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  • The Pleasure Principle The Pleasure Principle Quick View

    $21.99
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    The Pleasure Principle

    The most popular of all the Gary Numan albums is undeniably 1979's The Pleasure Principle. The reasons are simple -- there is not a single weak moment on the disc, it contains his sole U.S. (number one worldwide) hit, "Cars." The Pleasure Principle is also one of the first Gary Numan albums to feature true ensemble playing, especially heard within the airtight, killer groove of "Metal" (one of Numan's all-time best tracks). Starting things off with the atmospheric instrumental "Airlane," the quality of the songs gets stronger and stronger as the album progresses -- "Films," "M.E.," "Observer," "Conversation," the aforementioned "Cars," and the U.K. Top Ten hit "Complex" all show Numan in top form. If you had to own just one Gary Numan album, The Pleasure Principle would be it.
    1. Airplane
    2. Metal
    3. Complex
    4. Films
    5. M.E.
    6. Tracks
    7. Observer
    8. Conversation
    9. Cars
    10. Engineers
    Gary Numan
    $21.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Telekon Telekon Quick View

    $26.99
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    Telekon

    Gary Numan's follow-up to the flawless The Pleasure Principle was 1980's Telekon. Numan experimented with funk for the first time in his career ("Remind Me to Smile"), but there were still plenty of chilling synth excursions to keep the Numan faithful satisfied -- "This Wreckage," "The Aircrash Bureau," "I'm an Agent," and "I Dream of Wires" are all choice cuts. It debuted at the top of the UK Albums Chart in September 1980, making it his third consecutive No. 1 album.
    LP1
    1. This Wreckage
    2. The Aircrash Bureau
    3. Telekon
    4. Remind Me to Smile
    5. Sleep By Windows
    6. We Are Glass
    7. I'm An Agent
    7. I Dream Of Wires
    8. Remember I Was Vapour


    LP2
    1. Please Push No More
    2. The Joy Circuit
    3. We Are Glass
    4. Trois Gymnopedies (1st Movement)
    5. I Die You Die
    6. Down In The Park (PIano Version)
    7. A Game Called Echo
    8. Photograph
    9. Remind Me To Smile (US Mix)
    10. I Die You Die (Alt. Video Version)

    Gary Numan
    $26.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Brazilian Byrd (Pure Pleasure) Brazilian Byrd (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Brazilian Byrd (Pure Pleasure)

    The arrangements by Tommy Newsom for strings, brass, and woodwinds may be a bit sweet and the 12 performances may be overly concise (often under three minutes), but the resulting music is strangely pleasing. Acoustic guitarist Charlie Byrd always had a strong affinity for Brazilian jazz, and he sticks exclusively to Antonio Carlos Jobim songs during this tasteful and melodic effort. Truly beautiful music.



    Musicians:



    • Charlie Byrd (guitar) & with strings, brass & woodwinds




    Recording: 1965

    Production: Teo Macero



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    1. Jazz 'n' Samba (So Danco Samba)
    2. Corcovado
    3. That Look You Wear (Este Seu Olhar)
    4. The Girl From Ipanema
    5. Samba do Aviao (Song of the Jet)
    6. Engano
    7. O Amor em Paz
    8. Dindi
    9. Cancao do Amor Demais
    10. As Praias Desertas
    11. Samba Torto
    12. Someone To Light Up My Life (Se Todo)
    13. Engano (alternate take)
    Charlie Byrd
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Spoon's Life (Pure Pleasure) Spoon's Life (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Spoon's Life (Pure Pleasure)

    A beautifully recorded session of top quality blues performed by masters of their art. On paper it may look like a slightly odd coupling of KC shouter with a Chicago blues band. The results confirm that Jimmy Witherspoon is a blues singer full of passion and throughout this session all the musicians compliment each other admirably. A beautiful slab of music.



    Musicians:



    • Jimmy Witherspoon (vocal)

    • George Smith (harmonica)

    • Johnny Dollar, Sammy Lawhorn (guitar)

    • Nick Charles (bass)

    • Roosevelt "Snake" Shaw (drums)



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    1. Night Life
    2. Help Me
    3. Big Boss Man
    4. Cold Cold Feeling
    5. Worried Life Blues
    6. Did You Ever
    7. Blues With A Feeling
    8. Big Leg Woman
    9. Bags Under My Eyes
    Jimmy Witherspoon
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Pyramid (Pure Pleasure) Pyramid (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Pyramid (Pure Pleasure)

    With such a tight group as the MJQ is is impossible to single out individual musicians which probably accounts for their long lived success.
    This is a strong recording from the Modern Jazz Quartet, with inventive versions of John Lewis' Vendome. Ray Brown's Pyramid, Jim Hall's Romaine, and Lewis' famous Django, along with cooking jams on How High The Moon and It Don't Mean A Thing. The MJQ had become a jazz institution by this time, but they never lost their creative edge, and their performances (even on the remakes) are quite stimulating, enthusiastic, and fresh. - Scott Yanow/AMG

    Musicians:



    • John Lewis (piano)
    • Milt Jackson (vibraphone)
    • Percy Heath (bass)
    • Connie Kay (drums)


    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    1. Vendome
    2. Pyramid
    3. It Don't Mean A Thing (If It Ain't Got That Swing)
    4. Django
    5. How High The Moon
    6. Romaine
    The Modern Jazz Quartet
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Today! (Pure Pleasure) Today! (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Today! (Pure Pleasure)

    Clear, crisp modern recordings of the spooky, mysterious style of Blues Skip James developed early last century. His guitar playing is perfect. His high haunting voice floats and then holds and makes the hair on the back of your neck crawl. His piano playing is unpredictable yet concise. His unique style, which recorded earlier in his life (1930) sounded almost archaic (positively so), now sounds strangely modern due to the increased fidelity of the magnetic tape used for the recording. An unusual and original talent, Skip James was one of the best.




    Musicians:



    • Skip James (vocal, guitar, piano)




    Recording: 1964



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    Hard Time Killin Floor Blues
    Crow Jane
    Washington D.C. Hospital Center Blues
    Special Rider Blues
    Drunken Spree
    Cherryball
    How Long Blues
    All Night Long
    Cypress Grove Blues
    Look Down the Road
    My Gal
    I'm So Glad
    Skip James
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Keb' Mo' (Pure Pleasure) Keb' Mo' (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Keb' Mo' (Pure Pleasure)

    Keb' Mo's self-titled debut is an edgy, ambitious collection of gritty country blues. Keb' Mo' pushes into new directions, trying to incorporate some of the sensibilites of the slacker revolution without losing touch of the tradition that makes the blues the breathing, vital art form it is. His attempts aren't always successful, but his gutsy guitar playing and impassioned vocals, as well as his surprisingly accomplished songwriting, make Keb' Mo' a debut to cherish.




    Musicians:



    • Keb' Mo' (vocal, guitar, harmonica, banjo)

    • Tommy Eyre (keyboards)

    • James 'Hutch' Hutchinson (bass)

    • Laval Belle, Quentin Dennard (drums)

    • Tony Draunagel (percussion)




    Recording: 1994 at Red Zone Studios (Burbank, CA.) by Joe McGrath and at Penguin Recording (Los Angeles) by John Strother

    Production: John Porter




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Every Morning
    2. Tell Everybody I Know
    3. Love Blues
    4. Victims Of Comfort
    5. Angelina
    6. Anybody Seen My Girl
    7. She Just Wants To Dance
    8. Am I Wrong
    9. Come On In My Kitchen
    10. Dirty Low Down And Bad
    11. Don't Try To Explain
    12. Kindhearted Woman Blues
    13. City Boy
    Keb' Mo'
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Replicas Replicas Quick View

    $21.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Replicas

    By the release of their second album, Replicas, Gary Numan was the undisputed focal point and leader of icy electro-punkers Tubeway Army. And the move proved to be massively successful back home in the U.K., where both the album and the single "Are 'Friends' Electric?" topped the charts. The band had made a conscious effort to streamline the sound heard on its 1978 self-titled debut -- the distorted guitar riffs were played on Moog synthesizers instead, and Numan had perfected his faux-space-age persona. And the paranoia that is very evident in the lyrics and vocals on Numan's next release, The Pleasure Principle, can be detected on Replicas. Another near-perfect album by the band, highlights are many -- "Me! I Disconnect from You," "The Machman," "You Are in My Vision," and the chilling ballad "Down in the Park."
    1. Me, I Disconnect From You
    2. Are 'Friends' Electric?
    3. The Machman
    4. Praying To The Aliens
    5. Down In The Park
    6. You Are My Vision
    7. Replicas
    8. It Must Have Been Years
    9. When The Machines Rock
    10. I Nearly Married A Human
    Gary Numan
    $21.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Joan Baez (Pure Pleasure) Joan Baez (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Joan Baez (Pure Pleasure)

    At the time of its release, Joan Baez's debut album was something of a revelation. The folk music revival was beginning to gather steam, stoked on the popular side by artists such as the Kingston Trio and the Easy Riders, as well as up-and-coming ensembles such as the Highwaymen, and on the more intense and serious side by the Weavers. The female singers on the scene were mostly old-time, veteran activist types like Ronnie Gilbert and Malvina Reynolds, who was in her sixties. And then along comes this album, by a 19-year-old who looked more like the kind of co-ed every mother dreamt her son would come home with, displaying a voice from heaven, a soprano so pure and beguiling that the mere act of listening to her - forget what she was singing - was a pleasure. Baez's first album, made up primarily of traditional songs (including a startling version of House of the Rising Sun), was beguiling enough to woo even conservative-leaning listeners. Accompanied by the Weavers' Fred Hellerman and a pair of session singers, Baez gives a fine account of the most reserved and least confrontational aspects of the folk revival, presenting a brace of traditional songs (most notably East Virginia and Mary Hamilton) with an urgency and sincerity that makes the listener feel as though they were being sung for the first time, and opening with a song that was to become her signature piece for many years, Silver Dagger. The recording was notable at the time for its purity of sound, and Baez's voice soars with an awesome purity of Fare Thee Well, House of the Rising Sun, and All My Trials, and the guitar accompaniment on Wildwood Flower, among other tracks, comes through with richness and clarity.




    Musicians:



    • Joan Baez (vocal, guitar)

    • Fred Hellerman (guitar)




    Production: Maynard Solomon



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    Silver Dagger
    East Virginia

    Fare Thee Well
    House Of The Rising Sun

    All My Trials
    Wildwood Flower
    Donna Donna
    John Riley
    Rake And Rambling Boy

    Little Moses
    Mary Hamilton
    Henry Martin
    El Preso Numero Nueve
    Joan Baez
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • No Frontiers (Pure Pleasure) No Frontiers (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    No Frontiers (Pure Pleasure)

    Mary Black's 1989 No Frontiers is nothing short of a masterpiece. This (and the follow up 1991's Babes In The Wood, Pure Pleasure PPAN002) was when Black was at her creative and vocal peak. No Frontiers (the song) has become something of an Irish classic, a party piece for so many (even the Corrs covered it on Unplugged) and Past The Point Of Rescue was a massive country hit in 1991 for Hal Ketchum. Both songs are superb and Black's versions are the greatest. Carolina Rua and Vanities (featured on the huge selling A Woman's Heart) are well known but it is the darker Columbus and the mesmerizing Fat Valley Of Pain that showcase both the heartbreak and the depth of the album.


    A fine introduction to Black's music - the right mixture of folk and contemporary and one of the finest albums to come out of Ireland in the 1980s.

    Musicians:



    • Mary Black (vocal)

    • Pat Crowley (piano, accordion)

    • Donal Lunny (synthesizer)

    • Carl Geraghty (saxophone)

    • Declan Sinnott (guitar)

    • Garvan Gallagher (bass)

    • Noel Bridgeman (percussion)



    Recording: 1989 by Dan Fitzgerald

    Production: Declan Sinnott




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. No Frontiers
    2. Past The Point Of Rescue
    3. The Shadow
    4. Carolina Rua
    5. Shuffle Of The Buckled
    6. Columbus
    7. Another Day
    8. Fat Valley Of Pain
    9. I Say A Little Prayer
    10. Vanities
    11. The Fog In Monterey
    Mary Black
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Folksy Nina (Pure Pleasure) Folksy Nina (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Folksy Nina (Pure Pleasure)

    Pianist and singer Nina Simone defied categorization by blending classical, jazz and popular music into an unconventional and highly personal idiom: over four decades, she galvanized audiences with albums and performances replete with deep passion and keen attention to emotion.
    Fiercely honest, Simone was admired for her eccentricity and individualism. She was known for her spirited personality on and off the stage, which included flirting with audience members and voicing her opinions about social topics of the time.



    Like the 1963 LP Nina Simone At Carnegie Hall (Pure Pleasure SCP 455), this was recorded in front of a devoted and enthusiastic live audience at Carnegie Hall on May 12, 1963. It isn't just unworthy leftovers, but a strong set in its own right, concentrating on material that could be seen as traditional or folk in orientation. It's not exactly strictly folk music, in repertoire or arrangement (which includes piano, guitar, bass, and drums, though not every tune has all of the instruments); Twelfth Of Never certainly isn't folk music. However, there was also an uptempo piano blues, Leadbelly's Silver City Bound; covers of the Israeli Erets Zavat Chalav and Vanetihu which served as further proof that Simone's eclecticism knew no bounds; and the stark, moody, spiritually shaded ballads at which she excelled (When I Was a Young Girl, Hush Little Baby). Lass Of The Low Country is as exquisitely sad-yet-beautiful as it gets.



    Musicians:



    • Nina Simone (piano, vocal)

    • Alvin Schackman, Phil Orlando (guitar)

    • Lisle Ackinson (bass)

    • Montego Joe (drums)




    Recording: May 1963 at Carnegie Hall, New York, by Dick Alderson

    Production: Jack Lewis



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    1. Silver City Bound
    2. When I Was a Young Girl
    3. Erets Zavat Chalav
    4. Lass of the Low Country
    5. The Young Knight
    6. Twelfth of Never
    7. Vanetihu
    8. You Can Sing a Rainbow
    9. Hush Little Baby
    Nina Simone
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Straight Ahead (Pure Pleasure) Straight Ahead (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Straight Ahead (Pure Pleasure)

    This is one of Abbey Lincoln's greatest recordings. It is a testament to the credibility of her very honest music (and her talents) that Lincoln's sidemen on this date include the immortal tenor saxophonist Coleman Hawkins who takes a memorable solo on Blue Monk), Eric Dolphy on flute and alto, trumpeter Booker Little (whose melancholy tone is very important in the ensembles), pianist Mal Waldron , and drummer Max Roach. Highpoints include When Malindy Sings, Blue Monk, Billie Holiday's Left Alone, and African Lady.



    Abbey Lincoln and Max Roach were married in 1962, an association that lasted until 1970. They worked together for a while but Lincoln (who found it harder to get work in jazz due to the political nature of some of her music) became involved in acting and did not record as a leader during 1962-1972. She finally recorded for Inner City in 1973 and gradually became more active in jazz. Her two Billie Holiday tribute albums for Enja (1987) showed listeners that the singer was still in her prime and she has recorded several excellent sets for Verve in the 1990s. Because she puts so much thought into each of her recordings, it is not an understatement to say that every Abbey Lincoln set is well worth owning.




    Musicians:



    • Abbey Lincoln (vocal)

    • Eric Dolphy (piccolo-flute, bass clarinet, alto saxophone)

    • Walter Benton, Coleman Hawkins (tenor saxophone)

    • Booker Little (trumpet)

    • Julian Priester (trombone)

    • Mal Waldron (piano)

    • Art Davis (bass)

    • Max Roach (drums)

    • Roger Sanders, Robert Whiteley (conga)




    Recording: February 1961 at Nola Penthouse Studios, New York City




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Straight Ahead
    2. When Malinda Sings
    3. In the Red
    4. Blue Monk
    5. Left Alone
    6. African Lady
    7. Retribution
    Abbey Lincoln
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • That's It (Pure Pleasure) That's It (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    That's It (Pure Pleasure)

    A very distinctive tenor with a hard, passionate tone and an emotional style that was still tied to chordal improvisation, Booker Ervin was a true original. He was originally a trombonist, but taught himself tenor while in the Air Force (1950-1953). After studying music in Boston for two years, he made his recording debut with Ernie Fields' R&B band (1956). Ervin gained fame while playing with Charles Mingus (off and on during 1956-1962), holding his own with the volatile bassist and Eric Dolphy. He also led his own quartet, worked with Randy Weston on a few occasions in the '60s, and spent much of 1964-1966 in Europe before dying much too young from kidney disease. Ervin, who is on several notable Charles Mingus records, made dates of his own for Bethlehem, Savoy, and Candid during 1960-1961, along with later sets for Pacific Jazz and Blue Note.



    Booker Ervin, who always had a very unique sound on the tenor, is heard in prime form on this quartet set. In virtually all cases, the jazz and blues musicians who recorded for Candid in 1960-61 (during its original brief existence) were inspired and played more creatively than they did for other labels. That fact is true for Ervin, even if he never made an indifferent record. In addition to Poinciana and Speak Low, Ervin's quartet (which was a regular if short-lived group) performs four of the leader's originals; best known is Booker's Blues.




    Musicians:



    • Booker Ervin (tenor saxophone)

    • George Tucker (bass)

    • Horace Parlan (piano)

    • Al Harewood (drums)




    Recording: January 1961 at Nola Penthouse Studios, New York City, by Bob d'Orleans

    Production: Nat Hentoff




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. Mojo
    2. Uranus
    3. Poinciana
    4. Speak Low
    5. Bookers Blues
    6. Boo
    Booker Ervin
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Out Front (Pure Pleasure) Out Front (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Out Front (Pure Pleasure)

    Booker Little was the first trumpet soloist to emerge in jazz after the death of Clifford Brown to have his own sound. His tragically brief life (he died at age 23 later in 1961) cut short what would have certainly been a major career. This is supremely soulful modern jazz and one of his best albums ever as a leader. The album's got a tremendous feel from the very first note and there are many strong moments during these consistently challenging and satisfying performances. He had a bold jazz vision that makes us miss his talents even more strongly than before!




    Musicians:



    • Booker Little (trumpet)

    • Julian Priester (trombone)

    • Eric Dolphy (alto saxophone, bass clarinet, flute)

    • Don Friedman (piano)

    • Art Davis, Ron Carter (bass)

    • Max Roach (drums, vibraphone, percussion)




    Recording: March and April 1961 in Nola Penthouse Studios, New York City, by Bob d'Orleans

    Production: Nat Hentoff




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. We Speak
    2. Stength And Sanity

    3. Quiet Please
    4. Moods In Free Time
    5. Man Of Words
    6. Hazy Hues
    7. A New Day
    Booker Little
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Mr. Bechet (Pure Pleasure) Mr. Bechet (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Mr. Bechet (Pure Pleasure)

    Budd Johnson didn't do much recording as a leader, so this French studio date is particularly valuable. He's reunited with Earl Hines, with whom he played during three stints between 1932-1942; they're joined by drummer Panama Francis and bassist Jimmy Leary. The title track is an original tribute to the king of soprano saxophonists, Sidney Bechet. Though it was his second instrument, Johnson delivers a powerful solo with his own unique tone. He's back to tenor sax for the bluesy Am I Wasting My Time? and clearly enjoys himself on Hines' romping Linger Awhile. Like all of Budd Johnson's releases, this LP is strongly recommended.



    Musicians:



    • Budd Johnson (tenor saxophone, soprano saxophone)

    • Earl Hines (piano)

    • Jimmy Leary (bass)

    • Panama Francis (drums)



    Recording: July 1974 at the Seed Studio in Vallauris, France, by Gerhard Lehner




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Blues For Sale
    2. Gone With The Wind
    3. If You were Mine
    4. Am I Waisting My Time
    5. The Dirty Old Man
    6. Linger Awhile
    7. Mr Bechet
    Budd Johnson & Earl Hines
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Color Changes (Pure Pleasure) Color Changes (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Color Changes (Pure Pleasure)

    Possessor of the happiest sound in jazz, flÜgelhornist Clark Terry always plays music that is exuberant, swinging, and fun. A brilliant (and very distinctive) soloist, he gained early experience playing trumpet in the viable St. Louis jazz scene of the early '40s (where he was an inspiration for Miles Davis) and, after performing in a Navy band during World War II, he gained a strong reputation playing with the big band of Charlie Barnet (1947-1948), the orchestra and small groups of Count Basie (1948-1951), and particularly with Duke Ellington (1951-1959). Terry, a versatile swing/bop soloist who started specializing on flÜgelhorn in the mid-'50s, had many features with Ellington (including Perdido) and started leading his own record dates during that era. He recorded regularly in the 1960s including a classic set with the Oscar Peterson Trio and several dates with the quintet he co-led with valve trombonist Bob Brookmeyer.



    This is one of flÜgelhornist Clark Terry's finest albums. Terry had complete control over the music and, rather than have the usual jam session, he utilized an octet and arrangements by Yusef Lateef, Budd Johnson, and Al Cohn. The lineup of musicians lives up to its potential, and the charts make good use of the sounds of these very individual stylists. The material, which consists of originals by Terry, Duke Jordan, Lateef, and Bob Wilber, is both rare and fresh, and the interpretations always swing.




    Musicians:



    • Clark Terry (trumpet, fluegel horn)

    • Jimmy Knepper (trombone)

    • Julius Watkins (french horn)

    • Yusef Lateef (tenor saxophone, flute; english horn, oboe)

    • Seldon Powell (tenor saxophone, flute)

    • Tommy Flanagan, Budd Johnson (piano)

    • Joe Benjamin (bass)

    • Ed Shaughnessy (drums)




    Recording: November 1960 at Nola Penthouse Studios, New York City, by Bob d'Orleans

    Production: Nat Hentoff




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. Blue Waltz (la Valse Bleue)
    2. Brother Terry
    3. Flutin and Fluglin

    4. No Problem
    5. La Rive Gauche
    6. Nahstye Blues
    7. Chat Qui Peche (A Cat That Fishes)
    Clark Terry
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Painting Signs (Pure Pleasure) Painting Signs (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $49.99
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    x

    Painting Signs (Pure Pleasure)

    Painting Signs stands up as a complete work from beginning to end. Eric Bibb makes a fine case for blues as a music of introspection, warmth, and supreme nuance. Easily his most mature album to date, Painting Signs continues Bibb's formula of socially aware songs performed from an acutely personal point-of-view; standout tracks Don't Ever Let Nobody Drag Your Spirit Down and a cover of Hope In A Hopeless World hammer home his message of individual freedom and the responsibilities that accompany it. (It's no coincidence that Pops Staples, to whom Bibb dedicates this album, once recorded the latter song.) That's not to say Painting Signs is overly didactic or, indeed, 'heavy' in any way; even the most serious songs here, like the plea for peace and unity Got To Do Better, are leavened by a musical backdrop that's soulful and immediately accessible. Gospel-leaning backing vocals by Linda Tillery and her Cultural Heritage Choir help flesh out several cuts, and robust accordion fills by Bibb's longtime accompanist Janne Petersson add a subtle Louisiana flavor to the rolling, propulsive Kokomo and, to surprisingly good effect, the deep-grooved version of Jimmy Reed's Honest I Do. Elsewhere, he keeps a minimalist tone dominated by acoustic guitar, an arrangement that's particularly mesmerizing on the chilling title track. With its emphasis on sophisticated songcraft and its gentle blend of folk, gospel, and country influences, Painting Signs presents Bibb as an artist intent on blurring the line between blues and 'roots music' in general.



    Musicians:



    • Eric Bibb (vocal, guitar)

    • Wilson Pickett (vocal)

    • Dave Bronze (bass, guitar, vocal)

    • Robbie McIntosh (guitar)

    • Hans Theesink (mandolin)

    • Janne Petersson (organ, piano, electric piano, accordion)

    • Henry Spinetti (drums)

    • Linda Tillery & The Cultural Heritage Choir (backing vocal)



    Format: 2LPs 33rpm / gatefold sleeve



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. Kokomo
    2. Hope In A Hopeless World
    3. Five Miles Above
    4. I Heard The Angels Singing

    5. Delia's Gone
    6. Got To Do Better
    7. The Light Was Worth The Candle

    8. Angel
    9. Walkin' Home

    10. To Know You
    11. Honest I Do
    12. Paintin' Signs
    13. Don't Ever Let Nobody Drag Your Spirit Down
    Eric Bibb
    $49.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Newport Rebels (Pure Pleasure) Newport Rebels (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Newport Rebels (Pure Pleasure)

    The jazz experience just doesn't get any better than this! Newport Rebels was nominated for Sterophile's Records To Die For because of Roy Eldridge's ballsy, all-out trumpet playing on Mysterious Blues and Me and You. Eldridge approached the horn as if neither he nor it had limits - his electrifying, perfectly paced solos prove him right. Neither do the other musicians disappoint. The result is jazz tastefully stretched beyond traditional roots. And the late-1960s, direct-to-two-track recording guarantees a natural sound with few production artifacts.




    Musicians:



    • Abbey Lincoln (vocal)

    • Booker Little, Benny Bailey, Roy Eldridge (trumpet)

    • Jimmy Knepper, Julian Priester (trombone)

    • Eric Dolphy (alto saxophone)

    • Walter Benton (tenor saxophone)

    • Kenny Dorham, Tommy Flanagan (piano)

    • Charles Mingus, Peck Morrison (bass)

    • Max Roach, Jo Jones (drums)




    Recording: November 1960 at the Newport Jazz Festival, Rhode Island, and Nola Penthouse Studios, New York City

    Production: Nat Hentoff




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Mysterious Blues
    2. Cliff Walk
    3. Wrap Your Troubles In Dreams (And Dream Your Troubles Away)
    4. Taint Nobodys Bizness If I Do
    5. Me and You
    Jazz Artists Guild
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Leadbelly (Pure Pleasure) Leadbelly (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Leadbelly (Pure Pleasure)

    Leadbelly's last recording sessions for a commercial record label, held in the early fall of 1944, yielded a dazzling 12 songs, embracing virtuoso guitar blues (Grasshoppers In My Pillow), pounding piano-driven scatting (The Eagle Rocks, with Leadbelly himself at the ivories, a talent for which he wasn't usually recognized), and familiar standards done in some startlingly different ways, including Goodnight, Irene, Rock Island Line, and Ella Speed, done with the understated accompaniment of a zither (courtesy of Paul Mason Howard) as well as his own guitar. Leadbelly was in excellent voice and top form on guitar and piano - having gone to California to test the commercial waters, he met Tex Ritter, an old friend, who arranged for Leadbelly to come to his house and, with Merle Travis playing as well and Capitol executive Lee Gillette present, auditioned then and there for the label; he was energized by the experience, and Capitol's recording caught the brightest as well as the deepest tones in his playing, thus making this record one of the very best showcases for acoustic 12-string guitar of the period. Sadly, only a handful of these tracks were issued during the man's own lifetime, thus convincing him that they were another career dead end - in 1956 (and again in 1962) they emerged with an impassioned annotation by Dave Dexter Jr., imploring people to buy these last commercial sides by one of the most celebrated bluesmen of the century.



    Production notes: Whilst this album has been mastered and produced to the highest possible standards it is NOT upto what would be considered audiophile standards. This would be impossible bearing in mind the standards of recording and mastering at the time.




    Musicians:



    • Leadbelly (guitar, piano)

    • Paul Mason Howard (zither)




    Recording: October 1944 in Hollywood, USA

    Production: Dave Dexter Jr. and Lee Gilette



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    Goodnight Irene
    Grasshoppers In My Pillow

    The Eagle Rocks
    Rock Island Line

    Ella Speed
    Backwater Blues
    Take This Hammer
    Tell Me, Baby
    Eagle Rock Rag

    Western Plain
    Sweet Mary Blues
    On A Christmas Day
    Huddie Ledbetter
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • USA (Pure Pleasure) USA (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    USA (Pure Pleasure)

    For the most part, this is a 1961 session wherein the blues raconteur and pianist Memphis Slim runs through a good chunk of his repertoire, the songs that came to mind that afternoon. As such, it's relaxed entertainment, rather than a fixed recording for a larger audience. Which is not to say an audience can't enjoy this music. Slim's piano playing is dynamically rich, delicate at times, and pounding when necessary. His vocals are strong, too, but just as capable of dropping down to just above a whisper to make a point. They just don't make records like this anymore, documents of an artist at work without any attempt to be outside the moment.




    Musicians:



    • Memphis Slim (vocal, piano)

    • Jazz Gillum (vocal, harmonica)

    • Arbee Stidham (vocal, guitar)




    Recording: January 1961 at Nola Penthouse Studios, New York City by Bob d'Orleans

    Production: Nat Hentoff




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Born With The Blues
    2. Just Let Me Be
    3. Red Haired Boogie
    4. Blue And Disgusted
    5. New Key To The Highway
    6. Id Take Her To Chicago
    7. Harlem Bound
    8. El Capitan
    9. I Just Landed In Your Town
    10. John Henry
    11. I Believe Ill Settle Down
    12. Bad Luck And Troubles
    13. Late Afternoon Blues
    14. Memphis Slim, U.S.A.
    Memphis Slim
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • After Midnight (Pure Pleasure) After Midnight (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $49.99
    Buy Now
    x

    After Midnight (Pure Pleasure)

    Nat 'King' Cole's music is the perfect combination of romantic charm and musical invention. Cole is renowned for his big production numbers and pop hits such as Stardust, but he was also an accomplished and unique jazz pianist and excelled in a small-group setting. After Midnight's album cover states that this is a 'trio' release. However, Cole is actually paired up with his trio plus five guest soloists (saxophone, trombone, trumpet, percussion, and violin). The dubious credits don't matter much though. This is precious music and, without a doubt, one of Cole's best records. Included here are wonderful and intimate renditions of Cole favorites Sweet Lorraine, (Get Your Kicks on) Route 66, and many others. Trombonist Juan Tizol performs a beautiful version of his Afro-Cuban tune Caravan, and Cole and violinist Stuff Smith trade some hot licks on the up-tempo I Know That You Know. For anybody looking to understand the depth and breadth of Cole's jazz roots, this disc is an excellent point of departure.




    Musicians:



    • Nat 'King' Cole (piano, vocal)

    • Willie Smith (alto saxophone)

    • Harry 'Sweets' Edison (trumpet)

    • Juan Tizol (trombone)

    • John Collins (guitar)

    • Charlie Harris (bass)

    • Stuff Smith (violin)

    • Lee Young (drums)

    • Jack Costanza (conga, bongo)




    Recording: August and September 1956 at Capitol Studios, Los Angeles, California

    Production: Lee Gillettedeutsch



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. Just You, Just Me
    2. Sweet Lorraine
    3. Sometimes I'm Happy
    4. Caravan
    5. It's Only a Paper Moon
    6. You're Looking at Me

    7. The Lonely One
    8. Don't Let it Go to Your Head
    9. I Know That You Know
    10. Blame it on my Youth
    11. When I Grow too Old to Dream
    12. Route 66

    13. I Was a Little too Lonely (and You Were a Little too Late)
    14. Your Can Depend on Me
    15. What is There to Say
    16. Two Loves Have I
    17. andy
    18. You're Looking at Me (alternate take)
    Nat King Cole
    $49.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Jazz Reunion (Pure Pleasure) Jazz Reunion (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Jazz Reunion (Pure Pleasure)

    It is strange that two such individual musicians as Pee Wee Russell and Coleman Hawkins were kept apart for some 32 years but it is a fact that not since 1929 had they met in a recording studio. Pee Wee Russell's unique, and sometimes derided approach was praised as ahead of its time, and cited by some as an early example of free jazz. Coleman Hawkins, at the time of this 1961 Jazz Reunion record date dismissed any idea that Russell was now playing modern, claiming that he had always played that way. The greatly imaginative improvisations of Russell when at his best remain an inspiration to jazz clarinetists.



    On this album the whole group move with an elasticity which only comes when exactly the right mood is attained by all the musicians taking part. Pee Wee plays with deep passion throughout and Hawkins was never heard in better blowing form than this. His virile, robust solos are as forceful as anything he recorded in his long distinguished career. Emmett Berry's solos are models of tasteful improvisation. Brookmeyer displays a pretty turn of wit and builds his solos with ingenuity. With excellent arrangements by Nat Pierce and some lovely cymbal work from Jo Jones this really is a beauty.




    Musicians:



    • Coleman Hawkins (tenor saxophone)

    • Pee Wee Russell (clarinet)

    • Emmett Berry (trumpet)

    • Bob Brookmeyer (trombone)

    • Nat Pierce (piano)

    • Milt Hinton (bass)

    • Jo Jones (drums)




    Recording: February 1961 at Nola Penthouse Studio, New York City, by Bob d'Orleans
    Production: Nat Hentoff




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. If I Could Be With You (One Hour Tonight)

    2. Tin Tin Deo
    3. Mariooch
    4. All Too Soon
    5. 28th And 8th
    6. What Am I Here For
    Pee Wee Russell & Coleman Hawkins
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Little Niles (Pure Pleasure) Little Niles (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Little Niles (Pure Pleasure)

    Randy Weston, one of the world's foremost pianists and composers, a true innovator and visionary. Starting with the gospel of bop according to Thelonious Monk, Weston gradually absorbed the letter and spirit of African and Caribbean rhythms and tunes, welding everything together into a searching, energizing, often celebratory blend. His piano work ranges across a profusion of styles from boogie-woogie through bop into dissonance, marked by a stabbing quality reminiscent of, but not totally indebted to Monk.



    Combining the Ellingtonish arrangements of Melba Liston with the rhythmically intriguing explorations of Randy Weston this album represented a high point in his career at the time. All the tunes, written by Randy Weston, were inspired by his children Niles and Pamela. The innocence, excitement, anticipation and tension of childhood are all displayed here in these warm vinyl grooves.



    Musicians:



    • Randy Weston (piano)

    • Johnny Griffin (tenor saxophone)

    • Ray Copeland, Idrees Sulieman (trumpet)

    • Melba Liston (arranger, trombone)

    • George Joyner (bass)

    • Charlie Persip ( drums)





    Recording: October 1958 at RCA Studios, NYC




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Earth Birth
    2. Little Susan
    3. Nice Ice
    4. Little Niles
    5. Pams Waltz
    6. Babes Blues
    7. Lets Climb a Hill
    Randy Weston
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Blue Rose (Pure Pleasure) Blue Rose (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Blue Rose (Pure Pleasure)

    One of Rosemary Clooney's best records, and one of Duke's more accessible offerings, combined on one LP. The recorded output of the 1950's didn't get much more satisfying than this. Duke's music was always very sophisticated and this time it's even more obvious with a presence of such a talented singer as Rosemary Clooney. The songs are marvelous and she sounds young, fresh and sexy (ladylike sexy). In Blue Rose, not only are Clooney's vocals outstanding, but the arrangements are some of the prettiest of jazz.



    The band swings simply and sweetly, though still thoroughly in the Duke style. As if to make the point that the band is the 'other' star of this recording, there's one instrumental here - Passion Flower (Johnny Hodges on sax never sounded more sure of himself). Its inclusion in the program, without a vocal from Clooney, is at first bizarre - but seems to make sense within the context of the album.



    The fascinating album notes explain why and how separate tracks for Rosemary Clooney and Duke Ellington's orchestra had to be laid down. One would never realize that singer and orchestra were not together. They are totally in sync. This is not big, belting jazz; this is sophisticated, late night, intimate singing and playing. This is one of the most memorable pairings of a 'popular' singer with a jazz giant; ranking with the first Sinatra-Basie album and the Coltrane-Hartman session.




    Musicians:



    • Rosemary Clooney (vocal)

    • Duke Ellington (piano, arranger)

    • Billy Strayhorn (arranger)

    • Johnny Hodges, Russell Procope (alto saxophone)

    • Clark Terry, Cat Anderson (trumpet)

    • Gordon Jackson (trombone)

    • Jimmy Woode (bass)

    • Sam Woodyard (drums)




    Recording: January and February 1956




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. Hey Baby
    2. Sophisticated Lady

    3. Me and You
    4. Passion Flower
    5. I Let A Song Go Out Of My Heart
    6. Grievin
    7. Blue Rose
    8. Im Checkin OutGoombye

    9. I Got It Bad
    10. Mood Indigo
    Rosemary Clooney & Duke Ellington
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
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