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Pianos Become The Teeth

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  • Wait For Love (Pre-Order) Wait For Love (Pre-Order) Quick View

    $19.99
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    Wait For Love (Pre-Order)

    Wait For Love, their fourth album, sees PIANOS
    BECOME THE TEETH taking another sonic
    step forward to craft a musical statement that truly
    transcends genres. The Baltimore natives have
    produced a collection of songs that feature lush
    soundscapes and a more nuanced and melodic
    sound when compared to the screamo-aggression
    of their early work.


    Fans who have followed the band's trajectory-
    from their 2013 split with TouchÉ AmorÉ-can
    trace the way the band's sound has evolved from
    a melodic screamo act to a group that create
    heaviness and weight via raw emotion instead of
    distortion and dissonance.

    1. Fake Lighting
    2. Charisma
    3. Bitter Red
    4. Dry Spells
    5. Bay of Dreams
    6. Forever Sound
    7. Bloody Sweet
    8. Manila
    9. Love on Repeat
    10. Blue
    Pianos Become The Teeth
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed PRE-ORDER Buy Now
  • The Lack Long After The Lack Long After Quick View

    $18.99
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    The Lack Long After

    The Lack Long After is the post-rock/screamo act, Pianos Become The Teeth's follow-up to their critically acclaimed full-length debut Old Pride. The 8-song set expands upon its predecessor with the band's most emotional and honest music to date.
    1. I'll Be Damned
    2. Shared Bodies
    3. Good Times
    4. Sunsetting
    5. Liquid Courage
    6. Spine
    7. Such Confidence
    8. I'll Get By
    Pianos Become The Teeth
    $18.99
    Vinyl LP Buy Now
  • After The Party After The Party Quick View

    $19.99
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    After The Party

    For their fifth full-length After the Party, The Menzingers set
    out to make the quintessential jukebox record: an unstoppably melodic
    album primed for bar-room sing-alongs. Delivering anthemic
    harmonies, furious power chords, and larger-than-life melodies, the
    Philadelphia-based garage-punk four-piece amply fulfills that mission
    while achieving something much more deeply nuanced. With its
    delicately crafted storytelling and everyman romanticism, After the
    Party ultimately proves to be a wistful but life-affirming reflection
    on getting older but not quite growing up.


    "We spent our 20s living in a rowdy kind of way, and now we're at a
    point where it seems like everyone in our lives is moving in different
    directions," says Tom May, who joined fellow singer/guitarist
    Greg Barnett, bassist Eric Keen, and drummer Joe Godino in forming
    The Menzingers as teenagers in their hometown of Scranton. With
    each song unfolding as its own fully realized story, After the Party
    came to life thanks largely to an introspective yet outward-looking
    lyrical sensibility on the part of Barnett and May.


    Produced by Will Yip (Title Fight, Balance & Composure, Pianos
    Become the Teeth) and recorded in Yip's Conshohocken, Pennsylvania-based
    Studio 4, After the Party finds the band breaking into new
    sonic terrain. The Menzingers' most refined album to date, After
    the Party was also shaped from an intensive writing and pre-production
    process that involved holing up for five weeks in Yip's
    studio. Along with sculpting more expansive arrangements, the band
    focused on experimenting with new effects and production techniques
    to forge the album's dynamic but intricately textured sound.

    1. Tellin' Lies
    2. Thick as Thieves
    3. Lookers
    4. Midwestern States
    5. Charlie's Army
    6. House on Fire
    7. Black Mass
    8. Boy Blue
    9. Bad Catholics
    10.Your Wild Years
    11. The Bars
    12. After the Party
    13. Livin' Ain't Easy
    The Menzingers
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • What's Left To Let Go What's Left To Let Go Quick View

    $15.99
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    What's Left To Let Go

    Hailing from the United Kingdom, Goodtime Boys are one of Bridge Nine Records' newest signees. Signing to a hardcore label such as B9 carries with it an expectation that Goodtime Boys immediately buck. The band share more in common with La Dispute and Pianos Become the Teeth than other B9 bands like Foundation or Expire.


    What's Left to Let Go starts off with Bloom, which has a chilling relaxed guitar intro. However when the full band come in, it kicks it up a notch with a melodic but upbeat rhythm. Then vocalist Alex Pennie comes in with his powerful vocals and really brings in the full sound of the band. I immediately noticed the accent on the vocalist, but it's a good thing as it makes the band sound different than most bands of this hard-to-name genre that has been gaining a lot of ground in the hardcore community. His lyrics are immediately at the forefront of everything, as well they should be, being powerful and emotional. The rest of the song keeps up this swing of going from relaxed to very powerful and back again like a lot of the songs on this record. However, it doesn't get monotonous or boring as the band have a good enough writing ability to keep the music interesting.


    In the middle of the record the song Rest cools things off a bit coming in with a simple drum beat and an almost haunting guitar melody that fit the lyrics and vocal delivery perfectly. And that's the great simplicity of What's Left to Let Go; Goodtime Boys aren't afraid to use a pattern and vocal style that has been established, but do their own thing with it to try and keep it interesting. This album is technically a double EP and not a singular LP as the first five songs were previously released on the Are We Now, Or Have We Ever Been EP. However, if I had not known this I would not have figured it out from listening to the record as the songs flow so fluidly it sounds like one album. This is partially due to the band's cohesive writing and also partially due to those songs and the new songs being mixed by Defeater guitarist and Getaway Recordings engineer Jay Maas.

    1. Bloom
    2. Callous
    3. Breathe
    4. Reunion
    5. Rest
    6. Wake
    7. Daylight
    8. Harrow
    9. Bliss
    10. Sleep
    Goodtime Boys
    $15.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • I'm Not The Devil I'm Not The Devil Quick View

    $24.99
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    I'm Not The Devil

    Cody Jinks was raised on country music but he cut his teeth on metal. "Metallica was king. They set the tone for me and I spent a good part of my youth wanting to be James Hetfield." After a dedicated stint as a frontman in a thrash metal band, Jinks willingly found himself back to where it all began. "My dad loved the outlaw country icons, Johnny Cash, Waylon Jennings and Merle Haggard. That never ending consistency of incredible music growing up laid some very deep seeds. I'm mean, come on nothing better than mentally diving into 'The Hag' and metal when it comes time for me to write songs."


    Always avoiding trends and ferociously choosing his direction was the only option from day one, even though that very path could have prevented success. "What is success if you can't wake up everyday being who you really are. In the end, that will catch up with you." Jinks has been tested countless times by his career choices. The better part of the last 15 years have included numerous empty bar rooms and a never ending financial loss. "Yeah, I've been pretty good at losing money. Not the greatest feeling in the world to be gone from home for long stretches of time, only to walk in the door broke. Luckily I've got a damn good woman in my life. She has stood by me with unmeasurable strength to say the least and it is an absolute fact that I seriously overplayed my hand when landing her."


    His long, dark beard and endless array of tattoos are no fad. They unquestionably define Cody Jinks. His prototypical metal/hard rock band frontman look is not a well orchestrated image, but again, define Cody Jinks. Diving into to his album, I'm Not the Devil is the perpetual truth of who he is and where he has found himself at this point in his career. "I'm just glad that I ended up where I am now," Jinks said. "It makes complete sense that I'm at this place in my life. Country music found me when I was young and chased me down as I grew older"


    Jinks' latest project is his deepest, darkest and most provocative album to date, with a metal common denominator, the apocalypse, running throughout the record. "It's a pretty scary time," Jinks said. "There are some evil people running things in the world. It hits me since I have a six and three-year old."
    There's not a weightier song than the aptly titled "Heavy Load." It's the most apocalyptic song on the album but the dense cut, with a pretty violin break, is a gorgeous tune. The vocal hook grabs ears when Jinks croons "Train Jumps Tracks Some Time Ago/You Can't Root That Heavy Load." "That was the last song I wrote on the record," Jinks said. "I couldn't be happier how that one turned out."


    "All You Can" features a pretty piano line and sobering wordplay. When Jinks belts out 'What Are You Living For," you can't help but think about the serious question posed in what is becoming an increasingly shallow existence. "I was really tired when I wrote that song," Jinks said. "We had been on the road for awhile. The bottom line is that if you're not helping people, you're not doing your job as a human being. It's time to quit feeling sorry for yourself and do something."
    One of Jinks' favorite songs on the album is "The Way I Am," a cover of a Merle Haggard classic. "I love that song," Jinks says. "I wrapped it up just before Merle died. The song always resonated with me. I relate to that one since there are times I would rather be out fishing."


    "No Words" is a stunner of a gritty, autobiographical love song, which is a throwback to how songs used to be written. It is a tuneful gem, inspired by reality. Jinks starts out dark as night. "My Whole View of the World has Changed/ I Guess that Comes with Age/I Don't Believe there is Good in Every Man Like I Did Back Then/I May Drink More Than I Should/You've Seen Me on the Floor/I Spent my Lifetime in this Cage I Built Around Me." But the song is actually a tip of the hat to his beloved wife of 19 years. "There Aint' No Words/ To Say How Much I Need You/With You Here/ You Make This Life I Lead Worth Living." "It's about my wife," Jinks says. "But the funny thing is that she doesn't like it. She thinks it sounds too sad."


    With the title track "I'm Not the Devil," Jinks wakes us all up to the realities of mistakes and the heartfelt desire to be forgiven. "We are all guilty of mistakes and very guilty of pointing out the mistakes of others. Forgiveness feels so much better or so I think."


    It's impressive how Jinks is getting his message across. Jinks utilizes space well in his songs. Notes aren't crammed in. Jinks lets his songs breathe. "After all I've experienced, I think I've matured," Jinks says. "I think you can hear it in the music. I've grown up."


    Even though he still looks the part of the headbanger he was back in the day, he has moved on. "It's all for the best, Jinks says. "I'm where I was meant to be."


    It's all about the music and the fans, who are the fuel that drives Jinks. "They come out night after night giving up hard earned money and precious time to see me play," Jinks says. " It's truly is amazing when you really think about it. The best way I can say thanks is by giving back with effort and gratitude."

    1. The Same
    2. I'm Not the Devil
    3. No Guarantees
    4. No Words
    5. Give All You Can
    6. She's All Mine
    7. The Way I Am
    8. Chase That Song
    9. Heavy Load
    10. Grey
    11. Church at Gaylor Creek
    12. Vampires
    13. Hand Me Down
    Cody Jinks
    $24.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Broken People Broken People Quick View

    $18.99
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    Broken People

    American music is a mile-wide river that beckons black and white, urban and rural, dreamer and doer alike to launch their vessels. All the streams of style and genre flow into it; its tributaries are blues and jazz, mountain and folk, rock, soul and R&B.


    The release of the debut album by Muddy Magnolias, Broken People, marks the launch of a great new vessel onto that waterway. The album showcases a confluence of style and sound as colorful as it is unlikely, steeped in that river of influence, yet bracingly fresh.


    With Broken People, Jessy Wilson and Kallie North take us on an 11-song journey with its origins in two widely divergent backgrounds that came together in a friendship and creative partnership with world-changing resonance.


    North was raised in southeast Texas and began singing with her family and studying piano at an early age. She grew to love rich vocal harmonies singing in church choirs and listening to artists like the Carpenters, Alison Krauss, James Taylor and the Eagles. By her early teens, she was singing lead parts in church and in musical theater productions at her high school. Her palette grew when a friend turned her on to the Grateful Dead, and after high school she spent every spare moment in the clubs of Austin, absorbing everything from alt-country and jam bands to New Orleans funk. She met her husband at a concert and moved with him to his native Mississippi. There, on their isolated farm, she had her awakening, starting a career as a photographer, capturing the spirited, deep history of the Mississippi Delta.


    "To me, the Delta is the most overlooked and mysterious place," she says. "It was the birthplace of America's music, and all the legends were influenced by everything that came out of it. I went on this personal exploration to learn about the Delta blues and the region's history. I picked up a camera and started taking pictures, blogging about what I was experiencing, and I tapped into all the creative energy lying dormant inside me." When her husband gave her a guitar, she began spending her days on the porch of their farm learning how to connect her first chords. From there, the songs began pouring out and she knew she had to find a way to get to Nashville and write songs professionally.


    Wilson, raised in Brooklyn, was in love with music from her earliest days. She was singing before she could talk, and was 5 when her mother recognized her passion for music. "I would cry because I couldn't hit the high notes in Whitney Houston and Mariah Carey songs," she says. Influenced by greats from Aretha and Smokey Robinson to Lauryn Hill, Mary J. Blige and The Notorious B.I.G., she began auditioning in the highly competitive New York entertainment scene and was working professionally in musical theater by the age of 10. Her mother took her to nightclubs where she experienced a variety of live performances. She attended New York's top performing arts schools, including La Guardia High School, the "Fame" school, where she discovered her love for gospel music and took part in the gospel chorus for four years. She worked at Cafe Wha? in Greenwich Village, making $500 a weekend while still in high school.


    She sang backup for Alicia Keys in her teens, then worked four years with John Legend, and through him with legends like will.i.am, Kanye West, Raphael Saadiq and Babyface. Legend mentored her in songwriting and recording before she began writing songs on her own for American Idol winner Fantasia Barrino and others. Inspired by her evolving love of songwriting, she too moved to Nashville, looking for a wider creative palette. There, while meeting with then-BMI executive Clay Bradley, her eye settled on a photograph of "a rundown juke joint piano" in his office.


    "I want to meet whoever took that photo," she said. The photographer was North-it had been taken during her creative awakening in Mississippi-and the subsequent meeting led quickly to collaboration and an epic friendship.


    "The first day we wrote together," says North, "there wasn't much thought that we were blending genres and worlds. That never came up. It was just natural. She had never written a country song and I was writing them every day. We sat down to write one but when we listened back it was a country R&B song. And we decided to become songwriting partners." Before long, they had their first cut as collaborators, and they were off and running.


    "The spirit of the Muddy Magnolias existed from the moment we met," says Wilson, "but we didn't know we were the Muddy Magnolias yet." North was toying with the idea of a solo career; Wilson had aspirations of making history as an African-American female songwriter in Nashville. Their new friendship was a game-changer.


    "We spent a whole year writing, trying to understand what our message was when we combined our stories," says Wilson. Then one day over afternoon wine at Burger Up, their favorite hangout in the 12 South section of Nashville, both admitted to be being at a crossroads. "The next thing you know," says North, "Jessy said, 'What if we made a record together?' It was like all of our dreams in one."


    "We went back to that same office on Music Row where I saw the photograph," says Wilson, "and sat down side by side in Clay's office and said, 'We've got something to tell you. We're going to make an album together.'" Bradley believed enough to sign on as their manager. They held three days of band auditions and found four best friends who had been playing together since college, primarily doing jazz. The fit was perfect, providing just the right sonic backdrop for their soulful approach and high-energy delivery.


    As they continued to write and perform, opening for the likes of The Zac Brown Band and Gary Clark, Jr., they put together a project that crosses genres effortlessly, showcasing two voices that soar together in a blending of cultures as electrifying as if Janis Joplin and Tina Turner, or Whitney Houston and Lee Ann Womack had joined forces.


    Broken People combines poetic imagery and vocal passion, with the musicianship and production of Motown or Muscle Shoals by way of the raw honesty of Sun Records. Of course it deals with love, longed for and unleashed, in songs like "I Need A Man," "Why Don't You Stay" and "Devil's Teeth," but the album soars as it reaches for bigger themes, dealing with the need for hope in "Take Me Home," for love on a societal scale in "Shine On" and "Brother What Happened," and hope for the future in "Got It Goin' On." With "Leave It To The Sky," the two, joined by John Legend on vocals and piano, make a powerful case for spiritual solutions, and few songs in the modern lexicon are as steeped in present-day reality as the gospel- and R&B-tinged title track.


    "Ultimately," says North, "this album is a result of an unlikely friendship and is a testament to what can happen when you diversify your relationships."


    "It's about getting out of your comfort zone and being rewarded with a great friendship," adds Wilson. "We've both felt the power of that."


    "Our path is so much better and our lives are so much richer because of it," says North, "and we want to bring people along on this journey."


    "We want to see what society would be like if we all reached out in ways we normally wouldn't," adds Wilson.


    And that is the magic and the message. The music of Muddy Magnolias, live and on record, comes from a place where the Mississippi meets the A-Train by way of Nashville. Whether yours is the back porch or the front stoop, Spanish moss or window box garden, dusty country lane or crowded subway car, rural honky-tonk or uptown club, this is music that beckons. Muddy Magnolias are collaboration without boundaries, musical healing in a landscape of the heart, and all of us who treasure creative energy, honest art and the possibilities of love and unity, are better for their arrival.

    1. Broken People
    2. Brother, What Happened?
    3. Got It Goin' On
    4. Why Don't You Stay
    5. Take Me Home
    6. Shine On!
    7. It Ain't Easy
    8. I Need A Man
    9. Devil's Teeth
    10. Train
    11. Leave It To The Sky (feat. John Legend)
    Muddy Magnolias
    $18.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Keep You (Out Of Stock) Keep You (Out Of Stock) Quick View

    $19.99
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    Keep You (Out Of Stock)

    Pianos Become The Teeth are from Baltimore, Maryland; the band made waves on the
    scene with their 2009 debut Old Pride and gained national attention with 2011's The
    Lack Long After. Their third album and Epitaph debut, Keep You, sees the band taking a
    brave step forward to craft a musical statement that truly transcends genres. "There's
    still the same amount of passion and energy inherent in this record, it's just presented
    in a different way," frontman Kyle Durfey explains. The immediately noticeable difference is Durfey's vocal approach that sees him traded the throat-gutting screams of
    the band's early releases with cleaner, more intelligible vocals. However anyone who
    has followed the band's trajectory-specifically the song "Hiding" from their 2013 split
    with TouchÉ AmorÉ-can trace the way the band's sound has evolved from a melodic
    screamo act to a group that create heaviness and weight via raw emotion instead of
    distortion and dissonance. Capturing the band's creative vision this time around, producer Will Yip (Circa Survive, Braid) enhances the band's new vision, bringing out harmonies and swelling strings that compliment these songs in exciting ways that even the
    band couldn't initially predict . "I think it's a musical growth not a departure," Durfey
    summarizes. "I wouldn't say we would never make another overtly aggressive record
    again but this is the record we wanted to make."
    1. Ripple Water Shine
    2. April
    3. Lesions
    4. Old Jaw
    5. Repine
    6. Late Lives
    7. Enamor Me
    8. Traces
    9. The Queen
    10. Say Nothing
    Pianos Become The Teeth
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP + CD - Sealed Temporarily out of stock
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