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  • Happy Trails (Pure Pleasure) Happy Trails (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Happy Trails (Pure Pleasure)

    Ranked 189/500 on Rolling Stone Magazine's 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.

    Without question, this follow-up to Quicksilver Messenger Service's self-titled debut release is the most accurate in portraying the band on vinyl in the same light as the group's critically and enthusiastically acclaimed live performances. The album is essentially centered around the extended reworkings of Bo Diddley's Who Do You Love? and Mona, as well as the lesser lauded - yet no less intense - contribution of Gary Duncan's (guitar/vocals) Calvary. This album is the last to feature the original quartet incarnation of QMS. The collective efforts of John Cipollina (guitar/vocals), Greg Elmore (percussion), David Freiberg (bass/vocals), and the aforementioned Duncan retain the uncanny ability to perform with a psychedelic looseness of spirit, without becoming boring or in the least bit pretentious. The side-long epic Who Do You Love? suite is split into an ensemble introduction and coda as well as four distinct sections for the respective bandmembers.



    Musicians:



    • John Cipollina (guitar)

    • Gary Duncan (guitar, vocals)

    • David Freiberg (bass, vocals)

    • Greg Elmore (drums, percussion)




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.




    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Who Do You Love - Part 1
    2. When You Love
    3. Where You Love
    4. How You Love
    5. Which Do You Love
    6. Who Do You Love - Part 2
    7. Mona
    8. Maiden of the Cancer Moon
    9. Calvary
    10. Happy Trails
    Quicksilver Messenger Service
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • After Hours With Sarah Vaughan (Pure Pleasure) After Hours With Sarah Vaughan (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
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    After Hours With Sarah Vaughan (Pure Pleasure)

    Sarah Vaughan signed for Columbia in 1949 & her chart successes continued with the charting of Black Coffee in the summer of 1949. During her tenure at Columbia through 1953, Vaughan was steered almost exclusively to commercial pop ballads, a number of which had chart success.


    No matter what she's singing you can't help but notice her amazing control and range. She's able to float effortlessly from the lowest end of the scale to the highest without effort. Her singing is as much second nature as breathing is to most of us.


    Listen to Vaughan wrap her voice around a word and you begin to understand what is meant by the term phrasing. You also realize why you don't hear the term used very often anymore as very few modern singers have this ability. It refers to a singer's ability to associate the lyrics of a song with the music. However, it means more than just being able to carry a tune. It's how you sing the words and music together. To be fair the music of today doesn't really lend itself to that style of singing either. However hearing a singer of the quality of Vaughan you begin to regret its passing. I'm sure there are jazz singers around who have the ability, but we don't hear them on a regular basis.


    Of course it's this ability which allowed her to be equally comfortable with any style of music she wished to sing. On this LP we hear her sail through a series of smoothly orchestrated pop tunes. Even the version of Gershwin's Summertime is given the uptempo treatment. This might have been a collection of rather commercial standards, but she gives them a soulfulness that raises them above the level of just another pop song. She might not be as emotionally raw as Billie Holliday, but that doesn't stop her from being able to imbue even the simplest of songs with the heart necessary to make them soar.


    Musicians:


    • Sarah Vaughan & band


    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. After Hours
    2. Street Of Dreams
    3. You Taught Me To Love Again
    4. You're Mine, You

    5. My Reverie
    6. Summertime
    7. Black Coffee
    8. Thinking Of You
    9. I Cried For You
    10. Perdido
    11. Deep Purple

    12. Just Friends
    Sarah Vaughan
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Concierto (Pure Pleasure) Concierto (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $49.99
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    Concierto (Pure Pleasure)

    Jim Hall's Concierto was arguably a masterpiece and possibly the greatest LP in the history of CTI. With two legendary players in the frontline, trumpeter Chet Baker and Paul Desmond, Hall interprets standards and engaging originals. A master of melody who never wastes notes, the centerpiece for this release is Hall's interpretation of one movement from Rodrigo's Guitar Concerto, arranged by Don Sebesky. New tracks include alternate takes of You'd Be So Nice to Come Home To and Rock Skippin', plus Unfinished Business, an incomplete track that fades following Desmond's solo just as Hall starts to play (This song is actually La Paloma Azul, a Mexican folk tune played by Paul Desmond while with the Dave Brubeck Quartet about a decade earlier, also known as The Blue Dove).



    Musicians:



    • Jim Hall (guitar)

    • Chet Baker (trumpet)

    • Paul Desmond (alto saxophone)

    • Roland Hanna (piano)

    • Ron Carter (bass)

    • Steve Gadd (drums)



    Recording: April 1975 at Van Gelder's Recording Studio, Englewood Cliffs, N.J., USA by Rudy Van Gelder

    Production: Creed Taylor



    Format: 2LPs 33rpm / gatefold sleeve



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.




    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. You'd Be So Nice To Come Home To
    2. Two's Blues
    3. The Answer Is Yes

    4. Concierto de Aranjuez
    5. Rock Skippin'
    6. Unfinished Business

    Bonus Tracks
    7. You'd Be So Nice To Come Home To (alternate take)

    8. The Answer Is Yes (alternate take)
    9. Rock Skippin' (alternate take)
    Jim Hall
    $49.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Let Yourself Go (Pure Pleasure) Let Yourself Go (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $49.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Let Yourself Go (Pure Pleasure)

    Let Yourself Go is an exceptional collection of 13 tunes written by the cream of popular song writers -- Berlin, Gershwin Brothers, and others -- honoring Fred Astaire's contributions to the vocal art. With his low key, narrow ranged voice, Astaire probably introduced and/or made popular more songs that were destined to become standard entries in the Great American Songbook than any other artist. Kent delivers this selective play list with one of three musical combinations, just piano, with piano plus rhythm, and with a larger aggregation which includes sax and guitar. Irrespective of the instrumental context, all of the tunes are delivered with Stacey's pleasant nasal twang to help her create the impression that the lyrics she's singing are part of an intimate one on one conversation with each listener. There's nothing over dramatic on this album. No gimmicks, just a voice as engaging as any on the scene conveying the meaning of a melody in the tradition of the person she is honoring, the inestimable Astaire.


    Kent's pianist, David Newton, is one of the premiere accompanists in the U.K., having worked with such top flight singers as Tina May. He and Kent display their musical attraction to each other on a relaxed, suave rendition of Isn't This a Lovely Day and They Can't Take That Away From Me, where Kent and Newton gently joust as they deliver an elegant rendition of this tune. 'Relaxed' is as good a word as any to describe the atmosphere for this session. There's nothing frenetic here. S'Wonderful, usually performed at a fast pace, gets a languid, medium tempo treatment with Newton's piano, an effortlessly lilting Colin Oxley guitar and Jim Tomlinson's tenor sharing the mike with Kent. A Fine Romance is about as upbeat as it gets, with Oxley's cleaned line guitar setting the pace. Newton engages in a bit of Erroll Garner-like humming during his solo on this tune. Tomlinson's romantic tenor is featured on Let Yourself Go and They All Laughed. On One for My Baby, he brings out his clarinet, using the middle register to help create the proper melancholy mood for this definitive 'drowning my sorrows in booze' tune.


    This is another excellent album by American born, U.K.-based singer Stacey Kent, and is happily recommended.

    Musicians:



    • Stacey Kent (vocal)

    • Jim Tomlinson (tenor saxophone, alto saxophone, clarinet)

    • Colin Oxley (guitar)

    • David Newton (piano, keyboards)

    • Simon Thorpe (bass)

    • Steve Brown (drums)




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    LP 1
    1. Let Yourself Go
    2. They Can't Take That Away From Me
    3. I Won't Dance
    4. Isn't This A Lovely Day?
    5. They All Laughed
    6. He Loves And She Loves


    LP 2
    1. Shall We Dance?
    2. One For My Baby (And One More For The Road)
    3. S' Wonderful
    4. A Fine Romance
    5. I Guess I'll Have To Change My Plan
    6. I'm Putting All My Eggs In One Basket
    7. By Myself

    Stacey Kent
    $49.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Slaves Mass (Pure Pleasure) Slaves Mass (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Slaves Mass (Pure Pleasure)

    Not strictly a jazz album in the strict sense, Slaves Mass has strong compositional themes among its seven tracks. The maestro Hermeto Pascoal plays everything from flutes, soprano saxophone, guitar, Fender Rhodes, acoustic piano and clavinet on this set, and enlists help from Ron Carter, Airto, Flora Purim, Raul DeSouza, David Maro and others. Mixing Pot, is the opener and an anomaly in that it is a vanguard fusion tune where Pascoal really digs in and improvises. It also features the only appearance on this set of Alphonso Johnson on electric bass. In Missa Dos Escravos, the title track, Pascoal's emblematic pig gives his first growls in a song dominated by Brazilian Indian references. Wonderfully and intricately composed, it centers around folk tropes. Chorinho Para Ele is a beautiful and modern choro with a somewhat challenging glissando bridge that really proposed new directions for the traditional genre. Aquela Valsa is a beautiful six/eight theme that turns into a samba with a beautiful trombone solo by DeSouza. Cannon is an utterly improvisational piece that meanders and winds around Pascoal's flute solo. Atonalism dominates the piano solo in Escuta Meu Piano, which also presents bits and pieces of different styles (like baio) and folk songs. Hot samba improvisation is found in GelÉia de Cereja, that slips and slides through a variety of schema and dynamic changes without much internal focus, but it is a compelling bit of creative anarchy nonetheless in that it displays Pascoal's full range of restless musical and textural impulses -- as well as a beautiful soprano solo.



    Musicians:



    • Hermeto Pascoal (saxophone, trombone, flute, keyboard)

    • David Amaro (guitar)

    • Raul De Souza (trombone)

    • Airto Moreira (drums)

    • Flora Purim (vocal)



    Recording: 1977



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Mixing Pot
    2. Slaves Mass
    3. Little Cry For Him
    4. Cannon (Dedicated To Cannonball Adderley)
    5. Just Listen
    6. That Waltz
    7. Cherry Jam
    Hermeto Pascoal
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Wonderful World Of Jazz (Pure Pleasure) The Wonderful World Of Jazz (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    The Wonderful World Of Jazz (Pure Pleasure)

    There is nothing hurried about this disc. That said, the music is focused and will stretch your mind. Lewis employed masterful melodic improvisers here: Paul Gonsalves, Eric Dolphy, Jim Hall among others. Listen to Body And Soul as it builds powerfully and the soloists explore every possible melodic theme, where the quiet power of these master musicians is almost too much to take. Listen to I Remember Clifford where the players are essentially the MJQ with Jim Hall replacing Milt Jackson. This set swings, but oh-so-elegantly. Just like Mr. Lewis. - S.C.Berry


    Whether you're an old-time jazz afficionado or new to the genre, this album is essential. In my opinion, Lewis' lovely solo on Body & Soul makes his version virtually definitive - 15 minutes of bliss. The rest of the album, particularly Afternoon In Paris, is at the same level. Wonderful is the perfect title for this record. - E Barrios

    Musicians:



    • John Lewis (piano)

    • Eric Dolphy (alto saxophone)

    • James Rivers (bassoon)

    • Paul Gonsalves (tenor saxophone)

    • Herb Pomeroy (trumpet)

    • Gunther Schuller (french horn)

    • Jim Hall (guitar)

    • George Duvivier (bass)

    • Connie Kay (drums)



    Recording: July and September 1960

    Production: Nesuhi Ertegun & Tom Dowd



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Body And Soul
    2. I Should Care
    3. Two Degrees East, Three Degrees West
    4. Afternoon In Paris
    5. I Remember Clifford
    John Lewis
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Love Calls (Pure Pleasure) Love Calls (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Love Calls (Pure Pleasure)

    Think of 'Lockjaw' Davis and ten to one you think of Count Basie. Think of Paul Gonsalves and - same thing, you think of Duke Ellington. The top tenors, in other words, of the top big bands; musicians from the top league where the competition is toughest. Yet there is no battle here, no contest, no vying to outdo the other in terms of velocity.


    If you know these two men only by hearsay, you may have reservations about them as balladeers. They both have reputations for derring-do of a different kind. Davis has never hesitated to do battle with the most frenetic performers, with those who would stick at nothing to win, and lost - to him. And Gonsalves was the hero of one of the great nights in jazz history, when he blew twenty-seven romping, stomping choruses on Duke Ellington's Diminuendo And Crescendo In Blue at Newport 1956.


    It is easy for jazzmen to become typed, so that the public demands the repeated display of just one particular facet of his talent. This has happened to the two men showcased in this album, where the other side of their musical personalities is brought into focus. Although they have both developed highly individual styles, their original sources of inspiration were masters of the ballad - Ben Webster in Davis' case, Coleman Hawkins in that of Gonsalves.


    Their different approaches to the ballad make this recording consistently interesting and surprising. Both are soulful, both are rhapsodical. But Davis plays with clear, confident articulation, a buzz in his tone, and a bite in his phraseology. Generally he is the more driving and passionate of the two. The Gonsalves style is, on the other hand, sinuous, insinuating and less direct. His imaginative lyricism is more tender and often melancholy, his tone well-produced and finely rounded.


    The breathy sub-tone, which Gonsalves uses so well, adds a curiously confidential and intimate dimension. It is like the musical equivalent of a whispered aside or a delicate suggestion. But both men alternate very adroitly between the discreet and the bold. Their mutual understanding is, in fact, positively uncanny at times, for they had never previously recorded together, and preparation before the sessions was minimal. In the studio their long term professionalism stood them in good stead, as did that of their accompanists, whose taste and sensitivity contribute so much to the recording's appeal. Never obtrusive, they remain in close, listening support, Hanna and Barksdale being quick to prolong or emphasize the thoughts of the two soloists.


    Musicians:



    • Eddie 'Lockjaw' Harris, Paul Gonsalves (tenor saxophone)

    • Roland Hanna (piano)

    • Everett Barksdale (guitar)

    • Ben Tucker (bass)

    • Grady Tate (drums)



    Recording: 1967 at RCA Victor's Studio B, New York City, by Bernard Keville

    Production: Brad McCuen


    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Love Is Here To Stay
    2. When Sunny Gets Blue
    3. If I Ruled The World
    4. Time After Time
    5. Just Friends
    6. Don't Blame Me
    7. I Should Care
    8. The Man With The Horn
    9. We'll Be Together Again
    10. A Weaver Of Dreams
    11. If I Should Lose You
    Eddie Lockjaw Davis
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Nina At The Village Gate (Pure Pleasure) Nina At The Village Gate (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Nina At The Village Gate (Pure Pleasure)

    In the intimate ambiance of The Village Gate, Nina Simone made pure magic with her voice and on the keyboard, one Manhattan evening back in 1961. She sang and played with a trio, which featured her favorite guitarist, Al Shackman. We are so fortunate that the moment was captured and recorded.



    I can't really categorize Nina's sound or her music and call her 'just' a fabulous jazz vocalist. Although, she plays extraordinary jazz with her voice, as in Just In Time. She has been often called a musical anomaly, because there is no one category for her work. She was trained as a classical pianist, and in cuts like Bye Bye Blackbird, the complexity of her piano comes through loud and clear. Her folk songs, like the biting House Of The Rising Sun, and Zungo, an African work song, place her at the top of a long list of folk singers. Ms. Simone's gospel songs, i.e., Children Go Where I Send You, can raise the roof and bring down the house, as she did at the Gate in '61. She is a protest singer, Brown Baby, and an actress, capable of an extraordinary range of emotions.



    Nina has the rare ability to dig into her material and bring unexpected meaning to familiar lyrics. She is eclectic with her taste and her repertoire. But whatever touches Nina, and whatever Nina touches, will reach you and evoke an emotional response. Her music is as fresh today, as it was 42 years ago, singing for that Manhattan audience. They could not have loved her more then, than we do now.




    Musicians:



    • Nina Simone (piano, vocal)

    • Al Schackman (guitar)

    • Chris White (bass)

    • Bob Hamilton (drums)




    Recording: 1961 in New York City

    Production: Cal Lampley



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Just In Time
    2. He Was Too Good to Me
    3. House of the Rising Sun
    4. Bye Bye Blackbird
    5. Brown Baby
    6. Zungo
    7. If He Changed My Name
    8. Children Go Where I Send You
    Nina Simone
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • I Can't Stand The Rain (Pure Pleasure) I Can't Stand The Rain (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    I Can't Stand The Rain (Pure Pleasure)

    This wonderful album, originally released in 1974 on the Memphis-based Hi Records label, deserved a wider audience than it ended up getting at the time. It played to Ann Peebles' great strength, her poised and sultry voice, and surrounded by the sparse, easy funkiness of the trademark Hi rhythm section and producer Willie Mitchell's perfect use of horns and strings, she sings like a resilient but disappointed angel on this impressive set of songs about the darker side of love. Her best song is here, the eccentric but brilliant I Can't Stand the Rain, along with a marvelous version of Joe Simon's (You Keep Me) Hangin' On, and perfect readings of a pair of Earl Randle songs, If We Can't Trust Each Other and I'm Gonna Tear Your Playhouse Down. Peebles sings her heart out, and with those somehow bright-sounding Hi grooves behind her, it all comes together to make a classic album of dark, bouncy, and beautiful Southern soul.



    Musicians:



    • Ann Peebles (vocal)

    • James Mitchell (bassoon)

    • Jack Hale (trombone)

    • Charles Hodges (keyboards)

    • Archie Turner (piano)

    • Leroy Hodges (bass)

    • Howard Grimes (drums)

    • Memphis Sanctified Singers (horn section)



    Recording: 1973 at Royal Recording Studios, South Lauderdale, Memphis, Tennessee

    Production: Willie Mitchell





    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. I Can't Stand The Rain
    2. Do I Need You?
    3. Until You Came Into My Life
    4. (You Keep Me) Hangin' On
    5. Run, Run, Run
    6. If We Can't Trust Each Other
    7. A Love Vibration
    8. You Got To Feed The Fire
    9. I'm Gonna Tear Your Playhouse Down
    10. One Way Street
    Ann Peebles
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Boogie With Canned Heat (Pure Pleasure) Boogie With Canned Heat (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Boogie With Canned Heat (Pure Pleasure)

    This is Canned Heat's second album and definitely their finest. Not one weak track on the entire album. If you like the Blues, Rock, and an oldies flavour you cannot go wrong with this. Also, all the band members are featured in terrific solo parts.




    Musicians:



    • Bob Hite (vocal)

    • Alan Wilson (vocal, guitar, harmonica)

    • Henry Vestine (guitar)

    • Larry Taylor (bass)

    • Adolfo de la Parra (drums)




    Recording: 1968 in Liberty Studios, Los Angeles

    Production: Dallas Smith



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.




    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Evil Woman
    2. My Crime
    3. On The Road Again
    4. World In A Jug
    5. Turpentine Moan
    6. Whiskey Headed Woman #2
    7. Amphetamine Annie
    8. An Owl Song
    9. Marie Laveau
    10. Fried Hockey Boogie

    Canned Heat
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP- Sealed Buy Now
  • In Person (Pure Pleasure) In Person (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    In Person (Pure Pleasure)

    Note: This issue is as the original vinyl album issue & contains all the dialogue from Ray and the stage promoter, along with audience participation.



    I bought this LP, of the Atlanta concert, in 1960. It knocked me out then, and it knocks me out now. For me, this IS Ray Charles. In the intro to Night Time Is The Right Time Ray says, »... and Miss Marjorie Hendricks will help us out on vocals ...«, and boy, does she help out! Turn up the volume and strap yourself down.
    The greatness of this album. Ray was touring with his band in the 50's, and they played at a concert in Herndon Stadium, Atlanta. An engineer at radio station WAOK recorded the occasion on a one track tape recorder using a single microphone. The recording was later played over the air. The response of the radio audience was overwhelming, resulting in the ultimate release of the Atlantic album. It is one of the most extraordinary albums of all time. First, the recording is amazing considering how it was recorded. The band is heard with perfect clarity and balance, and the audience is also picked up, and you can hear the shouting, whooping, the give and take with the audience, and the extraordinary energy in what was a typical concert of Ray Charles playing to his own audience. Many of the tunes were or became classics, known to every funk and blues musician in the country and to most of the population at large. Ray Charles was revered like no other musician.



    This is the most cathartic of all Ray Charles' recordings. On two tracks, The Right Time and Tell The Truth-both shared with the Raelettes' lead singer, Marjorie Hendricks-the music transcends art to become powerfully shamanistic. It remains one of the greatest rhythm and blues albums of all time.



    Musicians:



    • Ray Charles (piano, vocal)

    • Marcus Belgrave, John Hunt (trumpet)

    • David Newman (tenor saxophone)

    • Bennie Crawford (bassoon)

    • Edgar Willis (bass)

    • Teagle Flemming (drums)



    Recording: May 1959 at Herndon Stadium, Atlanta, Georgia, by Ivan Miles



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. The Right Time
    2. What'd I Say
    3. Yes, Indeed
    4. The Spirit Feel
    5. Frenesi
    6. Drown In My Own Tears
    7. Tell The Truth
    Ray Charles
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • What's Going On (Pure Pleasure) What's Going On (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    What's Going On (Pure Pleasure)

    In 2006, exactly a year after Katrina, in the aftermath of a vicious natural disaster that displayed the incompetence of the Crescent City's infrastructure, the Army Corps of Engineers, and the Federal Government, they addressed the tragedy in the only way they know how, by re-creating the same kind of bewilderment and anger that Marvin Gaye felt and witnessed in 1971 by issuing their own take on Gaye's classic album What's Goin' On. This is a question that is proved all the more poignant given the efforts of an entire region trying not only to rebuild homes and businesses, but trying to preserve a culture as this recording was released. The Dirty Dozen recruit a number of vocalists to help out on the hinge tunes. The samples of New Orleans Mayor Ray Nagin's voice in the aftermath of the hurricane usher in the brass slip-sliding along the dark funky overtones of Gaye's signature tune. Guitarists Doug Bossi and Ben Keeler dig into the groove, as does drummer Terence Higgins and keyboardist/producer Anthony Marinelli, as Chuck D raps the refrain in the context of modern history, the disaster, and the ineptitude and even hostility of a government who wages war and ignores domestic problems. It's a news report from the front lines as the horns cut the melody, the harmony, and the deep, steamy funk groove. What's Happening Brother, closes the funk from the inside, turning the groove back in on itself not only playing the rage, but echoing it in the grain of Bettye LaVette's vocal, which dares to spit out the truth with questions and observations in the pain of a first person narrative. The airy arrangement of Flyin' High (In the Friendly Sky) is nearly mournful, nostalgic for a more innocent time, but is all the more poignant for that longing. The deep tribal drums Mardi Gras Indian-style, with the skronky saxophones, tight guitar groove, and screaming narrative in Save The Children give way to the smoothness of Gaye's melody. It's a bewildered tune, sad with undercurrents of rage. Ivan Neville's arrangement for God Is Love is a stunner, full of deeply imaginative hues and colors and gospel grooves. G. Love helps out on Mercy Mercy Me (The Ecology), where the musicality in Gaye's vocal disappears but is supercharged in the horn charts, and Love's vocal sounds confused, displaced, out of time against the instruments. Right On is both militant and celebratory. It's got the funk, but it's also got gospel, rock, and deep soul blaring from the trombones and the repetitive riff in the rest of the brass section. Guru from Gang Starr cuts out from the moody, spectral introduction of Inner City Blues, when Higgins drums play counter to Kirk Joseph's deep blues sousaphone on the bassline. Frustration is everywhere and the horns point fingers to this truth which Guru lays out: that today is the same and perhaps even more so than it was in Gaye's time. The desolation in Gaye's lyric isn't lost but it is fleshed out over the chart so that they are merely the ghosts from the past preaching and exhorting in this new generation. Never has party music sounded so poignant, so utterly damning and hopeful and unbowed. This is the next step in the Homecoming that was a funeral for a friend; this is the aftermath, the sound of angry resurrection coming out with the sun, one where the revolution may be televised but bursts out of the edges in the screen and makes itself known by the medium understood by the people who have to live its realization. With killer grooves that take no prisoners, What's Goin' On is the most fitting tribute yet to Gaye, because not only does it prove the timelessness of the music itself, it echoes that what is indeed goin' on (Gaye's dedication to Detroit as its decline became a reality with no onlookers interested in doing anything) is even more true today than it was in 1971.



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. What's Going On feat. Chuck D
    2. What's Happening Brother feat. Bettye Lavette
    3. Flying High (In the Friendly Skies)
    4. Save the Children
    5. God is Love feat. Ivan Neville
    6. Mercy Mercy Me (The Ecology)
    7. Right On
    8. Wholy Holy
    9. Inner City Blues (Make Me Wanna Holler)
    The Dirty Dozen Brass Band
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Yellow Princess (Pure Pleasure) The Yellow Princess (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    The Yellow Princess (Pure Pleasure)

    This particular John Fahey LP is a personal favourite of many of his devout fans for several reasons. And although such a judgment is tough, if one were looking to own only one album by this unique guitarist, The Yellow Princess could be the one. The recording sound is among the best of his many releases; at the proper volume, the effect is as if one had taken up residency inside the sound hole of a giant acoustic guitar. The program of pieces is marvellously emotional and varied, with many moments of precisely stated harmonies moving at courageously slow tempos. The second piece on the first side, View (East from the Top of the Riggs Road/B&O Trestle), is surely one of his masterpieces, on a par with Charles Ives for musical Americana. It is a great added bonus to have liner notes by the artist, some of the best and most absurd text he ever came up with. Yet another reason this is one of Fahey's top sides is it allows a chance to hear one of his few collaborations with other musicians. Several members of the fine rock group Spirit are present, along with drummer Kevin Kelley, for several lovely pieces, including the March! For Martin Luther King, a remarkably heartfelt tribute that could have gone on much longer. Taped sounds and electronic effects on The Singing Bridge of Memphis, Tennessee certainly predict the more noisy stuff Fahey would get into in the later part of his career.




    Musicians:



    • John Fahey (guitar, vocal)

    • Jay Ferguson (organ, piano)

    • Mark Andes (electric bass)

    • Matt Andes (guitar)

    • Kevin Kelley (drums)




    Recording: 1968 at Sierra Sound Laboratories, Berkeley, CA, USA

    Production: John Fahey & Barret Hansen




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.




    This title is not eligible for discount.

    SIde One

    1. The Yellow Princess

    2. View (East From The Top Of The Riggs Road / B&O Trestle)

    3. Lion

    4. March! For Martin Luther King

    5. The Singing Bridge Of Memphis, Tennessee

     

    Side Two

    1. Dance Of The Inhabitants Of The Invisible City Of Bladensburg

    2. Charles A. Lee: In Memoriam

    3. Irish Letter

    4. Commemorative Transfiguration And Communion At Magruder Pars
    John Fahey
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • First Light (Pure Pleasure) First Light (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    First Light (Pure Pleasure)

    Freddie Hubbard was one of the most prolific jazz trumpeters in the business. He played a hot and sassy horn! When he was teamed up with George Benson, Jack DeJohnette and Ron Carter (just to name a few) on this one of many Creed Taylor-produced collaborations, he most deservedly won the Grammy!


    The opening title song First Light has an ethereal beginning with a diverse arrangement. An unusual arrangement of Paul McCartney's Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey is most satisfying. Henry Mancini's Moment To Moment has a hauntingly sweet sound. Lonely Town is darkly complex.


    There are many sides and moods to each of the songs within this original work. With stylish jazzy rhythms and rich orchestrations, this is THE Freddie Hubbard album to have!


    Musicians:


    • Freddie Hubbard (trumpet, flugelhorn)
    • Richard Wyands (piano)
    • Hubert Laws (flute)
    • Ron Carter (bass)
    • Phil Kraus (vibraphone)
    • Jack DeJohnette (drums)
    • Airto Moreira (percussion) and strings



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. First Light
    2. Uncle Albert/Admiral Halsey
    3. Moment to Moment
    4. Yesterday's Dreams
    5. Lonely Town
    6. Fantasy in D
    Freddie Hubbard
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Little Girl Blue (Pure Pleasure) Little Girl Blue (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Little Girl Blue (Pure Pleasure)

    Little Girl Blue, released in 1957, was Nina Simone's first recording, originally issued on the Bethlehem label. Backed by bassist Jimmy Bond and Albert 'Tootie' Heath, it showcases her ballad voice as one of mystery and sensuality and showcases her up-tempo jazz style with authority and an enigmatic down-home feel that is nonetheless elegant. The album also introduced a fine jazz pianist. Simone was a solid improviser who never strayed far from the blues. Check the opener, her reading of Duke Ellington's Mood Indigo, which finger-pops and swings while keeping the phrasing deep-blue. It is contrasted immediately with one of the -- if not the -- definitive reads of Willard Robison's steamy leave-your-lover ballad Don't Smoke in Bed. The title track, written by Rodgers & Hart, features Good King Wenceslas as a classical prelude to one of the most beautiful pop ballads ever written. It is followed immediately by the funky swing in Love Me or Leave Me with a smoking little piano solo in the bridge where Bach meets Horace Silver and Bobby Timmons.


    It's also interesting to note that while this was her first recording, the record's grooves evidence an artist who arrives fully formed; many of the traits Simone displayed throughout her career as not only a vocalist and pianist but as an arranger are put on first notice here. My Baby Just Cares for Me has a stride shuffle that is extrapolated on in the piano break. Her instrumental and improvising skills are put to good use on Tadd Dameron's Good Bait, which is transformed into something classical from its original bebop intent. You'll Never Walk Alone feels more like some regal gospel song than the Rodgers & Hammerstein show tune it was. Of course, one of Simone's signature tunes was her version of I Loves You, Porgy, which appears here for the first time and was released as a single. Her own Central Park Blues is one of the finest jazz tunes here.



    Musicians:



    • Nina Simone (piano, vocal)

    • Jimmy Bond (bass)

    • Albert "Tootie" Heath (drums)



    Recording: 1957



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.




    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Mood Indigo
    2. Don't Smoke In Bed
    3. He Needs Me
    4. Little Girl Blue
    5. Love Me Or Leave Me
    6. My baby Just Cares For Me
    7. Good Bait
    8. Plain Gold Ring
    9. You'll Never Walk Alone
    10. I Loves You Porgy
    11. Central Park Blues
    Nina Simone
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Straight Life (Pure Pleasure) Straight Life (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Straight Life (Pure Pleasure)

    Recorded between trumpeter Freddie Hubbard's better-known classics Red Clay and First Light, Straight Life is actually arguably Hubbard's greatest recording. Hubbard, joined by an all-star group that includes tenor saxophonist Joe Henderson, keyboardist Herbie Hancock, guitarist George Benson, bassist Ron Carter, and drummer Jack DeJohnette, is frequently astounding on Straight Life (check out that introduction) and Mr. Clean, constructing classic solos. The very memorable set is rounded off by the trumpeter's duet with Benson on a lyrical version of the ballad Here's That Rainy Day. This exciting album is essential for all serious jazz collections.



    Musicians:



    • Freddie Hubbard (trumpet, fluegel horn)

    • Joe Henderson (tenor saxophone)

    • Herbie Hancock (piano)

    • George Benson (guitar)

    • Ron Carter (bass)

    • Jack DeJohnette (drums)

    • Richard Pablo Landrum (percussion)

    • Weldon Irvine (tambourine)



    Recording: November 1970 at Van Gelder Studios, Englewood Cliffs, NJ (USA), by Rudy Van Gelder

    Production: Creed Taylor



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Straight Life
    2. Mr. Clean
    3. Here's That Rainy Day
    Freddie Hubbard
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Charles Mingus Presents Charles Mingus (Pure Pleasure) Charles Mingus Presents Charles Mingus (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Charles Mingus Presents Charles Mingus (Pure Pleasure)

    Charles Mingus has a fascinating way of offering music that is grounded in tradition while remaining startlingly original. The freshness of a piece like Charles Mingus Presents Charles Mingus, has the effect of rendering much of what passes for jazz as tedious. The band is small for Mingus, and includes Eric Dolphy on alto saxophone and bass clarinet, Ted Curson on trumpet, and Dannie Richmond on drums. It would be one of Dolphy and Curson's last recording dates with the artist, and they seem determined to go all out for it. The leader's bass line kicks off Folk Forms No. 1, followed by Dolphy outlining the melody, and then joined by Curson. A simple riff develops into a lively New Orleans funeral march that's developed for 12 minutes. Original Faubus Fables is serious in intent - a political attack on segregation governor Faubus - but Mingus and Richmond's singing is difficult to listen to with a straight face. Still, this doesn't distract from the wonderful music. Again and again, the elasticity of the sound is fascinating, at once spacious with the bass and drums balanced against the brass and then noisy, with the horns wailing and crying. The last two pieces, What Love? and the outrageously titled All the Things You Could Be by Now if Sigmund Freud's Wife Was Your Mother, are much looser, bordering on free jazz. The album accomplishes what the best of Mingus accomplishes: the perfect tension between jazz played as an ensemble and jazz played as totally free.




    Musicians:



    • Eric Dolphy (alto saxophone, bass clarinet)

    • Ted Curson (trumpet)

    • Charles Mingus (bass)

    • Dannie Richmond (drums)




    Recording: October 1960 at Nola Penthouse Studios, New York City, by Bob d'Orleans

    Production: Nat Hentoff




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Folk Forms, No. 1

    2. Original Faubus Fables

    3. What Love

    4. All The Things You Could Be By Now If Sigmund Freud's Wife Was Your Mother

    Charles Mingus
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Sweet Sister Funk (Pure Pleasure) Sweet Sister Funk (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Sweet Sister Funk (Pure Pleasure)

    From the mid to late 60's the producer Sonny Lester was at the helm of some of the period's most significant jazz music (Thad Jones-Mel Lewis Orchestra, Chick Corea, Duke Ellington's 70th birthday concert) and also some of the genre's biggest hits (mostly from organist Jimmy Mcgriff). With the folding of the Solid State label in 1971 Sonny Lester formed the aptly named Groove Merchant label (named after the tune Jerome Richardson wrote for the Jones-Lewis Orchestra). He then produced some of the periods most notable soul/jazz, jazz/fusion from the likes of McGriff, Richard Groove Holmes, Reuben Wilson, Lonnie Smith to name but a few.



    This gem of an album from Ramon Morris, and one of the hardest to find on Groove Merchant, was recorded during what many people would consider to be the classic period for this particular brand of jazz/funk/soul/fusion. It was recorded not long after he'd spent time with Art Blakey as a Jazz Messenger appearing on his 1972 Prestige album Child's Dance along with Stanley Clarke and Woody Shaw. He then also recorded on the Woody Shaw album, also from 1972, Song Of Songs.



    He now teaches at Carnegie-Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pa.



    Musicians:



    • Ramon Morris (tenor saxophone)

    • Albert Dailey (electric piano)

    • Mickey Bass (bass)

    • Mickey Roker (drums)

    • Cecil Bridgewater (trumpet)

    • Lloyd Davis (guitar)

    • Tony Waters (conga)




    Recording: 1972

    Production: Sonny Lester



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.




    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. First Come, First Serve
    2. Wijinia
    3. Sweet Sister Funk

    4. Sweat
    5. Don't Ask Me
    6. Lord Sideways
    7. People Make the World Go Round
    Ramon Morris
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Al Green Explores Your Mind (Pure Pleasure) Al Green Explores Your Mind (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Al Green Explores Your Mind (Pure Pleasure)

    By the time of 1974's Al Green Explores Your Mind, this version of the Memphis sound was the production style for only a handful of artists. Producer Willie Mitchell used a lighter touch for his most famous artist, and it's all but crafted into the Al Green sound. Despite his skills, Green never falls into mannerism here and gives heartfelt and cogent vocals rooted in intelligence and technique. Sha-La-La (Make Me Happy), although lyrically slight, has the artist's charisma and Mitchell's pop chops. Take Me to the River, with perfect backing from Hi Rhythm and a horn and string arrangement, finds Green at his most persuasive. The last track, School Days, has Green longing for a school girlfriend and despite the potentially sappy sentiment, it works like a charm. The greatness of Al Green Explores Your Mind comes from a collective effort, including James Mitchell's dreamlike string arrangements and the always skilled backing vocals of Rhodes, Chalmers & Rhodes. But the biggest draw here is Green's phrasing and intimate vocals, making the record an extremely strong effort.



    Musicians:



    • Al Green (vocal)

    • Wayne Jackson (trumpet)

    • Andrew Love (tenor saxophone)

    • James Mitchell (bassoon)

    • Jack Hale (trombone)

    • Charles Hodges (keyboards)

    • Archie Turner( piano)

    • Mabon Teenie Hodges (guitar)

    • Leroy Hodges (bass)

    • Howard Grimes (drums, percussion)




    Recording: 1974 at Royal Recording Studios, South Lauderdale, Memphis, Tennessee by Willie Mitchell

    Production: Willie Mitchell & Al Green




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Sha-La-La (Make Me Happy)
    2. Take Me To The River
    3. God Blessed Our Love
    4. The City
    5. One Nite Stand
    6. I'm Hooked On You
    7. Stay With Me Forever
    8. Hangin' On
    4. School
    Al Green
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Richland Woman Blues (Pure Pleasure) Richland Woman Blues (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Richland Woman Blues (Pure Pleasure)

    Best known for that ditty about camels, Maria Muldaur has since established herself as one of the finest folk/country/jazz/blues/gospel interpreters ever to have a Top Five single. After 26 years and 24 solo albums, Muldaur -- inspired by a trip to Memphis' Beale Street -- digs deep into her roots and pays tribute to the classic blues women of the '20s and '30s. Aided by the similarly inclined Bonnie Raitt, Taj Mahal, and Alvin 'Youngblood' Hart, Muldaur breezes through 14 tunes from icons Bessie Smith and Memphis Minnie, as well as obscurities from the Reverend Gary Davis, Mississippi John Hurt, and Blind Willie Johnson. Keeping the unplugged accompaniment stripped way down to a single guitar or piano and occasional bass, Muldaur has room to maneuver her evocative vocals that shift from gritty groans to a high-pitched edgy trill. Far from a dry history lesson, these songs are performed with the strength and tenacity of the women who originally sang them. Whether spinning saucy, double entendre lyrics in Me And My Chauffeur Blues (»the way you ride so easy, I can't turn you down«) or longing for her Southern home after moving north during the Depression in Bessie Smith's Far Away Blues, the singer remains invigorated and inspired throughout. By returning to her late-'60s Jim Kweskin Jug Band coffeehouse days, Maria Muldaur has discovered her middle-aged oasis with Richland Woman Blues. And there's not a camel in sight.



    Musicians:



    • Maria Muldaur (vocal)

    • Alvin Youngblood Hart (guitar, vocal)

    • Bonnie Raitt, John Sebastian (guitar)

    • David Wilkie (mandocello)

    • Dave Mathews (piano)

    • Roly Salley (bass)

    • Angela Strehli, Tracy Nelson (vocal)




    Recording: 2001 by John Jacob

    Production: John Jacob & Maria Muldaur



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. The One To Sing The Blues
    2. I'm So Bad (Baby I Don't Care)
    3. No Voices In The Sky
    4. Going To Brazil
    5. Nightmare/Dreamtime
    6. Love Me Forever
    7. Angel City
    8. Make My Day
    9. R.A.M.O.N.E.S.
    10. Shut You Down
    11. 1916
    Maria Muldaur
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Joan Baez (Pure Pleasure) Joan Baez (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Joan Baez (Pure Pleasure)

    At the time of its release, Joan Baez's debut album was something of a revelation. The folk music revival was beginning to gather steam, stoked on the popular side by artists such as the Kingston Trio and the Easy Riders, as well as up-and-coming ensembles such as the Highwaymen, and on the more intense and serious side by the Weavers. The female singers on the scene were mostly old-time, veteran activist types like Ronnie Gilbert and Malvina Reynolds, who was in her sixties. And then along comes this album, by a 19-year-old who looked more like the kind of co-ed every mother dreamt her son would come home with, displaying a voice from heaven, a soprano so pure and beguiling that the mere act of listening to her - forget what she was singing - was a pleasure. Baez's first album, made up primarily of traditional songs (including a startling version of House of the Rising Sun), was beguiling enough to woo even conservative-leaning listeners. Accompanied by the Weavers' Fred Hellerman and a pair of session singers, Baez gives a fine account of the most reserved and least confrontational aspects of the folk revival, presenting a brace of traditional songs (most notably East Virginia and Mary Hamilton) with an urgency and sincerity that makes the listener feel as though they were being sung for the first time, and opening with a song that was to become her signature piece for many years, Silver Dagger. The recording was notable at the time for its purity of sound, and Baez's voice soars with an awesome purity of Fare Thee Well, House of the Rising Sun, and All My Trials, and the guitar accompaniment on Wildwood Flower, among other tracks, comes through with richness and clarity.




    Musicians:



    • Joan Baez (vocal, guitar)

    • Fred Hellerman (guitar)




    Production: Maynard Solomon



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.




    This title is not eligible for discount.

    Silver Dagger
    East Virginia

    Fare Thee Well
    House Of The Rising Sun

    All My Trials
    Wildwood Flower
    Donna Donna
    John Riley
    Rake And Rambling Boy

    Little Moses
    Mary Hamilton
    Henry Martin
    El Preso Numero Nueve
    Joan Baez
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Keb' Mo' (Pure Pleasure) Keb' Mo' (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Keb' Mo' (Pure Pleasure)

    Keb' Mo's self-titled debut is an edgy, ambitious collection of gritty country blues. Keb' Mo' pushes into new directions, trying to incorporate some of the sensibilites of the slacker revolution without losing touch of the tradition that makes the blues the breathing, vital art form it is. His attempts aren't always successful, but his gutsy guitar playing and impassioned vocals, as well as his surprisingly accomplished songwriting, make Keb' Mo' a debut to cherish.




    Musicians:



    • Keb' Mo' (vocal, guitar, harmonica, banjo)

    • Tommy Eyre (keyboards)

    • James 'Hutch' Hutchinson (bass)

    • Laval Belle, Quentin Dennard (drums)

    • Tony Draunagel (percussion)




    Recording: 1994 at Red Zone Studios (Burbank, CA.) by Joe McGrath and at Penguin Recording (Los Angeles) by John Strother

    Production: John Porter




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.




    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Every Morning
    2. Tell Everybody I Know
    3. Love Blues
    4. Victims Of Comfort
    5. Angelina
    6. Anybody Seen My Girl
    7. She Just Wants To Dance
    8. Am I Wrong
    9. Come On In My Kitchen
    10. Dirty Low Down And Bad
    11. Don't Try To Explain
    12. Kindhearted Woman Blues
    13. City Boy
    Keb' Mo'
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Any Day Now (Pure Pleasure) Any Day Now (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $49.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Any Day Now (Pure Pleasure)

    The material - many of the Dylan classics - is unsurpassable. Her voice is at its zenith, young, supple - neither undisciplined (as in her 1st records) nor the later, low vibrato warble. There is none of the self-conscious and silly Dylan vocal imitation found in Baez's later recording. Where Dylan's own singing is wonderfully raw and rough, Baez is clear and pure. Both are great for me, but very, very different from each other. These lovely renditions are like no one else's. Just pure Joan in her finest voice.



    She is backed here by several of the very best of '70s Nashville session musicians (pickers). Some folks think of Nashville sidemen as inevitably bound up with Country Music. While this is not counter-country, it fits much more into folk - as the names Dylan and Baez rightly connote.



    One Too Many Mornings is too often overlooked among Dylan's compositions, and this is among the best renditions I've heard. The full-length, unhurried treatment Sad Eyed Lady of the Lowland is spell-binding and satisfying. Perhaps my favorite, though, is the subtle and poignant Spanish Boots of Spanish Leather. Dylan's lyrical genius is fully manifest, in his gorgeous melody and Joan Baez's a wonderful performance.
    For many of us who listened both then and recently, this pristine work inevitably reminds us how much has aged in the decades since this earlier era - also recaptured so vividly in Dylan's own Chronicles. These are timely works, both for reminiscence and to introduce newbies to the non-acid experiences that stirred an earlier generation. But regardless of any social import, this is simply beautiful poetry and music.



    Musicians:



    • Joan Baez (guitar, vocal)

    • Fred Carter (mandolin)

    • Hargus 'Pig' Robbins (keyboards)

    • Stephen Stills, Pete Drake, Harold Rugg (guitar)

    • Tommy Jackson, Johnny Gimble (violin)




    Recording: 1968 by Selby Cofeen

    Production: Maynard Solomon



    Format: 2LPs 33rpm / gatefold sleeve



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Love Minus Zero/No Limit
    2. North Country Blues
    3. You Ain't Going Nowhere
    4. Drifter's Escape
    5. I Pity the Poor Immigrant

    6. Tears of Rage
    7. Sad-Eyed Lady of the Lowlands
    8. Love Is Just a Four-Letter Word
    9. I Dreamed I Saw St. Augustine

    10. The Walls of Redwing
    11. Dear Landlord
    12. One Too Many Mornings
    13. I Shall Be Released
    14. Boots of Spanish Leather
    15. Walkin' Down the Line

    16. Restless Farewell
    Joan Baez
    $49.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Oscar Pettiford: Volume 2 (Pure Pleasure) Oscar Pettiford: Volume 2 (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Oscar Pettiford: Volume 2 (Pure Pleasure)

    Oscar Pettiford became a major influence on a number of jazz artists along with fellow bassists Jimmy Blanton and Charles Mingus. This album titles as Volume 2 or Another One, Pettiford's third album as a leader for the Bethlehem label, was recorded in 1955. This exceptional date features the horns of Donald Byrd, Ernie Royal, Bob Brookmeyer, Gigi Gryce, and Jerome Richardson. Highlights include the Pettiford-penned Bohemia After Dark, named after the club in Greenwich Village and acknowledged as a jazz standard, Stardust, featuring Pettiford's poetic bass faintly accompanied by pianist Don Abney, and Minor Seventh Heaven, with Pettiford switching to cello. This is not just a bebop date; Pettiford had the range to incorporate influences like Duke Ellington and calypso, creating a full, lyrical band sound that matched his bass playing. Pettiford's legacy was cut short after he passed away suddenly in 1958 in Copenhagen at the age of 37.

    Musicians:



    • Donald Byrd, Ernie Royal (trumpet)

    • Bob Brookmeyer (trombone)

    • Gigi Gryce (alto saxophone, clarinet)

    • Jerome Richardson (tenor saxophone, clarinet, flute)

    • Don Abney (piano)

    • Oscar Pettiford (bass. cello)

    • Osie Johnson (drums)



    Recording: August 1955 in New York City



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Kamman's A-Comin
    2. Minor 7th Heaven
    3. Stardust
    4. Bohemia After Dark
    5. Oscalypso
    6. Scorpio
    7. Titoro
    8. Don't Squawk
    9. Another One
    Oscar Pettiford
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
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