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  • Out On The Floor Out On The Floor Quick View

    $25.99
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    Out On The Floor

    Import


    Out On The Floor collects the best material from the Rationals' mid-60s garage/soul heyday, including such signature tunes as Leavin' Here, Temptation's Bout To Get Me and their big regional hit, I Need You. Mostly recorded at sessions in 1967 and 1968, when the Michigan quartet was at the top of its game, the contents of Out On The Floor have remained unreleased or un-reissued for years until now.

    1. Leavin Here (Version 1)
    2. I Gotta Go Now (Out On The Floor)
    3. Said I Wasnt Gonna Tell Nobody
    4. Turn On
    5. Knock On Wood
    6. Poor Dog (Who Cant Wag His Own Tail)
    7. I Need You
    8. Listen To Me
    9. Temptations Bout To Get Me
    10. You Got It Made
    11. Sunset
    12. Ha Ha Song
    The Rationals
    $25.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Echobox Traveler T1 Earphones 4 COLORS AVAILABLE Echobox Traveler T1 Earphones Quick View

    $99.00
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    Echobox Traveler T1 Earphones

    Have a question about this product? Please email our audio advisor or call 1-877-929-8729 with any questions or concerns regarding your equipment purchase.


    Professional Sound for way less.


    Using the highest quality materials and cutting edge engineering, the Traveler represents the perfect balance of powerful, authentic sound, and durability to withstand the wear and tear of rugged daily use.


    • German-made PEEK dynamic drivers
    • Modern design and variety of colors
    • Solid Titanium Housings
    • Enhanced noise isolation

    Audiophile Sound


    By tapping in to our unique German made PEEK diaphragms, the Traveler is designed to fully immerse you in a beautiful and powerful sonic experience. Deep, accurate bass and detailed, layered clarity on the mids and highs come together to present an uncompromising earphone worlds beyond its competition.


    Love Color


    Pablo Picasso once said that colors follow the changes of the emotions, and we agree. Featuring a variety of subtle, modern colors, find the right color to match your unique style.


    Titanium Housings


    Titanium has double the strength-to-weight ration of steel, rendering the Traveler's tiny housings virtually indestructible, yet impossibly light and comfortable.


    Serious Noise Isolation


    We get it, it's a loud world out there. It is for this very reason that we have partnered with the Minnesota based company Comply to offer a pair of medium T-400 Isolation Series memory foam tips standard with every Traveler. As you probably guessed, the Isolation Series are all about noise isolation. Using some serious technology, Comply tips use thermal reactive memory foam that works with your body's natural heat to seal the ear canal perfectly. Hear more of what you want to hear, not what you don't, and listen longer with a comfort normally reserved only for custom molded earphones.


    Echobox Audio
    $99.00
    Earphones - Apple or Android (4 Colors Available)
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  • Optica Optica Quick View

    $18.99
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    Optica

    Shout Out Louds took their time with these songs, recording for about 1.5 years in a small Stockholm studio and producing themselves for the first time with help from Johannes Berglund. A theme emerged and Optica was born, an album celebrating color and light from a band confident in its sound.


    Shout Out Louds comment: "In our eagerness to please no one but ourselves this time around, we decided to take on the challenge of producing our own music for the first time ever. Our close friend and sound aficionado of choice Johannes Berglund and his studio in Stockholm presented us with an ideal package for the endeavor. A secluded work space close to home, but off the earth's surface, a more than generous timeline, and the patient and brilliant sixth member we needed to get through the whole thing safely. Together we made up a downstairs world of explosive colors, big, warm sounds and a very, very uninhibited work process. We never worried about following a clear path, trusting that the conscious decision not to worry would be enough to lead us right, and that right doesn't necessarily have to mean rational or even reasonable We all set prestige and skillfulness aside in favor of experimentation and sheer gusto. That will probably come across live too. I don't think we've ever been this excited to take an album on tour."

    1. Sugar
    2. Illusions
    3. Blue Ice
    4. 14th of July
    5. Burn
    6. Walking in Your Footsteps
    7. Glasgow
    8. Where You Come In
    9. Hemila
    10. Chasing the Sinking Sun
    11. Circles
    12. Destroy
    Shout Out Louds
    $18.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Feed The Machine Feed The Machine Quick View

    $21.99
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    Feed The Machine

    Pressed On Black & Red Marble Colored Vinyl


    Diamond-certified, global award-winning rock band, Nickelback, are set to release their ninth studio album 'Feed the Machine' on vinyl via BMG. Recorded in Vancouver and produced by Nickelback and Chris Baseford, the new album features singles "Feed the Machine," "Must Be Nice," and "Song On Fire."


    "Feed the Machine is about thinking for yourself and not taking the phrase "believe me" at face value," said Nickelback guitarist, Ryan Peake.


    This album showcases a more aggressive and urgent sound from the band. With the title track and lead single, "Feed the Machine", Nickelback explores the struggle for people to think for themselves on a variety of levels within this tumultuous digital-fueled era. Introspective and timely, the track offers a pulsating slice of the Nickelback aural experience. With that gauntlet thrown, the second track off the album demands the listener throw a "Coin for the Ferryman" on a road trip that promises, "we can make it but we take the chance of never going back home," while the single "Must Be Nice" provides listeners with 100 miles an hour in your face rock-n-roll. The album does not shy away from also touching upon matters of the heart. On "Song On Fire", the band talks about the need to love or be loved, your heart yearning for something that your rational mind knows is impossible to hold onto.

    1. Feed The Machine
    2. Coin For The Ferryman
    3. Song On Fire
    4. Must Be Nice
    5. After The Rain
    6. For The River
    7. Home
    8. The Betrayal (Act III)
    9. Silent Majority
    10. Every Time We're Together
    11. The Betrayal (Act I)
    Nickelback
    $21.99
    Colored Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • What A Time To Be Alive What A Time To Be Alive Quick View

    $17.99
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    What A Time To Be Alive

    After the shocking, and for many, demoralizing result of the 2016 election,
    "I didn't buy the silver lining some were promoting that 'well, at least art and music will
    be great now!'," says Superchunk co-founder and frontman Mac McCaughan.
    "Obviously, any sane person would gladly trade four to eight years of terrible music for not
    having our country dismantled to satisfy the whims of a vengeful child and his enablers."


    That said, good music and art still have a lot to say, and the urgency of
    current events gave Mac, Laura, Jim, and Jon the momentum to make
    something new sooner than later. "It would be strange to be in a band, at least our
    band, and make a record that completely ignored the surrounding circumstances that we
    live in and that our kids are going to grow up in." Enter What a Time to Be Alive,
    recorded and mixed by Beau Sorenson. It's a record, says Mac, "about a pretty
    dire and depressing situation but hopefully not a record that is dire and depressing to listen
    to."


    Indeed, like so much of Superchunk's music in the band's nearly three
    decades together, the songs on What a Time to Be Alive meet rage and anxiety
    head-on with the catharsis and exhilaration of loud punk fire and vulnerable
    pop energy. Like 2013's I Hate Music, which focused on death, loss, and the
    role of music in an aging life, the new record brings spirit to the frontlines of
    pain-it's as defiant as it is despairing, as much a call to arms as a throwing up
    of hands.


    The record features more guest backing vocalists than any previous
    Superchunk album, including Sabrina Ellis (A Giant Dog, Sweet Spirit), Katie
    Crutchfield (Waxahatchee), Stephin Merritt (The Magnetic Fields), Skylar
    Gudasz, and David Bazan. "Part of that was wanting a feeling of community," says
    Mac. "I think that's important to not be completely bummed out about everything all the
    time."


    Despite the album's driving force, it would be a mistake to call the album
    political, which suggests it has anything to do with parties, policy, or anything
    that can be broken down into a rational difference of opinion. "We're not trying
    to offer policy solutions in the confines of a three-minute song," says Mac. "It's about 'how
    do you live / not go crazy' in the current climate when it seems like every day there's a new
    outrage being perpetrated."

    1. What a Time to Be Alive
    2. Lost My Brain
    3. Break the Glass
    4. Bad Choices
    5. Dead Photographers
    6. Erasure
    7. I Got Cut
    8. Reagan Youth
    9. Cloud of Hate
    10. All for You
    1. Black Thread
    Superchunk
    $17.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Come My Fanatics Come My Fanatics Quick View

    $37.99
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    Come My Fanatics

    Import


    What a difference two years can make ... Between their self-titled debut and this follow-up, Electric Wizard beefed up and distorted their sound and polished their song-writing and the result has taken them light years beyond what the first album achieved. For this reason alone, anyone interested in the band's history and how a young group can progress in leaps and bounds, these two albums are worth seeking out and hearing. The most obvious improvement in the band's style is the overall sound: thick and grimy textures in slower-than-slow guitar chords and riffs, accompanied by basic drum rhythms and a washed-out wailing vocal singing lyrics of despair at the present world and conjuring avenues of escape from the social and political oppression in our society.


    We dive straight into the deep end with Return Trip, a crusty doom sludge song if ever there was one, with black grime peeling off riffs to expose a raw layer that quickly changes to hard and dark and bleeds off in turn. The song sticks to the straight and narrow: even an extended instrumental passage doesn't attract a wiggly guitar solo, and it's only towards the end the song acquires layers of melody and riffing to suggest the vocalist's increasing mental derangement. Jus Oborn's singing isn't great - it's more like chanting or shouting sometimes - but his voice has a rough, anguished edge suited to the lyrical content. Real life is cold, hard, tyrannical, unjust and abusive and for many people the only way to stay sane is to escape into one's own world through the portal of hallucinogenic drugs. Wizard in Black and Doom-Mantia take up where Return Trip leaves off: these are epic tracks that extend the sludge / stoner doom trip out further into the realms of psychedelia, the latter track featuring treated vocals and multi-tracked voices (or so they sound).


    Ivixor B / Phase Inducer is a wonderfully trippy mindfuck of a piece featuring a seemingly endless loop of female chanting with bubbly guitar effects and lazy bass rhythm followed by an abstract spacey tone piece that probably fell from an old pre-Autobahn Kraftwerk album and needed a home, so why not here. The atmosphere is spooky without appearing sinister. The two separate passages of the track are combined in a way that suggests a breakdown in a spaceship's communications with Earth while the astronauts are overcome by strange cosmic forces that can't be understood by rational people. Very original and quite ingenious!


    The remaining tracks on the album suffer for being footnotes to the instrumental track and the strong first half of the album. Son of Nothing is hardcore melodic rock with metal trimmings in style and its post-apocalyptic / sci-fi lyrics embody both hope and fear as the remnants of humanity flee a scorched Earth to find a new home. Solarian 13 brings up the rear with a mix of gently buoyant and seesawing grime-thickened guitar rhythms around which trippy ambient effects swirl and tease.


    The album draws its strength from a more streamlined musical approach in which music serves to enhance each song and its subject rather than fill out empty spaces with frills or show off individual musicians' dexterity and master of their instruments; and also from powerful lyrical themes of alienation, global destruction and flight to new worlds whether internally in one's head as a form of escape or externally for survival. Fantasy, the apocalypse and its aftermath, and science fiction elements of space travel through drugs and spaceships, and human migration to new worlds combine with doom, stoner and sludge metal to generate an original piece of work in Come My Fanatics .... It's on this album that EW find their calling.


    - NausikaDalazBlindaz (The Metal Archives)

    1. Return Trip
    2. Wizard in Black
    3. Doom-Mantia
    4. Ivixor B / Phase Inducer
    5. Son of Nothing
    6. Solarian 13
    7. Demon Lung
    10. Return to the Son of Nothingness
    Electric Wizard
    $37.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • What A Way To Die What A Way To Die Quick View

    $24.99
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    What A Way To Die

    The archetype for the '60s-era girl group was etched indelibly into stone, like a commandment: three pretty girls with matching outfits and bouffant hairdos would sing, with musical backing supplied by a bunch of guys standing in the shadows. The Quatro sisters shattered that archetype forever with the Pleasure Seekers, an all-girl teenage rock & roll group who played all the instruments themselves and were fully capable of wiping the stage with any male band that crossed their path.


    The Quatro girls had been brought up in a musically-minded family, nurtured with classical piano and vocal lessons. As Patti recalls, "By 1964, I had been taking guitar lessons, hanging with musicians in the local music scene. We had seen a Beatles concert, and I was quite dazed and focused at the event, watching the audience cry and scream out of control. It was my epiphany moment, and I was determined to start an all-girl band."
    Shortly thereafter, the first lineup of the Pleasure Seekers fell into place with Patti Quatro (lead guitar), Marylou Ball (rhythm guitar), Suzi Quatro (bass), Diane Baker (keyboards), Nan Ball (drums) and vocal duties shared by all. Around the fall of 1965 the girls dared local teen club manager Dave Leone to give them a slot at his popular Hideout Club, claiming they were better than most of the other live bands there. "You're on," responded Leone, "in two weeks. Three songs!"


    The Pleasure Seekers were soon a popular feature at the club, honing their skills alongside the likes of the Rationals, the Amboy Dukes and Bob Seger & the Last Heard. "In the beginning, there was a lot of skepticism," remembers Patti, "especially the first night. The boys crowded the stage, the girlfriends pulled them away with laughter, as if 'Girls playing?! Yeah, right!' It was always satisfying to see them be silenced quickly when we began playing. We grew used to seeing slack jaws open in surprise." Next they were asked by Leone to record and release a single on his Hideout label.


    That March 1966 release is now regarded as the greatest "girl garage" single of the era: "Never Thought You'd Leave Me" b/w "What a Way to Die." "Dave brought lyrics, and we put the songs together quickly," remembers Patti. "We felt very legit in making this record at a small local studio. Nan was the sexy voice on 'Never Thought You'd Leave Me,' and there was lots of laughter as Marylou added the screams on 'What a Way to Die.'" Suzi Quatro remembers the recording as "very important and memorable."


    The Pleasure Seekers were soon in demand in the region, playing teen clubs, parties, colleges and local TV shows. After a series of lineup changes, the band brought in older Quatro sister Arlene (keyboards) and Darline Arnone (drums), the first female drummer sponsored by Slingerland Drums. A short time later, Pami Benford joined-up on guitar and bass (that lineup lasting through most of 1968). "It was a very versatile group," remembers Patti, "with Pami and Suzi sharing bass, and Pami and I sharing lead and rhythm guitars."


    "The gender bias was my hot button," recalls Arlene, "along with confidence in our musical abilities. With women musicians dismissed as a novelty, I delighted in watching the audience go from skepticism/ridicule, to shock/cheers." For Suzi, though, this period was where she learned her craft: "I considered myself a musician, and didn't really think about gender too much." Two tracks recorded in 1967, but unissued at the time, "Elevator Express" and "Gotta Get Away," highlight the band's growing musical maturity since their Hideout debut. "Detroit was the best learning ground in the world for musicians," recalls Suzi, "with an amazing energy and creativity that is in every successful artist that has come out of the city." "We were actually one of the earliest Detroit bands traveling the country," adds Patti. "Everyone wanted this unusual all girl band who rocked an entire Motown revue (changing instruments and singers throughout) and an entire Sgt. Pepper/Magical Mystery Tour revue, as well as covering English bands, acid rock and everything in between."


    Signing up with Associated Booking Corporation, the group began making the transition from local to national act. Producer Dick Corby caught the Pleasure Seekers at Trude Heller's in New York's Greenwich Village and signed them to a Mercury Records deal in early 1968. To keep rein on their finances in NYC, Patti recalls, "We booked Arthur's nightclub for a month, staying at the infamous rock Gorham Hotel, recording by day-playing by night." Also in residence were the Who, the Blues Magoos and an assortment of other bands. "Hitting NYC as young teens, it was exciting, scary, fun-all emotions churning," she continues. "We felt we had hit the big time, going from the tiny local Hideout session to the huge Mercury professional studio facility, complete with session people adding strings and other elements."


    A single pairing "Good Kind of Hurt" and "Light of Love" was released in April 1968, while a third song, "Locked in Your Love," remained in the can. The group then headed out to the Northwest for a lengthy tour. "The Northwest tour was awesome," remembers Patti. "We were billed with Canned Heat, Boyce & Hart and Merilee Rush, and were held over six weeks to tour with Eric Burdon and the Animals. The Mercury single was out, momentum was surging." Both sides of the single were getting airplay, but ultimately it failed to gain any traction. "Really neither song reflected our own sound," admits Patti. "We rearranged 'Light of Love' for live performance, feeling disconnected to the record, yet realizing we had to play ball with the executives to keep us rolling."


    Ultimately Mercury's vision for the Pleasure Seekers clashed rather sharply with the band's vision. "The suits wanted tits and ass," recalls Darline, "wowing Vegas crowds, playing tinkly tunes in lavish costumes." "In that male-dominated music era, we were strictly a novelty, and a high-risk endeavor," adds Patti. "The record executives felt women musicians would fall in love or get pregnant so were not worth investing the time and money. We had to kick down many doors. We were serious musicians, and in it for the right reasons. In the end, we were not happy with a forced direction that Mercury Records had in mind, and ended up leaving the label to rock our music in our own fashion."


    After a memorable 1968 Far East tour, playing for wounded returning American soldiers from Vietnam, the Pleasure Seekers (with new drummer Nancy Rogers) returned to a Detroit that was now, in Patti's words, "exploding with heavier sounds. That sparked us to change direction with new ideas we had been exploring. Arlene left the band and we brought in our youngest sister Nancy (vocals). With Suzi's Joplinesque vocals combined with Nancy's wailing 'female Robert Plant' style, we enjoyed a harder edged, 'double-punch' effect."


    The last four songs on the album, "White Pig Blues," "Brain Confusion," "Where Have You Gone?" and the atmospheric psychedelic mover "Mr. Power," all date from this 1968-69 period when the Pleasure Seekers were playing the Grande Ballroom alongside the MC5, Alice Cooper, the Stooges, the Amboy Dukes and SRC. With this change in musical direction and the departure of Arlene and Pami, the band forged on as Cradle. Suzi Quatro departed for England in 1971, launching a successful solo career. Patti and Nancy continued with Cradle until 1973 when Patti joined another pioneering female rock group, Fanny.


    The Pleasure Seekers reunited recently in April 2012 (minus Suzi) for a well-received show in their hometown, where they were inducted into Detroit's Hall of Fame. "I think all of us Quatro girls are extremely proud of our pioneering days" reflects Patti. "In a renaissance-era of music, we kicked down doors for women to rock heavy. There were key times in our lives of making decisions that may have turned us towards larger fame, but less happiness-depending on your philosophy of such things. The Pleasure Seekers could have been a Las Vegas show act bringing in buckets of money or on Motown, turned very formulaic girlie-soul. But we stayed true to our goals, and I don't think any of us have any regrets of staying our course and playing the music that moved us. It's all been a thrilling ride with great memories."


    - Mike & Anja Stax (Ugly Things magazine)

    1. Intro By DJ The Lord
    2. Gotta Get Away
    3. Never Thought You'd Leave Me
    4. Light Of Love
    5. Good Kind Of Hurt
    6. What A Way To Die
    7. Elevator Express
    8. Locked In Your Love
    9. White Pig Blues
    10. Brain Confusion
    11. Where Have You Gone
    12. Mr. Power
    The Pleasure Seekers
    $24.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Unquiet Sky The Unquiet Sky Quick View

    $24.99
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    The Unquiet Sky

    Since the early 80's when bands like Cathedral and Saint Vitus pioneered the doom genre of metal, the style has continuously evolved and spread, despite being far less recognized and appreciated than most other forms of more traditional heavy metal. Bands like Eyehategod and Crowbar melded elements of doom into sludge and stoner metal, gaining modest success in the more mainstream metal community, but doom is beginning to enjoy a new wave of popularity, thanks largely to the more progressive experimental work of artists like Stephen O'Malley (Sunn0))), Burning Witch). Indian is a Chicago-based trio whose brand of doom is more akin to that of Eyehategod than the earliest or latest incarnations of the genre, and their distinctively black metal vocals immediately set them apart from the pack.


    First things first: The Unquiet Sky is everything a doom record should be. The bass tone is so perfect and intense that it could shake your body through a pair of headphones. The guitars bring Black Sabbath-esque fuzz down enough notches to kill a horse. The percussion is sparse when it needs to be (Ration) and energetic when it's allowed (Tied and Gagged). Dylan O'Toole's vocals give Indian the extra edge over many of the other bands who have perfected this formula by complementing the melancholy created by the music with a demonic voice of evil. There is even an extended track of terrifyingly psychedelic feedback, perfectly placed to scare the crap out of you when you're high. In fact, the only thing that fails to be suitably doom-y and evil about this record is the cover illustration of a Christ-like baboon which, despite being evil enough in spirit, looks a bit too much like it was drawn in a junior high art class.


    This record is an easy recommend for fans of the doom genre, but what about anyone unacquainted with the genre I personally don't consider myself a huge aficionado of the style, but loved this record. The only things required to enjoy The Unquiet Sky are an attention span and a love of all things metal. This record generally moves slowly, as does most doom, but it is far less droning and repetitive than many recent examples of the genre. As the name of the style suggests, doom is, by its very nature, dark, oppressive music. As such, Indian is definitely better suited to being digested over an extended period of time at high volumes, rather than short bursts in your car or through headphones.


    Bottom Line: If you're searching for the latest, greatest doom record to add to your collection, look no further than Indian's The Unquiet Sky. Fans of Neurosis, Eyehategod and Godflesh should also definitely pick this up. It's a solid record from beginning to end from an up-and-coming trio of doom virtuosos.


    - Cory (Lambgoat)

    1. No Able Fires
    2. Ration
    3. Dead Weight
    4. Los Nietos
    5. Queen
    6. Tied and Gagged
    7. God of Panic, Lord of Decay
    8. Loophole Noose
    9. Shill
    10. We Can Build You
    11. Worshiper of Sores
    Indian
    $24.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
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