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  • I Could Never Take The Place Of Your Man (Single) I Could Never Take The Place Of Your Man (Single) Quick View

    $12.99
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    I Could Never Take The Place Of Your Man (Single)

    12 Maxi-Single Reissue

    Featuring I Could Never Take The Place Of Your Man And Hot Thing

    I Could Never Take the Place of Your Man is a song originally recorded in Prince's home studio in 1982. The song is an upbeat pop number featuring a combination of live drumming with two drum machine patterns. Also featured are two guitar solos, one wild and energetic and one more bluesy and subdued in the full album cut. The lyrics paint the image of a woman seeking a man to replace the one who left, while Prince refuses, saying that she would not be satisfied with a one-night stand. The music and accompanying music video pushed this song to the top 10 in the US.

    The 12-inch single includes the full album version of I Could Never Take the Place of Your Man, as well as several remixes of Hot Thing. One of these was included on the Ultimate compilation album in 2006. Hot Thing received enough airplay by DJs to chart on its own, reaching #63.

    1. I Could Never Take The Place Of Your Man
    2. Hot Thing (Edit)
    3. Hot Thing (Extended Remix)
    4. Hot Thing (Dub Version)
    Prince
    $12.99
    12 Vinyl Single - Sealed Buy Now
  • Jake Xerxes Fussell Jake Xerxes Fussell Quick View

    $21.99
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    Jake Xerxes Fussell

    The Southern half of the Georgia-Alabama border follows the Chattahoochee River, which cleaves Columbus, Georgia from its decidedly less reputable neighbor, Phenix City, Alabama. Georgia's second city is the hometown of "Mother of the Blues" Ma Rainey and novelist Carson McCullers, but it was local hillbilly duo Darby and Tarlton's 1927 hit "Columbus Stockade Blues" that first immortalized Columbus in popular culture. Back in their day, if you ended up in lockup in Columbus, chances are you did your dirtiest deeds across the river. Historically rife with vice of every conceivable variety-gambling, prostitution, moonshining, and endemic corruption and violence perpetrated by both gangs and police-the notoriously anarchic Phenix City was once known as "The Wickedest City in America."


    A similar frontier liminality and skewed sense of place characterize the music of Durham, North Carolina singer and guitarist Jake Xerxes Fussell, whose self-titled debut record, produced by and featuring William Tyler, transmutes ten arcane folk and blues tunes into vibey cosmic laments and crooked riverine rambles. Jake Xerxes (yes, that's his real middle name, after Georgia potter D.X. Gordy) grew up in Columbus, son of Fred C. Fussell, a folklorist, curator, and photographer who hails from America's Wickedest City. Fred's fieldwork took him, often with young Jake in tow, across the Southeast documenting traditional vernacular culture, which included recording blues and old-time musicians with fellow folklorists and recordists George Mitchell and Art Rosenbaum (which led Jake to music, and to some of the songs herein) and collaborating with American Indian artists (which led Jake eventually to his graduate research on Choctaw fiddlers.)


    As a teenager Jake began playing and studying with elder musicians in the Chattahoochee Valley, apprenticing with Piedmont blues legend Precious Bryant ("Georgia Buck"), with whom he toured and recorded, and riding wild with Alabama bluesman, black rodeo rider, rye whiskey distiller, and master dowser George Daniel ("Rabbit on a Log"). He joined a Phenix City country band who were students of Jimmie Tarlton of Darby and Tarlton; he accompanied Etta Baker in North Carolina; he moved to Berkeley, where he hung with genius documentary filmmaker Les Blank and learned from Haight folkies like Will Scarlett (Jefferson Airplane, Hot Tuna, Brownie McGhee) and cult fingerstyle guitarist Steve Mann ("Push Boat"); he appeared on A Prairie Home Companion. He did a whole lot of listening, gradually honing his prodigious guitar skills, singing, and repertoire. In 2005 he moved to Oxford, Mississippi, where he enrolled in the Southern Studies department at Ole Miss, recorded and toured with Rev. John Wilkins, and, last year, met up with acclaimed artist William Tyler to begin recording his first solo album.


    Collaborating with Tyler and engineer Mark Nevers in Nashville was a conscious decision to depart cloistered trad scenes and sonics for broader, more oblique horizons. Tyler, a guitar virtuoso known for his own compositions that untether and reframe traditional six-string forms and techniques, helmed the push boat in inimitable fashion, enlisting crack(ed) Nashville session vets Chris Scruggs (steel guitar, bass, fiddle: Bonnie "Prince" Billy, Marty Stuart), Brian Kotzur (drums: Silver Jews), and Hoot Hester (fiddle: Bill Monroe, Ray Charles) to crew.


    So it's no accident that Jake approaches the songs and styles represented here with both interpretive respect and unfussy irreverence, imbuing them with equal parts vaporish, percolating atmosphere and academic rigor, honoring the folksong headwaters by emphasizing their liquid mutability, alien strangeness, and sly humor above preconceived notions of static authenticity. Fussell recognizes that folk revivalist preciousness about spurious genre boundaries often feels absurdly at odds with the unruliness and restlessly inventive practices of tradition bearers-no revival or reenactment gear is necessary when the music lives and breathes and throws around hips and knees like these. Likewise, when you examine their lyrical content, ostensibly linear tales about rivers and work (labor of the hands, as in "Boat's up the River" and "Man at the Mill" and labor of the heart, as in "Star Girl" and "Pork and Beans") reveal themselves as fractured, riddled with narrative lacunae that open up the texts as squirrelly riddles or gentle metaphysical jokes.


    For Fussell, these odd disjunctures demonstrate the way that verses and choruses, the stories we tell, disintegrate and erode over time, worn smooth as river stones and transmogrified by their repeated telling, more lovely for their fissures and absences than for any imaginary original integrity. (Aptly, "Chattahoochee" may mean something like "writing on rocks" in Muscogee or Yuchi.) Each song rendered here contains its own twinned inversion-its own Columbus, its own Phenix City-and Jake navigates their shoals with intuitive grace and authority.

    1. All in Down and Out
    2. Let Me Lose
    3. Star Girl
    4. Raggy Levy"
    5. Rabbit on a Log
    6. Boat's up the River
    7. Man at the Mill
    8. Push Boat
    9. Georgia Buck
    10. Pork and Beans
    Jake Xerxes Fussell
    $21.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • We Are The Romans (Out Of Stock) We Are The Romans (Out Of Stock) Quick View

    $25.99
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    We Are The Romans (Out Of Stock)

    The year was 1999. Prince told us to party like it is 1999. The world had us thinking there would be computer mayhem after the year 1999. The same year that George W. Bush told us that he would be a republican candidate for the upcoming election. It was the same year that the Euro was introduced as a major form of currency. Yet after all of events, three blunders and one economic uprising (give you a hint, the economic uprising did not have anything to do with George W. Bush), there was one record in 1999 that changed a genre of music as we know it or perhaps even created one. In 1999 in Tacoma, Washington the four members of Botch created an album that is considered one of the best within its genre entitled, We Are The Romans. A title that is a statement about the United States thought of immortality, but a realization that we are not. The album cover shows what appears to be New York City with a huge blot of black ink covering the city. Within the blot is a red target, signifying that the United States is indeed a target. The even more disturbing aspect of the art is the fact that when you first open the contents, there is a picture of destroyed buildings. That picture, perhaps, tells the story of what will happen in the near future to the United States or maybe Botch themselves. Now then, let us get to the album that Norma Jean tried to base an entire album off.


    Botch had only produced two full-length albums during their brief career as a band. We Are The Romans was the second of the two and a major advancement from their earlier release, American Nervoso. While American Nervoso was an amazing record in its own regard, it was not produced well and not as groundbreaking, musically, as We Are The Romans. During this release they came up with catchy and yet menacing guitar riffs, thick distorted sludgy bass riffs, extremely technical drumming.


    As an opener, "To Our Friends in the Great White North," kicks you directly, square in the nuts. With an initial shout, the guitar, bass, drums immediately follow. A consistent downward scale is played on the guitar that soon slyly transitions in a chug-to-high chord section. It then begins to break down as the pace begins to slow down. On and off head banger riffs follow at a slow dissipated pace that leads into a clean vocal section chanting


    it's your fault (it's your fault)

    ***ing up the kids (***ing up the kids)


    The chant is repeated for a few solitary moments and then it becomes tacit with just a high-hat keeping tempo that quickly turns until another heavy part with intense guitar work. The initial reactions after this song that it was simply mind blowing. The album maintains its ride of almighty power into the next song "Mondrian Was A Liar" with math metal elements incorporated. "Transitions from Persona to Object" continues the theme of memorable guitar riffs with a hook that is repeated and altered throughout the duration of the entire song. While the noises protruding may not be the most pleasant to the ear, they certainly add to the effect of destruction. While some may say that the repetitive nature of the song continues for far too long (clocking in at just over six minutes), the overall feeling was that it could not be abruptly stopped after any given point. It eventually comes to a halt when the drums are the only remaining instrument left. "C. Thomas Howell as the Soul Man"" provides a sloppy and gritty performance with classic tapping guitar riffs. Also contained is a three note distorted bass riff that evolves into a clean break within the song that builds up into chaos that then tapers off.


    More than half way through the album, We Are The Romans needed a shot of pure adrenaline. In what is the climax of the album, "Saint Matthew Returns to the Womb" has an unspeakable feeling about it. The song practically defines metalcore (in an album that is the start of metalcore, as we know it, perhaps). A song that combines classic elements of brutal metal and what can be considered "fun" hardcore. It is a true staple strong in the short lifespan of Botch. Finally, in what maybe be considered the song that may have predicted Botch's downfall, "Man The Ramparts." Surely, one can look at the album in the eyes of America's downfall, but ironically, Botch may have fell first. Think about it this way, it was their last full length without conflicts of the direction the band was going. It is a song about preparing for what is ahead, because it will soon be a collapse, but not without a last stand.


    We'll man the ramparts

    With arrows ready

    With our flags up

    We are the Romans


    The song can almost be related to a battle. It starts as it were trudging along to the beat of a war drum with off time guitar and bass. It then starts the battle with a brutal scream and fiery fierceness to it. As it continues, it slowly disassembles and then regains composure into the previous intensity. The song dies down, with every beat and it begins to fade into a choir hymn saying We are the Romans as almost collecting forces to join for one last hurrah. Eight minutes and thirty now elapse, the quintessential loudest section of the entire song ERUPTS. Precise drumming and abrasive chords carry on until the final hits of the instruments and the last screech and it everything stops.


    It is over. The piercing screaming, the rhythmically brilliant drumming, the coarse sound of the bass, and the memorable guitar riffs are no longer. While "I Wanna Be A Sex Symbol On My Own Terms" is the only track that I feel was a grave disappointment, they produced an unbelievably solid record. We are the Romans was a completely original album in its own regard and left a legacy behind. They made the music that was out there more interesting and complex. Botch created a fusion that was perfected with this release. I am glad one thing will never change, no matter what year it is next; I can still listen to this album.


    - Ryan Flatley (Sputnik Music)

    1. To Our Friends In the Great White North
    2. Mondrian Was A Liar
    3. Transitions From Persona To Object
    4. Swimming The Channel Vs. Driving The Channel
    5. C. Thomas Howell As The Soul Man
    6. Saint Matthew Returns To The Womb
    7. Frequency Ass Bandit
    8. I Wanna Be A Sex Symbol On My Own Terms
    9. Man The Ramparts
    10. Untitled
    Botch
    $25.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Temporarily out of stock
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