Pro-ject Authorized & Certified VPI Dealer

A World of Vinyl

(877) 929-8729
Site Search
Menu Free shipping on domestic orders over $49.99! - We ship worldwide!
15% Off Vinyl - LP15
Home > Products for: '

Pure Pleasure

'
Results per page:
  • First Impressions (Pure Pleasure) First Impressions (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    First Impressions (Pure Pleasure)

    For a label that wasn't around long, Strata East achieved the same sort of label recognition that Impulse! or Blue Note managed to build. In other words, you knew what you were getting when you bought a record on the label, even if you didn't know the names on the outside of the cover. This is no exception. Who is Shamek Farrah? Who knows? Who cares? It's the music that's important. This is the standard spiritually intense new jazz one learns to expect from the label, soaked in some Eastern influences but always with its ear to the street. Musicians took their roles as leaders and spokesmen very seriously back then. This very adult statement from a group of very serious men is no exception. However, what might be an average, forgettable session is rescued by the propulsive engine of Milton Suggs' bass. He adds the fire and the drive that keeps things interesting and prevents the music from wandering into a circular spiritual morass. For fans of the sound or the label, this can be heartily recommended.



    Musicians:



    • Shamek Farrah (alto saxophone)

    • Norman Person (trumpet)

    • Sonelius Smith (piano)

    • Milton Suggs (bass)

    • Ron Warwell (drums)

    • Kenny Harper (percussion)

    • Calvert 'Bo' Satter-White (conga)



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    1. Meterologicly Tuned
    2. Watch What Happens Now
    3. Umoja Suite
    4. First Impressions
    Shamek Farrah
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Blood Sweat And Tears (Pure Pleasure) Blood Sweat And Tears (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Blood Sweat And Tears (Pure Pleasure)

    Winner of 3 Grammys in 1970 (Album of the Year, Best Arrangment for Spinning Wheel and Best Contemporary Instrumental Perfomance for Variations On A Theme By Erk Satie) this absolutely mind-blowing album peaked at #1 on the US Charts, staying there for seven weeks, going double platinum by the end of 1969 and stayed on the top 40 for 66 weeks. It's actually in the 13th place of the best selling albums from all time in the US with about 3 millions copies sold.


    Arguably, the Blood, Sweat & Tears that made this self-titled second album - consisting of five of the eight original members and four newcomers, including singer David Clayton-Thomas - was really a different group from the one that made Child Is Father To The Man, which was done largely under the direction of singer/songwriter/keyboard player/arranger Al Kooper. They had certain similarities to the original: the musical mixture of classical, jazz, and rock elements was still apparent, and the interplay between the horns and the keyboards was still occurring, even if those instruments were being played by different people.


    Kooper was even still present as an arranger on two tracks, notably the initial hit You've Made Me So Very Happy. But the second BS&T, under the aegis of producer James William Guercio, was a less adventurous unit, and, as fronted by Clayton-Thomas, a far more commercial one. Not only did the album contain three songs that neared the top of the charts as singles - You've Made Me So Very Happy, Spinning Wheel, and And When I Die - but the whole album, including an arrangement of God Bless The Child and the radical rewrite of Traffic's Smiling Phases, was wonderfully accessible. It was a repertoire to build a career on, and Blood, Sweat & Tears did exactly that, although they never came close to equaling this album.

    Musicians:



    • David Clayton Thomas (vocal)

    • Steve Katz (guitar, harmonica, vocal)

    • Dick Halligan (organ, piano, trombone, flute, vocal)

    • Fred Lipsius (alto saxophone, piano)

    • Lew Soloffm Chuck Winfield (trumpet, fluegel horn)

    • Jerry Hyman (trombone)

    • Jim Fielder (bass)

    • Bobby Colomby (drums, percussion, vocal)



    Recording: August and October 1968 by Roy Halee and Fred Catero

    Production: James William Guerico



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. Variations On A Theme By Erik Satie
    2. Smiling Phases
    3. Sometimes in Winter
    4. More and More
    5. And When I Die
    6. God Bless The Child
    7. Spinning Wheel
    8. You've Made Me So Very Happy
    9. Blues - Part II
    10. Variations On A Theme By Erik State
    Blood, Sweat And Tears
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Suitcase (Pure Pleasure) Suitcase (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Suitcase (Pure Pleasure)

    On Suitcase, his eighth studio release, Keb' Mo' (Kevin Moore) reunites with John Porter, the producer of Moore's critically lauded first album, and the result is a pleasant, midtempo suite of songs dedicated to the emotional baggage everyone carries with them as they plow through increasingly complicated lives in search of peace, love, and some measure of personal redemption. Moore covers this ground with a wink and a grin in his voice, though, and Suitcase emerges as a wry commentary on modern life that still manages to sound bright and positive, beginning with the effervescent, sprung reggae rhythm of the opening track, Your Love, one of the best cuts here. Other highlights include the lovely ballad, Still There for Me, a celebration of the little man and his private victories, I'm a Hero, and the soothing, hopeful shuffle that closes things out, Life Is Beautiful. Moore is generally classified as a blues player, but the truth is, aside from his first album, he has actually done very little true blues material, and it is probably more accurate to call what he does blues-informed, but even that ignores the point that he is probably much closer in tone, theme, and feel to James Taylor than he is to Robert Johnson or any other blues figure. He does turn to the blues here, though, on the title track, Suitcase, and morphs it into a wonderfully engaging song about what people bring into a romantic relationship and what they take away in the end, making full use of the 'emotional baggage' connection inherent in the title. It is Keb' Mo' at his best, drawing on his ability to synthesize roots forms like the blues into completely contemporary commentaries on the struggles, travails, and blind faith in personal redemption that accompanies people as they slog their way daily ever deeper into the 21st century.




    Musicians:



    • Keb' Mo' (guitar, dobro)

    • Fran Banish, Kat Dyson, Greg Leisz (guitar)

    • Michael Finnigan (organ)

    • Reggie McBride (bass)

    • Sergio Gonzalez (drums)

    • Jeff Paris (electric piano, organ)

    • Jon Cleary (piano, organ)

    • Paulinho da Costa (percussion)

    • background vocals and the Texacali Horns




    Recording: at Shangri La Studio, Malibu, and Stu Stu Studio, Los Angeles, by Rik Pekkonen & John Porter

    Production: John Porter



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. Your Love
    2. The Itch
    3. Eileen
    4. Remain Silent
    5. Still There For Me
    6. Rita
    7. I'm A Hero
    8. Suitcase
    9. Whole 'Nutha Thang
    10. I See Love
    11. I'll Be Your Water
    12. Life Is Beautiful
    Keb' Mo'
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Right Place Wrong Time (Pure Pleasure) Right Place Wrong Time (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Right Place Wrong Time (Pure Pleasure)

    This recording session was not released until five years after it was done. One can imagine the tapes practically smoldering in their cases, the music is so hot. Sorry, there is nothing 'wrong' about this blues album at all. Otis Rush was a great blues expander, a man whose guitar playing was in every molecule pure blues. On his solos on this album he strips the idea of the blues down to very simple gestures (i.e., a bent string, but bent in such a subtle way that the seasoned blues listener will be surprised). As a performer he opens up the blues form with his chord progressions and use of horn sections, the latter instrumentation again added in a wonderfully spare manner, bringing to mind a master painter working certain parts of a canvas in order to bring in more light. Blues fans who get tired of the same old song structures, riff, and rhythms should be delighted with most of Rush's output, and this one is among his best. Sometimes all he does to make a song sound unlike any blues one has ever heard is just a small thing -- a chord moving up when one expects it go down, for example. The production is particularly skilled, and the fact that Capitol Records turned this session down after originally producing it can only be reasonably accepted when combined with other decisions this label has made, such as turning down the Doors because singer Jim Morrison had »no charisma«. This record doesn't mess around at all. The first track takes off like the man they fire out of a cannon at the end of a circus, a perceived climax swaggeringly representing just the beginning, after all. Some of the finest tracks are the ones that go longer than five minutes, allowing the players room to stretch. And that means more of Rush's great guitar playing, of course. For the final track he leaves the blues behind completely for a moving cover version of Rainy Night in Georgia by Tony Joe White.


    Musicians:



    • Otis Rush (vocal, guitar)

    • Doug Killmer, John Kahn (bass)

    • Hart McNee (alto saxophone)

    • John Wilmeth (trumpet)

    • Ron Stallings (tenor saxophone)

    • Fred Burton (guitar)

    • Mark Naftalin (piano)

    • Ira Kamin (organ)

    • Bob Jones (drums)




    Recording: February 1971 at Wally Heider's Studio, San Francisco

    Production: Nick Gravenites and Otis Rush



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Tore Up
    2. Right Place, Wrong Time
    3. Easy Go
    4. Three Times A Fool
    5. Rainy Night In Georgia
    6. Natural Ball
    7. I Wonder Why
    8. Your Turn To Cry
    9. Lonely Man
    10. Take A Look Behind
    Otis Rush
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • T. Bone Walker Sings The Blues (Pure Pleasure) T. Bone Walker Sings The Blues (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    T. Bone Walker Sings The Blues (Pure Pleasure)

    T-Bone Walker is one of the all time greats, an innovator and significant influence on just about every blues guitarist who followed. But his musical legacy is also incredibly enjoyable, full of humour as well as invention.



    A man who played the blues with flair, sophistication, technical brilliance and a sense of humour, Aaron Thibeaux Walker was born in Linden, Cass County, of Cherokee Indian descent. His trademark was the cool, telling West Coast licks which emanated from his guitar - there have been few who have done the job better.




    Musicians:



    • Aaron T-Bone Walker (vocal, guitar)

    • Eddie Hutcherson (trumpet)

    • Edward Hale (alto saxophone)

    • Eddie Davis (tenor saxophone)

    • Jim Wynn (tenor saxophone, baritone saxophone)

    • Willard McDaniels (piano)

    • Buddy Woodson, Billy Hadnott (bass)

    • Robert "Snake" Sims (drums)




    Recording: April 1950, August and December 1951, January1952




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. Strollin' With Bones
    2. You Don't Love Me
    3. You Don't Understand
    4. Say! Pretty Baby
    5. Tell Me What's the Reason
    6. Blue Mood
    7. The Sun Went Down
    8. Travelin' Blues
    9. Evil Hearted Woman
    10. Cold, Cold Feeling
    11. I Got the Blues Again

    12. Blues Is a Woman
    T. Bone Walker
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Nina At The Village Gate (Pure Pleasure) Nina At The Village Gate (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Nina At The Village Gate (Pure Pleasure)

    In the intimate ambiance of The Village Gate, Nina Simone made pure magic with her voice and on the keyboard, one Manhattan evening back in 1961. She sang and played with a trio, which featured her favorite guitarist, Al Shackman. We are so fortunate that the moment was captured and recorded.



    I can't really categorize Nina's sound or her music and call her 'just' a fabulous jazz vocalist. Although, she plays extraordinary jazz with her voice, as in Just In Time. She has been often called a musical anomaly, because there is no one category for her work. She was trained as a classical pianist, and in cuts like Bye Bye Blackbird, the complexity of her piano comes through loud and clear. Her folk songs, like the biting House Of The Rising Sun, and Zungo, an African work song, place her at the top of a long list of folk singers. Ms. Simone's gospel songs, i.e., Children Go Where I Send You, can raise the roof and bring down the house, as she did at the Gate in '61. She is a protest singer, Brown Baby, and an actress, capable of an extraordinary range of emotions.



    Nina has the rare ability to dig into her material and bring unexpected meaning to familiar lyrics. She is eclectic with her taste and her repertoire. But whatever touches Nina, and whatever Nina touches, will reach you and evoke an emotional response. Her music is as fresh today, as it was 42 years ago, singing for that Manhattan audience. They could not have loved her more then, than we do now.




    Musicians:



    • Nina Simone (piano, vocal)

    • Al Schackman (guitar)

    • Chris White (bass)

    • Bob Hamilton (drums)




    Recording: 1961 in New York City

    Production: Cal Lampley



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. Just In Time
    2. He Was Too Good to Me
    3. House of the Rising Sun
    4. Bye Bye Blackbird
    5. Brown Baby
    6. Zungo
    7. If He Changed My Name
    8. Children Go Where I Send You
    Nina Simone
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Oscar Pettiford: Volume 2 (Pure Pleasure) Oscar Pettiford: Volume 2 (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Oscar Pettiford: Volume 2 (Pure Pleasure)

    Oscar Pettiford became a major influence on a number of jazz artists along with fellow bassists Jimmy Blanton and Charles Mingus. This album titles as Volume 2 or Another One, Pettiford's third album as a leader for the Bethlehem label, was recorded in 1955. This exceptional date features the horns of Donald Byrd, Ernie Royal, Bob Brookmeyer, Gigi Gryce, and Jerome Richardson. Highlights include the Pettiford-penned Bohemia After Dark, named after the club in Greenwich Village and acknowledged as a jazz standard, Stardust, featuring Pettiford's poetic bass faintly accompanied by pianist Don Abney, and Minor Seventh Heaven, with Pettiford switching to cello. This is not just a bebop date; Pettiford had the range to incorporate influences like Duke Ellington and calypso, creating a full, lyrical band sound that matched his bass playing. Pettiford's legacy was cut short after he passed away suddenly in 1958 in Copenhagen at the age of 37.

    Musicians:



    • Donald Byrd, Ernie Royal (trumpet)

    • Bob Brookmeyer (trombone)

    • Gigi Gryce (alto saxophone, clarinet)

    • Jerome Richardson (tenor saxophone, clarinet, flute)

    • Don Abney (piano)

    • Oscar Pettiford (bass. cello)

    • Osie Johnson (drums)



    Recording: August 1955 in New York City



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    1. Kamman's A-Comin
    2. Minor 7th Heaven
    3. Stardust
    4. Bohemia After Dark
    5. Oscalypso
    6. Scorpio
    7. Titoro
    8. Don't Squawk
    9. Another One
    Oscar Pettiford
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Regeneration (Pure Pleasure) Regeneration (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Regeneration (Pure Pleasure)

    Around the time of this recording, Stanley Cowell had achieved a degree of prominence as the pianist for the advanced bop quartet Music Inc., which he co-led with trumpeter Charles Tolliver, as well as for unusual projects like his Piano Choir. With Regeneration he chose another path, essentially trying to produce a jazz-infused pop album with strong African roots, perhaps owing a little bit to Stevie Wonder. He assembled an extremely strong cast of musicians for the venture, including Marion Brown, Billy Higgins, and Ed Blackwell, as well as several African string and percussion masters and, by and large, succeeded conceptually if not commercially.


    A few songs use vocals in a fairly standard pop framework, and, while they are performed capably enough, the lyrical content leaves something to be desired in typical mid-'70s fashion. But much of the rest of the music makes up for this with, among other things, a delightful fife and drum piece by Brown and strong bass work by Bill Lee (Spike's dad). Regeneration is an interesting, often enjoyable album which, aside from its own small pleasures, provides a snapshot of some of the cross-fertilization in genres occurring at the time. - Brian Olewnick


    Musicians:


    • Jimmy Heath (soprano saxophone)
    • Stanley Cowell (piano, synthesizer)
    • Jerry Venable (guitar)
    • Aleke Kanonu, Shimmy Shewabble (drums,bass)
    • Bill Lee, Charles Fowlkes (bass)
    • Psyche Wanzandae (flute, harmonica)
    • Billy Higgins (drums)
    • Stanley Cowell (kora)
    • Ed Blackwell, Nadi Quamar (percussion, harp)



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    1. Trying To Find A Way
    2. The Gembhre
    3. Shimmy Shewobble
    4. Parlour Blues
    5. Thank You My People
    6. Travelin' Man
    7. Lullabye
    Stanley Cowell
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Yellow Princess (Pure Pleasure) The Yellow Princess (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    The Yellow Princess (Pure Pleasure)

    This particular John Fahey LP is a personal favourite of many of his devout fans for several reasons. And although such a judgment is tough, if one were looking to own only one album by this unique guitarist, The Yellow Princess could be the one. The recording sound is among the best of his many releases; at the proper volume, the effect is as if one had taken up residency inside the sound hole of a giant acoustic guitar. The program of pieces is marvellously emotional and varied, with many moments of precisely stated harmonies moving at courageously slow tempos. The second piece on the first side, View (East from the Top of the Riggs Road/B&O Trestle), is surely one of his masterpieces, on a par with Charles Ives for musical Americana. It is a great added bonus to have liner notes by the artist, some of the best and most absurd text he ever came up with. Yet another reason this is one of Fahey's top sides is it allows a chance to hear one of his few collaborations with other musicians. Several members of the fine rock group Spirit are present, along with drummer Kevin Kelley, for several lovely pieces, including the March! For Martin Luther King, a remarkably heartfelt tribute that could have gone on much longer. Taped sounds and electronic effects on The Singing Bridge of Memphis, Tennessee certainly predict the more noisy stuff Fahey would get into in the later part of his career.




    Musicians:



    • John Fahey (guitar, vocal)

    • Jay Ferguson (organ, piano)

    • Mark Andes (electric bass)

    • Matt Andes (guitar)

    • Kevin Kelley (drums)




    Recording: 1968 at Sierra Sound Laboratories, Berkeley, CA, USA

    Production: John Fahey & Barret Hansen




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    SIde One

    1. The Yellow Princess

    2. View (East From The Top Of The Riggs Road / B&O Trestle)

    3. Lion

    4. March! For Martin Luther King

    5. The Singing Bridge Of Memphis, Tennessee

     

    Side Two

    1. Dance Of The Inhabitants Of The Invisible City Of Bladensburg

    2. Charles A. Lee: In Memoriam

    3. Irish Letter

    4. Commemorative Transfiguration And Communion At Magruder Pars
    John Fahey
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Final Comedown (Pure Pleasure) The Final Comedown (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    The Final Comedown (Pure Pleasure)

    Guitarist Grant Green is known for laid back non-chordal single note playing. He was underrated during his life, but is now seen as one of the greatest guitarists of his era. During the early 60's, both his fluid, tasteful playing in organ/guitar/drum combos and his other dates for Blue Note established Green as a star. He was off the scene for a while in the mid-60's, but came back strong in the late '60's and '70's when this album was recorded.



    The Final Comedown was Blue Note's first film soundtrack and is an excellent debut into the Blaxploitation soundtrack genre of the period. As Grant Green's entry into this blaxploitation genre it does differ to a certain degree from his other works. There are pensive mood pieces along with more funky percussive tunes. Like any film score, the moods shift from tense to tranquil, featuring staccato horn punches, dramatic tympani, bongo driven beats and wah wah guitar. Grant Green brings a deeper jazz feel to the tracks with in particular the title track being more akin to his other Blue Note material of the period.



    Musicians:



    • Grant Green (guitar)

    • Wade Marcus (composer, conductor)

    • Richard Tee (piano, organ)

    • Irving Markowitz, Marvin Stamm (trumpet, fluegel horn)

    • Phil Bodner (flute, piccolo, alto saxophone, oboe)

    • Harold Vick (alto saxophone, tenor saxophone)

    • Gordon Edwards (electric bass)

    • Grady Tate (drums)

    • Ralph MacDonald (conga, bongo)






    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Past, Present And Future
    2. The Final Comedown
    3. Father's Lament
    4. Fountain Scene
    5. Soul Food - African Shop
    6. Slight Fear And Terror

    7. Afro Party
    8. Luanna's Theme
    9. Battle Scene
    10. Traveling To Get To Doc
    11. One Second After Death
    Grant Green
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Zodiac (Pure Pleasure) Zodiac (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Zodiac (Pure Pleasure)

    It's impossible to talk about this album without acknowledging the spectre of death that hangs over it - not only is it the third entry in Strata-East Records' Dolphy Series, a collection of archival recordings from some of the label's close associates honoring the recently deceased multi-instrumentalist, but it is actually dedicated to two members of the band, Wynton Kelly and Kenny Dorham, who died in between the recording sessions and its release. The point is driven home even further by the fact that the album begins with a tribute from Payne to the fallen Martin Luther King, Jr., a piece that acts as a de facto solo for Dorham - his playing all rosy elegance and regal warmth - before shifting into the lighter (though equally coolly-paced) I Know Love, a showcase for Payne's sax. While not the most somber jazz track ever recorded, this opening suite is a low-key and mournful way to open the affair, but thankfully the album really picks off and shows these musicians more in their element the rest of the way.


    Girl, You Got a Home is a funky piece, beginning very soulfully with some tight interplay among the rhythm section of Kelly, bassist Wilbur Ware and drummer Albert Heath. Ware is in especially fine form on this track, tying together the disparate passages of the piece by grounding the more ponderous moments in a deep funk, while Kelly's playing is especially ear catching in the way he stabs at his piano like it's an organ. After the first two tracks take up nearly twenty minutes, the four-minute Slide Hampton feels almost impossibly brief, a feeling that's enhanced by its quick, jittery, and infectious rhythm, driven by some really dexterous work from Kelly. The final track, Flying Fish, may be the album's highlight, a Caribbean-inspired composition that casts the rhythm section as flighty ground for both Payne and Dorham to vamp on. The track is oddly danceable for something released on Strata-East, maybe the most fun moment ever for the label, and relentlessly uptempo. Though this release may be in part defined by the deaths that preceded it, it's clear that the recording process was actually a lot of fun for everybody, as their enthusiasm and energy jumps right out of the speakers. This is one of the first Strata East records I really got into and is still one of my favorites, a must-hear for any fans of the flightier moments of Dorham or Kelly's career, and a fitting tribute for both master musicians.


    Musicians:


    • Kenny Dorham (trumpet)
    • Cecil Payne (bassoon, alto saxophone)
    • Wynton Kelly (piano)
    • Wilbur Ware (bass)
    • Albert Kuumba Heath (drums)



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. Martin Luther King, Jr. / I Know Love
    2. Girl, You Got A Home
    3. Slide Hampton
    4. Follow Me
    5. Flying Fish
    Cecil Payne
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Last Night's Dream (Pure Pleasure) Last Night's Dream (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Last Night's Dream (Pure Pleasure)

    It's no wonder that this album, cut in 1968 with British blues maven Mike Vernon at the helm, works so well. When you team a rejuvenated Shines with his longtime compadres Horton, Spann, bassist Willie Dixon, and drummer Clifton James, a little blues history was bound to be made.



    Johnny Shines is the ultimate Delta bluesman, combining the classic styles he learned as a youth into a very personal style, fluent, creative and forcefully talented as both a singer and guitarist - Jim DeKoester



    He rates amongst the most important and individualistic blues stylists of the post-war years - Pete Welding



    A forceful explosive blues singer whose strong, vibrato laden voice possesses a range and sensitivity which is rivalled by few other bluesmen - Peter Guralnick




    Musicians:



    • Johnny Shines (vocal, guitar)

    • Otis Spann (piano)

    • Big Walter Horton (harmonica)

    • Willie Dixon (bass)

    • Clifton James (drums)




    Recording: June 1968 in Chicago by Malcolm Chisholm

    Production: Mike Vernon



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Solid Gold
    2. From Dark 'Til Dawn
    3. I Will Be Kind to You
    4. Last Night's Dream
    5. Baby Don't You Think I Know

    6. Pipeline Blues
    7. I Don't Know
    8. Black Panther
    9. I Had a Good Home
    10. Mean Fisherman
    Johnny Shines
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Little Niles (Pure Pleasure) Little Niles (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Little Niles (Pure Pleasure)

    Randy Weston, one of the world's foremost pianists and composers, a true innovator and visionary. Starting with the gospel of bop according to Thelonious Monk, Weston gradually absorbed the letter and spirit of African and Caribbean rhythms and tunes, welding everything together into a searching, energizing, often celebratory blend. His piano work ranges across a profusion of styles from boogie-woogie through bop into dissonance, marked by a stabbing quality reminiscent of, but not totally indebted to Monk.



    Combining the Ellingtonish arrangements of Melba Liston with the rhythmically intriguing explorations of Randy Weston this album represented a high point in his career at the time. All the tunes, written by Randy Weston, were inspired by his children Niles and Pamela. The innocence, excitement, anticipation and tension of childhood are all displayed here in these warm vinyl grooves.



    Musicians:



    • Randy Weston (piano)

    • Johnny Griffin (tenor saxophone)

    • Ray Copeland, Idrees Sulieman (trumpet)

    • Melba Liston (arranger, trombone)

    • George Joyner (bass)

    • Charlie Persip ( drums)





    Recording: October 1958 at RCA Studios, NYC




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Earth Birth
    2. Little Susan
    3. Nice Ice
    4. Little Niles
    5. Pams Waltz
    6. Babes Blues
    7. Lets Climb a Hill
    Randy Weston
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Folk Art (Pure Pleasure) Folk Art (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $44.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Folk Art (Pure Pleasure)

    Jazz is essentially an African-American folk art, elements not lost on Joe Lovano as he presents this all-original program of progressive music. His updated quintet Us Five is one of his freshest units in some time, with bassist Esperanza Spalding, the criminally underrated pianist James Weidman, and two stir-the-pot drummers in Francisco Mela and Otis Brown III. Together they fulfill Lovano's vision as a band that is not afraid to take many chances, stay within a bop-based tradition, and cut loose on many levels in terms of adding diverse elements to this mix of music. Lovano is noticeably restless, using his reliable tenor sax, but also straight alto, clarinet, and taragato. The drummers not only play their standard kits, but ethnic percussion instruments from many continents, while Spalding is maturing and growing exponentially into a formidable voice on her instrument. Weidman is simply brilliant throughout, largely ignored since his early days with Abbey Lincoln until now, but there's no reason he should be so underestimated or slighted.




    Musicians:



    • Joe Lovano (saxophone)

    • James Weidman (piano)

    • Esperanza Spaulding (bass)

    • Otis III, Francisco Mela (drums)




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Powerhouse
    2. Folk Art
    3. Wild Beauty
    4. Us Five
    5. Song for Judi
    6. Drum Song
    7. Dibango
    8. Page 4
    9. Ettenro
    Joe Lovano Us Five
    $44.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Bright Moments (Pure Pleasure) Bright Moments (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $49.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Bright Moments (Pure Pleasure)

    Rahsaan Roland Kirk's live club gigs were usually engaging, freewheeling affairs, full of good humor and a fantastically wide range of music. The double album Bright Moments is a near-definitive document of the Kirk live experience, and his greatest album of the '70s. The extroverted Kirk was in his element in front of an audience, always chatting, explaining his concepts, and recounting bits of jazz history. Even if some of his long, jive-talking intros can sound a little dated today, it's clear in the outcome of the music that Kirk fed voraciously off the energy of the room.


    Most of the tracks are long (seven minutes or more), demonstrating Kirk's wealth of soloing ideas in a variety of styles (and, naturally, on a variety of instruments). Pedal Up is a jaw-dropping demonstration of Kirk's never-duplicated three-horns-at-once technique, including plenty of unaccompanied passages that simply sound impossible. There's more quintessential Kirk weirdness on Fly Town Nose Blues, which heavily features an instrument called the nose flute, and the title track has a healthy dose of Kirk singing through his (traditional) flute.


    His repertoire is typically eclectic: Ellington's Prelude to a Kiss; a groovy Bacharach pop tune in You'll Never Get To Heaven; a lovely version of Fats Waller's Jitterbug Waltz; and a stomping, exultant New Orleans-style original, Dem Red Beans and Rice. Perhaps the best, however, is an impassioned rendition of the ballad standard If I Loved You, where Kirk's viscerally raw, honking tone hints in a roundabout way at the avant-garde without ever losing its melodic foundation. Bright Moments empties all the major items out of Kirk's bag of tricks, providing a neat microcosm of his talents and displaying a consummate and knowledgeable showman. In short, it's nothing less than a 'tour de force'.



    Musicians:



    • Rahsaan Roland Kirk (tenor saxophone, flute)

    • Ron Burton (piano)

    • Henry Pearson (bass)

    • Todd Barkan (synthesizer)

    • Joe Habao (percussion)

    • Robert Shy (drums)



    Recording: 1973 live at Keystone Korner, San Francisco, by Biff Davies, Ed Barton & Jack Crymes

    Production: Joel Dorn



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    LP 1
    1. Introduction
    2. Pedal Up
    3. You'll Never Get To Heaven
    4. Clackety Clack
    5. Prelude To A Kiss
    6. Talk (Electric Nose)
    7. Fly Town Nose Blues


    LP 2
    1. Talk (Bright Moments)
    2. Bright Moments Song
    3. Dem Red Beans And Rice
    4. If I Loved You
    5. Talk (Fats Waller)
    6. Jitterbug Waltz
    7. Second Line Jump

    Rahsaan Roland Kirk
    $49.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • We Insist!/ Freedom Now Suite (Pure Pleasure) We Insist!/ Freedom Now Suite (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    We Insist!/ Freedom Now Suite (Pure Pleasure)

    This is a classic. At a time when the civil rights movement was starting to heat up, drummer Max Roach performed and recorded a seven-part suite dealing with black history (particularly slavery) and racism. Driva' Man has a powerful statement by veteran tenor Coleman Hawkins and there is valuable solo space elsewhere for trumpeter Booker Little and trombonist Julian Priester, but it is the overall performance of Abbey Lincoln that is most notable. Formerly a nightclub singer, Lincoln really came into her own under Roach's tutelage and she is a strong force throughout this intense set. On Tryptich: Prayer/Protest/Peace, Lincoln is heard in duets with the drummer and her wrenching screams of rage are quite memorable. This timeless protest record is a gem. Scott Yanow




    Musicians:



    • Abbey Lincoln (vocal)

    • Coleman Hawkins, Walter Benton (tenor saxophone)

    • Booker Little (trumpet)

    • Julian Priester (trombone)

    • James Schenk (bass)

    • Max Roach (drums)

    • Babatunde Olatunji (conga)

    • Thomas Du Vall, Ray Mantilla (percussion)




    Recording: August and September 1960 at Nola Penthouse Studio, New York City, by Bob d'Orleans

    Production: Max Roach




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Driva Man
    2. Freedom Day
    3. Triptych: Prayer

    4. Protest
    5. Peace
    6. All Africa
    7. Tears For Johannesburg
    Max Roach
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • That's It (Pure Pleasure) That's It (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    That's It (Pure Pleasure)

    A very distinctive tenor with a hard, passionate tone and an emotional style that was still tied to chordal improvisation, Booker Ervin was a true original. He was originally a trombonist, but taught himself tenor while in the Air Force (1950-1953). After studying music in Boston for two years, he made his recording debut with Ernie Fields' R&B band (1956). Ervin gained fame while playing with Charles Mingus (off and on during 1956-1962), holding his own with the volatile bassist and Eric Dolphy. He also led his own quartet, worked with Randy Weston on a few occasions in the '60s, and spent much of 1964-1966 in Europe before dying much too young from kidney disease. Ervin, who is on several notable Charles Mingus records, made dates of his own for Bethlehem, Savoy, and Candid during 1960-1961, along with later sets for Pacific Jazz and Blue Note.



    Booker Ervin, who always had a very unique sound on the tenor, is heard in prime form on this quartet set. In virtually all cases, the jazz and blues musicians who recorded for Candid in 1960-61 (during its original brief existence) were inspired and played more creatively than they did for other labels. That fact is true for Ervin, even if he never made an indifferent record. In addition to Poinciana and Speak Low, Ervin's quartet (which was a regular if short-lived group) performs four of the leader's originals; best known is Booker's Blues.




    Musicians:



    • Booker Ervin (tenor saxophone)

    • George Tucker (bass)

    • Horace Parlan (piano)

    • Al Harewood (drums)




    Recording: January 1961 at Nola Penthouse Studios, New York City, by Bob d'Orleans

    Production: Nat Hentoff




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. Mojo
    2. Uranus
    3. Poinciana
    4. Speak Low
    5. Bookers Blues
    6. Boo
    Booker Ervin
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Chase Is On (Pure Pleasure) The Chase Is On (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    The Chase Is On (Pure Pleasure)

    The twin tenor sax tradition yielded grand pairings with the likes of Wardell Gray and Dexter Gordon, Arnett Cobb and Eddie 'Lockjaw' Davis, Gene Ammons and Sonny Stitt, and Al Cohn and Zoot Sims. This one-shot teaming of Charlie Rouse and Paul Quinichette brought forth a union of two distinctly different mannerisms within the mainstream jazz continuum. Rouse, who would go on to prolific work with Thelonious Monk and was at this time working with French horn icon Julius Watkins, developed a fluid signature sound that came out of the more strident and chatty style heard here. By this time in 1957, Quinichette, nicknamed the Vice Prez for his similar approach to Lester Young, was well established in the short term with Count Basie. His liquid, full-bodied, soulful tone became an undeniable force, albeit briefly, before he dropped out of the scene shortly after this date to be an electrical engineer. The stereo split of the saxophonists in opposite channels, a technique endemic of the time, works well whether they play solos or melody lines together. It enables you to truly hear how different they are. Working with standards, there's a tendency for them to play the head arrangements in unison, but then one of them on occasion plays an off-the-cuff short phrase that strays from the established melodic path. They also seem to do a hard bop jam, then a ballad, and back to hard swinging.


    The title track is simply a killer, a perfect fun romp of battling duelists, and one that you'd like to hear in any nightclub setting. Some slight harmonic inserts set This Can't Be Love apart from the original and The Things I Love displays the two tenors at their conversational best, while the lone original, Knittin', is a fundamental 12-bar swing blues, straight up and simple but with some subtle harmonic nuances. The rhythm section of pianist Wynton Kelly, bass player Wendell Marshall, and drummer Ed Thigpen do their usual yeoman job. But on two tracks, pianist Hank Jones and rhythm guitarist Freddie Green take over, and the sound of the band changes dramatically to the more sensitive side on a low-down version of When The Blues Come On and the good-old basic vintage swinger You're Cheating Yourself. The combination of Rouse and Quinichette was a very satisfactory coupling of two talented and promising post-swing to bop individualists, who played to all of their strengths and differences on this worthy -- and now legendary -- session.


    Musicians:



    • Charlie Rouse, Paul Quinichette (tenor saxophone)

    • Wynton Kelly, Hank Jones (piano)

    • Freddie Green (guitar)

    • Wendell Marshall (bass)

    • Ed Thigpen (drums)



    Recording :August and September 1957 in New York




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    1. The Chase Is On
    2. When The Blues Come On
    3. This Can't Be Love
    4. Last Time For Love
    5. You're Cheating Yourself
    6. Knittin'
    7. Tender Trap
    8. The Things I Love
    Paul Quinichette & Charlie Rouse
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • In Person (Pure Pleasure) In Person (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    In Person (Pure Pleasure)

    Note: This issue is as the original vinyl album issue & contains all the dialogue from Ray and the stage promoter, along with audience participation.



    I bought this LP, of the Atlanta concert, in 1960. It knocked me out then, and it knocks me out now. For me, this IS Ray Charles. In the intro to Night Time Is The Right Time Ray says, »... and Miss Marjorie Hendricks will help us out on vocals ...«, and boy, does she help out! Turn up the volume and strap yourself down.
    The greatness of this album. Ray was touring with his band in the 50's, and they played at a concert in Herndon Stadium, Atlanta. An engineer at radio station WAOK recorded the occasion on a one track tape recorder using a single microphone. The recording was later played over the air. The response of the radio audience was overwhelming, resulting in the ultimate release of the Atlantic album. It is one of the most extraordinary albums of all time. First, the recording is amazing considering how it was recorded. The band is heard with perfect clarity and balance, and the audience is also picked up, and you can hear the shouting, whooping, the give and take with the audience, and the extraordinary energy in what was a typical concert of Ray Charles playing to his own audience. Many of the tunes were or became classics, known to every funk and blues musician in the country and to most of the population at large. Ray Charles was revered like no other musician.



    This is the most cathartic of all Ray Charles' recordings. On two tracks, The Right Time and Tell The Truth-both shared with the Raelettes' lead singer, Marjorie Hendricks-the music transcends art to become powerfully shamanistic. It remains one of the greatest rhythm and blues albums of all time.



    Musicians:



    • Ray Charles (piano, vocal)

    • Marcus Belgrave, John Hunt (trumpet)

    • David Newman (tenor saxophone)

    • Bennie Crawford (bassoon)

    • Edgar Willis (bass)

    • Teagle Flemming (drums)



    Recording: May 1959 at Herndon Stadium, Atlanta, Georgia, by Ivan Miles



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    1. The Right Time
    2. What'd I Say
    3. Yes, Indeed
    4. The Spirit Feel
    5. Frenesi
    6. Drown In My Own Tears
    7. Tell The Truth
    Ray Charles
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Sweetenings (Pure Pleasure) Sweetenings (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Sweetenings (Pure Pleasure)

    Harry 'Sweets' Edison, a smooth and suave trumpeter, was a cohort of orchestra leader Count Basie, a favourite of bandleader Nelson Riddle, and a noted backup artist for the most prominent vocalists of his time. Edison, with his energetic yet reticent blowing style, bridged a genre gap between the early classic jazz sound of Louis Armstrong and modern bebop modes. Edison, who played equally well in both styles, had a special talent for sustaining his trumpet notes and injecting each single tone with expression and soul never heard before or after.


    The special quality of his trumpet playing earned him the nickname 'Sweets' because of the sweetness of the tones. Likewise his ability to control the tone of his trumpet brought him to the forefront as a session musician, playing accompaniments for the most respected vocalists of his time.


    Edison was a true pioneer of jazz. An old-time homespun boy, born in Columbus, Ohio, he never knew with certainty even the year of his birth. According to his best knowledge, he was born in 1919, although some sources list the date as early as 1915. Edison knew even less about his own father, a Native American of the Hopi (Apache) tribe and a drifter who stayed only a few weeks with Edison's mother before taking to the road and was rarely heard from afterward. Edison spent his early years with an uncle, who was a coal miner and a farmer, in Louisville, Kentucky. It was Edison's uncle who taught the boy to play the pump organ and to play scales on an old cornet. Edison, who also listened to his uncle's records, was especially inspired by the music of Louis Armstrong and Bessie Smith.


    Harry Sweets Edison added something special to any date in which he took part, but these 1958 sessions he led for Roulette are especially enjoyable. Joined by either Jimmy Jones or Kenny Drew on piano and Joe Benjamin or John Simmons on bass, along with tenor saxophonist Jimmy Forrest and drummer Charlie Persip, Edison's trumpet swings effortlessly through a batch of standards and originals.


    The loping blues Centerpiece became a classic jazz composition, recorded by numerous jazz artists, but this was its debut appearance on LP. Jive at Five dates from his years with Count Basie and finds the band sticking to an accompanying role in this swinging but brief arrangement. Edison utilizes a mute in the gently swinging Louisiana, while he showboats just a bit in a brief take of It Happened in Monterey. While this record might have offered a little more variety by giving solo space to some of the talented sidemen present, this long out of print LP is well worth acquiring.



    Musicians:



    • Harry Edison (trumpet)

    • Jimmy Forrest (tenor saxophone)

    • Jimmy Jones (piano)

    • Joe Benjamint (bass)

    • John Simmons (bass)

    • Charlie Persip (drums)



    Recording: November 1958 in New York
    Production: Teddy Reig




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Centerpiece
    2. Candy
    3. Jive At Five
    4. Imagination
    5. Louisana
    6. Harriet
    7. It Happened In Monterey
    8. If I Had You
    9. Paradise
    10. Indiana
    11. Pussy Willow
    12. Sweetenings
    Harry Sweets Edison
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Robert Pete Williams with Big Joe Williams (Pure Pleasure) Robert Pete Williams with Big Joe Williams (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Robert Pete Williams with Big Joe Williams (Pure Pleasure)

    REAL blues ... He took the pain in his soul and the dirt on his hands and made songs out of them ... Robert Pete Williams ... the most avant-garde blues performer ever recorded. No punk rock band has ever matched the jagged, acerbic fury of the riffs Williams played 35 years ago. No rapper has approached his ability to evoke the torment of life in prison or bend language to cast an eerie spell over a chance encounter with a seductive woman. His blues was extremely original, sometimes even hard to understand. No other performer has captured the emotional effect of a desperate situation like he did. He had never been recorded when he was discovered in Angola Penitentiary in Louisiana, convicted of murder.



    Robert Pete probably has the most unique blues style of all bluesmen. Neither his guitar work nor his singing can be categorized into any established regional style such as East Coast, Mississippi Delta or Texas Blues. His music and lyrics are spontaneous and original. No major influence of other bluesmen can be found in his idiosyncratic, intensely personal performances. Blues scholar Pete Welding described his music as tough, mean, and, above all, impassioned like the man himself.




    Musicians:



    • Robert Pete Williams (guitar, vocal)

    • Big Joe Williams (kazoo)




    Recording: March 1972 in Copenhagen, Denmark



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Doctor Blues
    2. Got On His Mind
    3. Meet Him Over In Paradise
    4. Goodbye Baby
    5. It's Gotta Be Jelly 'Cause Jam Don't Shake Thataway
    6. Texas Blues
    7. Talkin' Blues
    8. Greyhound Bus
    Robert Pete Williams
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Blue Rose (Pure Pleasure) Blue Rose (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Blue Rose (Pure Pleasure)

    One of Rosemary Clooney's best records, and one of Duke's more accessible offerings, combined on one LP. The recorded output of the 1950's didn't get much more satisfying than this. Duke's music was always very sophisticated and this time it's even more obvious with a presence of such a talented singer as Rosemary Clooney. The songs are marvelous and she sounds young, fresh and sexy (ladylike sexy). In Blue Rose, not only are Clooney's vocals outstanding, but the arrangements are some of the prettiest of jazz.



    The band swings simply and sweetly, though still thoroughly in the Duke style. As if to make the point that the band is the 'other' star of this recording, there's one instrumental here - Passion Flower (Johnny Hodges on sax never sounded more sure of himself). Its inclusion in the program, without a vocal from Clooney, is at first bizarre - but seems to make sense within the context of the album.



    The fascinating album notes explain why and how separate tracks for Rosemary Clooney and Duke Ellington's orchestra had to be laid down. One would never realize that singer and orchestra were not together. They are totally in sync. This is not big, belting jazz; this is sophisticated, late night, intimate singing and playing. This is one of the most memorable pairings of a 'popular' singer with a jazz giant; ranking with the first Sinatra-Basie album and the Coltrane-Hartman session.




    Musicians:



    • Rosemary Clooney (vocal)

    • Duke Ellington (piano, arranger)

    • Billy Strayhorn (arranger)

    • Johnny Hodges, Russell Procope (alto saxophone)

    • Clark Terry, Cat Anderson (trumpet)

    • Gordon Jackson (trombone)

    • Jimmy Woode (bass)

    • Sam Woodyard (drums)




    Recording: January and February 1956




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. Hey Baby
    2. Sophisticated Lady

    3. Me and You
    4. Passion Flower
    5. I Let A Song Go Out Of My Heart
    6. Grievin
    7. Blue Rose
    8. Im Checkin OutGoombye

    9. I Got It Bad
    10. Mood Indigo
    Rosemary Clooney & Duke Ellington
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Charles Mingus Presents Charles Mingus (Pure Pleasure) Charles Mingus Presents Charles Mingus (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Charles Mingus Presents Charles Mingus (Pure Pleasure)

    Charles Mingus has a fascinating way of offering music that is grounded in tradition while remaining startlingly original. The freshness of a piece like Charles Mingus Presents Charles Mingus, has the effect of rendering much of what passes for jazz as tedious. The band is small for Mingus, and includes Eric Dolphy on alto saxophone and bass clarinet, Ted Curson on trumpet, and Dannie Richmond on drums. It would be one of Dolphy and Curson's last recording dates with the artist, and they seem determined to go all out for it. The leader's bass line kicks off Folk Forms No. 1, followed by Dolphy outlining the melody, and then joined by Curson. A simple riff develops into a lively New Orleans funeral march that's developed for 12 minutes. Original Faubus Fables is serious in intent - a political attack on segregation governor Faubus - but Mingus and Richmond's singing is difficult to listen to with a straight face. Still, this doesn't distract from the wonderful music. Again and again, the elasticity of the sound is fascinating, at once spacious with the bass and drums balanced against the brass and then noisy, with the horns wailing and crying. The last two pieces, What Love? and the outrageously titled All the Things You Could Be by Now if Sigmund Freud's Wife Was Your Mother, are much looser, bordering on free jazz. The album accomplishes what the best of Mingus accomplishes: the perfect tension between jazz played as an ensemble and jazz played as totally free.




    Musicians:



    • Eric Dolphy (alto saxophone, bass clarinet)

    • Ted Curson (trumpet)

    • Charles Mingus (bass)

    • Dannie Richmond (drums)




    Recording: October 1960 at Nola Penthouse Studios, New York City, by Bob d'Orleans

    Production: Nat Hentoff




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Folk Forms, No. 1

    2. Original Faubus Fables

    3. What Love

    4. All The Things You Could Be By Now If Sigmund Freud's Wife Was Your Mother

    Charles Mingus
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Down Home (Pure Pleasure) Down Home (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Down Home (Pure Pleasure)

    Bethlehem Records was a major jazz label in the 1950's formed by Gus Wildi with an impressive roster of artists including singers Nina Simone, Carmen MacRae, Chris Conner & Mel Torme, to name a few; arrangers: Marty Paich, Russ Garcia, Frank Hunter; and musicians including: Dexter Gordon, Roland Kirk, Charles Mingus, Frank Rosolino, Herbie Mann, Stan Levey, Art Blakey, Milt Hinton, Errol Garner, Zoot Sims, Duke Ellington, J.J. Johnson and many, many others. The label distinguished itself by giving artists creative control of their projects and presented albums of rather cutting edge graphic design. Its legacy is a lengthy discography that freshly and ambitiously captured and preserved an era of truly amazing music including West Coast Cool Jazz, East Coast Bop, and Vocalists. For many of the artists, their first or greatest recorded work happened at Bethlehem. By trusting its staff and artists to make their own creative decisions, to experiment, and thus to flourish, Bethlehem actively helped create and not just document a whole and diverse era of Jazz music.
    1960, when this album was recorded, was one of Zoot Sims' most productive years. The performances here are recognised as being the masterpieces of Sims' middle period.



    Musicians:



    • Zoot Sims (tenor saxophone)

    • Dave McKenna (piano)

    • George Tucker (bass)

    • Dannie Richmond (drums)



    Recording: June 1960 in New York City by Peter Ind

    Production: Teddy Charles



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Jive At Five
    2. Doggin' Around
    3. Avalon
    4. I Cried For You
    5. Bill Bailey
    6. Goodnight Sweetheart
    7. There'll Be Some Changes Made
    8. I've Heard That Blues Before
    Zoot Sims
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
Go to top