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  • Shostakovitch: Cello Concerto, Symphony No. 1 (Speakers Corner) Shostakovitch: Cello Concerto, Symphony No. 1 (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Shostakovitch: Cello Concerto, Symphony No. 1 (Speakers Corner)

    Dmitri Shostakovich: Cello Concerto No. 1 in E-flat major op. 107; Symphony No. 1 in F minor, op. 10


    That every beginning has its magic may almost have become forgotten these days, when true world premieres of musical works are almost non-existent. But this special magic still remains in the present recording of Shostakovich's Cello Concerto No. 1, which was first heard with these artists in 1959. Shostakovich dedicated the work to his friend Mstislav Rostropovich who committed the virtuoso solo part to memory in only four days, before the concert took place. The cellist tackles the work dauntlessly right from the beginning and swirls the burlesque staccatos through space. With a lovely sound and quite in accordance with the title of the movement, Espressivo, the soloist lets the melody breathe, supported by wonderfully sonorous orchestral writing, answered by calls on the solo horn.


    The Finale makes itself heard with a robust inflection, which the soloist counters with an imperturbable steadfastness of rhythm that not only demands refinement but also playing in the top regions and double-stopped harmonics.


    That this recording is indisputably a work of reference is underlined by its coupling with the First Symphony, which is well worth listening to. Shostakovich composed this work as his graduation piece at the Leningrad Conservatory more than 30 years earlier.


    Musicians:


    • Mstislav Rostropovich and the Philadelphia Orchestra conducted by Eugene Ormandy


    Recording: November 1959 at Broadwood Hotel, Philadelphia, USA, by Stan Tonkel

    Production: Thomas Frost


    About Speakers Corner


    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    Concerto For Cello In E Flat, Op. 107
    I - Allegretto
    II - Moderato / III - Andantino - Allegro / IV - Allegro Non Troppo


    Symphony No. 1 In F Major, Op. 10
    I - Allegretto
    II - Allegro
    III - Lento
    IV - Allegro Molto

    Dmitri Shostakovitch
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Shostakovich: Cello Concerto No. 2 (Speakers Corner) Shostakovich: Cello Concerto No. 2 (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
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    Shostakovich: Cello Concerto No. 2 (Speakers Corner)

    The world of music expects something special from the dedicatees of major compositions, especially when the honoured person himself performs the work either on stage or in the recording studio. Among such personages is Mstislav Rostropovich, the great maestro of the cello, who studied and successfully collaborated with Dmitri Shostakovich while still a student at the Moscow Conservatory and who later gave the premiere performances of his Cello Concertos.



    The Cello Concerto No. 2 from 1966 was composed around the same time as the highly emotional choral Symphonies Nos. 13 and 14 and displays a similar character of gloom and grim drama. The soloist presents the dark theme out of the depths and soon enters into brighter regions full of aggressive layers of sound. A wild conflict between soloist and orchestra follows, whereby the forced gaiety of the cello rages.
    As a contrast, the soloist is in perfect harmony with the piano in Glazunov's Chant du M√Čnestrel. Supported by warm chords, Rostropovich lets his instrument soar to the heights in a cultivated and thoughtful fashion and proves once again that he is truly a great interpreter of Russian music.




    Recording: August 1975 at Boston Symphony Hall by Hans-Peter Schweigmann

    Production: Thomas Mowrey




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    Dmitri Shostakovich: Concerto for Violoncello and Orchestra No. 2
    Alexander Glazounov: Chant du Menestrel - Mstislav Rostropovich and the Boston Symphony Orchestra conducted by Seiji Ozawa
    Dmitri Shostakovitch
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
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