enjoy. Whoever wants the ultimate basic Elvis collection can't go wrong here.



    Musicians:



    • Elvis Presley (guitar, vocal)

    • The Jordanaires (vocal)

    • and various bands




    Recordings: January 1956 - September 1957 in Hollywood, New York and Nashville in mono

    Production: Steve Sholes


    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Hound Dog
    2. Loving You
    3. All Shook Up
    4. Heartbreak Hotel
    5. Jailhouse Rock
    6. Love Me
    7. Too Much
    8. Don't Be Cruel
    9. That's When Your Heartaches Begin
    10. (Let Me Be Your) Teddy Bear
    11. Love Me Tender
    12. Treat Me Nice
    13. Anyway You Want Me (That's How I Will Be)
    14. I Want You, I Need You, I Love You
    Elvis Presley
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl Mono - Sealed Buy Now
  • Sibelius Song Recital (Speakers Corner) Sibelius Song Recital (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Sibelius Song Recital (Speakers Corner)

    Jean Sibelius (1885-1957) composed songs from the beginning almost to the end of his lifetime. Shortly before his death, he arranged the piece, which closes this album, Kom nu hit, Död, and so opened a stylistic gateway to Modernity. All the songs in this collection were composed around 1900 and are filled with Late Romantic harmony, a glorious sound and emotional feeling. The song Svatar Rosor is immersed in an alternating bath of major and minor to evoke a dramatic and tragic mood, while the wonderfully colourful Den Första Kyssen, op. 37 no. 1 depicts in music a girl's dialogue with the evening star. And with Flickan kom ... op. 37 no. 5 and Var det en dröm op. 37 no. 4, a powerful vocal drama is placed alongside a lyrical gem. Of the latter work Sibelius allegedly said: »Here you are, this is my most beautiful song!

    Without a doubt, Kirsten Flagstad is the ideal singer for this repertoire. Her highly dramatic soprano voice rises monumentally over the surging orchestral sound but dims down appropriately and effortlessly in the hushed passages. Wagnerians, Strauss lovers and fans of grand romantic gesture will thoroughly enjoy this LP.




    Musicians:



    • Kirsten Flagstad (vocal)

    • Øivin Fjeldstad (conductor)






    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Sibelius Song Recital
    Jean Sibelius
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Borodin - String Quartet No. 2 / Shostakovich - Quartet No. 8 (Speakers Corner) Borodin - String Quartet No. 2 / Shostakovich - Quartet No. 8 (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Borodin - String Quartet No. 2 / Shostakovich - Quartet No. 8 (Speakers Corner)

    Unlike his fellow countryman Tchaikovsky, it wasn't easy for Alexander Borodin to achieve the recognition due to him. As a professor of chemistry, Borodin found very little time for composing, but in spite of this he is considered one of the most important Russian symphonic composers of the 19th century. Borodin also created works for small ensembles; thanks to its beautiful, slow notturno, his String Quartet No. 2 is among the most important compositions in chamber music.



    Dmitri Shostakovich has often been honoured as one of the outstanding composers of this century. Shostakovich was devastated by the destruction of Dresden and the composition of the moving String Quartet No. 8 was his means of overcoming his war experiences. The intensity of this piece is augmented by the relaxed climax in the largo which brings his composition to a serene ending.
    The international career of the Moscow Philharmonic Quartet began in 1955 when it took on the honourable title "The Borodin Quartet". These 1962 recordings are masterly performances, full of great expressivity. Even the highest demands are met by the warm and full sonority.






    Recording: September 1962 at DECCA Studios, London by J. Clegg

    Production: E. Smith





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    This title is not eligible for discount.

    The Borodin Quartet
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Bruckner: Symphony No. 5 / Mozart: Symphony No. 36 (Speakers Corner) Bruckner: Symphony No. 5 / Mozart: Symphony No. 36 (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $69.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Bruckner: Symphony No. 5 / Mozart: Symphony No. 36 (Speakers Corner)

    Eugen Jochum was a modest man who did not use the media to draw attention to himself but rather to document his musical intentions. And right from the very beginning he focussed on magnitude. Aged only 23, he made his debut in Munich with Bruckner's Symphony No. 7 and so laid the foundations for his lifelong devotion to the Austrian composer's works, as is demonstrated by his complete recording of the Symphonies that was made during the years 1958-1967. The present account of the Fifth Symphony was recorded roughly half way through his thorough exploration and study of Bruckner's symphonic works. From the very beginning, the Concertgebouw Orchestra strides majestically towards the Finale with its sonorous brass sound in the chorale, and fugal sections. A divine atmosphere is guaranteed - quite literally - by the work being performed in the hallowed halls of the Benedictine Abbey in Ottobeuren to celebrate its foundation 1200 years ago.



    Jochum's fresh and scholarly account of Mozart's "Linz" Symphony reminds us of his superb mastery of the Viennese Classics. The music, which ranges from festive cheerfulness to abrupt gloominess, is resolutely conducted - with the happy result that the hackneyed image of Jochum as an otherworldly specialist of the Romantic era is completely abolished. Measured against the conductor's self-concept as a universal medium for expressing the ideas of the great maestros, the present recording is a befitting portrait of his superb versatility on the rostrum.





    Recording: May 1964 at Benedictiner Abbey, Ottobeuren, Germany, by Henk Jansen

    Production: Jaap van Ginneke



    Format: 2LPs 33rpm



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Anton Bruckner: Symphony No. 5 in B flat major
    2. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart: Symphony No. 36 in C major, K.425 (Linz)
    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
    $69.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Tchaikovsky - Symphony No. 6 Pathetique (Speakers Corner) Tchaikovsky - Symphony No. 6 Pathetique (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Tchaikovsky - Symphony No. 6 Pathetique (Speakers Corner)

    Made during the pioneering days of stereo technology when everyone was vying for a piece of the cake, it is hard to believe that this absolutely top-notch recording of Tchaikovsky's "PathÉtique" has never been brought to the ears of music lovers until today. And it is even more unbelievable since it was made by a first-class orchestra, the Berlin Radio Symphony Orchestra, and conducted by one of the greatest conductors of the 20th century, Ferenc Fricsay. The reasons for the non-release are a matter of speculation because those responsible have kept them under their hat.



    Not even the man behind the microphone, Werner Wolf, can recall making this recording - although a yellowed recording protocol discloses carefully noted details about the recording venue and date. No wonder that the tapes never got made into records. It is not with a little pride and much joyful anticipation that the announcement can be made: the record is spinning on the turntable at last!



    And at long last a gap in Fricsay's repertoire can be closed. Specially recommended: listen to the wonderful clarity of the upper strings which is preserved even in the softest passages.



    This record was part of the 3-LP Set "The Conductors" and is now available again.




    Musicians:



    • Radio-Symphony-Orchestra Berlin

    • Ferenc Fricsay (conductor)




    Recording: 17-19 and 22 September 1959 at Jesus-Christus Kirche, Berlin, by GÜnter

    Hermanns and Werner Wolf / Production: Otto Gerdes





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.




    This title is not eligible for discount.

    Symphony No. 6 in B minor, Op. 74 (Pathetique)
    Satz: Adagio - Allegro non troppo
    Satz: Allegro con grazia
    Satz: Allegro molto vivace
    Satz: Finale. Adagio lamentoso
    Pyotr Ilich Tchaikovsky
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
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