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  • Songs In The Attic Songs In The Attic Quick View

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    Songs In The Attic

    Songs In the Attic on Numbered Limited Edition 180 Gram LP from Mobile Fidelity


    1981 Live Album Finds Joel Adding Warmth to Ballads, Punch and Kick to Rockers


    Taking You to the Stage: Mobile Fidelity Version Pulls Gives You a Dead-Center Seat and Wonderful Sonic Perspective


    Ideal Summation of Joel's Early Period Material, Enhanced by Accomplished Band in Concert Setting


    Great live albums often function as documents of a performer's stinting onstage abilities, stopgaps between studio albums, introductions to a musician's earlier work, and/or opportunities for familiar material to be showcased in superior ways. Songs In the Attic serves all of these purposes and more. As Billy Joel's first live album, it's still his best, punctuated by dynamic renditions of favorites and deep cuts, and augmented by a tested band in sync with the pianist.


    A vital component of Mobile Fidelity's Billy Joel catalog restoration series, Songs In the Attic is mastered from the original master tapes and pressed on 180 gram LP at RTI. The resulting presentation effortlessly outshines that heard on all previous editions of this 1981 set. Joel's piano possesses fuller body and lifelike resonance. His veteran group's contributions emerge with newfound clarity, dynamics, decay, and extension. Balances are supreme, and shades and colors blend, amplifying richness and presence.


    On the heels of three multi-platinum albums and a commercial breakthrough, Joel released Songs In the Attic to both tide fans over until 1982's The Nylon Curtain as well to feature material in a looser, warmer setting. The record highlights not only the singer's consistency and knack for indelible melodies, but savvy live techniques. Upbeat tunes such as "Everybody Loves You Now" receive a more fleshed-out treatment that yields added punch and swagger, while balladic numbers like "I've Loved These Days" take on a cozy warmth akin to the feeling of putting on a sweater on a cool fall day.


    Songs In the Attic also bridged the gap for listeners for whom Joel was then a new entity, as many didn't come to his music until The Stranger. Hence, tracks like "Captain Jack" and "The Ballad of Billy the Kid," from Piano Man, get a fresh identity, particularly courtesy of a backing band that, by then, had been gigging with Joel for years. No wonder that, unlike a majority of live records, Songs In the Attic yielded two Top 40 pop hits: "Say Goodbye to Hollywood" and "She's Got a Way." No matter from what angle it's viewed, the set stands as one of the most important and enjoyable live records ever released.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Miami 2017 (Seen the Lights Go Out on Broadway)
    2. Summer, Highland Falls
    3. Streetlife Serenader
    4. Los Angelenos
    5. She's Got a Way
    6. Everybody Loves You Now
    7. Say Goodbye to Hollywood
    8. Captain Jack
    9. You're My Home
    10. The Ballad of Billy the Kid
    11. I've Loved These Days
    Billy Joel
    $49.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl 45 RPM LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Satanic Panic In The Attic Satanic Panic In The Attic Quick View

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    Satanic Panic In The Attic

    The sixth full-length and first for Polyvinyl from this Athens, GA band is a departure from previous releases. There's a 70's Afro beat and an 80's new wave influence, and the songs are full of danceable electro hooks.
    1. Disconnect the Dots
    2. Lysergic Bliss
    3. Will You Come and Fetch Me
    4. My British Tour Diary
    5. Rapture Rapes the Muses
    6. Eros' Entropic Tundra
    7. City Bird
    8. Erroneous Escape into Erik Eckles
    9. Chrissie Kiss the Corpse
    10. Your Magic Is Working
    11. Climb the Ladder
    12. How Lester Lost His Wife
    13. Spike the Senses
    14. Vegan in Furs
    1. Everything About Her Is Wrong
    2. Pimps Are Simpering, The
    Of Montreal
    $18.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Columbia Years 1968-1969 The Columbia Years 1968-1969 Quick View

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    The Columbia Years 1968-1969

    All Tracks Previously Unreleased (Except Track B5/8)


    Production By Miles Davis & Teo Macero


    Featuring Performances From Hugh Masekela, Mitch Mitchell (Jimi Hendrix Experience), John Mclaughlin, Herbie Hancock, Harvey Brooks, Wayne Shorter, Billy Cox (Band Of Gypsys), Larry Young, And Members Of The Jazz Crusaders


    Remastered From The Original Analog Master Tapes


    New Interviews, Rare Photos, And Unseen Historical Documents From The Teo Macero Archive


    One can hardly imagine Prince, Erykah Badu, or Outkast without the influence of Betty Davis. Her style of raw and revelatory punk-funk defies any notions that women can't be visionaries in the worlds of rock and pop. In recent years, rappers from Ice Cube to Talib Kweli have rhymed over her intensely strong but sensual music. Betty penned the song ''Uptown'' for The Chambers Brothers and wrote the tunes that got The Commodores signed to Motown. The Detroit label soon came calling, pitching a Motown songwriting deal, which Betty turned down. Motown wanted to own everything. Heading to the UK, Marc Bolan of T. Rex urged the creative dynamo to start writing for herself. A common thread throughout Betty's career would be her unbending DIY ethic, which made her quickly turn down anyone who didn't fit with the vision. She would eventually say no to Eric Clapton as her album producer, seeing him as too banal. In 1968, she married Miles Davis and quickly influenced him on the magic of psychedelic rock along with introducing him to Jimi Hendrix-personally inspiring the classic album, Bitches Brew.


    Miles and Betty fans have long debated the truth of a near mythological session recorded in Studios B and E at Columbia's 52nd Street Studios on May 14th and 20th, 1969. The landmark session was produced by Miles and Teo Macero and featured Betty on vocals, accompanied by Jimi Hendrix Experience drummer Mitch Mitchell, guitarist John McLaughlin, Herbie Hancock on keys, and Dylan/Miles session bassist Harvey Brooks. Other players included bassist Billy Cox (Band of Gypsys), saxophonist Wayne Shorter, and organist Larry Young. Now, Light In The Attic, with full support from Betty herself, presents these recordings to the public for the very first time. These historic sessions-never heard, never bootlegged-predate Miles' revolutionary album, Bitches Brew, and are the true birth of Miles' jazz-rock explorations, along with the roots for Betty's groundbreaking funk that came years later, starting with her self-titled debut in 1973. While, ultimately, these recordings would go unreleased for nearly half a century, they would greatly shape each of their careers.


    The vibe is intrinsically unique, fresh, and futuristic-jazz heavyweights playing psychedelia, rock, and jazz-fusion long before the term became commonplace. The songs include Betty originals and covers of classics by Creedence and Cream. The concepts explored on these previously unheard sessions fueled concepts that wouldn't be fully realized until years later with Miles' seminal On The Corner.


    Additionally, included here is the first time rerelease of a 1968 Columbia single, recorded in October 1968 at Columbia Studios in Los Angeles. The session was produced by Jerry Fuller and featured South African maverick Hugh Masekela on trumpet and arrangements, plus members of jazz-funk pioneers The Crusaders-including trombonist Wayne Henderson and pianist Joe Sample. Two of the three tracks included here from this session are previously unreleased.


    This deluxe package is a treasure trove for both Betty and Miles fans, including rare documents from the pen of co-producer Teo Macero, rarely seen photos from legendary photographer Baron Wolman, and new interviews with Mrs. Davis herself, Harvey Brooks, and Hugh Masekela-the entire project overseen with Betty's full blessing.

    1. Hangin' Out
    2. Politician Man

    3. Down Home Girl

    4. Born On The Bayou

    5. I'm Ready, Willing & Able (Take 1)

    6. I'm Ready, Willing & Able (Take 9)

    7. It's My Life (Alternate Take)

    8. Live, Love, Learn

    9. My Soul Is Tired
    Betty Davis
    $25.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • First Issue First Issue Quick View

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    First Issue

    180 Gram Viny


    Includes Gatefold Jacket, Poster and Stickers!


    In 1976 Johnny Rotten and the Sex Pistols set the agenda for punk's year zero with 'Anarchy In The UK', a song that summed up the spirit, sound and attitude of the band in one shocking package. Two years later, the Sex Pistols were in tatters, but Rotten was as unsentimental as you'd hope. He reverted to his real name - John Lydon - and set about forming a band whose very identity kicked against press and media manipulation. Featuring bassist Jah Wobble, drummer Jim Walker and guitarist Keith Levene, his new group were Public Image Limited. The public image would be limited.


    PiL were a very distinct prospect from the Pistols, founded with a greater thought for rhythm, and with a sound that turned the page from snarling punk to a more experimental sound fusing rock, dance, folk, ballet, pop and dub. But that's not to say Lydon's new outfit lacked vitriol. 'Public Image' hits out against the notorious British tabloid press, who never gave Lydon an easy ride, and against his own Sex Pistols public image - "You only saw me for the clothes I wore".


    The debut single (and the album that followed) operated as a theme song and a manifesto: " my entrance/My own creation/My grand finale/My goodbye," as the lyrics had it. It is, essentially, the sound of four people letting loose in a studio - and not caring what anyone else thought.

    1. Theme
    2. Religion I
    3. Religion II
    4. Annalisa
    5. Public Image
    6. Low Life
    7. Attack
    8. Fodderstompf
    Public Image LTD.
    $29.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Wheedle's Groove: Seattle Funk, Modern Soul & Boogie: Volume II 1972-1987 Wheedle's Groove: Seattle Funk, Modern Soul & Boogie: Volume II 1972-1987 Quick View

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    Wheedle's Groove: Seattle Funk, Modern Soul & Boogie: Volume II 1972-1987

    In 2004, the first volume of Wheedle's Groove shone a light on the formerly unheralded soul scene in 1960s and '70s Seattle, followed by a new album in 2008, and then an award winning feature-length documentary film. The on-going Wheedle's Groove series continues to present a vast chapter of the city's musical heritage that has little to do with long-haired rock dudes with guitars. No - in the world of Wheedle's Groove, platform shoes and pimp hats were the order of the day.


    But unlike Volume I, Seattle's soul scene did not stop in 1975. A new volume, Wheedle's Groove Vol. II, documents the period from 1972 to 1987, when funk was superseded by disco and modern soul. Heading into the '80s, artists in the Emerald City caught wind of the hip-hop and electro scenes that were growing in bigger cities across America, and gave the music their own distinct spin.


    As the years unfurl in the tracks of Wheedle's Groove Volume II, so does the recent history of American music, the songs tracing technological changes and social change, and music's move from the club to disco as live bands moved aside for DJs. Witness Septimus, on the cusp of both, blending a live drummer with a Roland drum machine and cutting 'Here I Go Again' on a disco-friendly 12" single.


    Separated from the major centers of soul music, Seattle was a scene that developed out of the gaze of the mainstream music industry, but one that moved just as fast. As John Studamire of the band Priceless remembers, "A lot of the groups around town would have to incorporate that disco sound or you'd sound totally dated."


    Seattle's size and location had a great effect on its sound. Artists on the scene were accustomed to playing small, discreetly segregated club shows and pressing short runs of 45s for local radio stations. Touring happened mostly on a regional scale and artists popped up in a variety of different bands. Fans of Volume I will recognize some familiar names here: Robbie Hill's Family Affair turn in the soul-jazz gem 'Don't Give Up' and Cold, Bold & Together present the undeniable vocal beauty of 'Let's Backtrack.'


    Compiled and sequenced by Seattle's DJ Supreme La Rock, this 18-track compilation will also introduce you to the long-forgotten blue-eyed soul boy Don Brown ('Don't Lose Your Love') and frustrated talents Push, overlooked for record deals on account of singer "Big Joe" Erickson's larger-than-life heft ('You Turn Me On'). There's Frederick Robinson III and his gospel-funk protest tune 'Love One Another', Tony Benton of Teleclere being Seattle's answer to Prince ('Steal Your Love') and Seattle Mariners baseball star Lenny Randle recording a tribute to their infamous stadium.

    1. Epicentre - Get Off The Phone
    2. Priceless - Love In Your Life
    3. Don Brown - Don't Lose Your Love
    4. Deuce featuring Clevon - Your Love Is Fine (Lovin' Fine)
    5. Push - You Turn Me On (Portland Session)
    6. Seattle Pure Dynamite - I Wonder Love
    7. Septimus - Here I Go Again
    8. Priceless - Look At Me
    9. Lenny Randle & Ballplayers featuring Rashawna - Kingdome
    10. Malik Din - Trouble In Mind
    11. Romel Westwood - I'm Through With You
    12. Teleclere - Steal Your Love
    13. Steppen Stones - Darlin Oh Darlin
    14. Cold, Bold & Together - Let's Backtrack
    15. Unfinished Business - Holding On
    16. Frederick Robinson III - Love One Another
    17. Bernadette Bascom - I Don't Wanna Lose Your Love
    18. Robbie Hill's Family Affair - Don't Give Up
    Various Artists
    $25.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Something Special Something Special Quick View

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    Something Special

    The three years spent on MGM Records between 1966 and 1968 were golden ones for Lee Hazlewood. He spent them working with his muse, Suzi Jane Hokom, writing a still-unreleased book, The Quiet Revenge of Elmo Furback, competing with Phil Spector from their respective studios, and coming up with the formula for the boy/girl" songs for which he'd become famous. In fact, the unflattering portrait on the cover of Something Special did little to hint at how hip this late-flowering talent (he was in his late 30s when "These Boots Are Made For Walkin'" made him a star songwriter) had become.


    The common strand on the MGM trilogy is one of the unexpected happening. They were an ill fit for a major label-experimental, difficult to pigeonhole, and unpredictable. Those descriptors apply nowhere more aptly than Something Special. Where 1966's The Very Special World Of Lee Hazlewood and 1967's Lee Hazlewoodism: Its Cause And Cure had employed an arranger, Billy Strange, and a full orchestra, Something Special stripped things back and brought in a flavor of jazz and blues, complete with gravelly-voiced scatting courtesy of collaborator Don Randi. This sat alongside tracks like "Little War" and "Hands," the kind of late night, acoustic balladeering Hazlewood would later seize for his career-highlight LP, Requiem For An Almost Lady. The sound was that of a stripped-down nightclub jazz/blues/folk combo, fully rejecting the psychedelic music going on all over the world.


    The album made clear that forging a career as a serious star was not at the top of Hazlewood's agenda, and at the third opportunity, he'd let the listener in on the joke. Tellingly, Hokom recalls Hazlewood saying the MGM albums were his "expensive demos. I'm sure that MGM thought that they would be successful." Little chance of that with Something Special -it was originally released only in Germany. The same year, Hazlewood founded the LHI imprint, and began building his own empire, one we've been lovingly archiving for the past few years. We now present this missing link in the story, three albums that generated some of Hazlewood's best-and most varied-work.

    1. Shades
    2. This Town
    3. Child
    4. Stone Cold Blues
    5. Little War
    6. Them Girls
    7. Fort Worth
    8. Hands
    9. Mannford, Oklahoma
    10. Summer Night
    11. Moochie Ladeux*
    12. The Lone Ranger Ain t My Friend Anymore*
    Lee Hazlewood
    $22.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Betty Davis (Awaiting Repress) Betty Davis (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $20.99
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    Betty Davis (Awaiting Repress)

    One can hardly imagine the genre-busting, culture-crossing musical magic of Outkast, Prince, Erykah Badu, Rick James, The Roots, or even the early Red Hot Chili Peppers without the influence of R&B pioneer Betty Davis. Her style of raw and revelatory punk-funk defies any notions that women can't be visionaries in the worlds of rock and pop. In recent years, rappers from Ice Cube to Talib Kweli to Ludacris have rhymed over her intensely strong but sensual music.


    There is one testimonial about Betty Davis that is universal: she was a woman ahead of her time. In our contemporary moment, this may not be as self-evident as it was thirty years ago - we live in an age that's been profoundly changed by flamboyant flaunting of female sexuality: from Parlet to Madonna, Lil Kim to Kelis. Yet, back in 1973 when Betty Davis first showed up in her silver go-go boots, dazzling smile and towering Afro, who could you possibly have compared her to? Marva Whitney had the voice but not the independence. Labelle wouldn't get sexy with their "Lady Marmalade" for another year while Millie Jackson wasn't "Feelin' Bitchy" until 1977. Even Tina Turner, the most obvious predecessor to Betty's fierce style wasn't completely out of Ike's shadow until later in the decade.


    Ms. Davis's unique story, still sadly mostly unknown, is unlike any other in popular music. Betty wrote the song "Uptown" for the Chambers Brothers before marrying Miles Davis in the late '60s, influencing him with psychedelic rock, and introducing him to Jimi Hendrix - personally inspiring the classic album 'Bitches Brew.'


    But her songwriting ability was way ahead of its time as well. Betty not only wrote every song she ever recorded and produced every album after her first, but the young woman penned the tunes that got The Commodores signed to Motown. The Detroit label soon came calling, pitching a Motown songwriting deal, which Betty turned down. Motown wanted to own everything. Heading to the UK, Marc Bolan of T. Rex urged the creative dynamo to start writing for herself. A common thread throughout Betty's career would be her unbending Do-It-Yourself ethic, which made her quickly turn down anyone who didn't fit with the vision. She would eventually say no to Eric Clapton as her album producer, seeing him as too banal.


    In 1973, Davis would finally kick off her cosmic career with an amazingly progressive hard funk and sweet soul self-titled debut. Davis showcased her fiercely unique talent and features such gems as "If I'm In Luck I Might Get Picked Up" and "Game Is My Middle Name." The album Betty Davis was recorded with Sly & The Family Stone's rhythm section, sharply produced by Sly Stone drummer Greg Errico, and featured backing vocals from Sylvester and the Pointer Sisters.

    1. If I'm In Luck I Might Get Picked Up
    2. Walkin Up The Road
    3. Anti Love Song
    4. Your Man My Man
    5. Ooh Yeah
    6. Steppin In Her I. Miller Shoes
    7. Game Is My Middle Name
    8. In The Meantime
    Betty Davis
    $20.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • Now That Everything's Been Said Now That Everything's Been Said Quick View

    $22.99
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    Now That Everything's Been Said

    We all know the Carole King who wrote some of the biggest hits of the '60s, from "Will You Love Me Tomorrow" to "Pleasant Valley Sunday," via "The Locomotion" and "(You Make Me Feel Like) A Natural Woman." We also know the singer-songwriter behind Tapestry, the album that launched King as a solo singer in her own right. But in between-and not nearly as well known-is King's band, The City, and their album, Now That Everything's Been Said.


    By the mid-'60s, King's marriage to Gerry Goffin, with whom she'd written many of those wonderful hits, had hit the rocks. A divorce loomed, and King all but retired to raise their two daughters. She headed west to Laurel Canyon in '67, taking the children with her, and made the previously unlikely move of joining a progressive folk-rock band. King formed The City with future husband Charles Larkey on bass and Danny Kortchmar on guitar and vocals. With King on piano and vocals, they created a folk rock sound that pre-empted the singer-songwriter boom of the '70s.


    Produced by Lou Adler and featuring Jimmy Gordon on drums, The City's sound is deep and soulful, imperfect but passionate. And the songs, with King writing or co-writing all but one, are as exceptional as you'd expect and as widely covered as her factory work. "Now That Everything's Been Said" was a hit for American Spring, "A Man Without A Dream" was tackled by The Monkees, and "Hi-De-Ho (That Old Sweet Roll)" was a hit for Blood, Sweat & Tears. Central to the album's appeal is King's own stirring reading of her track "Wasn't Born To Follow," covered masterfully by The Byrds for the Easy Rider soundtrack.


    King had been used to a life on the sidelines, and her stage fright left the trio unable to tour the LP which adversely affected their fortunes. That, plus some behind-the-scenes distribution problems, meant the album was quickly deleted, and it remained so for the next thirty years-partly at King's request. Even so, its failure was a surprise to those concerned. "I was 26 when Now That Everything's Been Said was released in 1968," King says of the album. "[We] expected it to zoom to the top of the charts within, at most, a few weeks. Individually and together, we optimistically imagined the album's success as if it had already happened. Danny and Charlie kept telling each other, 'It's a great album. The City is gonna be Number 1 with a bullet!'


    Listening now, you can feel the threads that lead to Tapestry and to the hugely successful performing career that followed. It's not so much an oddity in King's work as the missing link between her two lives. Reissued here in deluxe vinyl, this is, at long last, a chance to own this lost album.

    1. Snow Queen
    2. I Wasn't Born To Follow
    3. Now That Everything's Been Said
    4. Paradise Alley
    5. Man Without A Dream
    6. Victim Of Circumstance
    7. Why Are You Leaving
    8. Lady
    9. My Sweet Home
    10. I Don't Believe It
    11. That Old Sweet Roll (Hi-De-Ho)
    12. All The Time
    The City
    $22.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Get A Grip Get A Grip Quick View

    $34.99
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    Get A Grip

    Get a Grip is the eleventh studio album by American rock band Aerosmith, originally released on April 20, 1993, by Geffen Records. Get a Grip was the band's last studio album to be released by Geffen before they returned to Columbia Records.


    Get a Grip featured guests including Don Henley, who sang backup on Amazing, and Lenny Kravitz, who offered backup vocals and collaboration to Line Up. As on Permanent Vacation and Pump, this album featured numerous song collaborators from outside the band including Desmond Child, Jim Vallance, Mark Hudson, Richie Supa, Taylor Rhodes, Jack Blades, and Tommy Shaw.


    Get a Grip became Aerosmith's best-selling studio album worldwide, achieving sales of over 20 million copies, and is tied with Pump for their second best-selling album in the United States, selling over 7 million copies as of 1995. (Toys in the Attic leads with eight million). This also made it their third consecutive album with US sales of at least five million. Two songs from the album won Grammy Awards for Best Rock Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal, in 1993 and 1994. The album was voted Album of the Year by Metal Edge readers in the magazine's 1993 Readers' Choice Awards, while Livin' on the Edge was voted Best Video

    LP 1
    1. Intro
    2. Eat The Rich
    3. Get A Grip
    4. Fever
    5. Livin' On The Edge
    6. Flesh
    7. Walk On Down
    8. Shut Up And Dance


    LP 2
    1. Cryin'
    2. Gotta Love It
    3. Crazy
    4. Line Up
    5. Can't Stop Messin'
    6. Amazing
    7. Boogie Man

    Aerosmith
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Get Your Wings Get Your Wings Quick View

    $24.99
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    Get Your Wings

    Remastered from the original source tapes!


    Contains the classics Same Old Song And Dance, Train Kept A-Rollin' and Seasons of Wither


    Often overshadowed by the subsequent twin highlights of Toys in the Attic and Rocks, Aerosmith's 1974 second album, Get Your Wings, is where Aerosmith became Aerosmith -- it's where they teamed up with producer Jack Douglas, it's where they shed much of their influences and developed their own trademark sound, it's where they turned into songwriters, it's where Steven Tyler unveiled his signature obsessions with sex and sleaze. Chief among these attributes may be Douglas, who either helped the band ease into the studio or captured their sound in a way their debut never did. This is a leaner, harder album, bathed in grease and layered in grit, but it's not just down to Douglas. The band itself sounds more distinctive. There are blues in Joe Perry and Joey Kramer's interplay, but this leapfrogs over blues-rock; it turns into slippery hard rock. To be sure, it's still easy to hear the Stones here, but they never really sound Stonesy; there's almost more of the Yardbirds to the way the group works the riffs, particularly evident on the cover of the early 'Birds classic The Train Kept a Rollin'. But if the Yardbirds were tight and nervy, Aerosmith is blown out and loose, the sound of excess incarnate -- that is, in every way but the writing itself, which is confident and strong, fueled by Tyler's gonzo sex drive. He is the Lord of the Thighs, playing that Same Old Song and Dance, but he also slows down enough for the eerie Seasons of Wither, a powerful slow-churning ballad whose mastery of atmosphere is a good indication of how far the band has grown. They never attempted anything quite so creepy on their debut, but it isn't just that Aerosmith is trying newer things on Get Your Wings, it's that they're doing their bloozy bluster better and bolder, which is what turns this sophomore effort into their first classic.

    -All Music Guide

    1. Same Old Song and Dance
    2. Lord of the Thighs
    3. Spaced
    4. Woman of the World
    5. S.O.S. (Too Bad)
    6. Train Kept A-Rollin'
    7. Seasons of Wither
    8. Pandora's Box
    Aerosmith
    $24.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Caveman (Awaiting Repress) Caveman (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $16.99
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    Caveman (Awaiting Repress)

    On Their self-titled sophomore album, Caveman strech thier legs in a number of different, albeit cohesive, directions.


    Caveman-a five-man vibe collective from NYC-released their first album in 2011. As first albums go, CoCo Beware was something akin to a moody statement of intent, a blueprint for a band quickly learning how to create horizon-wide rock songs that were equal parts intimate and expansive. Initially self-released and later snatched up by Fat Possum for re-release in early 2012, the record brims over with four-part harmonies, crystalline guitar lines, and tracks that see-sawed between echoey lullaby ("A Country's King of Dreams") to shoegaze-by-way-of classic-FM-radio sprawl ("Old Friend"). The album quickly elevated Caveman from local band to watch to a sizable touring draw and formidable live act, as evidenced by stints on the road with the likes of The War on Drugs, White Rabbits and Built to Spill. Despite being the work of a brand new band, CoCo Beware displayed a kind of Zen-like ease. It was the sound a five friends settling into a nice groove; the music that happens when, for whatever reason, a lot of seemingly disparate elements finally fall into place.


    "We all went up to Jimmy's grandmother's place in New Hampshire," says singer Matthew Iwanusa. "That's where the new record kind of started. It was literally the attic of her barn, lit up by Christmas lights. We'd all sit in this one room together and one by one we'd all go into the bathroom and record ourselves making the most psycho noises possible. It actually felt kind of like a weird breakthrough. We were all confident and comfortable enough with each other to try out these experiments, which extended itself into the making of the new record which is really just an evolution of this vibe that we'd been cultivating for long time."


    With that, the guys holed up in Brooklyn's Rumpus Room to start recording in earnest with Nick Stumpf (who produced the band's debut album) and Albert Di Fiore behind the controls. The album is a kind of sonic microcosm-a series of emotional yet tough mini-narratives operating within the same quixotic musical universe.


    As a result, the guitars on Caveman are bigger and more expansive, the rhythm section is tighter and more adventurous, the keyboards more opaque and pronounced. Like a marriage between Tangerine Dream, late period Slowdive, and Lindsey Buckingham, tracks like their new single "In the City" and "Ankles" boast synth lines that sound simultaneously retro and futuristic, while "Pricey" and "Never Want to Know" overflow with guitar sounds that could have miraculously floated off an old Cure album. It should be noted that James Carbonetti, the band's primary guitar player, also happens to be one of the most highly regarded guitar makers in New York City.


    And while Caveman's music could certainly operate on the level of dreamy soundscape and still be excellent, the depth of feeling in front man Matthew Iwanusa's lyrics helps weave the songs deeply into your memory. When Iwanusa sings Where's the time to waste on someone else's life? on "Where's the Time," it's hard not to read between the lines. Wonder and regret seem to fuel the record in almost equal measure.

    1. Strange to Suffer
    2. In the City
    3. Shut You Down
    4. Where's the Time
    5. Chances
    6. Over My Head
    7. Ankles
    8. Pricey
    9. I See You
    10. I Never Want to Know
    11. The Big Push
    Caveman
    $16.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • Underground Underground Quick View

    $34.99
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    Underground

    Import

    Monk, considered one of the greatest Jazz pianists of all time, recorded Underground in '67-'68. It's the last recording with the Thelonious Monk Quartet (Larry Gales on bass, Charlie Rouse on tenor sax, and Ben Riley on drums) and one of the last album he made for Columbia. What makes Underground special is that unlike his other Columbia recordings, four out of the seven songs were newly composed and recorded. Not to mention its striking cover artwork, which depicts Monk as a French Resistance member in a particularly messy attic. Music On Vinyl is especially proud to announce that this recording has been specially re-mastered in the US for this vinyl edition from the original tapes.

    1. Thelonious
    2. Ugly Beauty
    3. Raise Four
    4. Boo Boo's Birthday
    5. Easy Street
    6. Green Chimneys
    7. In Walked Bud
    Thelonious Monk
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
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