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  • Schubert - Symphony 9 (Speakers Corner) Schubert - Symphony 9 (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Schubert - Symphony 9 (Speakers Corner)

    This is Schubert's longest symphony, and its music has been described as heavenly. The symphony is typically and specifically Schubertian in its form, occupying a position in the history of music between Beethoven, Bruckner and Mahler - right on the threshold which separates classicism from romanticism.



    It is hard to say if Josef Krips ever succeeded in making a finer recording. The presentation has a direct, unforced spontaneity, confirming that Krips had an intuitive understanding of Schubert's compositions. The orchestra plays with dynamic vivacity without ever sounding aggressive. The interpretation of the two final movements is delightful in its airy exhilaration: swaying in a dance-like rhythm, tripping lightly through virtually every key there is, and in between, in the Scherzo, the gravity of the trio. The Finale, again, is merry in character with triplets rushing past, and the listener revels in every single repetition as the magnificence of this work reveals itself.



    The inspired orchestra does full justice to the music and renders an interpretation in the Viennese tradition at its very best. This recording simply cannot be surpassed in terms of performance or sound quality - it is a must not only for the lover of Schubert's music.





    Musicians:



    • London Symphony Orchestra

    • Josef Krips (conductor)




    Recording: May 1958 at Kingsway Hall in London by Kenneth E. Wilkinson

    Production: Erik Smith




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. First Movement: Andante
    2. First Movement: Allegro Ma Non Troppo
    3. Second Movement: Andante Conmoto
    4. Third Movement: Scherzo
    5. Fourth Movement: Allegro Vivace
    Josef Krips with London Symphony Orchestra
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra Plays The Music Of Rush The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra Plays The Music Of Rush Quick View

    $18.99
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    The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra Plays The Music Of Rush

    Purple Pyramid Records, a division of Cleopatra Records, will release The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra Plays The Music Of Rush on November 13. Nearly sixty musicians and thirty vocalists transform nine of Rush's greatest hits into even more intricate, soaring orchestral works.


    The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra covers the best-known classics, from Working Man, the self-titled debut album track that launched Rush's career in the U.S. to Subdivisions from Signals, the album that proved electronic rock could reside in the top ten. The band's most successful record, Moving Pictures, is represented by rousing versions of Tom Sawyer and Red Barchetta. Special guest guitarists include Steve Rothery of Marillion on Working Man and Adrian Smith of Iron Maiden on Red Barchetta. The Windrush Choir provides backing vocals and solos.


    The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra, formed in 1946 and based in London, has been called the nation's favorite orchestra. It has had internationally known maestros like Andre Previn and Louis Clark, and has toured the world. The RPO is a best-selling and adventurous recording entity as well. In 1969, it recorded a concerto for Deep Purple, composed by the band's organist Jon Lord. It earned a top ten U.S. single in 1982 with Hooked On Classics. Over the years, RPO has orchestrally arranged Pink Floyd, Oasis, Queen, R.E.M., Madonna and ABBA.


    The orchestra was recorded at the legendary Abbey Road Studios in London, conducted by BAFTA Award-winning musician and composer Richard Harvey. Harvey performed with the prog rock group Gryphon and as an accomplished multi-instrumentalist (specializing in mediaeval and Renaissance periods), worked with many folk and rock musicians such as Richard and Linda Thompson, Kate Bush and Sweet. He has toured and recorded with John Williams, and has performed and composed film/TV soundtracks for more than thirty years. The album was produced by James Graydon and Richard Cottle, who also arranged all the music.

    1. 2112 Overture
    2. The Spirit Of Radio
    3. Tom Sawyer
    4. Red Barchetta (feat. Adrian Smith)
    5. Subdivisions
    6. Fly By Night
    7. Closer To The Heart
    8. Limelight
    9. Working Man (feat. Steve Rothery)
    Royal Philharmonic Orchestra
    $18.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Right Place Wrong Time (Pure Pleasure) Right Place Wrong Time (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
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    Right Place Wrong Time (Pure Pleasure)

    This recording session was not released until five years after it was done. One can imagine the tapes practically smoldering in their cases, the music is so hot. Sorry, there is nothing 'wrong' about this blues album at all. Otis Rush was a great blues expander, a man whose guitar playing was in every molecule pure blues. On his solos on this album he strips the idea of the blues down to very simple gestures (i.e., a bent string, but bent in such a subtle way that the seasoned blues listener will be surprised). As a performer he opens up the blues form with his chord progressions and use of horn sections, the latter instrumentation again added in a wonderfully spare manner, bringing to mind a master painter working certain parts of a canvas in order to bring in more light. Blues fans who get tired of the same old song structures, riff, and rhythms should be delighted with most of Rush's output, and this one is among his best. Sometimes all he does to make a song sound unlike any blues one has ever heard is just a small thing -- a chord moving up when one expects it go down, for example. The production is particularly skilled, and the fact that Capitol Records turned this session down after originally producing it can only be reasonably accepted when combined with other decisions this label has made, such as turning down the Doors because singer Jim Morrison had »no charisma«. This record doesn't mess around at all. The first track takes off like the man they fire out of a cannon at the end of a circus, a perceived climax swaggeringly representing just the beginning, after all. Some of the finest tracks are the ones that go longer than five minutes, allowing the players room to stretch. And that means more of Rush's great guitar playing, of course. For the final track he leaves the blues behind completely for a moving cover version of Rainy Night in Georgia by Tony Joe White.


    Musicians:



    • Otis Rush (vocal, guitar)

    • Doug Killmer, John Kahn (bass)

    • Hart McNee (alto saxophone)

    • John Wilmeth (trumpet)

    • Ron Stallings (tenor saxophone)

    • Fred Burton (guitar)

    • Mark Naftalin (piano)

    • Ira Kamin (organ)

    • Bob Jones (drums)




    Recording: February 1971 at Wally Heider's Studio, San Francisco

    Production: Nick Gravenites and Otis Rush



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Tore Up
    2. Right Place, Wrong Time
    3. Easy Go
    4. Three Times A Fool
    5. Rainy Night In Georgia
    6. Natural Ball
    7. I Wonder Why
    8. Your Turn To Cry
    9. Lonely Man
    10. Take A Look Behind
    Otis Rush
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Grace Under Pressure Grace Under Pressure Quick View

    $29.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Grace Under Pressure

    200 Gram Vinyl


    Remastered From Original Analogue Masters


    Remastered on 200-gram, heavyweight vinyl at legendary Abbey Road Studios using the Direct to Metal Mastering (DMM) audiophile copper plating process, all from original analogue masters. Grace Under Pressure is the band's tenth studio album and was originally released in April, 1984. Grace Under Pressure reached #10 on the Billboard chart and went platinum. Alex Lifeson called it 'the most satisfying of all our records.' It was the first album they recorded without long-time producer Terry Brown, eventually producing it themselves. The song's themes were influenced by the growing tensions in the Cold War. The music itself continued the presence of synthesizers introduced on Signals, as well as incorporating elements of ska and reggae into their sound. Singles included 'Distant Early Warning,' 'The Body Electric,' 'Red Sector A' and 'Afterimage.'

    1. Distant Early Warning
    2. Afterimage
    3. Red Sector A
    4. The Enemy Within
    5. The Body Electric
    6. Kid Gloves
    7. Red Lenses
    8. Between The Wheels
    Rush
    $29.99
    200 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Chicago/The Blues/Today! (Pure Pleasure) (Awaiting Repress) Chicago/The Blues/Today! (Pure Pleasure) (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $99.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Chicago/The Blues/Today! (Pure Pleasure) (Awaiting Repress)

    In early 1966, blues history was made with the issuance of a three-volume set of new recordings produced by blues historian Samuel Charters. This series was known as Chicago/The Blues/Today! and the release sent shock waves through the world of rock & roll. Every artist on the three volumes had recorded before (some, like Otis Rush and Junior Wells, had actually seen small hits on the R&B charts), but these recordings were largely their introduction to a newer -- and predominately white -- album-oriented audience. These recordings have stayed in print and have been reasonably good sellers over the years since their original release, all coming out on compact disc. This new packaging puts all three volumes together, but with no bonus tracks, as no extras were recorded for these sessions.



    A plus in the new packaging, is that it features a nice booklet with detailed, updated notes from Charters, a nice appreciation from Ed Ward, and absolutely eye-boggling session photos taken by Charters' wife, Ann. Even if you still have the original vinyl or CDs, this is one of the times when it would be best to spend the dough and add this one to your collection, because blues records seldom come as important, innovative, or just plain pleasurable to listen to as this set. File under 'essential'.




    Musicians:



    • J.B. Hutto

    • Junior Wells

    • Otis Spann

    • Otis Rush

    • Jimmy Cotton

    • Johnny Shines Blues Band

    • Johnny Young's South Side Blues Band

    • Homesick James

    • and Big Walter Horton's Blues Harp Band with Memphis Charlie Musselwhite




    Recording: 1965 at RCA Studios, Chicago

    Production: Samuel Chartersdeutsch



    Format: 3LPs 33rpm / Box, booklet



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    LP1
    1. Help Me (A Tribute to Sonny Boy Williamson)
    2. It Hurts Me Too
    3. Messin' with the Kid
    4. Vietcong Blues
    5. All Night Long
    6. Going Ahead
    7. Please Help
    8. Too Much Alcohol
    9. Married Woman Blues
    10. That's the Truth
    11. Marie
    12. Burning Fire
    13. S P Blues
    14. Sometimes I Wonder
    15. Spann's Stomp


    LP2
    1. Cotton Crop Blues
    2. The Blues Keep Falling
    3. Love Me or Leave
    4. Rocket 88
    5. West Helena Blues
    6. Everything's Gonna Turn Out Allright
    7. It's a Mean Old World
    8. I Can't Quit You Baby
    9. Rock
    10. It's My Own Fault
    11. Dust my Broom
    12. Somebody Been Talkin'
    13. Set a Date
    14. So Mean to Me


    LP3
    1. One More Time
    2. Kid Man Blues
    3. My Black Mare
    4. Stealin' Back
    5. I Got Mine In Time
    6. Tighten Up On It
    7. Dynaflow Blues
    8. Black Spider Blues
    9. Layin' Down My Shoes and Clothes
    10. If I Get Lucky
    11. Rockin' My Boogie
    12. Mr. Boweevil
    13. Hey Hey

    Various Artists
    $99.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl - 3 LPs Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • Pleading The Blues (Pure Pleasure) Pleading The Blues (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Pleading The Blues (Pure Pleasure)

    The year was 1959. The occasion was a 'Battle of the Blues' at the Blue Flame Club in Chicago. A young harmonica player Junior Wells - who got his start as Little Walter Jacobs' replacement in Muddy Waters' band back in '52 - probably didn't imagine he would come in second. After all, he had already put down both Otis Rush and Magic Sam. Still to come, though, was this fleet-fingered, skinny young Louisiana cat - Buddy Guy, who came first. As the climax to his blistering solo, Guy tossed his guitar in the air, then caught it by the neck one handed. As it slid through his fingers, Buddy created this high levee moan. Crowd gone wild. It was the beginning of a beautiful friendship.



    That chance meeting set in motion more than a relationship. This early, and profound, respect translated into a partnership that somehow superceded Wells' early work with one of the most important people in the blues. Wells and Guy would produce some of the most unabashed and deeply cool West Side blues recordings.
    This album recorded for the French Isabel label, in 1979 is a companion piece to Guy's "Blues Giant" recording of the same year. There's the gentle blues shuffle of "It Hurts Me Too", made famous by Elmore James. There's the electric-blues muscle of the title tune. Finally, as a bonus track, there's the funky, clearly James Brown-influenced "I Smell Something". This is a fine recording - and certainly one of Junior's best little-known releases.



    Musicians:



    • Buddy Guy (guitar, vocals)

    • Phil Guy (guitar)

    • J. Williams (bass)

    • Ray Allison (drums)




    Recording: October 1979 at Condorcet Studio, Toulouse (France), by Francois Porterie

    Production: Didier Tricard




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    1. Pleading The Blues
    2. It Hurts Me Too
    3. Cut Out The Lights
    4. Just For My Baby
    5. Quit Teasing My Baby
    6. I'll Take Care Of You
    7. Take Your Time Baby
    Junior Wells
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl - Sealed Buy Now
  • AudioQuest Yukon Interconnect Cable MULTIPLE LENGTHS AVAILABLE AudioQuest Yukon Interconnect Cable Quick View

    $299.95
    Buy Now
    x

    AudioQuest Yukon Interconnect Cable


    Have a question about this product? Please email our audio advisor or call 1-877-929-8729 with any questions or concerns regarding your equipment purchase.



    RCA to RCA


    XLR & Custom Lengths Available Upon Request


    Meaning "Big River" in Athabaskan, the Yukon River starts with the Llewellyn Glacier as its source in British Columbia, and empties into Alaska's Bering Sea. It may have been the first immigration route for North America's first indigenous humans, and was certainly the principle means of travel during the 1896-1903 Klondike Gold Rush. Paddle-wheel riverboats continued as the dominant form of transportation along the river until the 1950s when the Klondike Highway was completed. King Salmon from the Yukon River remain an elusive, but prized delicacy.


    SOLID PERFECT-SURFACE COPPER+ (PSC+) CONDUCTORS: Perfect-Surface Copper+ has an astonishingly smooth and pure surface. Proprietary metal-processing technology protects the wire's surface at every stage of drawing and fabrication. When high-purity low-oxide copper is kept as soft, pure and smooth as possible, it becomes a wonderfully low-distortion PSC+ conductor. PSC+ is manufactured by applying the same exceptional technology to an ultra-pure copper. The resulting sound quality is even more focused and simply less in the way. For over 30 years AudioQuest has pioneered the use of superior metals; yet even we were surprised by the huge leap in performance made possible with Perfect-Surface Technology. PSC+ simply outperforms all previously available copper metals at any price. All of Yukon's conductors are solid. Electrical and magnetic interaction between strands in a conventional cable is the greatest source of distortion, often causing a somewhat dirty, harsh sound. Solid conductors are fundamental toward achieving Yukon's very clean sound.


    POLYETHYLENE AIR-TUBE INSULATION: Any solid material adjacent to a conductor is actually part of an imperfect circuit. Wire insulation and circuit board materials all absorb energy (loss). Some of this energy is stored and then released as distortion. All of Yukon's conductors use PE Air-Tube Insulation because air absorbs next to no energy, and Polyethylene is low-loss and has a benign distortion profile. PE Air-Tube Insulation causes much less of the out-of-focus effect common to other materials.


    CARBON-BASED 3-LAYER NOISE-DISSIPATION SYSTEM (NDS): 100% shield coverage is easy. Preventing captured RF Interference from modulating the equipment's ground reference requires AQ's Noise-Dissipation System. Metal and Carbon-Loaded synthetics prevent most RFI from reaching the equipment's ground plane.


    TRIPLE-BALANCED GEOMETRY: The three conductors in "Triple-Balanced" Yukon cables ensure that whether prepared with RCA or XLR plugs, the positive and negative signals have equally low-distortion conducting paths. The 100% coverage shield is never used as an inferior conductor.


    COLD-WELDED HANGING-SILVER DIRECTLY OVER PURE PURPLE COPPER PLUGS: This plug design allows for a connection devoid of solder, which is a common source of distortion. Because the ground shells are stamped instead of machined, the metal can be chosen for low distortion instead of machinability. Purple Copper offers a cleaner, clearer sound than the nickel-plated or OFHC metals commonly found in competing manufacturers' plugs.


    AudioQuest
    $299.95
    Analog-Audio Interconnect Cable (Pair) - Multiple Lengths Available
    Buy Now
  • Couldn't Stand The Weather (Pure Pleasure) Couldn't Stand The Weather (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $49.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Couldn't Stand The Weather (Pure Pleasure)

    With his astonishingly accomplished guitar playing, Stevie Ray Vaughan ignited the blues revival of the '80's. Vaughan drew equally from bluesmen like Albert King, Otis Rush, and Muddy Waters and rock & roll players like Jimi Hendrix and Lonnie Mack, as well as the stray jazz guitarist like Kenny Burrell, developing a uniquely eclectic and fiery style that sounded like no other guitarist, regardless of genre. Vaughan bridged the gap between blues and rock like no other artist had since the late '60s. For the next seven years, Stevie Ray was the leading light in American blues, consistently selling out concerts while his albums regularly went gold. His tragic death in 1990 only emphasized his influence in blues and American rock & roll.

    Musicians:



    • Stevie Ray Vaughan (vocal, guitar)

    • Jimmie Vaughan (guitar)

    • Stan Harrison (tenor saxophone)

    • Tommy Shannon (bass)

    • Chris "Whipper" Layton, Fran Christina (drums)



    Format: 2LPs 33rpm / standard sleeve



    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    Side 1
    1. Scuttlebuttin'
    2. Couldn't Stand The Weather
    3. Things That I Used To Do


    Side 2
    4. Voodoo Chile (Slight Return)
    5. Cold Shot


    Side 3
    6. Tin Pan Alley
    7. Honey Bee
    8. Stang's Swang


    Side 4
    9. SRV Speaks
    10. Hide Away
    11. Look at Little Sister
    12. Give Me Back My Wig
    13. Come On (Pt.3)

    Stevie Ray Vaughan
    $49.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Total Strife Forever Total Strife Forever Quick View

    $22.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Total Strife Forever

    The lead single, and the accompanying video, from East India Youth's debut album Total Strife Forever really tells you all you need to know about the record. 'Looking For Someone' opens like a familiar, albeit electronic, ballad with East India Youth (otherwise known as William Doyle) emoting directly into camera in a way reminiscent of Sinead O'Connor. Then he begins to ascend, the London skyline now whizzing past Doyle as the elevator he's in climbs the Heron Tower. Almighty, booming drums signalled the ascension; humming synths join the journey to the top before the music is stripped away and the camera pans away, twisting as the elevator descends. We are then shown a vertigo-inducing journey back to street level and a trip through the shaft of an elevator. Abrasive synthesisers and what sounds like a distorted church organ are the soundtrack for this dizzying descent. It's no longer a simple plea to a lost lover, but a rallying cry against loneliness in the midst of huge, anonymous monuments.


    Total Strife Forever is a brutal electronic album, but one that still retains a very humanistic core - this juxtaposition is a thematic thread which runs throughout the album. Doyle then sculpts and defines the music in order to create tension between these two disparate elements, or else uses their differences in order to surprise and engage the listener. This is done within individual songs and across the record: over 11 tracks you'll hear acid beats, euphoric electronic pop, ambient passages, drone, krautrock and more. What's incredible is how East India Youth has managed to bring all of these elements together and construct a cohesive record.


    The album opens with 'Glitter Recession'. Soft piano meets a twinkling keyboard melody and then heavy bass stabs. The piano becomes louder and deeper, the keyboard softer, and swirling synths enter the mix. It's a beautiful, optimistic opening, the instruments all layered so that they never feel like they are jostling for attention, but rather adding details and intricacies to make the piece more alive. 'Glitter Recession' is followed by the first of four 'Total Strife Forever' pieces, this one built around a steady sawtooth bass line that grows in intensity as a pounding kick drum appears and echoing synths wash in and out of audible range. It feels like it is building towards heavy electronic noise, of the kind bands like Fuck Buttons are renowned for. But instead 'Total Strife Forever I' is more restrained as sustained chords create a stunning euphoric ending.


    The third track 'Dripping Down' is the first to feature vocals. If you've previously heard the singles leading into this album, or the Hostel EP from last year, you might be surprised by the fact that Total Strife Forever is largely instrumental, yet it makes the rare appearance of vocals all the more effective. 'Dripping Down's harmonies are beautiful, particularly in the closing moments of the track when they sound as though they've been recorded in a grand cathedral (most of this album was in fact recorded at home over the course of three years).


    With clear percussion and shimmering synthesiser riffs, 'Dripping Down' is the first dance track on the album, yet what follows takes things up a notch. 'Hinterland' is an out and out acid track. It starts with an echoing, sonar-like melody, ambient chords and a quick snare/kick beat. The bass drops and we're given an infectious, shuffling four-to-the-floor beat; what follows deserves to be a staple in any self-respecting DJ's club mix. 'Hinterland' is phenomenal, yet somehow East India Youth manages to go beyond that on the next track.


    'Heaven How Long' is easily the album's highlight and arrives just around the mid-point of the album. It's euphoric electronica at its best, and features one of the record's most delicate sections in the second verse. Doyle's vocals, hushed during the verses, soar for the chorus and the whole song ends with a krautrock inspired instrumental, marrying looped synthesisers to heavy bass guitar riffs.


    The second half of the Total Strife Forever is just as strong and rewarding as the first half. There's the aforementioned lead single 'Looking For Someone', as well as three more 'Total Strife Forever' pieces. The second of those tracks, which immediately follows 'Heaven How Long', is easily one of the most meditative tracks on the album, solely comprising an organ, haunting choral vocals and a deep electronic buzzing. In many ways it's similar to Tim Hecker's most recent work which used church organs and filters to blur the lines between what's real and what's synthetic. Meanwhile, 'Midnight Koto' is perhaps the album's most atmospheric track. Distant loops, heavily distorted and sounding like a terrifying rush of traffic, play under the koto melody. It's heavily inspired by Brian Eno, particularly his work with Bowie on tracks like 'Moss Garden'.


    Whilst these references are clear, at no point does it seem like East India Youth is just trying to replicate his idols. Total Strife Forever pulls together these influences and creates something truly extraordinary. This is an album firmly rooted in a decade where technology blurs the lines between fact and fiction, where we 'socialise' with brands and it's possible to feel hopelessly alone amidst the towering skyscrapers of a city. The final track 'Total Strife Forever IV' opens with static that eventually fades away to reveal grand synthesiser melodies before disintegrating once more. The beauty of those melodies is only enhanced by their temporary nature. Amidst the machinery there's a realisation that whilst the buildings, the brands and digital world might live on, it's reality and our fellow human beings that are truly beautiful and deserving of our attention.


    - Robert Whitfield (The 405)

    1. Glitter Recession
    2. Total Strife Forever I
    3. Dripping Down
    4. Hinterland
    5. Heaven, How Long
    6. Total Strife Forever II
    7. Looking For Someone
    8. Midnight Koto
    9. Total Strife Forever III
    10. Song For Granular Piano
    11. Total Strife Forever IV
    East India Youth
    $22.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Culture Of Volume Culture Of Volume Quick View

    $24.99
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    Culture Of Volume

    The lead single, and the accompanying video, from East India Youth's debut album Total Strife Forever really tells you all you need to know about the record. 'Looking For Someone' opens like a familiar, albeit electronic, ballad with East India Youth (otherwise known as William Doyle) emoting directly into camera in a way reminiscent of Sinead O'Connor. Then he begins to ascend, the London skyline now whizzing past Doyle as the elevator he's in climbs the Heron Tower. Almighty, booming drums signalled the ascension; humming synths join the journey to the top before the music is stripped away and the camera pans away, twisting as the elevator descends. We are then shown a vertigo-inducing journey back to street level and a trip through the shaft of an elevator. Abrasive synthesisers and what sounds like a distorted church organ are the soundtrack for this dizzying descent. It's no longer a simple plea to a lost lover, but a rallying cry against loneliness in the midst of huge, anonymous monuments.


    Total Strife Forever is a brutal electronic album, but one that still retains a very humanistic core - this juxtaposition is a thematic thread which runs throughout the album. Doyle then sculpts and defines the music in order to create tension between these two disparate elements, or else uses their differences in order to surprise and engage the listener. This is done within individual songs and across the record: over 11 tracks you'll hear acid beats, euphoric electronic pop, ambient passages, drone, krautrock and more. What's incredible is how East India Youth has managed to bring all of these elements together and construct a cohesive record.


    The album opens with 'Glitter Recession'. Soft piano meets a twinkling keyboard melody and then heavy bass stabs. The piano becomes louder and deeper, the keyboard softer, and swirling synths enter the mix. It's a beautiful, optimistic opening, the instruments all layered so that they never feel like they are jostling for attention, but rather adding details and intricacies to make the piece more alive. 'Glitter Recession' is followed by the first of four 'Total Strife Forever' pieces, this one built around a steady sawtooth bass line that grows in intensity as a pounding kick drum appears and echoing synths wash in and out of audible range. It feels like it is building towards heavy electronic noise, of the kind bands like Fuck Buttons are renowned for. But instead 'Total Strife Forever I' is more restrained as sustained chords create a stunning euphoric ending.


    The third track 'Dripping Down' is the first to feature vocals. If you've previously heard the singles leading into this album, or the Hostel EP from last year, you might be surprised by the fact that Total Strife Forever is largely instrumental, yet it makes the rare appearance of vocals all the more effective. 'Dripping Down's harmonies are beautiful, particularly in the closing moments of the track when they sound as though they've been recorded in a grand cathedral (most of this album was in fact recorded at home over the course of three years).


    With clear percussion and shimmering synthesiser riffs, 'Dripping Down' is the first dance track on the album, yet what follows takes things up a notch. 'Hinterland' is an out and out acid track. It starts with an echoing, sonar-like melody, ambient chords and a quick snare/kick beat. The bass drops and we're given an infectious, shuffling four-to-the-floor beat; what follows deserves to be a staple in any self-respecting DJ's club mix. 'Hinterland' is phenomenal, yet somehow East India Youth manages to go beyond that on the next track.


    'Heaven How Long' is easily the album's highlight and arrives just around the mid-point of the album. It's euphoric electronica at its best, and features one of the record's most delicate sections in the second verse. Doyle's vocals, hushed during the verses, soar for the chorus and the whole song ends with a krautrock inspired instrumental, marrying looped synthesisers to heavy bass guitar riffs.


    The second half of the Total Strife Forever is just as strong and rewarding as the first half. There's the aforementioned lead single 'Looking For Someone', as well as three more 'Total Strife Forever' pieces. The second of those tracks, which immediately follows 'Heaven How Long', is easily one of the most meditative tracks on the album, solely comprising an organ, haunting choral vocals and a deep electronic buzzing. In many ways it's similar to Tim Hecker's most recent work which used church organs and filters to blur the lines between what's real and what's synthetic. Meanwhile, 'Midnight Koto' is perhaps the album's most atmospheric track. Distant loops, heavily distorted and sounding like a terrifying rush of traffic, play under the koto melody. It's heavily inspired by Brian Eno, particularly his work with Bowie on tracks like 'Moss Garden'.


    Whilst these references are clear, at no point does it seem like East India Youth is just trying to replicate his idols. Total Strife Forever pulls together these influences and creates something truly extraordinary. This is an album firmly rooted in a decade where technology blurs the lines between fact and fiction, where we 'socialise' with brands and it's possible to feel hopelessly alone amidst the towering skyscrapers of a city. The final track 'Total Strife Forever IV' opens with static that eventually fades away to reveal grand synthesiser melodies before disintegrating once more. The beauty of those melodies is only enhanced by their temporary nature. Amidst the machinery there's a realisation that whilst the buildings, the brands and digital world might live on, it's reality and our fellow human beings that are truly beautiful and deserving of our attention.


    - Robert Whitfield (The 405)

    1. The Juddering
    2. End Result
    3. Beaming White
    4. Turn Away
    5. Hearts That Never
    6. Entirety
    7. Carousel
    8. Don't Look Backwards
    9. Manner Of Words
    10. Montage Resolution
    East India Youth
    $24.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Signals (Out Of Stock) Signals (Out Of Stock) Quick View

    $29.99
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    Signals (Out Of Stock)

    200 Gram Vinyl


    Remastered From Original Analogue Masters


    Remastered on 200-gram, heavyweight vinyl at legendary Abbey Road Studios using the Direct to Metal Mastering (DMM) audiophile copper plating process, all from original analogue masters. Signals, originally released in 1982, marked the band's increase use of electronic instrumentation, especially sequencers and electric violin (played by Ben Mink). Peaking at #10 on the Billboard chart, Signals eventually went platinum. A total of five singles were released from Signals, including 'Subdivisions,' which became a live staple of their concerts, along with 'New World Man,' 'The Analog Kid,' 'The Weapon' and 'Countdown.'


    1. Subdivisions
    2. The Analog Kid
    3. Chemistry
    4. Digital Man
    5. The Weapon
    6. New World Man
    7. Losing It
    8. Countdown
    Rush
    $29.99
    200 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Temporarily out of stock
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