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  • Walking The Blues (Pure Pleasure) Walking The Blues (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Walking The Blues (Pure Pleasure)

    Walking The Blues is arguably the finest record Otis Spann ever cut, boasting 11 cuts of astounding blues piano. On several numbers, Spann is supported by guitarist Robert Jr. Lockwood and their interaction is sympathetic, warm, and utterly inviting. Spann relies on originals here, from Half Ain't Been Told to Walking the Blues, but he also throws in a few standards (Goin' Down Slow, My Home Is In The Delta) that help draw a fuller portrait of his musicianship. Most importantly, however, is the fact that Walking The Blues simply sounds great -- it's some of the finest blues piano you'll ever hear.



    Musicians:



    • Otis Spann (vocal, piano)

    • Robert Lockwood Jr. (guitar)

    • St. Louis Jimmy (James Oden) (vocal)




    Recording: August 1960 at Fine Recording Studios, New York, by George Piros

    Production: Nat Hentoff



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    1. It Must Have Been the Devil
    2. Otis' Blues
    3. Goin' Down Slow
    4. Half Ain't Been Told
    5. Monkey Face Blues
    6. This Is the Blues
    7. Can't Stand Your Evil Ways
    8. Come Day, Go Day
    9. Walkin' the Blues
    10. Bad Condition
    11. My Home Is in the Delta
    Otis Spann
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Masterpieces (Pure Pleasure) Masterpieces (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Masterpieces (Pure Pleasure)

    When Ellington went into the studio in 1950 to record the longer tracks on this LP, his orchestra was a bridge between its late-1940's configuration (the 5-man trumpet section) and its mid-1950's personnel. The sax section had settled into the form it would have for most of the ensuing two decades (old-timers Hodges and Carney and newcomers Procope, Hamilton and Gonsalves); the trombone section had long-timer Lawrence Brown as well as Tyree Glenn and newcomer Quentin Jackson; and the drummer was still Sonny Greer, who had anchored the rhythm section since the beginning.


    The arrangements and orchestrations all bear the hallmarks of Ellington's collaboration with Billy Strayhorn in the late 1940's: they are lush, symphonic, impressionistic, and densely (and adventurously) harmonic. Mood Indigo, in particular, is a 15-minute tone-poem with shifting colors and key relationships as Ellington and Strayhorn bring the melody through a wide variety of guises, from Glenn's wah-wah trombone solo to Shorty Baker's lyrical waltz to orchestral and piano passages which do homage to the influence which Ravel and Stravinsky had on both of them.


    The Tattooed Bride is the only new piece from the original Masterpieces by Ellington LP, and it is a beauty. The others of the original tracks -- Sophistocated Lady and Solitude -- are not laid out as inventively in their harmonics or structure. Of the group, Solitude is perhaps the weakest, but this is a relative term. Ellington would go on to pen many more extended, symphonic works, but none would have quite the multicolored, impressionistic tone-pallate that these do. And Strayhorn's presence would not be as pronounced in those future works as it is here: the orchestration and harmonies in particular bear his mark. These are masterpieces indeed: great works of art by two of our greatest composers/orchestrators, and played by one of the greatest orchestras in Afro-American music. - Andrew R. Weiss

    Musicians:



    • Duke Ellington, Billy Strayhorn (piano)
    • Cat Anderson, Clark Terry, Ray Nance (trumpet)
    • Quentin Jackson (trombone)
    • Johnny Hodges (reeds)
    • Mercer Ellington (french horn)
    • Russell Procope (clarinet, reeds)
    • Wendell Marshall (bass)
    • Louie Bellson (drums)




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Mood Indigo
    2. Sophisticated Lady
    3. The Tattooed Bride
    4. Solitude
    Duke Ellington
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Nina At The Village Gate (Pure Pleasure) Nina At The Village Gate (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Nina At The Village Gate (Pure Pleasure)

    In the intimate ambiance of The Village Gate, Nina Simone made pure magic with her voice and on the keyboard, one Manhattan evening back in 1961. She sang and played with a trio, which featured her favorite guitarist, Al Shackman. We are so fortunate that the moment was captured and recorded.



    I can't really categorize Nina's sound or her music and call her 'just' a fabulous jazz vocalist. Although, she plays extraordinary jazz with her voice, as in Just In Time. She has been often called a musical anomaly, because there is no one category for her work. She was trained as a classical pianist, and in cuts like Bye Bye Blackbird, the complexity of her piano comes through loud and clear. Her folk songs, like the biting House Of The Rising Sun, and Zungo, an African work song, place her at the top of a long list of folk singers. Ms. Simone's gospel songs, i.e., Children Go Where I Send You, can raise the roof and bring down the house, as she did at the Gate in '61. She is a protest singer, Brown Baby, and an actress, capable of an extraordinary range of emotions.



    Nina has the rare ability to dig into her material and bring unexpected meaning to familiar lyrics. She is eclectic with her taste and her repertoire. But whatever touches Nina, and whatever Nina touches, will reach you and evoke an emotional response. Her music is as fresh today, as it was 42 years ago, singing for that Manhattan audience. They could not have loved her more then, than we do now.




    Musicians:



    • Nina Simone (piano, vocal)

    • Al Schackman (guitar)

    • Chris White (bass)

    • Bob Hamilton (drums)




    Recording: 1961 in New York City

    Production: Cal Lampley



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. Just In Time
    2. He Was Too Good to Me
    3. House of the Rising Sun
    4. Bye Bye Blackbird
    5. Brown Baby
    6. Zungo
    7. If He Changed My Name
    8. Children Go Where I Send You
    Nina Simone
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Leadbelly (Pure Pleasure) Leadbelly (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Leadbelly (Pure Pleasure)

    Leadbelly's last recording sessions for a commercial record label, held in the early fall of 1944, yielded a dazzling 12 songs, embracing virtuoso guitar blues (Grasshoppers In My Pillow), pounding piano-driven scatting (The Eagle Rocks, with Leadbelly himself at the ivories, a talent for which he wasn't usually recognized), and familiar standards done in some startlingly different ways, including Goodnight, Irene, Rock Island Line, and Ella Speed, done with the understated accompaniment of a zither (courtesy of Paul Mason Howard) as well as his own guitar. Leadbelly was in excellent voice and top form on guitar and piano - having gone to California to test the commercial waters, he met Tex Ritter, an old friend, who arranged for Leadbelly to come to his house and, with Merle Travis playing as well and Capitol executive Lee Gillette present, auditioned then and there for the label; he was energized by the experience, and Capitol's recording caught the brightest as well as the deepest tones in his playing, thus making this record one of the very best showcases for acoustic 12-string guitar of the period. Sadly, only a handful of these tracks were issued during the man's own lifetime, thus convincing him that they were another career dead end - in 1956 (and again in 1962) they emerged with an impassioned annotation by Dave Dexter Jr., imploring people to buy these last commercial sides by one of the most celebrated bluesmen of the century.



    Production notes: Whilst this album has been mastered and produced to the highest possible standards it is NOT upto what would be considered audiophile standards. This would be impossible bearing in mind the standards of recording and mastering at the time.




    Musicians:



    • Leadbelly (guitar, piano)

    • Paul Mason Howard (zither)




    Recording: October 1944 in Hollywood, USA

    Production: Dave Dexter Jr. and Lee Gilette



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    Goodnight Irene
    Grasshoppers In My Pillow

    The Eagle Rocks
    Rock Island Line

    Ella Speed
    Backwater Blues
    Take This Hammer
    Tell Me, Baby
    Eagle Rock Rag

    Western Plain
    Sweet Mary Blues
    On A Christmas Day
    Huddie Ledbetter
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Yellow Princess (Pure Pleasure) The Yellow Princess (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    The Yellow Princess (Pure Pleasure)

    This particular John Fahey LP is a personal favourite of many of his devout fans for several reasons. And although such a judgment is tough, if one were looking to own only one album by this unique guitarist, The Yellow Princess could be the one. The recording sound is among the best of his many releases; at the proper volume, the effect is as if one had taken up residency inside the sound hole of a giant acoustic guitar. The program of pieces is marvellously emotional and varied, with many moments of precisely stated harmonies moving at courageously slow tempos. The second piece on the first side, View (East from the Top of the Riggs Road/B&O Trestle), is surely one of his masterpieces, on a par with Charles Ives for musical Americana. It is a great added bonus to have liner notes by the artist, some of the best and most absurd text he ever came up with. Yet another reason this is one of Fahey's top sides is it allows a chance to hear one of his few collaborations with other musicians. Several members of the fine rock group Spirit are present, along with drummer Kevin Kelley, for several lovely pieces, including the March! For Martin Luther King, a remarkably heartfelt tribute that could have gone on much longer. Taped sounds and electronic effects on The Singing Bridge of Memphis, Tennessee certainly predict the more noisy stuff Fahey would get into in the later part of his career.




    Musicians:



    • John Fahey (guitar, vocal)

    • Jay Ferguson (organ, piano)

    • Mark Andes (electric bass)

    • Matt Andes (guitar)

    • Kevin Kelley (drums)




    Recording: 1968 at Sierra Sound Laboratories, Berkeley, CA, USA

    Production: John Fahey & Barret Hansen




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    SIde One

    1. The Yellow Princess

    2. View (East From The Top Of The Riggs Road / B&O Trestle)

    3. Lion

    4. March! For Martin Luther King

    5. The Singing Bridge Of Memphis, Tennessee

     

    Side Two

    1. Dance Of The Inhabitants Of The Invisible City Of Bladensburg

    2. Charles A. Lee: In Memoriam

    3. Irish Letter

    4. Commemorative Transfiguration And Communion At Magruder Pars
    John Fahey
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Right Time (Pure Pleasure) The Right Time (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    The Right Time (Pure Pleasure)

    I first heard Etta James as a young teenager when she had a hit with Tell Mama, a tune that has easily stood the test of time. She recorded this album a quarter-century later and sounded even better.

    For The Right Time she returns to the Muscle Shoals studio where she recorded Tell Mama, this time with producer Jerry Wexler, and it's an outstanding match. She hits nary a forced or false note and is backed with a stellar band that includes saxophonist Hank Crawford, guitarist Steve Cropper and bassist Willie Weeks. They plow ahead like a great offensive line blocking for an all-star running back -- one who isn't afraid to lower the shoulder and knock somebody over.

    There's plenty of manufactured emotion on records, but you won't find any of it here. Etta just rocks naturally. It's like sitting next to a seasoned story teller in full command of the narrative. Nothing for you to do but sit back, close your eyes and listen.

    A sign of great singers for me is how they put a stamp on songs that have been done many times. In that regard, Etta makes Love and Happiness and Ninety And A Half Won't Do her own. She tears up The Night Time Is the Right Time with the help of Crawford's sax. Of course she has the blues well covered, my personal favorite being Down Home Blues, and flashes her humorous side with the trash-talking Wet Match. She hits any note she wants without straining and with total conviction.

    But all the songs are top-notch. The best advice for anyone reading this is to just pick up the album and discover the old-school glory of Etta James. - Tyler Smith

    Musicians:

    • Etta James (vocal)
    • Lucky Peterson (organ, guitar)
    • Steve Cropper, Doug Bartenfeld (guitar)
    • Hank Crawford (alto saxophone)
    • Jim Horn (bassoon)
    • Gary Armstrong (trumpet)
    • Kirk 'Jelly Roll' Johnson (harmonica)
    • Clayton Ivey (piano)
    • Frank Crawford (synthesizer)
    • David Hood(bass)
    • Steve Ferrone, Roger Hawkins (drums)

    About Pure Pleasure

    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.

    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.

    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.

    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.

    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.

    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. I Sing The Blues
    2. Love And Happiness
    3. Evening Of Love
    4. Wet Match
    5. You're Taking Up Another Man's Place
    6. Give It Up (Duet With Steve Winwood)
    7. Let It Rock
    8. Ninety Nine And A Half (Won't Do)
    9. You've Got Me
    10. Nighttime Is The Right Time
    11. Down Home Blues
    Etta James
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Lady Day (Pure Pleasure) Lady Day (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Lady Day (Pure Pleasure)

    Excerpt from George Avakian's notes on the album sleeve:



    When planning this album, I had a hellish time trying to choose what I thought were the absolute cream of Billie Holiday. In the course of this wrestling, it struck me that not only were Billie's vocals incredibly perfect, but that I could not remember a single instance of anyone playing a bad solo or even a bad phrase among the hundred or more performances I had to choose from in the golden period of her work. Checking over records (which was almost unnecessary, because I could still remember them almost note for note) was a rather beautiful and somewhat shattering experience. Jazz, a product of so many things - musical evolution, the social scene of a particular time, the economic atmosphere of the moment, what somebody had for breakfast that day - and none of those tings will ever come together again as they did when these records were made.



    Musicians:



    • Billie Holiday (vocal)

    • Ben Webster, Lester Young (tenor saxophone)

    • Johnny Hodges (alto saxophone)

    • Roy Eldridge, Buck Clayton (trumpet)

    • Benny Goodman, Art Shaw (clarinet)

    • John Truehart (guitar)

    • Teddy Wilson (piano)

    • John Kirby (bass)

    • Cozy Cole, Joe Jones (drums)




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Miss Brown To You
    2. I Wished On the Moon
    3. What A Little Moonlight Can Do
    4. If You Were Mine
    5. Summertime
    6. Billie's Blues
    7. I Must Have That Man
    8. Foolin' Myself
    9. Easy Living
    10. Me, Myself and I
    11. A Sailboat In the Moonlight
    12. I Cried For You
    Billie Holiday
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Today! (Pure Pleasure) (Awaiting Repress) Today! (Pure Pleasure) (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Today! (Pure Pleasure) (Awaiting Repress)

    The '60s revived the careers of many early bluesmen, but none so dramatically as that of Mississippi John Hurt. Hurt recorded a few brilliant sides in the '20s, then ostensibly disappeared off the face of the Earth until folk musician Tom Hoskins went looking for him in 1963. At the age of 70, Hurt began one of the greatest comebacks in music history. From his first '60s shows until his death in 1966, Hurt was a popular mainstay of the folk-music circuit. TODAY! demonstrates why the audiences loved him so. More a melodic songster than a traditional bluesman, Hurt has a great deal in common with '60s folk musicians - many of whom he inspired. Hurt's dexterous and beautiful finger-picking style provided aspiring folk performers with a template, as did his warm and gentle stage presence. All these elements are amply evident on TODAY!, on which Hurt turns in definitive performances of Pay Day, Louis Collins, Spike Driver's Blues, and Make Me a Pallet on Your Floor. He even takes a rare (and successful) turn at slide guitar on Talking Casey. Like all of Hurt's Vanguard albums, TODAY! is an absolutely essential document of a great American artist.




    Musicians:



    • Mississippi John Hurt (vocal, guitar)




    Recording: 1966




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Payday
    2. Im Satisfied
    3. Candy Man
    4. Make Me A Pallet On The Floor
    5. Talkin Casey
    6. Corrina, Corrina
    7. Coffee Blues
    8. Louis Collins
    9. Hot Time In The Old Town Tonight

    10. If You Dont Want Me Baby
    11. Spike Driver's Blues
    12. Beulah Land
    Mississippi John Hurt
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • Felix Beloy: Baila Mi Son (Pure Pleasure) Felix Beloy: Baila Mi Son (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Felix Beloy: Baila Mi Son (Pure Pleasure)

    Rich and rhythmic, sparkling and seductive, Felix Baloy's voice marks him as one of Cuba's very finest soneros. This magnificent performance showcases a true artist at the peak of his profession, backed by the thrilling arrangements of Juan de Marcos and the peerless Afro Cuban All Stars.



    Felix Baloy has been singing for more than 40 years which means he has waited a long time to make his first solo album. One of Cuba's outstanding soneros with a unique timbre, the opportunity came about after he met Tumi Music founder Mo Fini in Havana in 1995 when Baloy sang on the label's splendid four CD set Las Leyendas de la Musica Cubana as part of the Cuban All Stars with Orquesta Amèrica.



    There's an absolute joy about this record, and Baloy proves himself worthy of all the praise that's been heaped on him in Cuba, as capable of gliding through the cha cha of Van a Bailar el Cha Cha Cha, with its prim strings, as the rawer bolero of El Mal de la Hipocresia. The arrangements frame his voice wonderfully, too, as on the rich bolero cha of Los Es Todo Tu Amor, with its glistening flute solo. Baloy does himself proud, and Gonzalez gives him a band to remember behind him, some crystal clear production, and songs any singer would love to sing. Nigh on perfect.



    Musicians:



    • Juan de Marcos Gonzalez (director)

    • Felix Baloy (vocal)

    • Teresa Garcia Caturla (vocal)

    • Javier Zalba (bassoon)

    • Yanko Pizaco (trumpet)

    • Daniel "El Gordo" Ramos (trumpet)

    • Alberto "Molote" Munoz (trombone)

    • Antonio Sesma (trombone)

    • David Alfaro (piano)

    • Ricardo Munoz (bass)

    • Rolando "El Nino" Salgado (percussion)



    Recording: 2000 in ICAIC Studios and DM Ahora Studios, Havana, Cuba, by Alain Martinez de la Torre

    Production: Juan de Marcos Gonzalez




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. Baila mi son
    2. Mami te Gusto
    3. Yo Soy el del sentimiento
    4. DespuÉs de esta noche
    5. El mal de la hipocresía
    6. Ven a bailer cha cha cha
    7. Cada vez que te veo
    8. Lo es todo to amor
    9. El son de Baloy
    10. Misericordia, no aguanto
    Afro-Cuban All Stars
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Silk Degrees (Pure Pleasure) Silk Degrees (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
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    x

    Silk Degrees (Pure Pleasure)

    Boz Scaggs is a unique and marvellous singer. His soulful voice can be, in turn, silky-smooth and sensual or funky and upbeat, depending on the material, but it is always compelling. This voice comes through superbly on the ten great tunes featured on Silk Degrees.



    Scaggs, a solid composer in its own right, wrote three tracks on his own, co-wrote five more with David Paich. Paich contributed the delightful Love Me Tomorrow by himself while the remaining tune is a cover of Allen Toussaint's excellent What Do You Want the Girl To Do.



    Stylistically, the compositions are a nice blend of Philly soul influenced pop and rock. The production is very slick and sophisticated thanks to the arrangements by future Toto's keyboardist David Paich, to the orchestral direction (strings and brass) by Sid Sharp, to the soulful back-up vocals and to the sheer artistry of all the musicians involved. A classic of elegant, well crafted music.





    Musicians:



    • Boz Scaggs (guitar, voalc)

    • David Paich (arranger, keyboards)

    • Les Dudek (guitar)

    • Plas Johnson (saxophone)

    • David Hungate (bass)

    • Jeff Porcaro (drums, percussion)




    Recording: At Davlen Sound Studios & Hollywood Sound, Los Angeles, by Tom Perry

    Production: Joe Wissert



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. What Can I Say
    2. Georgia
    3. Jump Street
    4. What Do You Want The Girl To Do
    5. Harbor Lights
    6. Lowdown
    7. It's Over
    8. Love Me Tomorrow
    9. Lido Shuffle
    10. We're All Alone
    Boz Scaggs
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Blues Giant (Pure Pleasure) The Blues Giant (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
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    The Blues Giant (Pure Pleasure)

    Buddy Guy is arguably the most distinctive, electrifying guitarist in Blues history. On a good night, there is no player in the world who can match him. But for all of Guy's talent, unfortunately there are few studio recordings that document his genius. Producers have always wanted him either to sound old-fashioned (i.e., the '50s Chess Chicago Blues sound) or too modern (i.e., some abberation of Jimi or Clapton).



    Buddy was only produced properly one time: and the result is this album. After several mediocre albums in the '60s and '70s, someone finally let Buddy play in the studio with the creative, reckless abandon that, when playing live, has ignited every building in which he has ever played. This IS Buddy Guy!



    Musicians:



    • Buddy Guy (guitar, vocal)

    • Phil Guy (guitar)

    • J. Williams (bass)

    • Ray Allison (drums)



    Recording: October 1979 at Condorcet Studio, Toulouse (France) by Francois Porterie

    Production: Didier Tricard




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. I Smell a Rat
    2. Are You Losing In Your Mind
    3. You've Been Gone Too Long
    4. She Is Out There
    5. Outskirts of Town
    6. When I Left Home
    Buddy Guy
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Divine One (Pure Pleasure) The Divine One (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
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    The Divine One (Pure Pleasure)

    Recorded just after Sarah Vaughan joined the Roulette label in 1960, The Divine One found her in exactly the right circumstances to suit her excellent talents. Arranged by Jimmy Jones, who also sits in on piano, the setting was a small group that included one strong voice to accentuate hers -- and no less a strong and clear voice than trumpeter Harry Sweets Edison (the perfect accompaniment for Vaughan). The Divine One is mostly a ballads collection, and it includes a few songs that were new to her repertoire -- good choices like Have You Met Miss Jones? (aka Old Jones), When Your Lover Has Gone, Wrap Your Troubles In Dreams, and Jump for Joy. One great left-field choice is Ain't No Use, the R&B song taken as a slow torch song that Big Maybelle had first recorded (Nina Simone didn't record it until several years later). Roulette would soon push Vaughan in many different directions -- releasing over a dozen LPs in just a few short years -- but this small-group date is a gem.




    Recording: October 1960

    Production: Jimmy Jones



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    1. Have You Met Miss Jones?
    2. Ain't No Use
    3. Everytime I See You
    4. You Stepped Out Of A Dream
    5. Gloomy Sunday
    6. What Do You See In Her
    7. Jump For Joy
    8. When Your Lover Has Gone
    9. I'm Gonna Laugh You Out Of My Life
    10. Wrap Your Troubles In Dreams
    11. Somebody Else's Dream
    12. Trouble Is A Man
    Sarah Vaughan
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • At Carnegie Hall (Pure Pleasure) At Carnegie Hall (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
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    At Carnegie Hall (Pure Pleasure)

    When Paul Robeson took the stage at Carnegie Hall in May of 1958, it had been 11 years since he had previously concertized freely in the United States. Blacklisted from the entertainment industry at home, and with the State Department unwilling to issue him a passport, he had fallen into eclipse as a singer and actor over the previous eight years. The concert recorded here, one of two at Carnegie Hall in May of 1958, marked his return. The performances on this record would also be his only stereo recordings -- all were, naturally enough, the work of Vanguard Records, the New York-based record company that was also the home to fellow blacklistees The Weavers.


    The singing legend is in excellent voice throughout, his rich bass-baritone reveling in performances of a repertory that encompassed Bach, Mussorgsky, Schubert, Dvorák, Beethoven, traditional gospel, Russian and Chinese folk songs, Old Man River from Show Boat, and monologues from Shakespeare and the opera Boris Godunov. With a piano accompaniment by Alan Booth, Robeson ranged across a huge part of his own performing history. The 60-year-old singer, despite the decade of artificially imposed inactivity, still had much of his vocal power intact and all his dramatic instincts, and makes every moment count in his performance, investing immense power in every note and nuance.


    Sadly, his Vanguard performances were to be his only work captured on modern recording equipment -- because of the blacklist, everything else predated the arrival of recording tape and the long-playing record. But the performance captured here, and those represented on Vanguard's The Essential Paul Robeson, show a man still capable of moving huge numbers of people with his voice -- and equally important, even at this late date, who had not lost the ability to walk a crowd through a vast and difficult range of repertory; his performances, even after ten years of professional exile, were also learning experiences, and consciousness-raising, which is why reactionaries in the United States were so afraid of him in the first place. And none of it has lost any of its power in the five decades since the actual event.


    Musicians:



    • Paul Robeson (vocals)

    • Alan Booth (piano)




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. Every Time I Feel the Spirit
    2. Balm In Gilead
    3. Volga Boat Song
    4. Monologue From Othello (Shakespeare)
    5. O Thou Silent Night (Alexadnrov)
    6. Chinese Children's Song
    7. My Curly Headed Baby (G.H. Clutsam)
    8. Old Man River
    9. Going Home (Dvorak, arr. Fisher)
    10. Monologue from Boris Godunov (Mussorgsky)
    11. The Orphan (Mussorgsky)
    12. Christ lag in Todesbanden (J.S. Bach)
    13. Didn't My Lord Deliver Daniel
    14. Lullaby (Franz Schubert)
    15. O No John
    16. Joe Hill
    17. Jacob's Ladder
    Paul Robeson
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Newport Uproar (Pure Pleasure) Newport Uproar (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
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    x

    Newport Uproar (Pure Pleasure)

    The 1967 Newport Jazz Festival, fourteenth in a world-famous series, was inexplicably the first at which Lionel Hampton had ever appeared. Better late than never, the great vibist and bandleader came, played and conquered. As the crowd roars ecstatically at the end of this record, the awed but happy voice of producer George Wein is heard: »This hasn't happened since Duke « he begins, casting back in his mind to 1956 and the nearest comparable triumph.



    There is nothing quite so effective as a big band at an outdoor jazz festival. So the 1967 Newport programme included those of Count Basie, Buddy Rich, Woody Herman, Don Ellis and Lionel Hampton. Lionel knew the competition he had to face, and knew that in the festival's climatic spot - the last act on the last night - his performance would be compared with those of all the others. He prepared accordingly.
    Members of his Inner Circle, the octet with which he normally works, would provide the nucleus for an orchestra largely composed of alumni from his earlier bands. When the call went out to the Old Guard, the response was magnificent, as a glance at the personnel will show. Top names in the profession came back to join him, to form one of the great all-star bands of all time. A two week engagement at The Metropole in New York, immediately before the festival, served as a prolonged dress rehearsal, where the ensembles were polished and new arrangements familiarized. Enthusiasm mounted night by night in the Seventh Avenue club, among musicians and public alike, until Newport and the evening of 3rd July were reached. Then, as you will hear, the spirit was willing and the flesh far, far from weak.



    All these preparations ensured a good performance, but the spark, the magic necessary to make it a great one, had to come from the leader. Everybody knows that he is a kind of rhythmic dynamo-driving, full of energy, unsparing of himself. His commitment and conviction communicate rapidly with any audience, so that it is soon won over to his side. Yet in the long, ninety minute program, errors in pacing would have been easy, forgivable, but extremely damaging. A climax reached too soon would have led to anti-climax, and a flat feeling as the crowd left the ground. As it was, Lionel's long professional experience served him superbly, so that his program rose steadily and inexorably to the all-out, emotional frenzy of Flying Home. Like a good general, he never lost his grasp on the situation. He inspired his men by personal example on the vibes, reinforced the beat on a second set of drums, and finally brought up the reserves - Alan Dawson, Milt Buckner and Illinois Jacquet - at just the right time, and in the right spot, to secure an unforgettable triumph and a tumultuous ovation.



    Musicians:



    • Lionel Hampton (vibraphone, piano, drums)

    • Illinois Jacquet (tenor saxophone)

    • Snooky Young, Wallace Davenport (trumpet)

    • Al Grey, Benny Powell (trombone)

    • Jerome Richardson, George Dorsey, Ed Pazant (reeds)

    • John Spruill, Milt Buckne (piano)

    • Billy Mackel (guitar)

    • George Duvivier (bass)

    • Steve Little (drums)



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    1. Turn Me Loose
    2. Thai Silk
    3. Tempo's Birthday
    4. Greasy Greens
    5. Greasy Greens (Encore)
    6. Meety Benny Baily
    7. Medley:
    Hey! Ba-Ba-Re-Bop/Hamp's Boogie Woogie
    8. Misunderstood Blues
    9. Flying Home
    Lionel Hampton
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Sweet Sister Funk (Pure Pleasure) Sweet Sister Funk (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
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    x

    Sweet Sister Funk (Pure Pleasure)

    From the mid to late 60's the producer Sonny Lester was at the helm of some of the period's most significant jazz music (Thad Jones-Mel Lewis Orchestra, Chick Corea, Duke Ellington's 70th birthday concert) and also some of the genre's biggest hits (mostly from organist Jimmy Mcgriff). With the folding of the Solid State label in 1971 Sonny Lester formed the aptly named Groove Merchant label (named after the tune Jerome Richardson wrote for the Jones-Lewis Orchestra). He then produced some of the periods most notable soul/jazz, jazz/fusion from the likes of McGriff, Richard Groove Holmes, Reuben Wilson, Lonnie Smith to name but a few.



    This gem of an album from Ramon Morris, and one of the hardest to find on Groove Merchant, was recorded during what many people would consider to be the classic period for this particular brand of jazz/funk/soul/fusion. It was recorded not long after he'd spent time with Art Blakey as a Jazz Messenger appearing on his 1972 Prestige album Child's Dance along with Stanley Clarke and Woody Shaw. He then also recorded on the Woody Shaw album, also from 1972, Song Of Songs.



    He now teaches at Carnegie-Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pa.



    Musicians:



    • Ramon Morris (tenor saxophone)

    • Albert Dailey (electric piano)

    • Mickey Bass (bass)

    • Mickey Roker (drums)

    • Cecil Bridgewater (trumpet)

    • Lloyd Davis (guitar)

    • Tony Waters (conga)




    Recording: 1972

    Production: Sonny Lester



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. First Come, First Serve
    2. Wijinia
    3. Sweet Sister Funk

    4. Sweat
    5. Don't Ask Me
    6. Lord Sideways
    7. People Make the World Go Round
    Ramon Morris
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • In New York (Pure Pleasure) In New York (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
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    In New York (Pure Pleasure)

    Lightnin' Hopkins was one of the most over-recorded artists in the blues genre. The recordings here were made at a pivotal moment in his career. In 1960, at 48 years old, he was no longer a star in the black community, but was becoming a folk legend. His deeply personal music not only reflected the experiences of his community but touched a universal nerve. Chris Strachwitz, who often recorded Hopkins, has called his records »brief audio snapshots of one of the great folk poets to emerge from the African-American experience in Texas.« When he died in 1982 he had recorded well over 600 'audio snapshots'. From his prolific output this Candid session ranks amongst his finest and most intimate work.




    Musicians:



    • Lightnin' Hopkins (vocal, guitar, piano)




    Recording: November 1960 at Nola Penthouse Studios, New York City, by Bob d'Orleans

    Production: Nat Hentoff




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Take It Easy
    2. Mighty Crazy
    3. Your Own Fault, Baby, To Treat Me The Way You Do
    4. Ive Had My Fun If I Dont Get Well No More
    5. The Trouble Blues
    6. Lightnins Piano Boogie

    7. Wonder Why
    8. Mister Charlie

    9. Black Cat
    Lightin' Hopkins
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Groovin' With Jug (Pure Pleasure) Groovin' With Jug (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
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    x

    Groovin' With Jug (Pure Pleasure)

    Ironically, Gene 'Jug' Ammons tended to be critical of organists; he was quoted as saying that »organ players don't know any changes.« However, as critical the Chicago tenor saxman might have been of organists - most of them, anyway - he did some of his best work in their presence. When Ammons united with Jack McDuff, Johnny 'Hammond' Smith and other B-3 masters in the '60s, the sparks would fly. They certainly fly on this excellent album, which finds Ammons and Richard 'Groove' Holmes co-leading a soul-jazz/hard bop organ combo that also includes guitarist Gene Edwards and drummer Leroy Henderson. The quartet is heard in two settings on August 15, 1961 - three of the eight selections were produced by Richard Bock in a Los Angeles studio in the afternoon, while the other three were recorded several hours later an L.A. club called the Black Orchid. Ammons and Holmes prove to be a strong combination in both settings, although their playing is somewhat looser at the Orchid, where the delights include some slow blues, a smokey ballad (Willow Weep for Me) and a lightning-fast barnburner. However critical Ammons might have been of most organists, it's obvious that he and Holmes share a lot of common ground on Groovin' With Jug.



    Musicians:



    • Richard "Groove" Holmes (organ)

    • Gene Ammons (tenor saxophone)

    • Gene Edwards (guitar)

    • Leroy Henderson (drums)




    Recording: August 1961 at The Black Orchid and Pacific Jazz Studios

    Production: Richard Bock




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Good Vibrations
    2. Willow Weep For Me
    3. Juggin Around Side
    4. Groovin With Jug
    5. Morris The Minor
    6. Hey You, Whats That?
    Richard Groove Holmes
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • I Can't Stand The Rain (Pure Pleasure) I Can't Stand The Rain (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    I Can't Stand The Rain (Pure Pleasure)

    This wonderful album, originally released in 1974 on the Memphis-based Hi Records label, deserved a wider audience than it ended up getting at the time. It played to Ann Peebles' great strength, her poised and sultry voice, and surrounded by the sparse, easy funkiness of the trademark Hi rhythm section and producer Willie Mitchell's perfect use of horns and strings, she sings like a resilient but disappointed angel on this impressive set of songs about the darker side of love. Her best song is here, the eccentric but brilliant I Can't Stand the Rain, along with a marvelous version of Joe Simon's (You Keep Me) Hangin' On, and perfect readings of a pair of Earl Randle songs, If We Can't Trust Each Other and I'm Gonna Tear Your Playhouse Down. Peebles sings her heart out, and with those somehow bright-sounding Hi grooves behind her, it all comes together to make a classic album of dark, bouncy, and beautiful Southern soul.



    Musicians:



    • Ann Peebles (vocal)

    • James Mitchell (bassoon)

    • Jack Hale (trombone)

    • Charles Hodges (keyboards)

    • Archie Turner (piano)

    • Leroy Hodges (bass)

    • Howard Grimes (drums)

    • Memphis Sanctified Singers (horn section)



    Recording: 1973 at Royal Recording Studios, South Lauderdale, Memphis, Tennessee

    Production: Willie Mitchell





    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    1. I Can't Stand The Rain
    2. Do I Need You?
    3. Until You Came Into My Life
    4. (You Keep Me) Hangin' On
    5. Run, Run, Run
    6. If We Can't Trust Each Other
    7. A Love Vibration
    8. You Got To Feed The Fire
    9. I'm Gonna Tear Your Playhouse Down
    10. One Way Street
    Ann Peebles
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Any Day Now (Pure Pleasure) Any Day Now (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $49.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Any Day Now (Pure Pleasure)

    The material - many of the Dylan classics - is unsurpassable. Her voice is at its zenith, young, supple - neither undisciplined (as in her 1st records) nor the later, low vibrato warble. There is none of the self-conscious and silly Dylan vocal imitation found in Baez's later recording. Where Dylan's own singing is wonderfully raw and rough, Baez is clear and pure. Both are great for me, but very, very different from each other. These lovely renditions are like no one else's. Just pure Joan in her finest voice.



    She is backed here by several of the very best of '70s Nashville session musicians (pickers). Some folks think of Nashville sidemen as inevitably bound up with Country Music. While this is not counter-country, it fits much more into folk - as the names Dylan and Baez rightly connote.



    One Too Many Mornings is too often overlooked among Dylan's compositions, and this is among the best renditions I've heard. The full-length, unhurried treatment Sad Eyed Lady of the Lowland is spell-binding and satisfying. Perhaps my favorite, though, is the subtle and poignant Spanish Boots of Spanish Leather. Dylan's lyrical genius is fully manifest, in his gorgeous melody and Joan Baez's a wonderful performance.
    For many of us who listened both then and recently, this pristine work inevitably reminds us how much has aged in the decades since this earlier era - also recaptured so vividly in Dylan's own Chronicles. These are timely works, both for reminiscence and to introduce newbies to the non-acid experiences that stirred an earlier generation. But regardless of any social import, this is simply beautiful poetry and music.



    Musicians:



    • Joan Baez (guitar, vocal)

    • Fred Carter (mandolin)

    • Hargus 'Pig' Robbins (keyboards)

    • Stephen Stills, Pete Drake, Harold Rugg (guitar)

    • Tommy Jackson, Johnny Gimble (violin)




    Recording: 1968 by Selby Cofeen

    Production: Maynard Solomon



    Format: 2LPs 33rpm / gatefold sleeve



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. Love Minus Zero/No Limit
    2. North Country Blues
    3. You Ain't Going Nowhere
    4. Drifter's Escape
    5. I Pity the Poor Immigrant

    6. Tears of Rage
    7. Sad-Eyed Lady of the Lowlands
    8. Love Is Just a Four-Letter Word
    9. I Dreamed I Saw St. Augustine

    10. The Walls of Redwing
    11. Dear Landlord
    12. One Too Many Mornings
    13. I Shall Be Released
    14. Boots of Spanish Leather
    15. Walkin' Down the Line

    16. Restless Farewell
    Joan Baez
    $49.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • The Natch'l Blues (Pure Pleasure) The Natch'l Blues (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    The Natch'l Blues (Pure Pleasure)

    Taj Mahal's second album, recorded in the spring and fall of 1968, opens with more stripped-down Delta-style blues in the manner of his debut, but adds a little more amplification (partly courtesy of Al Kooper on organ) before moving into wholly bigger sound on numbers like She Caught The Katy And Left Me A Mule To Ride and The Cuckoo -- the latter, in particular, features crunchy electric and acoustic guitars and Gary Gilmore playing his bass almost like a lead instrument, like a bluesman's answer to John Entwistle. Most notable, however, may be the two original closing numbers, You Don't Miss Your Water ('Til Your Well Runs Dry) and Ain't That A Lot Of Love, which offer Taj Mahal working in the realm of soul and treading onto Otis Redding territory. This is particularly notable on You Don't Miss Your Water, which achieves the intensity of a gospel performance and comes complete with a Stax/Volt-style horn arrangement by Jesse Ed Davis that sounds more like the real thing than the real thing. Ain't That a Lot of Love, by contrast, is driven by a hard electric guitar sound and a relentless bass part that sounds like a more urgent version of the bassline from the Spencer Davis Group's Gimme Some Lovin'. This LP reissue includes a trio of bonus tracks: a faster-paced rendition of The Cuckoo with a more prominent lead guitar, the slow electric lament New Stranger Blues featuring some good mandolin-style playing on the guitar, and the rocking instrumental Things Are Gonna Work Out Fine, which is a killer showcase for Davis' lead electric guitar and Taj Mahal's virtuosity on the harmonica.




    Musicians:



    • Taj Mahal (harmonica, guitar)

    • Jesse Edwin (guitar, piano, arranger)

    • Al Kooper (organ, piano)

    • Gary Gilmore (bass)

    • Chuck Blackwell, Earl Palmer (drums)




    Recording: May & October 1968

    Production: David Rubinson




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Good Morning Miss Brown Corinna
    2. I Ain't Gonna Let Nobody Steal My Jellyroll
    3. Going Up To The Country, Paint My Mailbox Blue
    4. Done Changed My Way Of Living
    5. The Cuckoo (alternative version)
    6. She Caught The Katy And Left Me A Mule To Ride
    7. The Cuckoo
    8. You Don't Miss Your Water ('Til Your Well Runs Dry)
    9. A Lot Of Love
    10. New Stranger Blues
    11. Things Are Gonna Work Out Fine
    Taj Mahal
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Three Loves Have I (Pure Pleasure) Three Loves Have I (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Three Loves Have I (Pure Pleasure)

    A native of San Juan, Puerto Rico, Tito Rodriguez came to New York City in 1939 to sing with his brother's band. He learned to play a variety of instruments before succeeding as a vocalist with Enric Madriguera, Xavier Cugat, Noro Morales, and JosÉ Curbelo. In 1947 he started his first band with RenÉ Hernández, Cachao Lopez, and Victor Paz.


    Several of the great Latin-American singers went on to form their own aggregations, but Rodriguez was the most successful. One reason is the music, which has the hip drive of Tito Puente (whom he copied during the Palladium battles of the 'two Titos') and the Palmieri brothers. Eddie Palmieri and company perform on some of his best albums. In fact, he and Puente, 'the two Titos' headlining at New York City's famous Palladium, were rivals for the title of Mambo King until Perez Prado took it.


    While Tito Rodriguez played mambo on a par with the others, it was his voice that set him apart. Whether it's mambo, Latin twist, or sentimental ballads, Rodriguez rarely strayed far from authentic or progressive Latin. Indeed, no other performer epitomizes the Latin showman as well as he: top vocal stylist, versatile musician, sophisticated arranger-composer, handsome bandleader, leader of the New York Latin scene. Tito Rodriguez' music is quintessential.


    Given the popularity of all three rhythms listed in the title, it's no surprise that Tito would think of them as his 'loves' - especially since they'd all helped spur on new energy in Latin music! But over and above the rhythms, the album itself is one of Tito's greatest from the 50s - spare, lean, and with a style that's both lively and jazzy - never dipping into some of the too-heavy modes that Tito succumbed to in later years. Tracks are all short, with lots of horn work on top of the percussion.



    Musicians:



    • Tito Rodriguez (vocals, percussion) & band



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    1. Sweetness Of You
    2. Yambere
    3. Asi ....Asi

    4. My Tobi's Blues

    5. A Llegado El Guaguanco
    6. This Is Mambo
    7. Violets And Violins
    8. Barito
    9. Baranga
    10. Cha-Cha-Cha Para Ti
    11. Sabroso Mambo
    12. Guaguanco Bonito
    Tito Rodriguez
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Texas Flood (Pure Pleasure) Texas Flood (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $44.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Texas Flood (Pure Pleasure)

    It's hard to overestimate the impact Stevie Ray Vaughan's debut, Texas Flood, had upon its release in 1983. At that point, blues was no longer hip, the way it was in the '60s. Texas Flood changed all that, climbing into the Top 40 and spending over half a year on the charts, which was practically unheard of for a blues recording. Vaughan became a genuine star and, in doing so, sparked a revitalization of the blues. This was a monumental impact, but his critics claimed that, no matter how prodigious Vaughan's instrumental talents were, he didn't forge a distinctive voice; instead, he wore his influences on his sleeve, whether it was Albert King's pinched yet muscular soloing or Larry Davis' emotive singing. There's a certain element of truth in that, but that was sort of the point of Texas Flood. Vaughan didn't hide his influences; he celebrated them, pumping fresh blood into a familiar genre.



    When Vaughan and Double Trouble cut the album over the course of three days in 1982, he had already played his set lists countless times; he knew how to turn this material inside out or goose it up for maximum impact. The album is paced like a club show, kicking off with Vaughan's two best self-penned songs, Love Struck Baby and Pride and Joy, then settling into a pair of covers, the slow-burning title track and an exciting reading of Howlin' Wolf's Tell Me, before building to the climax of Dirty Pool and I'm Crying. Vaughan caps the entire thing with Lenny, a lyrical, jazzy tribute to his wife.




    Musicians:



    • Texas Flood - Stevie Ray Vaughan (g, voc)

    • Tommy Shannon (b)

    • Chris "Whipper" Layton (dr)




    Recording: November 1982 at Down Town Studios, Los Angeles, and Riverside Sound, Austin (Texas) by Richard Mullen / September 1983 at The Palace, Hollywood, California

    Production: Stevie Ray Vaughan, Richard Mullen & Double Troubledeutsch



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Love Struck Baby
    2. Pride And Joy
    3. Texas Flood
    4. Tell Me
    5. Testify
    6. Rude Mood
    7. Mary Had A Little Lamb
    8. Dirty Pool
    9. Im Cryin
    10. Lenny


    Bonus Tracks:
    11. SRV Speaks
    12. Tin Pan Alley (AKA Roughest Place In Town)
    13. Testify (live)
    14. Mary Had A Little Lamb (live)
    15. Wham! (live)

    Stevie Ray Vaughan
    $44.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • American Folk Blues Festival 1964 (Pure Pleasure) American Folk Blues Festival 1964 (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    American Folk Blues Festival 1964 (Pure Pleasure)

    German jazz publicist Joachim-Ernst Berendt first had the idea of bringing original African-American blues performers to Europe. Jazz had become very popular, and rock and roll was just gaining a foothold, and both genres drew influences directly back to the blues. Berendt thought that European audiences would flock to concert halls to see them in person.



    Promoters Horst Lippmann and Fritz Rau brought this idea to reality. By contacting Willie Dixon, an influential blues composer and bassist from Chicago, they were given access to the blues culture of the southern United States. The first festival was held in 1962, and they continued almost annually until 1972, after an eight-year hiatus reviving the festival in 1980 until its final performance in 1985.
    The concerts featured some of the leading blues artists of the 1960s, such as Muddy Waters, Howlin' Wolf, Willie Dixon, John Lee Hooker and Sonny Boy Williamson along with blues legends from an earlier period such as Sleepy John Estes, John Henry Barbee & Lightnin' Hopkins.



    Attendees at Manchester in 1962, the first ever venue for the festival in Britain, included Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Brian Jones and Jimmy Page. Subsequent attendees at the first London festivals are believed to have also included such influential musicians as Eric Burdon, Eric Clapton, and Steve Winwood. Collectively these were the primary movers in the blues explosion that would lead to the British Invasion.



    Musicians:



    • Sonny Boy Williamson (vocal, harpsichord)

    • Hubert Sumlin (guitar)

    • Willie Dixon (bass)

    • Clifton James (drums)

    • Sunnyland Slim (vocal, piano)

    • Sam Lightnin' Hopkins, Howlin' Wolf (guitar, vocal)

    • Hammie Nixon (harpsichord, jug)




    Recording: October 1964 live at Musikhalle Hamburg, Germany, by Peter Kramper

    Production: Siegfried E. Loch



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    1. I'm Trying To Make London My Home
    2. Dissatisfied
    3. Everytime I Get To Drinkin'
    4. Ain't It A Pity
    5. Baby Please Don't Go
    6. I'm A Tearing Little Daddy
    7. Cotton Pickin' Blues
    8. No Title Boogie
    9. Slip In Mules
    10. Dust My Broom
    Various Artists
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Regeneration (Pure Pleasure) Regeneration (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Regeneration (Pure Pleasure)

    Around the time of this recording, Stanley Cowell had achieved a degree of prominence as the pianist for the advanced bop quartet Music Inc., which he co-led with trumpeter Charles Tolliver, as well as for unusual projects like his Piano Choir. With Regeneration he chose another path, essentially trying to produce a jazz-infused pop album with strong African roots, perhaps owing a little bit to Stevie Wonder. He assembled an extremely strong cast of musicians for the venture, including Marion Brown, Billy Higgins, and Ed Blackwell, as well as several African string and percussion masters and, by and large, succeeded conceptually if not commercially.


    A few songs use vocals in a fairly standard pop framework, and, while they are performed capably enough, the lyrical content leaves something to be desired in typical mid-'70s fashion. But much of the rest of the music makes up for this with, among other things, a delightful fife and drum piece by Brown and strong bass work by Bill Lee (Spike's dad). Regeneration is an interesting, often enjoyable album which, aside from its own small pleasures, provides a snapshot of some of the cross-fertilization in genres occurring at the time. - Brian Olewnick


    Musicians:


    • Jimmy Heath (soprano saxophone)
    • Stanley Cowell (piano, synthesizer)
    • Jerry Venable (guitar)
    • Aleke Kanonu, Shimmy Shewabble (drums,bass)
    • Bill Lee, Charles Fowlkes (bass)
    • Psyche Wanzandae (flute, harmonica)
    • Billy Higgins (drums)
    • Stanley Cowell (kora)
    • Ed Blackwell, Nadi Quamar (percussion, harp)



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    1. Trying To Find A Way
    2. The Gembhre
    3. Shimmy Shewobble
    4. Parlour Blues
    5. Thank You My People
    6. Travelin' Man
    7. Lullabye
    Stanley Cowell
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
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