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  • Shostakovitch: Cello Concerto, Symphony No. 1 (Speakers Corner) Shostakovitch: Cello Concerto, Symphony No. 1 (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Shostakovitch: Cello Concerto, Symphony No. 1 (Speakers Corner)

    Dmitri Shostakovich: Cello Concerto No. 1 in E-flat major op. 107; Symphony No. 1 in F minor, op. 10


    That every beginning has its magic may almost have become forgotten these days, when true world premieres of musical works are almost non-existent. But this special magic still remains in the present recording of Shostakovich's Cello Concerto No. 1, which was first heard with these artists in 1959. Shostakovich dedicated the work to his friend Mstislav Rostropovich who committed the virtuoso solo part to memory in only four days, before the concert took place. The cellist tackles the work dauntlessly right from the beginning and swirls the burlesque staccatos through space. With a lovely sound and quite in accordance with the title of the movement, Espressivo, the soloist lets the melody breathe, supported by wonderfully sonorous orchestral writing, answered by calls on the solo horn.


    The Finale makes itself heard with a robust inflection, which the soloist counters with an imperturbable steadfastness of rhythm that not only demands refinement but also playing in the top regions and double-stopped harmonics.


    That this recording is indisputably a work of reference is underlined by its coupling with the First Symphony, which is well worth listening to. Shostakovich composed this work as his graduation piece at the Leningrad Conservatory more than 30 years earlier.


    Musicians:


    • Mstislav Rostropovich and the Philadelphia Orchestra conducted by Eugene Ormandy


    Recording: November 1959 at Broadwood Hotel, Philadelphia, USA, by Stan Tonkel

    Production: Thomas Frost


    About Speakers Corner


    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    Concerto For Cello In E Flat, Op. 107
    I - Allegretto
    II - Moderato / III - Andantino - Allegro / IV - Allegro Non Troppo


    Symphony No. 1 In F Major, Op. 10
    I - Allegretto
    II - Allegro
    III - Lento
    IV - Allegro Molto

    Dmitri Shostakovitch
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Mendelssohn: Piano Concertos Nos. 1 & 2 (Speakers Corner) Mendelssohn: Piano Concertos Nos. 1 & 2 (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Mendelssohn: Piano Concertos Nos. 1 & 2 (Speakers Corner)

    That Mendelssohn was a genial composer and piano virtuoso is very evident in his piano concertos. Written in his youth, his first piano concerto is full of Élan and power, with grand gestures in the themes and an early masterly command of symphonic development, which is continued - though rather more subtly in the second. This music also testifies to the 22-year-old's superb command of his favourite instrument. To this day young pianists at music competitions all over the globe emulate such artistry.


    Such Olympian efforts were not for Rudolf Serkin, who approached the virtuoso works at the end of the Fifties with all the maturity of a 'grandseigneur'. With amazing accuracy and the most delicate touch he unfolds the tightly-knit music, illuminating the flowing melodies and figures with a candid, clear brightness and thereby painting a warm, romantic and colourful landscape with finely- yet firmly-drawn lines. Thanks are due to the wonderful recording technicians whose expertise has made this LP a true masterpiece.



    Musicians:



    • Rudolf Serkin and the Columbia Symphony Orchestra

    • Eugene Ormandy (conductor)




    Recording: December 1957 and October 1959 at Broadwood Hotel, Philadelphia, by Stan Tonkel

    Production: Thomas Frost





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    1. Piano Concerto No. 1 In G Minor
    I- Molto
    II- Presto
    III- Molto Allegro E Vivace


    2. Piano Concerto No. 2 In D Minor
    I- Allegro
    II- Adagio
    III- Finale

    Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Sibelius: Violin Concerto (Speakers Corner) Sibelius: Violin Concerto (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
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    Sibelius: Violin Concerto (Speakers Corner)

    Not always do composers of instrumental works take the playability of their ideas into consideration. Jean Sibelius - himself an excellent violinist - must have been aware of the enormous challenges to the soloist, but he did not, however, envisage that the première of his violin concerto would be badly received due to the inadequacy of the violinist. That his op. 47 would become a showpiece of romantic violin repertoire is certainly not only due to the first-class soloists of our time, but also thanks to the work's broad and expressive melodies. In the short introduction of the second movement, the leaping intervals of the violin - as though from nowhere - develop into a broad symphonic dialogue with a late-romantic inflection, which is unleashed to create an emotional climax in the 20-bar main theme of the second movement. Seemingly purposely written for the nimble fingers of the world-class violinist, David Oistrakh and the evenly matched Philadelphia Orchestra present a superbly virtuosic and powerful rendering right up to the rousing finale. As an encore we hear The Swan Of Tuonela sing its tender, sublime song in a substantial solo on the cor anglais.

    Musicians:



    • David Oistrakh (violin)
    • Philiadelphia Orchestra conducted by Eugene Ormandy



    Recording: December 1959 and January 1960 at Broadwood Hotel, Philadelphia (PA)

    Production: Howard Scott



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    1. Allegro Moderato
    2. Adagio Di Molto
    3. Allegro Ma Non Tanto
    4. The Swan Of Tuonela, Op.22
    David Oistrakh
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Peter & The Wolf Peter & The Wolf Quick View

    $41.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Peter & The Wolf

    Import


    180 Gram Audiophile Vinyl + Insert


    Classical Music On Vinyl Release: Packed In Sturdy PVC Collector's Bag




    David Bowie Narrates Prokofiev's Peter And The Wolf (1978) is a classical music album containing David Bowie's narration of Sergei Prokofiev's 1936 composition Peter And The Wolf. The music is performed by the Philadelphia Orchestra conducted by Eugene Ormandy. The album reached number 136 on the US Pop Albums chart.


    Side One contains the narration by David Bowie of public domain material originally written by Prokofiev. The second side of this LP features Eugene Ormandy conducting Benjamin Britten's Young Person's Guide To The Orchestra with the Philadelphia Orchestra. Ormandy and the aforementioned musicians from Philly also back up Bowie on side one.


    Critics lauded the album, saying Bowie 'found his most charming guise since Hunky Dory.' He tells the well-known fable with his usual eloquence and style, and gives instructions at the beginning for kids to understand how the music corresponds to characters in the story. The accompaniment from the Philadelphia Orchestra is first rate.


    The Music On Vinyl re-release includes detailed liner notes on the project by Mary Campbell, specifically geared to introduce children to the sounds of the individual instruments in the symphony orchestra. Both Prokofiev and Britten wrote their respective pieces with this aim in mind.

    1. Peter and the Wolf, Op. 65 (A Musical Tale for Children)
    2. Young Person's Guide to the Orchestra, Op. 34
    David Bowie
    $41.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
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