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  • Not The Actual Events Not The Actual Events Quick View

    $19.99
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    Not The Actual Events

    Part one of a three EP trilogy of records. Unapologetic, unfriendly, dense, lyrically complex, so-far-behind-the-times-it's-ahead-of-its-time, hipster-repelling uncompromising music smart people can fuck to.
    1. Branches/Bones

    2. Dear World

    3. She's Gone Away

    4. The Idea Of You

    5. Burning Bright (Field On Fire)
    Nine Inch Nails
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • ADD VIOLENCE (Awaiting Repress) ADD VIOLENCE (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $21.99
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    ADD VIOLENCE (Awaiting Repress)

    Nine Inch Nails' new EP, ADD VIOLENCE, is set for release on vinyl via Capitol Records. The five-song collection is the second in a series of three related EPs. The first, Not The Actual Events, was released in December of 2016.


    ADD VIOLENCE finds the band (Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross) becoming more accessible and impenetrable at the same time. The sonic palette expands significantly from Not The Actual Events, incorporating elements of beauty into the dark dissonance. The narrative arc linking the three records begins to emerge through the disassociated lyrics and the provocative and clue-filled cover artwork.

    1. Less Than
    2. The Lovers
    3. This Isn't The Place
    4. Not Anymore
    5. The Background World
    Nine Inch Nails
    $21.99
    12 Vinyl EP - Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • Bad Witch (Awaiting Repress) Bad Witch (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $13.99
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    Bad Witch (Awaiting Repress)

    Nine Inch Nails have announced details of a new six-track release, Bad Witch, set for release via Capitol Records. This new EP completes the trilogy that began with 2016's Not The Actual Events and 2017's Add Violence.
    1. Shit Mirror
    2. Ahead Of Ourselves
    3. Play The Goddamned Part
    4. God Break Down The Door
    5. I'm Not From This World
    6. Over And Out
    Nine Inch Nails
    $13.99
    12 Vinyl EP - Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • The Parallax II: The Further Sequence (Awaiting Repress) The Parallax II: The Further Sequence (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $29.99
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    The Parallax II: The Further Sequence (Awaiting Repress)

    Double gatefold marbled 2LP pressing with 2 x 4-color inserts from Metal Blade Records.

    Between the Buried and Me have not made a name for themselves through playing it safe. Pushing the envelope of heavy music with each successive release, they have continually evolved in thrilling new directions while maintaining the honesty and integrity that has connected with so many listeners. With The Parallax II: Future Sequence, the first concept album of their career, the North Carolina based unit have delivered their most complex, ambitious, and accomplished work to date. "We're certainly not the average metal band, we write what we want to write, and we've never really tried to fit in anywhere," states guitarist Paul Waggoner. "With this record we held nothing back. We were excited to experiment and see where it took us, and working with a concept was a really interesting new challenge."


    The concept was first introduced to the band's fans with 2011's The Parallax: Hypersleep Dialogues EP, which established the narrative's two characters, Prospect I and Prospect II, the story commencing with the events of Parallax II. Separated by millions of light years, the two men exist in ignorance of the other yet are intrinsically connected by a shared soul, which ultimately brings them together. "Both men exist in isolation, one because he runs away from the life that is his and the other when he leaves his dying planet in the hope of creating new life elsewhere, through the planting of souls," explains vocalist Tommy Rogers.


    "As the story progresses you realize they are actually the same person, and at the end of the journey they're responsible for destroying all life as they know it, reinforcing the idea that humanity is a destructive species, and that there's some kind of innate flaw about us that causes us to destroy everything we touch." While the story is very much based in fiction and grounded in the imagination of Rogers, it was important that the vocalist was able to emotionally connect with it, and relate it to his own life, thereby making it relatable for listeners. "That was probably the hardest thing for me, making sure I could find that connection. The main thing that these characters go through is confusion and isolation, and I think that's something every person deals with in their lives at some point. As a musician you spend a lot of time with your own thoughts, so despite the science fiction of it all it is still a very personal record."


    Produced by the band, which is rounded out by guitarist Dustie Waring, bassist Dan Briggs, and drummer Blake Richardson, alongside longtime collaborator Jamie King, the recording process was smooth, though labor intensive, if for no other reason than the sheer amount of material that had to be tracked. Stepping back from it, the band are proud of everything they have achieved. "This whole process was a lot of work, and it's definitely the most rewarding piece of music we've ever written," states Rogers. "It's a very coherent record, and I think nowadays records are getting thrown out there without much thought put into them. I like that what we've done is kind of bring back the whole album feel, which was really important once but doesn't seem to be any more." With plans to play Parallax II in its entirety on forthcoming tours, the band hope this album introduces new fans to their music, yet they maintain the humble aspirations that have always driven them.


    "I'm a firm believer that if you create something that's unique and different there's always going to be a niche market for that. Our mentality is to keep doing what we're doing, writing music that challenges both us and the listener, and to keep playing to everyone who wants to see us," Waggoner states. Rogers concurs with this, adding "I think what we do speaks loudly to people. We're a very genuine band, we do what we want because we love doing it, and I think that's what people want. They want honesty in their music, and they want music that comes from the heart rather than comes from a computer, or that is made by people motivated by making money. We're just going to keep writing the best songs we can and with that continue to grow, and hopefully through doing that more and more people will find us.

    1. Goodbye to Everything
    2. Astral Body
    3. Lay Your Ghosts to Rest
    4. Autumn
    5. Extremophile Elite
    6. Parallax
    7. The Black Box
    8. Telos
    9. Bloom
    10. Melting City
    11. Silent Flight Parliament
    12. Goodbye to Everything Reprise
    Between The Buried And Me
    $29.99
    Colored Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • Made In Brooklyn Made In Brooklyn Quick View

    $29.99
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    Made In Brooklyn

    New Album From Nitty Gritty Dirt Band Founder, John Mceuen


    Plated And Pressed At Quality Record Pressings


    Made in Brooklyn, the new album from Nitty Gritty Dirt Band founder, John McEuen, is coming your way on September 30th via Chesky Records. The album is a time capsule of American Roots music that features guest performances from the likes of Steve Martin, David Bromberg, David Amram, John Carter Cash, and a dozen other well-known stars of the genre. Featuring both original material from John, as well as unexpected covers such as Warren Zevon's Excitable Boy, Made in Brooklyn is a music-to-your-ears audio feast.


    Part of the Chesky Binaural + Series, all recorded with a single microphone, the band appears right before you with this spacious, lush and multi-dimensional recording. Now headphone users will hear the same three-dimensional sound and imaging as audiophiles have for the past 25 years with Chesky Recordings. Also, these new Binaural+ Series albums capture even more spatial realism for the home audiophile market, bringing you one step closer to the actual event. You will hear some of the most natural and pure cool music ever recorded!


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. My Dirty Life and Times
    2. Travelin' Mood
    3. She Darked the Sun
    4. Acoustic Traveller
    5. I Rose Up
    6. Excitable Boy
    7. My Favorite Dream
    8. I Still Miss Someone
    9. Mr. Bojangles
    John McEuen
    $29.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Concrete Confessional The Concrete Confessional Quick View

    $24.99
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    The Concrete Confessional

    An institution can be relied on forever. Its foundations don't shake due to the winds of change or tides of trends-no matter how volatile, omnipresent, or tenuous.


    With steadfast determination, drive, and dedication, Hatebreed cement themselves as one of heavy music's strongest institutions on their seventh full-length offering and very first for Nuclear Blast worldwide, 2016's The Concrete Confessional. Since 1994, the Connecticut quintet-Jamey Jasta [vocals], Chris Beattie [bass], Wayne Lozinak [guitar], Frank Novinec [guitar], and Matthew Byrne [drums]-has risen to the ranks of hardcore and heavy metal elite with a GRAMMY® Award nomination, main stage slots on festivals, and countless fans worldwide. 2013's The Divinity Of Purpose earned their highest entry on the Billboard Top 200, bowing at #17 with impressive first-week sales in excess of 17,000. When it came time to return to the studio after two years on the road, Jasta and his cohorts clung to the bedrock on which their legacy stands firm.


    "There's nothing better than loud amps, riffs that hit you right in the chest, and lyrics that spark a new thought and give you a charge," he declares. "That's our musical DNA. We could just be who we are. We don't need to incorporate whatever the trend is. We can just be Hatebreed. There are some new highlights to the game, but you know it's us."


    The Divinity Of Purpose saw them become a headliner in locations such as Slovenia, Slovakia, Russia, Japan, and beyond. They would perform at Poland's Woodstock in front of 400,000 people. Stateside, the band supported longtime friends Slipknot on an extensive 2015 run in between festival appearances at Rock On The Range, Welcome To Rockville, and more as well as Motörhead's Motörboat with Slayer and Motörhead.


    "Riding into this album, I realized we could play with bands of every genre nearly anywhere without deviating from who we are," continues Jasta. "The Motörboat was really a highlight of our career. We played this exclusive event with some of our chief influences. We got to literally chart new territory."


    Returning home in the Fall of 2015, they entered the studio with longtime producer Zeuss [Rob Zombie, Soulfly]. Immediately, they channeled the spirit that's long defined their signature sound. By January, the record was mixed by Josh Wilbur [Megadeth, Lamb Of God] and primed for ignition.


    "We had a really good vibe in the studio," he says. "The record is a snapshot of this time for us."


    It also reflects what's going on outside. The opening track and first single "A.D." fuses together torrential thrashed-out guitars, double bass drums, and Jasta's immortal growl before an incendiary lead. The singer dissects what the American Dream means in a climate of upheaval. "Fight fire with fire, you'll see everyone's burning," he screams. Think of it as "Vote With A Bullet" or "Holy Wars The Punishment Due" for the Instagram age.


    "It's a mirror of both sides of the story whether it's what you believe in the media or what you actually see," he explains. "Musically, it came together quickly. It's about all of the frustrated feelings that come out when I turn on the news. So much of our attention is focused on the wrong areas. People want to one-up each other with better clothes and cars, and it's all bullshit. Nobody goes to the grave with any of that stuff. It's not all instant gratification. What exists on the phone and computer isn't what exists in real life. What is the American Dream anymore?"


    The machine gun chug of "Looking Down The Barrel Of Today" proves equally uplifting and undeniable. "I wanted something to get crowds pumped up," he admits. "So many fans will tell us, 'Your records help me get through my life.' I needed to encourage this cyclical power to get up and face the day. You either make the best of today, or you're done in by it."


    "Something's Off" carries an ominously lyrical bass line into a guttural chant, showcasing Jasta's chilling vocal dynamics in the process. "I've written songs about depression, alcoholism, and falling back into destructive patterns," he says. "However, I never felt like I could really put my finger on what anxiety is. It's not just social anxiety but this unexplained feeling of unease. I've felt it since I was in kindergarten. You can't control when it happens. Heavy music has kept that beast at bay-in addition to exercise and experiences with my family. I had to confront it directly in the lyrics here."


    Elsewhere, "Remember When" and "Slaughtered In Their Dreams" juxtapose visceral lyricism with a searing sonic backdrop as chaotic as it is catchy. Through and through, The Concrete Confessional is classic Hatebreed.


    In order to transfer this message to the masses, the band inked a global deal with Nuclear Blast. "They're world-renowned mainstays in the metal community," he smiles. "We get to be in the company of career bands we look up to." These musicians have come a long way from the East Coast's storied nineties underground scene. Their journey has seen them achieve a 2005 GRAMMY® Award nod in the category of "Best Metal Performance" for "Live For This," sell over 1.2 million records, and land a #1 debut on Billboard's DVD Chart with 2009's Live Dominance. Moreover, they've annihilated audiences from OZZfest Japan and Download Festival to Wacken, Hellfest, and beyond.


    Now, The Concrete Confessional fits right into the bold, bloody, and beating heart of the Hatebreed institution.


    "The title had to be something that was heavy and hard, but also vulnerable and honest," Jasta leaves off. "Heavy music is this cleansing, therapeutic, and cathartic experience. You're on that concrete floor, the guitars are crushing you, and someone's screaming their head off-sharing their pain and aspects of their life through words, poetry, or songs. There's nothing like it. You confess you have negative thoughts, and you purge them. For however long you're at the show, there are no bills to pay, issues to deal with, or problems holding you back. You can be free."

    1. A.D.
    2. Looking Down The Barrel Of Today
    3. Seven Enemies
    4. In The Walls
    5. From Grace We've Fallen
    6. Us Against Us
    7. Something's Off
    8. Remember When
    9. Slaughtered In Their Dreams
    10. The Apex Within
    11. Walking The Knife
    12. Dissonance
    13. Serve Your Masters
    Hatebreed
    $24.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Maybe They Will Sing For Us Tomorrow (Awaiting Repress) Maybe They Will Sing For Us Tomorrow (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $25.99
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    Maybe They Will Sing For Us Tomorrow (Awaiting Repress)

    150 Gram Vinyl


    Five years ago on May 6th, 2008 we released Maybe They Will Sing For Us Tomorrow. It was a different record for us. We had been invited to play at the Riceboy Sleeps art exhibit after party. It would be our first live show. Since it would just be the two of us performing we had to write material specific to the event. Of course it was intimidating because both Jonsi Birgisson from Sigur Rós and the gentle natured, multitalented Alex Somers would be sitting in the audience just a few feet away from us. Nothing to worry about though, they were absolute sweethearts. Jonsi toasted us in the middle of the set, which helped soothe our nerves, and you could sense their genuine appreciation for our performance. (On a personal note, my favorite memory was when Jonsi sang to me while we were just sitting around and talking about creating loops and soundscapes.)


    Andrew and I came back home and decided to create a record out of the music we had written for the after party. There were no beats on the record, just pure ambience and a few cellos added to sweeten things up. We finished recording and Jonsi and Alex asked if Riceboy Sleeps could create the artwork after we asked them for permission to use the title, Maybe They Will Sing For Us Tomorrow. So here we are now with a remastered version and and a gorgeous vinyl release. Why? When we brought the original recordings to the mastering session the title track had been bounced down at the wrong sample rate so it wasn't in an actual key. It was between two keys. When we performed it live we would play it in the proper key and it just sounded better to us. So we approached Taylor Deupree and asked him to do a new mix of the title track and remaster the whole record. The record now sounds like it's in 3D and the title track is now true to our original vision. So rich and warm. As for the vinyl Well a lot of you have been asking for vinyl from us so this is kind of a test to see how it goes. But the main reason is the artwork. Vinyl sized artwork by Riceboy Sleeps. It's gorgeous and it's just nice to be able to hold it in your hands. Not to mention the warm sound of vinyl. This is a unique recording within the Hammock catalog. Unique in the way it was created, in it's sonic texture and artwork.

    -Hammock

    1. Gold Star Mothers
    2. City In The Dust On My Window
    3. This Kind of Life Keeps Breaking Your Heart
    4. Mono No Aware
    5. Three Sisters
    6. Maybe They Will Sing For Us Tomorrow
    7. Elm
    8. Razorback Drug Town
    9. Eighty-Four Thousand Hymns
    10. We Will Say Goodbye To Everyone
    11. All Of Your Children Are Addicts
    Hammock
    $25.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • The Journey Man The Journey Man Quick View

    $35.99
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    The Journey Man

    "In my music," says Goldie, "is everything I've learned, everyone I've met, everything I've experienced." And it's been an incredible trip. The maverick innovator - who rewrote the future of the jungle scene with landmark releases that still sound like they were kidnapped from tomorrow - has a unique story to tell. From children's homes in the West Midlands through stints in New York and Miami as one of the UK's most celebrated exponents of graffiti art to rubbing shoulders with an exceptional list of musical collaborators including David Bowie, Noel Gallagher and KRS-One, Goldie has defiantly, definitively, done it his own way. "I'm an alchemist," he likes to insist. "I practice the dark arts of messing with the form of something solid."


    Though marriage and his passion for bikram yoga have, he says, proved a calming influence, these days he's just as full of inspired, out-there ideas as he was back in 1993 when he did his first cover interview for the rave magazine Generator. "My music is about fallout," he said then, "about the damage that has been done to the system." Today, in the office of one of his London-based contacts, the ideas are still sparking. "Drum'n'bass has done to electronic music what graffiti has done to the art world," he muses, before launching into a rapid-fire synthesis of art history, dancefloor evolution and his own hyperactive brand of self-actualization, which loosely translates as: "Why do something ordinary when you can do something extraordinary?"


    It sums up the reason why, in 1994, music critic Simon Reynolds famously observed: "Goldie revolutionized jungle not once but three times. First, there was Terminator (pioneering the use of time stretching), then Angel (fusing Diane Charlemagne's live vocal with David Byrne/Brian Eno samples to prove that hardcore could be more conventionally musical), now there's Timeless, a 22-minute hardcore symphony." Each of these were moments that shaped the musical fabric of the decade and beyond, presaging Goldie's transition from the underground rave scene into the world of bona fide A- list superstars.


    But it didn't start out like that. The boy who would become Goldie was born Clifford Price on 19 September 1965, just as The Rolling Stones hit the top of the charts with Satisfaction. His dad Clement, originally from Jamaica, had been plying his trade as a foundryman in Leeds. His mum Margaret, who had been born in Glasgow, was a popular singer in the pubs and clubs of the West Midlands. Barely more than a toddler, Goldie was just three when she placed him into foster care (though she kept his younger brother Melvin). He still remembers, he says, the day the social workers came to take him away.


    Over the next 15 years, he bounced between a series of foster homes and local government institutions around the Walsall area. His eclectic musical taste was forged, he reckons, in those same local authority homes listening to the sonic tangle of other teenagers' record collections. "In one room," he says, "a kid would be playing Steel Pulse while through the wall someone else had a Japan record on and another guy would be spinning Human League." On rare visits to see his dad, he'd lie sprawled over the living room couch, listening to Jazz FM, marveling at the lavishly-tooled '80s productions of Miles Davis, Pat Metheny, David Sanborn and Michael Franks, adding further layers to his complex musicography.


    Already developing the irresistible urge to excel that has marked his inimitable musical career, Goldie's first love was roller-hockey. He earned a place as goalkeeper in England's national squad before the lure of music overtook the lure of sport. After discovering electro and hip hop, he grew his hair - the "goldilocks" that won him his nickname - and joined a breakdance crew called the B-Boys in nearby Wolverhampton. He also discovered graffiti. "They called me 'the spray can king of the Midlands'," he says proudly. His talent was undeniable, bringing him to the attention not only of Britain's Arts Council but to Dick Fontaine, producer of a Channel 4 TV documentary on graffiti. Fontaine's 1987 film Bombin' captured a visit to the UK by New York artist Brim Fuentes. Brim met Goldie and his B-Boys crew in Wolverhampton's Heathtown before heading a dozen miles away to Birmingham's Handsworth, where the producer filmed the aftermath of rioting that had left four dead, 35 injured and dozens of stores burned out. Several months later, Fontaine reversed the process and took Goldie to New York, introducing him to hip-hop pioneer Afrika Bambaataa. For Goldie, on his first trip abroad, never mind his first trip over the Atlantic, the Big Apple was love at first sight. Back in Britain, he begged, borrowed and saved until he had enough to fund a return trip to the Bronx.


    "I started painting the trains and getting involved on the streets," he says, remembering his total immersion in what was still, at that point, an emerging culture. Art and music as symbiotic technologies. Rubbing shoulders with the Big Apple's best graffiti artists, his own distinctive style was accelerated and enriched. A move to Miami followed. He worked in the flea markets, he says, "painting trucks for drug dealers" and developing a sideline in gold jewelry that included the distinctive grills that became a trademark on his return to the UK. The magical properties of shaping, working and bending precious metals to his will - as close to alchemy as the modern world gets - became an analogue for the way he prefers to operate in the studio, chasing quicksilver dreams, mercury-fast rivulets of imagination into impossibly lush, breakbeat concertos. Back in Britain, Goldie found himself seduced by the sweetheart of the rave. Though it took him eight attempts to get entry into the club, at London's Rage in 1991 he marveled at the alternate sonic worlds being forged by Fabio and Grooverider behind the decks. "It really flipped me out," he remembers. Soon he found himself in the orbit of Dego McFarlane and Mark Clair. Their label Reinforced was in the vanguard of breakbeat, issuing astonishing records that stripped out boundaries and limits while setting the tone for the scene's sense of adventure. At first, he helped out doing artwork and a bit of A&R. But soon he was in Reinforced's Internal Affairs studio watching intently as Mark and Dego recorded tracks like Cookin' Up Ya Brain and Journey From The Light. "I was watching what they could do," says Goldie, "trying to gauge the possibilities of the technology." Soon he was getting involved. "I remember one session we did that lasted over three days," he says, "just experimenting, pushing the technology to its limits. We'd come up with mad ideas and then try to create them. We were sampling from ourselves and then resampling, twisting sounds around and pushing them into all sorts of places."


    What followed was a series of inspired break-driven releases such as Killa Muffin, Dark Rider and Menace. Then Terminator, with its writhing drum loop, dropped and suddenly Goldie's name was on everyone's lips. He followed up with the equally revolutionary Angel, tilting the axis towards the lush, trippy textures that made 1995's debut album Timeless the drum'n'bass scene's first platinum album. Incredibly, given what was happening elsewhere in the scene at the time, the recording of the album's epic title track began as far back as 1993, when most other producers were still focused on the original sonic tropes of hardcore rave.


    Timeless was a masterpiece - of production, of songwriting, of sonic perfection and breakbeat futurism. Even today, it still sounds as astonishingly new and inspired as it did back on those early pre-release cassettes circulated by London Records in the early months of 1995 when Goldie was still living on the 18th floor of a North London tower block.


    By then, Goldie had already set up his own record label - Metalheadz - with his friends the DJ duo Kemistry and Storm. Along with studio collaborator, Rob Playford's Moving Shadow and LTJ Bukem's Looking Good imprint, Metalheadz helped to define drum'n'bass as a distinct musical format with singles by J Majik, Asylum and Goldie himself. Still bursting with energy, he then launched a legendary club night, Metalheadz Sunday Sessions, at London's Blue Note. The scene's best producers - among them revolutionary artists like Photek, Source Direct, Peshay and Dillinja - would compete to have their latest recordings debuted at the club and the scene's faithful came from far and wide to hear the best tunes before anyone else. "Those nights at the Blue Note were magical," he recalls. "It was an underground phenomenon that became an institution." David Bowie, who was making the drum'n'bass-influenced album Earthling at the time, fell in love with the place. "I remember popping out to take a break from all the madness inside the club," says Goldie. "He was outside having a cigarette, a bit of a breather. We chatted for a bit, looked at each other, grinned and then plunged back into it all. It was just that kind of place."


    Goldie is one of only a handful of artists ever to co-write with Bowie - on the track Truth from the drum'n'bass pioneer's second album Saturnz Return. Released in 1998, the album also saw his vision become more expansive (the opening track, Mother, clocked in at just over an hour). The album's collaborative approach included guest spots from rap legend KRS-One, Sex Pistols manager and all-around provocateur Malcolm McLaren, super-producer Trevor Horn and Oasis main man Noel Gallagher (on the single Temper Temper).


    Fuelled by the limitless creativity that has been the hallmark of his career to date, Goldie next turned to acting. He reunited with Bowie in Andrew Goth's 1999 thriller Everybody Loves Sunshine then took the part of Bullion in the 1999 James Bond movie The World Is Not Enough. Other box office smashes - including Guy Ritchie's crime heist caper Snatch - followed before he joined the cast of BBC1 soap opera EastEnders, playing the gangster Angel Hudson.


    A series of blockbuster TV appearances - on shows such as Maestro (where he learned to conduct an orchestra), Classic Goldie (which saw him perform his own orchestral composition at the Royal Albert Hall in the summer of 2009) and Goldie's Band: By Royal Appointment.


    The orchestral training proved useful. In 2014, he translated his original vision for Timeless into the stunning Timeless (Sine Tempore). Performed live with the Heritage Orchestra at the Wilderness Festival to suitably rapturous acclaim, the performance was repeated the following year as part of the Meltdown Festival at London's Royal Festival Hall. In between, he found time to unveil Fragments Of Gold, a piece inspired by medieval chants that he performed live in Glasgow Cathedral.


    Drum'n'bass, of course, has remained a consistent passion, both through his Metalheadz label and his releases under the Rufige Kru moniker (2007's Malice In Wonderland and 2009's Memoirs Of An Afterlife). "Technologically," he says, "breakbeat has managed to surpass all other forms of music to date. There isn't a recording engineer alive who can tell me there's any other form of music that is more complex than the music we make." Goldie has also recently announced he will be releasing a brand new double album 'The Journey Man' this year. The album comprises two parts, 16 brand new tracks in total, all written and produced by Goldie. It also features a host of collaborators handpicked by Goldie to help realize his vision for the album.


    "I often look at music not so much as a producer but like a director. You're drawing together engineers, performers and arrangers to create something special, something magical. It's like alchemy. The notes, the music, the lyrics, they're all in my head and each element has to be communicated and brought to life to create the finished track. I'm always inspired by great movie directors - people like Stanley Kubrick and PT Anderson - and, if you think about it, it's quite a similar approach. They start off with a vision and then they use that vision to deploy the actors and the cameramen and the editors in order to create the finished film."


    Collaborators on 'The Journey Man' album include vocalist and songwriter Natalie Duncan, who was discovered when chosen in the three-part BBC series 'Goldie's Band By Royal Appointment' and later provided the vocals for Goldie's 2012 single 'Freedom'. Other featured vocalists on the album include Terri Walker, Tyler Lee Daly, Natalie Williams, JosÉ James, Naomi Pryor as well as Goldie's wife, Mika Wassenaar Price.


    'The Journey Man' will be released through Cooking Vinyl and Goldie's own record label, Metalheadz.


    Goldie's love affair with painting has remained consistent too and he continues to exhibit visual work that's just as dazzling as his sonic output. Beginning with Night Writers, the 1986 exhibition at Wolverhampton's art gallery that introduced Goldie and his Supreme Graffiti Team to the British Arts Council, his shows have defined a unique aesthetic that's all his own. And through them all, from 1987's Rockin' The City in Birmingham (where he exhibited alongside Massive Attack's Robert Del Naja) and the 1988 Crucial Creators exhibition in Walsall to more recent gallery events like 2007's Love Over Gold and 2012's Athleticizm collection (including portraits of London Olympics stars such as Victoria Pendleton, Tom Daley and Jessica Ennis), runs a consistent thread of energy, experimentalism and boundary-pushing. His 2013 collection, Lost Tribes, an innovative series of pieces fusing Goldie's style with the artistic expression of the ancient peoples of Africa, Asia and America was, he says, "my most important breakthrough".


    And for the kid who lay awake, gazing at the stars, through the window of a children's home, growing up has brought some surprises. In 2012, he was selected as one of the BBC's New Elizabethans, 60 people - ranging from David Hockney to Roald Dahl, David Bowie and Tim Berners-Lee - who have helped shape British culture during the reign of Elizabeth II. Four years later, he was awarded the MBE in the Queen's New Year Honours. It's acceptance, of course, on a grand scale. But at heart, he's still the gatecrasher, amped-up on ideas, buzzing on nothing but love, hope and the certainty that, while his way might not be the easy way, it's very definitely the path of a true artist.


    - Tim Barr, 2017

    LP 1
    1. Horizons (feat. Terri Walker & Swindle)
    2. Prism
    3. Mountains
    4. Castaway
    5. The Mirrored River


    LP 2
    1. I Adore You (w/ Ulterior Motive)
    2. I Think of You
    3. Truth (feat. Jose James)
    4. Redemption


    LP 3
    1. Tu Viens Avec Moi?
    2. The Ballad Celeste
    3. This Is Not A Love Song
    4. The River Mirrored (feat. Terri Walker)
    5. Triangle
    6. Tomorrow's Not Today
    7. Run Run Run

    Goldie
    $35.99
    Vinyl LP - 3 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Layla (Awaiting Stock) Layla (Awaiting Stock) Quick View

    $49.99
    x

    Layla (Awaiting Stock)

    Ranked 115/500 On Rolling Stone Magazine's List Of The 500 Greatest Albums Of All Time.



    Eric Clapton and Duane Allman in the Same Band for the Only Time: Derek and the Dominos' Layla a Timeless Batch of Fire-Pot Blues, Poignant Gospel, Searing Rock, and Lustful Emotion


    Mastered from the Original Master Tapes and Pressed at RTI: Mobile Fidelity 180g 2LP of Layla Is the Definitive-Sounding Analog Edition, Presents Music With Immersive Detail and Realism


    The reputation of Derek and the Dominos' Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs, their lone record, precedes it. Eric Clapton performing in the studio with Duane Allman, Bobby Whitlock, Carl Radle, and more for the only time. A batch of fire-pot blues, poignant gospel, and searing rock - all birthed from the leader's insatiable lust for his friend George Harrison's wife. Now, experience it all, and one of the most famous guitar solos and codas in history, in unsurpassed sound courtesy of this quintessential Mobile Fidelity reissue.


    Mastered from the original master tapes and pressed at RTI, Mobile Fidelity's 180g 2LP set exposes the brilliance of Tom Dowd's original production and the scope of the virtuoso musicians' playing. You've never been closer to the aching vocals, stinging leads, tormented emotions, or wowing intensity that grace every track. Clapton's tones emerge with unprecedented soulfulness. Afforded their own space in the mix, Allman's slide-guitar passages crackle with urgency. All-important sonic components such as soundstaging, imaging, and dynamics transport you to the actual event. Mobile Fidelity's analog version testifies on behalf of why fans deemed Clapton god.


    Then, of course, there's the title track - crowned the 27th greatest song of all time by Rolling Stone. What to say about the outro - arguably the most famous, passionately penetrating, visceral, double-edged guitar solo in history. Clapton's strings weeping with longing, hope, regret, unrequited love. It deserves the best-possible sonic platform, and receives it here, on a pressing that brings Slowhand's every finger moment into great relief. Get inside Clapton's head, burrow into the conflicted emotions fluttering in his heart as he pines for his another man's wife, and in the process, produces an album that forever lives in the souls of anyone who's ever loved and lost.


    Clapton's pained yearning permeates everything here. Works such as the swampy Tell the Truth, the pleading Why Does Love Got to Be So Sad?, and blues-drenched Have You Ever Loved a Woman? attest to his raw-nerve discomfort, guilt, and desire. He leaves teardrops on the microphone stand and blood on the floor, singing and playing as if his life depends on it and if, by some miracle, the music will serve as both a confessional and apology to Harrison. It's all magnified by Clapton achieving a spiritual and sonic oneness with his band, which matches his high-stakes precision with a rolling, tumbling looseness.


    Allman adds firepower and achieves a still-unrivaled simpatico bond with Clapton, but each participant soars. Consider: The call-and-response, Sam and Dave-derived vocal exchanges between Whitlock and Clapton. Rich, creamy, Southern-stoked blends of R&B, blues, and soul. Vibrant tapestries in which the pianos, bass, guitars, and voices explode with ravishing fervor, naturalism, and desperation. Indeed, maybe a combo this great was only intended one shot in the studio. Perhaps the paralyzing degree of potency on display here, and the musicianship that remains the standard by which any blues-rock is judged, is meant to be preserved as one standalone record. Whatever the case, this is the analog version to own.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. I Looked Away
    2. Bell Bottom Blues
    3. Keep on Growing
    4. Nobody Knows You When You're Down and Out
    5. I Am Yours
    6. Anyday
    7. Key to the Highway
    8. Tell the Truth
    9. Why Does Love Got to Be So Sad?
    10. Have You Ever Loved a Woman
    11. Little Wing
    12. It's Too Late
    13. Layla
    14. Thorn Tree in the Garden
    Derek & The Dominos
    $49.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed AWAITING STOCK Buy Now
  • At Carnegie Hall (Pure Pleasure) At Carnegie Hall (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
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    At Carnegie Hall (Pure Pleasure)

    When Paul Robeson took the stage at Carnegie Hall in May of 1958, it had been 11 years since he had previously concertized freely in the United States. Blacklisted from the entertainment industry at home, and with the State Department unwilling to issue him a passport, he had fallen into eclipse as a singer and actor over the previous eight years. The concert recorded here, one of two at Carnegie Hall in May of 1958, marked his return. The performances on this record would also be his only stereo recordings -- all were, naturally enough, the work of Vanguard Records, the New York-based record company that was also the home to fellow blacklistees The Weavers.


    The singing legend is in excellent voice throughout, his rich bass-baritone reveling in performances of a repertory that encompassed Bach, Mussorgsky, Schubert, Dvorák, Beethoven, traditional gospel, Russian and Chinese folk songs, Old Man River from Show Boat, and monologues from Shakespeare and the opera Boris Godunov. With a piano accompaniment by Alan Booth, Robeson ranged across a huge part of his own performing history. The 60-year-old singer, despite the decade of artificially imposed inactivity, still had much of his vocal power intact and all his dramatic instincts, and makes every moment count in his performance, investing immense power in every note and nuance.


    Sadly, his Vanguard performances were to be his only work captured on modern recording equipment -- because of the blacklist, everything else predated the arrival of recording tape and the long-playing record. But the performance captured here, and those represented on Vanguard's The Essential Paul Robeson, show a man still capable of moving huge numbers of people with his voice -- and equally important, even at this late date, who had not lost the ability to walk a crowd through a vast and difficult range of repertory; his performances, even after ten years of professional exile, were also learning experiences, and consciousness-raising, which is why reactionaries in the United States were so afraid of him in the first place. And none of it has lost any of its power in the five decades since the actual event.


    Musicians:



    • Paul Robeson (vocals)

    • Alan Booth (piano)




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. Every Time I Feel the Spirit
    2. Balm In Gilead
    3. Volga Boat Song
    4. Monologue From Othello (Shakespeare)
    5. O Thou Silent Night (Alexadnrov)
    6. Chinese Children's Song
    7. My Curly Headed Baby (G.H. Clutsam)
    8. Old Man River
    9. Going Home (Dvorak, arr. Fisher)
    10. Monologue from Boris Godunov (Mussorgsky)
    11. The Orphan (Mussorgsky)
    12. Christ lag in Todesbanden (J.S. Bach)
    13. Didn't My Lord Deliver Daniel
    14. Lullaby (Franz Schubert)
    15. O No John
    16. Joe Hill
    17. Jacob's Ladder
    Paul Robeson
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Headquarters Stack-O-Tracks Headquarters Stack-O-Tracks Quick View

    $33.99
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    x

    Headquarters Stack-O-Tracks

    First Time 180 Gram Audiophile Clear Vinyl Release

    Mastered Impeccably By Monkees Fan & Friend Joe Reagoso At Friday Music Studios & Capitol Mastering, Hollywood, CA From The Colgems Record Tapes

    The Summer Of Love's First Album .... Re-Visited.... Re-Imagined...

    The Monkees Headquarters/ Stack-O-Tracks

    The Original Instrumental Backing Tracks To Their Most Celebrated Album

    First Time Authorized Alternate Artwork

    Yes... The Monkees Could Play Guitars, Bass, Drums, Piano, Steel Guitar, Organ, Banjo, Tambourine, Percussion..... and Play Them Well!!!

    In 1967 after two number one albums, a plethora of hit singles and a smash television show, The Monkees were on top and knew they each had true musical talents not championed by their label executives. Michael Nesmith spearheaded a change in direction before sessions began on their legendary Headquarters album. This action resulted in the much-covered dissolution with music mogul Don Kirshner, as Chip Douglas (The Turtles) was now recruited by Nesmith to work with the band.

    In rapid succession, things began to fall into place in February 1967. With initial tracks like country rocker Sunny Girlfriend, the band set the stage for what would become one of the most loved works in their catalog and one of the finest rock albums of a generation. A definite album opener, You Told Me begins Headquarters. The track features a brilliant 12 string guitar of Nesmith, as Tork's incredible banjo fills the track alongside Dolenz's driving drum work. With Jones' percussion, it became the very first song that many of us remember as we opened up our new copies back in the summer of '67. Not straying too far from previous success, the band scored a few more of Boyce and Hart compositions like Micky Dolenz's folk rock ballad I'll Spend My Life With You. The solid steel guitar work of Mike Nesmith became somewhat of a precursor to his groundbreaking Nashville sessions in the late sixties. Davy Jones has several watershed moments here with both Forget That Girl and Early Morning Blues and Greens Forget That Girl employs a unique English northern soul vibe, while the latter shares a wonderful rhythm presentation making it one of the more psychedelic infused and standout tracks on the LP. Michael Nesmith's handiwork is radiant on the entire album. You May Just Be The One rocks the album into full gear and makes it one of his and the bands' definitive landmark tracks. Headquarters also brought rightful acclaim to Peter Tork, as his first recorded Monkees' song For Pete's Sake soon became a prolific standard. The song transcended with the times and became one of the more insightful tunes from the quartet. It also replaced the familiar Monkees Theme at the end of season two, giving the song more TV exposure over the years. And as always, you can count on Micky Dolenz to deliver - whether it's his hard rock driving drum work on rockers like Randy Scouse Git & No Time, or his prog-rock feel on Mr. Webster, the album was definitely a great showcase for the artist.

    The Monkees' Headquarters was one of 4 albums of The Monkees that topped the charts in 1967. This fact alone is enough to warrant the importance of this album in musical history. But there are other amazing feats that Headquarters managed to deliver to millions of fans on its eventful release back in May of 1967. The album hit the stores before Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band by The Beatles. Friendly rivals as they were, Headquarters rose to number one and also opened the door to The Summer of Love. It remained in the upper rung of the retail charts until their fourth platter Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn & Jones Ltd. became a number one album to close out the year. Wow! Most notably, Headquarters showed the real world the transition of four talented guys on a hit TV show evolving into a self-produced, self-reliant, and one of the most loved bands in musical history, and yes, they could actually play their instruments .and they did it well!

    As another installment in our extensive Monkees catalog, Friday Music is pleased to announce a unique revisit to their third masterwork as we've now gone back to the original backing tracks and have assembled a fun and exciting instrumental Lp with The Monkees Headquarters Stack-O-Tracks. For this limited edition Friday Music release, we are pleased to offer for the first time on vinyl, the rare backing instrumental backing tracks, newly and impeccably mastered by Joe Reagoso (The Monkees/Brian Wilson) from the original Colgems Records masterwork.

    Joe Reagoso notes You've never heard 'Shades Of Gray' until you hear the strings up front like you will on this new vinyl release. Michael Nesmith's work on 'You May Just Be The One' is beyond thrilling, you feel like you are in the studio with the band as they knock out this and other Monkees classics. From beginning to end, song after song, we always knew how special Headquarter was, and now this further showcases the artistry and musical acumen each man brought to the sessions. Truly a crowning achievement. To further enhance your Monkees listening enjoyment, we are also pressing the limited edition album on clear 180 Gram audiophile vinyl, as well as including a revisit to the original album cover artwork, now with the rare Monkees beard photo not issued on vinyl in many years, and first time authorized colorization effects to the original artwork to celebrate fifty years of this classic rock album for the fans. 1967 ..The Summer Of Love A very hip time in our American culture you can now relive with these newly impeccably mastered recordings from the much-loved band that broke a lot of ground in a very short time and made the world a much better place for it The Monkees Headquarters Stack-O- Tracks Only From Your Friends At Friday Music!

    1. You Told Me (Instrumental Backing Track)
    2. I'll Spend My Life With You (Instrumental Backing Track)
    3. Forget That Girl (Instrumental Backing Track)
    4. Band 6
    5. You Just May Be The One (Instrumental Backing Track)
    6. Shades Of Gray (Instrumental Backing Track)
    7. I Can't Get Her Off My Mind (Instrumental Backing Track)
    8. For Pete's Sake (Instrumental Backing Track)
    9. Mr. Webster (Instrumental Backing Track)
    10. Sunny Girlfriend (Instrumental Backing Track)
    11. Zilch- Peter
    12. Zilch -Davy
    13. Zilch- Micky
    14. Zilch- Michael
    15. No Time (Instrumental Backing Track)
    16. Early Morning Blues And Green (Instrumental Backing Track)
    17. Randy Scouse Git (Instrumental Backing Track)
    The Monkees
    $33.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP Buy Now
  • The Grinding Wheel The Grinding Wheel Quick View

    $31.99
    Buy Now
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    The Grinding Wheel

    Armed with pioneering pure metal proposals like "Death Rider," "The Beast Within," and "Raise The Dead" already in 1982, New Jersey's Overkill were a rock-solid part of the first clutch of bands forging in fire this music known as thrash metal. Along with Metallica, Exodus, Slayer and cross-town doppelgangers Anthrax, D.D. Verni and Bobby "Blitz" Ellsworth were helping to create a new form of metal that is still as vibrant today as when the band's first album, Feel the Fire was issued by Jonny Zazula's Megaforce Records back in the spring of '85.


    Witness Overkill's 18th album of blistering yet precise and thought-provoking thrash magic, The Grinding Wheel, a record on which thrash's ultimate team of five machined parts shows up and executes to perfection with a little punk thrown in for bad measure.


    But a life dedicated to metal can be a grind, hence the title of this sparks-a-flyin' record. "It just makes sense for us," reflects D.D. "If you've been making metal for almost 40 years like we have, it can be a grind. But we also liked the old school metal idea of referencing "Grinder," the Judas Priest song, which suits the album because it has classic metal parts on it as well as the thrash parts. There's a blue collar feel to that title too, and that's how we approach Overkill. The guitar case is basically a lunchbox and we go to work."


    "One of the principles-if not characteristics-of the band is that it's been grinding through for long, long periods of time," seconds Blitz. "Decades to this point. And not necessarily with huge gains with regards to popularity, but for sure, with huge gains in as much as we can earn a living while doing the kind of music that we want. And so the idea of grinding it out over the decades became a device for writing the album, whether it would be riffs or lyrics."


    Despite, as D.D. says, the album's classic metal references (such as Black Sabbath in "Come Heavy" and Iron Maiden in "The Long Road" and the epic and cinematic title track), when the band gets up a full head of thrash steam, they bring to the party a trademark punk aesthetic, forged from trips on the train to CBGB and Max's Kansas City to witness original punk legends such as The Damned and The Dead Boys.


    "Punk is huge for Overkill," confirms Verni. "And it's something we very specifically brought back to the band in a sort of second wave, beginning with Ironbound in 2010 and then The Electric Age and White Devil Armory. I know from my end, it came from talking to the band and talking to fans. We had some of those metal records in the middle of our career where I wasn't paying enough attention to the punk rock vibe of the band. But just before we started writing Ironbound, I was very specific about getting back into that mentality, picking up on that energy again. You're not going to hear any Green Day or Ramones in us, but the energy and the attitude of punk mixed with the New York vibe that's what Overkill is, compared to other bands. You don't hear any of that in Megadeth; you don't hear any of that in Slayer. It's more specific to what we brought to the thrash world."


    Central to that premise is the incendiary "Let's All Go to Hades" which is sure to become a pit favourite. "This one was a hell of a lot of fun," says Blitz. "You know, I've always written abstractly. I'm not the guy who says, 'I'm going to crush your skull into dust.' I like writing more so from an abstract point of view, putting a slew of thoughts together that create one idea, like a puzzle more than a specific black or white. And when I looked at all these lyrics when I was done, I said, oh my God, I'm 57 and I finally matured (laughs). Oh, this is gross! (laughs). But I do like tongue-in-cheek songs like 'Hades,' where it says, sort of let's all go to the Bataclan, you know, stand arm in arm and sing 'Killed by Death.' I kind of tied in not long ago events, specifically what happened in Paris, with losing Lemmy. After that, I'm on a train from Paris to Istanbul on the Orient express, which actually existed (laughs)-it actually went from Paris to Istanbul. So that one is mapped out a bit more."


    Adds D.D., "It's not a 'smash your face into the wall' kind of song. It got a little bit of fun in it. I know any time you talk to the really heavy thrash guys, they go, 'Oh, no, no, no-no fun allowed. It's got to be heavy and brutal every second.' But that song definitely has a bit of fun in it. And we've done that before, with things like 'Old School' and 'Fuck You.' We're not afraid to do a bit of that sometimes."


    Another favorite lyric of Blitz', which is set to a non-nonsense old school thrash track, is "Our Finest Hour." "It's about the recognition of sameness," explains Ellsworth. "I think people are comfortable when they recognize themselves in someone else. And 'Our Finest Hour' is kind of a detailed journey through that concept. It's like, 'Come on over here; I recognize you.' I've always been a firm believer in the fact that it's great to accomplish things on your own, but people are always stronger as a group-that's the basic outline of that tune."


    At the other end of the spectrum from punk is a song like "The Long Road." D.D. readily agrees that there was a Maiden influence as part of this one's crafting. "Oh yeah, for sure. The opening, along with a little section in there with the vocals, definitely feels like New Wave of British Heavy Metal.


    More evident in the band's panoramic classic metal passages, but even articulated here on "Our Finest Hour," is another storied Overkill trademark, the definition one gets in the band's bass parts. Combine this with the Mensa-like percussive wizardry of Ron Lipnicki (laid bare for all to hear at headphone levels through the smack of his gravity-defying double bass work), and The Grinding Wheel emerges as a record with a remarkable rhythm section foundation from which to rise.


    "I've had that kind of sound now for a long time," says Verni. "There are a lot of bass players that say, 'I want to feel the bass.' And it's like, I just couldn't give a shit about feeling the bass. To me that's low-end. Guitars have low-end, kick drums have low-end, bass has low-end-I want to hear the bass, not feel it. So from a long time ago, that's what I would be doing on my EQ. I would be tweaking and turning knobs until not only could I feel it, but I can hear it separate from the guitars. And as a result, the bass just got more and more aggressive. I'm not a finesse player at all, on a bass. I bang the shit out of it, and I kind of do that to get away from the guitars and give it its own identity, its own sound, its own thing, so the bass has its own personality, not just serving as a foundation for the guitars."


    This affects the writing as well, says Blitz. "Don't forget, D.D. is a guitarist. He's been playing guitar probably more so than bass in his spare time since the late '80s. This is a guy who has two-and-a-half decades of six strings under his belt. So we get more of a unique perspective; it gives this band its unique qualities when it comes to songwriting. Because it's a guy holding six strings who's got plenty of experience playing those six strings, but thinking from the other perspective. So you get a punchier thing; you don't get a lot of fluff. When you compare Overkill to some of our contemporaries, there you get a guitar player writing guitar-based songs. D.D. is writing, first and foremost, from a rhythm perspective, and that's what drives the songs. Add Dave Linsk to the picture, once there's a ten-note riff written, then you have the best of both worlds."


    Which brings us back to the aforementioned machine-like efficiency of the five guys that comprise Overkill, this idea that there are no weak links within this particular classic five-piece with two guitars lineup of metal warriors.


    "That's the strength of the band," explains Blitz. "Dave is really the one that holds the guitar reigns in this band. He's a writer at his core. You know, he's one of these guys who brushes his teeth and hears a rhythm the way the bristles are hitting the enamel (laughs). He's that dude. 'Oh wait a second, I have another idea.' He has an idea a minute, and if that's the case, some of them are going to be great. So he holds the reins. When it comes to Derek, he's more the opinionated thought later on. And so when it runs through the machine, being D.D. and myself, then Dave, Derek comes in and can change that song. It's always kind of good to have, let's say, a chief and some Indians. And it depends who's wearing the chief hat at any particular time. But I think at the end of the day, when you're looking for a clean perspective, it goes through Derek-that's usually what his contribution is, more of a finalization."


    And Ron? "He's one-of-a-kind," says Verni. "He's a great drummer. I've worked with him for a bunch of records now. This is our fifth record together and so I really understand how he plays at this point. Working with him in the studio is just a pleasure, because he's so right on it."


    After heaping all manner of praise on legendary producer Andy Sneap (brought on only for mix given Verni's proven acumen at the task), D.D. further clarifies the reason Overkill can be at the top of their game 18 records into their distinguished run.


    "I have a studio and I did most of it at my place; I've been doing it that way for a while now. And now the group of guys we have in the band has been pretty consistent for a while. So we have a nice mix; everybody kind of knows their role, and is good at their role. Everybody brings a little something to the party. And I think that's why these last couple of records people ask, 'How is it that your records get better after 25 years?' And I think part of it is that everybody has a role in the band, everybody is comfortable with their role, and they're really good at the part they have. So the records actually get better. It's like having a team, instead of having a whole bunch of chiefs and no Indians.


    But a proven people's band like Overkill-a more personable bunch you'll never meet-fully recognizes that part of the band's success in being able to survive and thrive with the grind is due to the allegiance of the band's considerable worldwide fan base.


    "For sure," says Blitz. "One of the things with regard to grind, with regard to four decades of Overkill, it's good to be here, but it's obviously earned, not just by us but by the people that support this in general. The fact is that it's not just us grinding it out. I mean, maybe it is when it comes to the studio and writing and recording songs, from that selfish perspective. But the reason something exists for decades is based on group effort. Like we had talked about earlier with 'Our Finest Hour,' people are stronger together. In that light, this band is, let's say, not just our project, but it's a project by and for all those who hold it dear."

    1. Mean, Green, Killing Machine
    2. Goddamn Trouble
    3. Our Finest Hour
    4. Shine On
    5. The Long Road
    6. Let's All Go To Hades
    7. Come Heavy
    8. Red, White And Blue
    9. The Wheel
    10. The Grinding Wheel
    11. Emerald
    Overkill
    $31.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Grinding Wheel (Yellow And Black Vinyl) The Grinding Wheel (Yellow And Black Vinyl) Quick View

    $31.99
    Buy Now
    x

    The Grinding Wheel (Yellow And Black Vinyl)

    Pressed On Yellow And Black Vinyl

    Armed with pioneering pure metal proposals like Death Rider, The Beast Within, and Raise The Dead already in 1982, New Jersey's Overkill were a rock-solid part of the first clutch of bands forging in fire this music known as thrash metal. Along with Metallica, Exodus, Slayer and cross-town doppelgangers Anthrax, D.D. Verni and Bobby Blitz Ellsworth were helping to create a new form of metal that is still as vibrant today as when the band's first album, Feel the Fire was issued by Jonny Zazula's Megaforce Records back in the spring of '85.

    Witness Overkill's 18th album of blistering yet precise and thought-provoking thrash magic, The Grinding Wheel, a record on which thrash's ultimate team of five machined parts shows up and executes to perfection with a little punk thrown in for bad measure.

    But a life dedicated to metal can be a grind, hence the title of this sparks-a-flyin' record. It just makes sense for us, reflects D.D. If you've been making metal for almost 40 years like we have, it can be a grind. But we also liked the old school metal idea of referencing Grinder, the Judas Priest song, which suits the album because it has classic metal parts on it as well as the thrash parts. There's a blue collar feel to that title too, and that's how we approach Overkill. The guitar case is basically a lunchbox and we go to work.

    One of the principles-if not characteristics-of the band is that it's been grinding through for long, long periods of time, seconds Blitz. Decades to this point. And not necessarily with huge gains with regards to popularity, but for sure, with huge gains in as much as we can earn a living while doing the kind of music that we want. And so the idea of grinding it out over the decades became a device for writing the album, whether it would be riffs or lyrics.

    Despite, as D.D. says, the album's classic metal references (such as Black Sabbath in Come Heavy and Iron Maiden in The Long Road and the epic and cinematic title track), when the band gets up a full head of thrash steam, they bring to the party a trademark punk aesthetic, forged from trips on the train to CBGB and Max's Kansas City to witness original punk legends such as The Damned and The Dead Boys.

    Punk is huge for Overkill, confirms Verni. And it's something we very specifically brought back to the band in a sort of second wave, beginning with Ironbound in 2010 and then The Electric Age and White Devil Armory. I know from my end, it came from talking to the band and talking to fans. We had some of those metal records in the middle of our career where I wasn't paying enough attention to the punk rock vibe of the band. But just before we started writing Ironbound, I was very specific about getting back into that mentality, picking up on that energy again. You're not going to hear any Green Day or Ramones in us, but the energy and the attitude of punk mixed with the New York vibe that's what Overkill is, compared to other bands. You don't hear any of that in Megadeth; you don't hear any of that in Slayer. It's more specific to what we brought to the thrash world.

    Central to that premise is the incendiary Let's All Go to Hades which is sure to become a pit favourite. This one was a hell of a lot of fun, says Blitz. You know, I've always written abstractly. I'm not the guy who says, 'I'm going to crush your skull into dust.' I like writing more so from an abstract point of view, putting a slew of thoughts together that create one idea, like a puzzle more than a specific black or white. And when I looked at all these lyrics when I was done, I said, oh my God, I'm 57 and I finally matured (laughs). Oh, this is gross! (laughs). But I do like tongue-in-cheek songs like 'Hades,' where it says, sort of let's all go to the Bataclan, you know, stand arm in arm and sing 'Killed by Death.' I kind of tied in not long ago events, specifically what happened in Paris, with losing Lemmy. After that, I'm on a train from Paris to Istanbul on the Orient express, which actually existed (laughs)-it actually went from Paris to Istanbul. So that one is mapped out a bit more.

    Adds D.D., It's not a 'smash your face into the wall' kind of song. It got a little bit of fun in it. I know any time you talk to the really heavy thrash guys, they go, 'Oh, no, no, no-no fun allowed. It's got to be heavy and brutal every second.' But that song definitely has a bit of fun in it. And we've done that before, with things like 'Old School' and 'Fuck You.' We're not afraid to do a bit of that sometimes.

    Another favorite lyric of Blitz', which is set to a non-nonsense old school thrash track, is Our Finest Hour. It's about the recognition of sameness, explains Ellsworth. I think people are comfortable when they recognize themselves in someone else. And 'Our Finest Hour' is kind of a detailed journey through that concept. It's like, 'Come on over here; I recognize you.' I've always been a firm believer in the fact that it's great to accomplish things on your own, but people are always stronger as a group-that's the basic outline of that tune.

    At the other end of the spectrum from punk is a song like The Long Road. D.D. readily agrees that there was a Maiden influence as part of this one's crafting. Oh yeah, for sure. The opening, along with a little section in there with the vocals, definitely feels like New Wave of British Heavy Metal.

    More evident in the band's panoramic classic metal passages, but even articulated here on Our Finest Hour, is another storied Overkill trademark, the definition one gets in the band's bass parts. Combine this with the Mensa-like percussive wizardry of Ron Lipnicki (laid bare for all to hear at headphone levels through the smack of his gravity-defying double bass work), and The Grinding Wheel emerges as a record with a remarkable rhythm section foundation from which to rise.

    I've had that kind of sound now for a long time, says Verni. There are a lot of bass players that say, 'I want to feel the bass.' And it's like, I just couldn't give a shit about feeling the bass. To me that's low-end. Guitars have low-end, kick drums have low-end, bass has low-end-I want to hear the bass, not feel it. So from a long time ago, that's what I would be doing on my EQ. I would be tweaking and turning knobs until not only could I feel it, but I can hear it separate from the guitars. And as a result, the bass just got more and more aggressive. I'm not a finesse player at all, on a bass. I bang the shit out of it, and I kind of do that to get away from the guitars and give it its own identity, its own sound, its own thing, so the bass has its own personality, not just serving as a foundation for the guitars.

    This affects the writing as well, says Blitz. Don't forget, D.D. is a guitarist. He's been playing guitar probably more so than bass in his spare time since the late '80s. This is a guy who has two-and-a-half decades of six strings under his belt. So we get more of a unique perspective; it gives this band its unique qualities when it comes to songwriting. Because it's a guy holding six strings who's got plenty of experience playing those six strings, but thinking from the other perspective. So you get a punchier thing; you don't get a lot of fluff. When you compare Overkill to some of our contemporaries, there you get a guitar player writing guitar-based songs. D.D. is writing, first and foremost, from a rhythm perspective, and that's what drives the songs. Add Dave Linsk to the picture, once there's a ten-note riff written, then you have the best of both worlds.

    Which brings us back to the aforementioned machine-like efficiency of the five guys that comprise Overkill, this idea that there are no weak links within this particular classic five-piece with two guitars lineup of metal warriors.

    That's the strength of the band, explains Blitz. Dave is really the one that holds the guitar reigns in this band. He's a writer at his core. You know, he's one of these guys who brushes his teeth and hears a rhythm the way the bristles are hitting the enamel (laughs). He's that dude. 'Oh wait a second, I have another idea.' He has an idea a minute, and if that's the case, some of them are going to be great. So he holds the reins. When it comes to Derek, he's more the opinionated thought later on. And so when it runs through the machine, being D.D. and myself, then Dave, Derek comes in and can change that song. It's always kind of good to have, let's say, a chief and some Indians. And it depends who's wearing the chief hat at any particular time. But I think at the end of the day, when you're looking for a clean perspective, it goes through Derek-that's usually what his contribution is, more of a finalization.

    And Ron? He's one-of-a-kind, says Verni. He's a great drummer. I've worked with him for a bunch of records now. This is our fifth record together and so I really understand how he plays at this point. Working with him in the studio is just a pleasure, because he's so right on it.

    After heaping all manner of praise on legendary producer Andy Sneap (brought on only for mix given Verni's proven acumen at the task), D.D. further clarifies the reason Overkill can be at the top of their game 18 records into their distinguished run.

    I have a studio and I did most of it at my place; I've been doing it that way for a while now. And now the group of guys we have in the band has been pretty consistent for a while. So we have a nice mix; everybody kind of knows their role, and is good at their role. Everybody brings a little something to the party. And I think that's why these last couple of records people ask, 'How is it that your records get better after 25 years?' And I think part of it is that everybody has a role in the band, everybody is comfortable with their role, and they're really good at the part they have. So the records actually get better. It's like having a team, instead of having a whole bunch of chiefs and no Indians.

    But a proven people's band like Overkill-a more personable bunch you'll never meet-fully recognizes that part of the band's success in being able to survive and thrive with the grind is due to the allegiance of the band's considerable worldwide fan base.

    For sure, says Blitz. One of the things with regard to grind, with regard to four decades of Overkill, it's good to be here, but it's obviously earned, not just by us but by the people that support this in general. The fact is that it's not just us grinding it out. I mean, maybe it is when it comes to the studio and writing and recording songs, from that selfish perspective. But the reason something exists for decades is based on group effort. Like we had talked about earlier with 'Our Finest Hour,' people are stronger together. In that light, this band is, let's say, not just our project, but it's a project by and for all those who hold it dear.

    1. Mean, Green, Killing Machine
    2. Goddamn Trouble
    3. Our Finest Hour
    4. Shine On
    5. The Long Road
    6. Let's All Go To Hades
    7. Come Heavy
    8. Red, White And Blue
    9. The Wheel
    10. The Grinding Wheel
    11. Emerald
    Overkill
    $31.99
    Colored Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • AudioQuest Fire Interconnect Cable MULTIPLE LENGTHS AVAILABLE AudioQuest Fire Interconnect Cable Quick View

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    AudioQuest Fire Interconnect Cable


    Have a question about this product? Please email our audio advisor or call 1-877-929-8729 with any questions or concerns regarding your equipment purchase.



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    Technically speaking, fire is not an object, but an event: the rapid oxidation of a material in the chemical process of combustion by which heat and light are released into the surrounding environment. What we typically think of as "fire"-the often mysteriously beautiful and strangely hypnotic fireplace flicker of white, yellow, or red-orange glow-is actually just the visible part of the fire's flame, containing the superheated byproducts of the fire's incomplete exothermic reaction giving off visible light as excess energy is released. Interestingly, the cherry-red flame of a smoldering campfire measures somewhere around 700 Celsius; the deep orange flame of a candle, lit at a bedside or suffusing a living room with gentle aroma, typically burns at around 1000 Celsius; and the dazzling white flame created by a meteor as it enters Earth's atmosphere can often exceed 1500 Celsius! While fire is commonly considered to be a destructive event, it can also be a very effective tool for managing and enhancing fields, forests, and wetlands: Native Americans discovered that while fire killed woody plants, it encouraged the growth of fruit-bearing shrubs and forage-producing grasslands. Of course, fire's unique potential has been known for some time: It's likely that humans began using fire to heat food approximately 1 million years ago.


    Among the classical elements, fire is commonly associated with energy, assertiveness, and passion. In Greek Mythology, the cult hero Prometheus defied the gods by providing humanity the gift of fire, thereby enabling progress and civilization. People born under the astrological signs of Aries, Leo, and Sagittarius are thought to have fire personalities: They are enthusiastic, extroverted, and, like our good friend Prometheus, they are rebellious, passionate, brave, and valiant. It's no wonder that we have for so long been drawn to fire. A thing to be feared, respected, and loved, fire is that which drives us into the unknown, lights our way through darkness, and signals our way back home.


    SOLID PERFECT-SURFACE SILVER (PSS) CONDUCTORS: Solid conductors prevent both strand-to-strand contacts and magnetic interaction, major sources of distortion. Surface quality is critical because a conductor can be considered as a rail-guide for both the electric fields within a conductor, and for the magnetic fields outside the conductor. While less perfectly processed silver can have the same irritating tweeter-in-your-face sound as silver-plated strands, PSS Silver's smooth surface, extraordinarily careful processing, and high purity, deliver sound as smooth and beautiful as our PSC+ Copper, but with significantly higher resolution.


    DIELECTRIC-BIAS SYSTEM (DBS, US Pat #S 7,126,055 & 7,872,195 B1): Creates a strong, stable electrostatic field which saturates and polarizes (organizes) the molecules of the insulation. This dramatically reduces dielectric induced smearing of the signal, letting sound emerge from a "black" background.


    CARBON-BASED 8-LAYER NOISE-DISSIPATION (NDS): Shields-the-shield, reducing RFI contamination of the equipment ground plane.


    FEP AIR-TUBES (FEP IS A FLUORO-POLYMER): Almost no contact between conductors and insulation reduces smearing and preserves dynamics.


    TRIPLE-BALANCED GEOMETRY: Proper ground-reference conductor prevents using the shield as an inferior ground-reference conductor.


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    AudioQuest
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  • Live In San Francisco 1971 Live In San Francisco 1971 Quick View

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    Live In San Francisco 1971

    The closing of the Fillmore West (actually, the Carousel Ballroom) put a big dent in the 'City By the Bay'. This performance was taken from the closing concerts for the venue. The list of bands that Bill Graham didn't want was also big, and the Flamin' Groovies were on it, for years. Our first manager was Bill's right-hand man and when he quit working for Bill to manage the Flamin' Groovies this did not sit well with Bill, so the Groovies went up and down in Bill's eyes. So it came as a big surprise when we discovered he wanted us for this big and important event, to participate in a series of shows leading up to the closing of this legendary venue. I remember the show well. The difference in playing this gig as opposed to the Whisky-A-Go-Go in L.A. was like night and day. At the Whisky, we were the house band (two summers in a row); att the Fillmore, we were up for grabs. Oh yeah, this was our last show with my good buddy, Roy Loney.


    - Cyril Jordan (Flamin' Groovies)

    1. Bill Graham Intro
    2. I Can'T Explain
    3. Sweet Little Rock And Roller
    4. Have You Seen My Baby'
    5. Road House
    6. Shakin' All Over
    7. Teenage Head
    8. Louie, Louie
    9. Walkin' The Dog
    Flamin' Groovies
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • What A Way To Die What A Way To Die Quick View

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    What A Way To Die

    The archetype for the '60s-era girl group was etched indelibly into stone, like a commandment: three pretty girls with matching outfits and bouffant hairdos would sing, with musical backing supplied by a bunch of guys standing in the shadows. The Quatro sisters shattered that archetype forever with the Pleasure Seekers, an all-girl teenage rock & roll group who played all the instruments themselves and were fully capable of wiping the stage with any male band that crossed their path.


    The Quatro girls had been brought up in a musically-minded family, nurtured with classical piano and vocal lessons. As Patti recalls, "By 1964, I had been taking guitar lessons, hanging with musicians in the local music scene. We had seen a Beatles concert, and I was quite dazed and focused at the event, watching the audience cry and scream out of control. It was my epiphany moment, and I was determined to start an all-girl band."
    Shortly thereafter, the first lineup of the Pleasure Seekers fell into place with Patti Quatro (lead guitar), Marylou Ball (rhythm guitar), Suzi Quatro (bass), Diane Baker (keyboards), Nan Ball (drums) and vocal duties shared by all. Around the fall of 1965 the girls dared local teen club manager Dave Leone to give them a slot at his popular Hideout Club, claiming they were better than most of the other live bands there. "You're on," responded Leone, "in two weeks. Three songs!"


    The Pleasure Seekers were soon a popular feature at the club, honing their skills alongside the likes of the Rationals, the Amboy Dukes and Bob Seger & the Last Heard. "In the beginning, there was a lot of skepticism," remembers Patti, "especially the first night. The boys crowded the stage, the girlfriends pulled them away with laughter, as if 'Girls playing?! Yeah, right!' It was always satisfying to see them be silenced quickly when we began playing. We grew used to seeing slack jaws open in surprise." Next they were asked by Leone to record and release a single on his Hideout label.


    That March 1966 release is now regarded as the greatest "girl garage" single of the era: "Never Thought You'd Leave Me" b/w "What a Way to Die." "Dave brought lyrics, and we put the songs together quickly," remembers Patti. "We felt very legit in making this record at a small local studio. Nan was the sexy voice on 'Never Thought You'd Leave Me,' and there was lots of laughter as Marylou added the screams on 'What a Way to Die.'" Suzi Quatro remembers the recording as "very important and memorable."


    The Pleasure Seekers were soon in demand in the region, playing teen clubs, parties, colleges and local TV shows. After a series of lineup changes, the band brought in older Quatro sister Arlene (keyboards) and Darline Arnone (drums), the first female drummer sponsored by Slingerland Drums. A short time later, Pami Benford joined-up on guitar and bass (that lineup lasting through most of 1968). "It was a very versatile group," remembers Patti, "with Pami and Suzi sharing bass, and Pami and I sharing lead and rhythm guitars."


    "The gender bias was my hot button," recalls Arlene, "along with confidence in our musical abilities. With women musicians dismissed as a novelty, I delighted in watching the audience go from skepticism/ridicule, to shock/cheers." For Suzi, though, this period was where she learned her craft: "I considered myself a musician, and didn't really think about gender too much." Two tracks recorded in 1967, but unissued at the time, "Elevator Express" and "Gotta Get Away," highlight the band's growing musical maturity since their Hideout debut. "Detroit was the best learning ground in the world for musicians," recalls Suzi, "with an amazing energy and creativity that is in every successful artist that has come out of the city." "We were actually one of the earliest Detroit bands traveling the country," adds Patti. "Everyone wanted this unusual all girl band who rocked an entire Motown revue (changing instruments and singers throughout) and an entire Sgt. Pepper/Magical Mystery Tour revue, as well as covering English bands, acid rock and everything in between."


    Signing up with Associated Booking Corporation, the group began making the transition from local to national act. Producer Dick Corby caught the Pleasure Seekers at Trude Heller's in New York's Greenwich Village and signed them to a Mercury Records deal in early 1968. To keep rein on their finances in NYC, Patti recalls, "We booked Arthur's nightclub for a month, staying at the infamous rock Gorham Hotel, recording by day-playing by night." Also in residence were the Who, the Blues Magoos and an assortment of other bands. "Hitting NYC as young teens, it was exciting, scary, fun-all emotions churning," she continues. "We felt we had hit the big time, going from the tiny local Hideout session to the huge Mercury professional studio facility, complete with session people adding strings and other elements."


    A single pairing "Good Kind of Hurt" and "Light of Love" was released in April 1968, while a third song, "Locked in Your Love," remained in the can. The group then headed out to the Northwest for a lengthy tour. "The Northwest tour was awesome," remembers Patti. "We were billed with Canned Heat, Boyce & Hart and Merilee Rush, and were held over six weeks to tour with Eric Burdon and the Animals. The Mercury single was out, momentum was surging." Both sides of the single were getting airplay, but ultimately it failed to gain any traction. "Really neither song reflected our own sound," admits Patti. "We rearranged 'Light of Love' for live performance, feeling disconnected to the record, yet realizing we had to play ball with the executives to keep us rolling."


    Ultimately Mercury's vision for the Pleasure Seekers clashed rather sharply with the band's vision. "The suits wanted tits and ass," recalls Darline, "wowing Vegas crowds, playing tinkly tunes in lavish costumes." "In that male-dominated music era, we were strictly a novelty, and a high-risk endeavor," adds Patti. "The record executives felt women musicians would fall in love or get pregnant so were not worth investing the time and money. We had to kick down many doors. We were serious musicians, and in it for the right reasons. In the end, we were not happy with a forced direction that Mercury Records had in mind, and ended up leaving the label to rock our music in our own fashion."


    After a memorable 1968 Far East tour, playing for wounded returning American soldiers from Vietnam, the Pleasure Seekers (with new drummer Nancy Rogers) returned to a Detroit that was now, in Patti's words, "exploding with heavier sounds. That sparked us to change direction with new ideas we had been exploring. Arlene left the band and we brought in our youngest sister Nancy (vocals). With Suzi's Joplinesque vocals combined with Nancy's wailing 'female Robert Plant' style, we enjoyed a harder edged, 'double-punch' effect."


    The last four songs on the album, "White Pig Blues," "Brain Confusion," "Where Have You Gone?" and the atmospheric psychedelic mover "Mr. Power," all date from this 1968-69 period when the Pleasure Seekers were playing the Grande Ballroom alongside the MC5, Alice Cooper, the Stooges, the Amboy Dukes and SRC. With this change in musical direction and the departure of Arlene and Pami, the band forged on as Cradle. Suzi Quatro departed for England in 1971, launching a successful solo career. Patti and Nancy continued with Cradle until 1973 when Patti joined another pioneering female rock group, Fanny.


    The Pleasure Seekers reunited recently in April 2012 (minus Suzi) for a well-received show in their hometown, where they were inducted into Detroit's Hall of Fame. "I think all of us Quatro girls are extremely proud of our pioneering days" reflects Patti. "In a renaissance-era of music, we kicked down doors for women to rock heavy. There were key times in our lives of making decisions that may have turned us towards larger fame, but less happiness-depending on your philosophy of such things. The Pleasure Seekers could have been a Las Vegas show act bringing in buckets of money or on Motown, turned very formulaic girlie-soul. But we stayed true to our goals, and I don't think any of us have any regrets of staying our course and playing the music that moved us. It's all been a thrilling ride with great memories."


    - Mike & Anja Stax (Ugly Things magazine)

    1. Intro By DJ The Lord
    2. Gotta Get Away
    3. Never Thought You'd Leave Me
    4. Light Of Love
    5. Good Kind Of Hurt
    6. What A Way To Die
    7. Elevator Express
    8. Locked In Your Love
    9. White Pig Blues
    10. Brain Confusion
    11. Where Have You Gone
    12. Mr. Power
    The Pleasure Seekers
    $24.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
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