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  • The Bill Evans Album (Speakers Corner) The Bill Evans Album (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    The Bill Evans Album (Speakers Corner)

    The global corporation Columbia recorded and released only two LPs with pianist Bill Evans. A meagre result when one considers the numerous concerts that the new trio undertook between 1969 and 1974. Together with Eddie Gomez, a phenomenon on the bass, and drummer Marty Mortell, the three established a firm - and ever better - trio. Evans became interested in the possibilities offered by the Fender Rhodes piano and used it for the first time in The Bill Evans Album.


    The LP is remarkable in that only Evans's own compositions were recorded - three previously recorded pieces and four brand-new works. Of particular note is the melancholy Two Lonely People, Evans's musical interpretation of a poem by Carol Hall. Sugar Plum and T.T.T. were to remain in his repertoire right up until his very last recordings. Unusual but very commendable because it begins with an ad hoc introductory improvisation is the electric piano version of Evans's most well-known composition - Waltz For Debby.


    The excellent technical facilities at the Columbia Studio were used to the full by Bill Evans, even though they were only recording a small ensemble. And that is why the seven numbers sound far better than most of the trio's live recordings. And as Bill Evans once said, it was with this trio that he could fulfill his musical ambitions.

    Musicians:



    • Bill Evans (piano, electric piano

    • Eddie Gomez (bass)

    • Marty Morrell (drums)




    Recording: May and June 1971 at CBS 30th Street Studio, New York, by Pete Weiss

    Production: Helen Keane




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Funkallero
    2. The Two Lonely People
    3. Sugar Plum
    4. Waltz For Debby
    5. T.T.T. (Twelve Tone Tune)
    6. Re: Person I Knew
    7. Comrade Conrad
    Bill Evans
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Bach Keyboard Concertos (Speakers Corner) The Bach Keyboard Concertos (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $95.99
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    x

    The Bach Keyboard Concertos (Speakers Corner)

    The attempts that have been made to describe Glenn Gould's complex personality are endless in number, as are his surprising and often eccentric interpretations. Whether he is considered to be a sensitive maniac, neurotic individualist or uncompromising genius - Gould polarises, provokes and fascinates us long after his death in 1982. As early as 1964 the Canadian pianist ceased to give concerts, since he found appearing before an audience completely unacceptable and preferred to concentrate on studio recordings.



    Way in front of composers of the Viennese Classical era, which he did not take particularly seriously - although his performances keenly reflect Beethoven's rhythmicity - comes his personal deity: Bach. Gould's notorious strictness gives form to the minutest of figure in the score. He weaves his way through Bach's music and thereby articulates its tightly knit and multi-facetted depths. No lecturing keyboard proponent this, but a creative co-composer who imbues the spirit of the music with life and sonority. Upon the release in 1980 of the 80th Birthday Edition with its wealth of visual and tonal material, the music journalist Werner Theurich wrote that »no one had ever played more raptly, or more intensively. That Gould's performances are nothing but heavenly can be seen and felt. The rest is pure music.«




    Recording: April 1957, May 1967 and February 1969 at Columbia 30th Street Studio, New York City, by Fred Plaut

    Production: Andrew Kazdin




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    The Bach Keyboard Concertos J. S. Bach: Keyboard Concertos Nos. 1-5 and 7
    L. v. Beethoven: Piano Concerto No. 1 - Glenn Gould, the Columbia Symphony Orchestra conducted by Vladimir Golschmann and Leonard Bernstein
    Glenn Gould
    $95.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP Box Set - 3 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Rough And Ready (Speakers Corner) Rough And Ready (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    x

    Rough And Ready (Speakers Corner)

    Great talent and low morals well describes the groupie-loving and colleague-killing Jeff Beck - and no fear of denial! But this fast-paced life demanded its toll, which came in the form of a life-threatening car accident. The ace on the guitar was forced to retire for two years but returned to the scene full of vigour and with new musicians to launch the second Jeff Beck Group.
    Rough And Ready doesn't offer what might be expected from Brit Rock as far as a heavy sound or the boss's egomaniacal leaps on the guitar strings are concerned. Bob Tench opens the album with a surprisingly soulful sound and soaring falsetto in Get The Feeling. But then in the next number, Situation, we have crackling fire from the lead guitar and inventive solos - all easy-going and down-to-earth. Beck wouldn't tolerate routine rock: this is obvious from Max's Tune, in which developing melodies are hacked to pieces by the clash of cymbals. To round off the album, the band sings about Jody with constantly varying rhythms and fascinating harmonic twists, which genially and firmly find their way along the narrow path between sentiment and testosterone. So much roughness is a must!


    Musicians:



    • Jeff Beck (guitar)

    • Bob Tench (vocals)

    • Max Middelton (piano)

    • Clive Chaman (bass)

    • Cozy Powell (drums)



    Recording: April-July 1971 at Island Studios, London, by Jack Ashkinazy
    Production: Jeff Beck




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Got the Feeling
    2. Situation
    3. Short Business
    4. Max's Tune
    5. I've Been Used
    6. New Ways/Train Train
    7. Jody
    Jeff Beck Group
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Super Session (Speakers Corner) Super Session (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $44.99
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    Super Session (Speakers Corner)

    The musicians are aiming high with their desire for a "Super Session", for it's not something that can be planned. Only when the time, place, and audience play along, when one's lucky star is shining brightly, and the musicians have a good day, then one of music's great moments might be captured on tape. Not forgetting the recording technicians who also have to be in the mood!



    In 1968 this all happened to be the case with the majority of the nine numbers on the Columbia LP: Season Of The Witch (written by Donovan) in its present version is one of them, as well as You Don't Love Me and the Dylan classic It Takes A Lot To Laugh, It Takes A Train To Cry. All in all, one must consider the numbers with Steve Stills as most successful in the sense of a session because here each musician inspires the others. In the super session with Kooper and Bloomfield, the guitarist stands in the limelight while the other musicians back him up.



    Very often the three soloists even surpass the greatest moments of their own groups (Al Kooper's Blood, Sweat & Tears; Mike Bloomfield's Electric Flag; Steven Stills's Buffalo Springfield). In 1968 the magazine Rolling Stone judged this album to be one of the best releases of the year: an accolade which is completely justified and is still valid to this day. What better reason to get your copy of this "highly recommended" album without delay.



    Musicians:



    • Mike Bloomfield

    • Steven Stills (electric guitar)

    • Al Kooper (piano, organ, vocals, guitar, electric guitar)

    • Barry Goldberg (electric piano)

    • Harvey Brooks (bass)

    • Eddie Hoh (drums)




    Production: Al Kooper




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.




    This title is not eligible for discount.

    Albert's Shuffle
    Stop
    Man's Temptation
    His Holy Modal Majesty
    Really
    It Takes A Lot To Laugh, It Takes A Train To Cry
    Season Of The Witch
    You Don't Love Me
    Harvey's Tune
    Mike Bloomfield, Al Kooper, Steven Stills
    $44.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Nina Simone and Piano! (Speakers Corner) Nina Simone and Piano! (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Nina Simone and Piano! (Speakers Corner)

    Musicians certainly don't have it easy with record companies. First of all they must struggle to even get a contract. Then, when their debut release has proved a success, they are bandied around from one arranger to another in all the recording studios imaginable. But having been treated with such sounds as a snappy combo, meaty bigband, and smoochy string orchestra, there at last comes an opportunity for some artists to be themselves again.



    This album wholly concentrates on Nina Simone and demonstrates that she does not need help from anyone else in order to bring her strikingly expressive voice into the limelight. Accompanying her in her songs about loneliness, identity crises, and desires is her faithful friend, the piano, which she masters equally as well as her voice. The piano parts are far more than just casual accompaniments. Varying from number to number, they range from a classical, bluesy sound, to late-Romantic fervour, right up to avantgarde aggression. And yet all these pieces have something in common: filled with bizarre beauty, they portray a complex personality with all its ups and downs.



    Musicians:



    • Nina Simone (piano, vocals)




    Recording: 1969 in RCA Victor's Studio B, New York City, by Ray Hall

    Production: Stroud Productions, Inc.




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.




    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Seems I'm Never Tired Lovin' You
    2. Nobody's Fault But Mine
    3. I Think It's Going To Rain Today
    4. Everyone's Gone To The Moon
    5. Compensation
    6. Who Am I
    7. Another Spring
    8. The Human Touch
    9. I Get Along Without You Very Well (Except Sometimes)

    10. The Desperate Ones
    Nina Simone
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Piano In The Background (Speakers Corner) Piano In The Background (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Piano In The Background (Speakers Corner)

    Big band fans, take note! These nine numbers, in precisely this version, belong in every collection. We are talking about the year 1960, and the 17 musicians involved have probably performed this very repertoire every night in a different venue all over the globe. But in the studio it all sounds fresh and new, well practised but never dull, cool, groovy and intoxicating. The difference to a great number of other Ellington LPs is that here not a single wind soloist stands in the foreground but the whole body of musicians.


    The arrangements are all new and some of them are even quite unusual, but Sam Woodyard on the drums has everything well under control - sometimes not at all 'Ellington-like'.
    Snapping the fingers is automatic, and tapping your foot is also not to be frowned on; however this recording demands careful listening! If you have the first version of these numbers in your collection then it would be a good idea to compare them with this recording. The Duke Ellington Orchestra remains young, dynamic and varied thanks to a continually changing ensemble. And the 'Piano Man', as the best 'pause-filling' pianist ironically called himself, sat full of vigour before the 88 keys of the keyboard at the age of 60.


    Not only jazz fans will be saying a big thank you that this recording - made in the early days of stereophony - is available once again on virgin vinyl with superb sound.


    Musicians:


    • Duke Ellington (piano)
    • Johnny Hodges, Harry Carney, Russell Procope (saxophone)
    • Ray Nance, Willie Cook (trumpet)
    • Lawrence Brown, 'Booty' Wood (trombone)
    • Aaron Bell (bass)
    • Sam Woodyard (drums)



    Recording: May and June 1960 at Radio Recorders, Los Angeles

    Production: Henri Renaud


    About Speakers Corner


    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Happy Go Lucky Local
    2. What Am I Here For
    3. Kinda Dukish / Rockin' In Rhythm
    4. Perdido
    5. I'm Beginning To See The Light
    6. Midriff
    7. It Don't Mean A Thing
    8. Main Stem
    9. Take The A Train
    Duke Ellington
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Take Ten (Speakers Corner) Take Ten (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Take Ten (Speakers Corner)

    No, not Take Five but Take Ten is the title of this LP and its very first number. Certainly this should be taken as a hint that it was not Dave Brubeck but Paul Desmond who was the composer of this 'million seller'. At the recording session, the guitarist Jim Hall was more than a substitute for the piano - he contributed to the quartet a whole new sound colouring which was tinged with the influences of bossa nova.
    The numbers are all easy-going and airy, the melodic lines and sound are filled with transparency. All the while one is curious as to the clear part-writing, and the wealth of ideas emanating from the soloists. This does not only apply to the old favourites Alone Together, Nancy and The One I Love, all three of them arrangements made ad hoc in the studio and which demonstrate how familiar the musicians were with one another, how they listened to one another, answered, and kept the dialogue flowing. The atmosphere is relaxed, and this conveys itself to the listener even after almost half a century.



    RCA's recording and reproduction technology was ahead of its time. The music of these South-American-sounding gems comes out of the loudspeakers with brilliance, clarity and - at last - without the frustrating crackle of a second-hand LP.



    Musicians:



    • Paul Desmond (alto saxophone)

    • Jim Hall (guitar)

    • Gene Cherico, Gene Wright (bass)

    • Connie Kay (drums)




    Recording: 1963 in Webster Hall, New York, by Ray Hall

    Production: George Avakian





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.




    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Take Ten
    2. El Prince
    3. Alone Together
    4. Embarcadero
    5. Theme from ''Black Orpheus''
    6. Nancy (With the Laughing Face)
    7. Samba de Orfeu
    8. The One I Love (Belongs to Somebody Else)
    Paul Desmond
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Beethoven: Symphony No. 9 (Speakers Corner) Beethoven: Symphony No. 9 (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $69.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Beethoven: Symphony No. 9 (Speakers Corner)

    It was clear from the start that Beethoven's Ninth Symphony, with its air of solemnity in the final chorus, which calls for brotherly love just as the New Year comes in, would become a musical part of our world's cultural legacy. Hundreds of minds, Beethoven researcher Karl Nef prophesied, have been set in motion by this music in the most varied ways, and it will continue not only to bestow pleasure upon countless thousands, but also to stimulate mental life right at the most fundamental level.



    There are certainly only a very few truly cerebral interpretations which stand out from the fathomless mass of recordings. One of those upon which "The Absolute Sound" journal has stamped its coveted seal of approval is the recording with Georg Solti and his perfectly honed symphony musicians from Chicago. Here, this usually somewhat daring baton-wielder plumbs the very depths of the score and allows Beethoven's rich abundance of ideas to ferment into a great whole.



    The four soloists prove their worth as first choice for the richly detailed and balanced synopsis of this fissured work. They captivate us as much in the solo as in the group singing with their natural and expressive intonation. The dry, very present sound highlights the fact that this is an artistic performance at the highest level.




    Musicians:



    • Pilar Lorengar, Stuart Burrows, and other soloists

    • The Chicago Symphony Chorus & Orchestra

    • Sir Georg Solti (conductor)




    Recording: May 1972 in the Krannert Centre of the University of Illinois, Chicago, by Kenneth Wilkinson and Gordon Parry

    Production: David Harvey



    Format: 2LPs 33rpm / gatefold sleeve



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    This title is not eligible for discount.

    Ludwig Van Beethoven
    $69.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Splendido Hotel (Speakers Corner) Splendido Hotel (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $64.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Splendido Hotel (Speakers Corner)

    Just how much creative gunpowder had Al Di Meola ignited in his early career? First of all there was the flamenco firework in the best-seller Elegant Gypsy, and secondly his mega-successful live album resulting from a summit meeting in San Francisco with Paco de Lucia and John McLaughlin. After this great start it was no wonder that such prominent colleagues as Jan Hammer, Chick Corea, Steve Gadd, Anthony Jackson and Les Paul were eager to participate in the present album Splendido Hotel.


    This great line-up of musicians produce a rich, saturated sound and create numerous 'flavours' in this cocktail of sounds, which - as a double LP - can be likened to a fantastic long drink, as it were. Di Meola's idea of fusion starts off in the opening number as a slow, sluggish oriental-like melody, which develops to take on a rock rhythm. High-speed and lovingly detailed flamenco such as is found in Splendido Sundance alternates with subtle rhythms (Two To Tango) and good-humoured lighter numbers with an electronic undertone such as Roller Jubilee and a funky version of Bert Kaempfert's Spanish Eyes. With this great mix, the musicians create a wonderful atmosphere in which every Latin aficionado will feel at home.

    Musicians:



    • Al Di Meola (guitar, cello, drums, percussion)

    • Chick Corea (piano)

    • Les Paul (guitar)

    • Jan Hammer (synthesizer)

    • Anthony Jackson (bass)

    • Mingo Lewis (conga, bongo, percussion

    • Philippe Saisse (keyboards, marimba)

    • Steve Gadd (drums)

    • Eddie Colon (percussion)




    Recording: 1979 at CBS Recording and Electric Lady Studios, New York, by Dave Palmer and Love Castle Studios, Los Angeles, by Bernie Kisch

    Production: Al Di Meola and Philip Roberge




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    LP 1
    1. Alien Chase On Arabian Desert
    2. Silent Story In Her Eyes

    3. Roller Jubilee
    4. Two To Tango
    5. Al Di's Dream Theme


    LP 2
    1. Dinner Music Of The Gods

    2. Splendido Sundance
    3. I Can Tell
    4. Spanish Eyes
    5. Isfahan
    6. Bianca's Midnight Lullaby

    Al Di Meola
    $64.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPS Sealed Buy Now
  • Two Of A Mind (Speakers Corner) Two Of A Mind (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    x

    Two Of A Mind (Speakers Corner)

    Although the beautiful sound, mutual understanding and harmonic balance mostly predominate, the music of alto saxophonist Paul Desmond performing together with baritone saxophonist Gerry Mulligan is far from what one calls 'easy listening'. For many, it is even difficult to identify the melody of evergreens such as Stardust and The Way You Look Tonight. (And what theme is tucked away in Two Of A Mind????)
    The recording in the RCA Victor Studio took place over several days in 1962, and this is why different bass players and percussionists are heard - Wendell Marshall, Joe Benjamin and John Beal each take their turn on the bass, while Connie Kay and Mel Lewis change places behind the drum set. These musicians form a brilliant team, and that there is no piano is both deliberate and inevitable for Gerry Mulligan recordings of the day. By the way, the second saxophonist in The Way You Look Tonight is Paul Desmond - by means of over-dubbing in the middle of the stereo recording!
    The present LP could certainly take a rightful place in a 'Best Of' collection alongside the other recordings by Gerry Mulligan with Ben Webster and Stan Getz.



    Musicians:



    • Gerry Mulligan (bassoon)

    • Paul Desmond (alto saxophone)

    • Joe Benjamin, John Beal, Wendell Marshall (bass)

    • Connie Kay, Mel Lewis (drums)




    Recording: 1962 at RCA Victor's Studio A, New York City by Ray Hall, Bob Simpson and Mickey Crofford

    Production: Bob Prince and George Avakian





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. All the Things You Are
    2. Stardust

    3. Two of a Mind
    4. Blight of the Fumble Bee
    5. The Way You Look Tonight
    6. Out of Nowhere
    Paul Desmond & Gerry Mulligan
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Nilsson Sings Newman (Speakers Corner) Nilsson Sings Newman (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Nilsson Sings Newman (Speakers Corner)

    When two talented, cussed men such as Harry Nilsson and Randy Newman get together to record an album, you can be sure of an exceptional record filled with great vocals and poetry. Nilsson, who is described as a man who performs his songs with one cynical, laughing eye and one nostalgic, tearful eye in Rowohlt's Rock-Lexikon, finds inspiration in the then relatively unknown Newman, a docile but caustic social critic who often attacked American society in his songs.



    In the layers and harmonies achieved partly by overdubbing, and which alternate between cowshed, barbershop and the Beatles, Nilsson manages to make his bitter words somewhat easier to digest. He relates the bizarre chronicle of a couple who have a dull relationship and who morbidly look forward to passing away in an old people's home (Love Story), or he swears his undying love to a certain Caroline in springtime, or he is transported back in time in his mind's eye to an idyllic little town in the countryside (Dayton, Ohio 1903). A weighty musical background would lend nothing to these highly sophisticated songs. Piano chords, a little bit of electric harpsichord, and a tinkle on the organ keys here and there suffice to dally in an old-fashioned manner - with a sarcastic smile or even a nasty grin - in the desolation of reality, without getting the blues.



    Musicians:



    • Harry Nilsson (vocal, keyboards, percussion)

    • Randy Newman (piano)




    Recording: August - October 1969 at RCA's Music Center of the World, Hollywood, by Grover Helsley

    Production: Harry Nilsson





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Vine St.
    2. Love Story
    3. Yellow Man
    4. Caroline
    5. Cowboy
    6. The Beehive State
    7. I'll Be Home
    8. Living Without You
    9. Dayton, Ohio 1903
    10. So Long Dad
    Harry Nilsson
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Mahler - Symphony #1 (Speakers Corner) Mahler - Symphony #1 (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Mahler - Symphony #1 (Speakers Corner)

    "What kind of a world is this which produces such sounds and forms to portray itself?" said Mahler of his First Symphony and gave the world his answer in the music.



    What at first sounds like "endless Spring" is transformed grotesquely to become an irreal collage. Just how deceptive is this idyllic landscape through which the wayfarer wanders? Distant fanfares, furtive melodies and strange cuckoo calls disturb the seemingly peaceful depiction of Nature before the cheerful theme melody pushes to the fore. But this peace is transient too. The wayfarer begins to increase his pace, he is not the hunter but the hunted in a hostile world. This symphony neither portrays nor describes - it presents the esthetic counterpart of reality.



    In view of the recent revival of Mahler and the resultant new recordings of his works, this early DECCA recording cannot be too highly praised. The disc guarantees not only a masterly performance but sumptuous sound and transparency. The owner of this particular recording of the Titan Symphony certainly needs no other and has every right to ask, "What kind of a record is this which produces such sounds...?"



    Musicians:



    • London Symphony Orchestra

    • Sir Georg Solti (conductor)




    Recording: January and February 1964 at Kingsway Hall, London by Gordon Parry / John Culshaw





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Langsam, Schleppend, Wie Ein Naturlaut
    2. KrÄftig Bewegt, Doch Nicht Zu Schnell
    3. Feierlich Und Gemessen, Ohne Zu Schleppen
    4. StÜrmisch Bewegt
    Gustav Mahler
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Round About Midnight (Speakers Corner) Round About Midnight (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    x

    Round About Midnight (Speakers Corner)

    At long last these early recordings, which Miles Davis set down for the Columbia label in 1955 and 1956, are available on LP again. And what is more, they were made without any alternate takes or second attempts, as is the custom these days.



    You can sit back and enjoy the six numbers in the order which the producer, probably in conjunction with Davis, decided upon. To be sure, all of the titles are well known and have been played a thousand times over in many different versions. But what this Quintet (and here each and every individual musician is meant!) produces as regards inventiveness, thrilling improvisations and artistry is absolutely top notch. Davis's vibrato-less sound is taken over seamlessly by John Coltrane - wonderfully demonstrated in the middle of Bye, Bye Blackbird, while Paul Chambers' showpiece is Ack VÄrmeland du sköna (aka Dear Old Stockholm). In the years 1955/56, bebop was the talk of the day, born witness to by the classics Tadd's Delight by Tadd Dameron and Ah-Leu-Cha by Charlie Parker. Here, however, the improvised melodic strands are more moderate, pointing the way to the style that later became known as modal jazz.



    Although 'Round About Midnight as an album does not enjoy the reputation of Kind Of Blue, this Columbia recording contains many gems which are well worth hearing.



    Musicians:



    • Miles Davis

    • John Coltrane (tenor saxophone)

    • Red Garland (piano)

    • Paul Chambers (bass)

    • Philly Joe Jones (drums)




    Recording: October 1955, June and September 1956 at Columbia's 30th Street Studio, New York

    Production: George Avakian




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Round Midnight
    2. Ah-Leu-Cha
    3. All Of You
    4. Bye Bye Blackbird
    5. Tadds Delight

    6. Dear Old Stockholm
    Miles Davis
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Seductive Reasoning (Speakers Corner) Seductive Reasoning (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Seductive Reasoning (Speakers Corner)

    Thanks to their undeniable musical talent, which allowed them to be taken seriously in the folk scene, the industrious Roche sisters' career began when they were young. The duo began by singing Christmas carols, doo-wop song syllable puzzles, and tricky barbershop harmonies. They finally caught the attention of Paul Simon, who brought the gifted girls in as backup singers on his LP There Goes Rhymin' Simon, and was primarily responsible for the birth of their first recording. The lavishly produced album achieved high critical acclaim. Although it was a worthy professional debut, the public was hesitant to buy the album. The specialist magazine Rolling Stone commented drily and somewhat at a loss that the Roches weren't everyone's cup of tea.



    Maggie and Terre Roche are a well-rehearsed vocal team however: with a range from hazy, finely balanced voices singing as one, right up to pearly, radiant brilliance, the Roche sisters enthusiastically penned a songbook which is almost without exception their very own creation. Mechanical bluegrass music (Wigglin' Man), a steam-train character (If You Emptied ...) and a somewhat crude and unrefined country aura make the subtle lyrics easily accessible to all, but the LP also offers the listener wonderfully ill-humoured verse (The Mountain People) and story-like prose (West Virginia). This is a truly exceptional album, and well worth being discovered!



    Musicians:



    • Maggie Roche (piano, guitar)

    • Terre Roche (guitar)

    • Paul Simon (guitar)

    • Pete Carr (guitar)

    • Jimmy Johnson (guitar)

    • Barry Beckett (keyboard)

    • David Hood (bass)

    • Roger Hawkins(drums)



    Recording: 1973 in the Morgan Studios, London, and 1974 in the Muscle Shoals Studios, Sheffield, Alabama

    Production: Paul Simon, Paul Samwell-Smith, David Hood and Jimmy Johnson




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.




    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Underneath the Moon
    2. Down the Dream
    3. Wigglin' Man
    4. West Virginia
    5. If You Empty Out All Your Pockets You Could Not Make the Change
    6. Telephone Bill
    7. Malachy's
    8. Burden of Proof
    9. The Mountain People
    10. Jill of All Trades
    Maggie & Terre Roche
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Midnight Special (Speakers Corner) The Midnight Special (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    The Midnight Special (Speakers Corner)

    No attempt has ever been made to compare Harry Belafonte with other singers of his own generation or generations following. Perhaps this is because there simply is no other singer in the American folk scene who possesses anything remotely comparable to his uniquely silky yet dusky voice, or his genial mix of calypso, blues, gospel and traditional songs. The present album provides a wonderful testimony to the Jamaican singer's flexibility and multifariousness, which he learned to perfection of New York's jazz clubs. It includes songs such as "Midnight Special", a prisoner's nocturnal prayer for freedom, and "On Top Of Old Smokey", which Belafonte instils with intricate rhythm and Caribbean flair. And the tailor-made arrangements are no less thrilling: whether possessing all the drive of a stomping big band, filled with the intimacy of a smoochy small ensemble (with Bob Dylan on the mouth organ!) or with an earthy, folksy, blue grass sound - there's all that and plenty more! To put it in a nutshell: a veritable feast of traditional music which doesn't sound the least 'traditional'.



    Musicians:



    • Harry Belafonte (vocal)

    • Jimmy Jones (conductor, arranger)

    • Bob Dylan (harmonica)

    • Joe Wilder (trumpet)

    • Jerome Richardson (saxophone)

    • Millard Thomas, Ernie Calabria (guitar)

    • Norman Keenan (bass)

    • Don Lamond, Percy Brice (drums)




    Recording: 1962 by Bob Simpson

    Production: Hugo Montenegro





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. The Midnight Special
    2. Crawdad Song
    3. Memphis Tennessee
    4. Gotta Travel On
    5. Did You Hear About Jerry?
    6. On Top Of Old Smokey
    7. Muleskinner
    8. Makes A Long Time Man Feel Bad
    9. Michael Row The Boat Ashore
    Harry Belafonte
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Compadres (Speakers Corner) Compadres (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Compadres (Speakers Corner)

    To this day, the typical sound colouring of the Dave Brubeck Quartet is quite distinctive and unmistakable thanks to Paul Desmond's tenor saxophone. But Gerry Mulligan's low-pitched horn and his restrained swing also offers enough appeal to make one want to listen to these somewhat less popular but - for all that - very worthwhile recording by the Quartet.



    The Quartet's concert tour of Mexico's major cities in 1968 was a great success and so Dave Brubeck's recording company had no qualms in making live recordings of the group - complemented by bassist Jack Six and drummer Alan Dawson. Themes from indigenous folk music were skilfully coupled with new compositions with the result that the LP Compadres with its concert excerpts was in great demand and became a top hit.
    This carefully remastered new pressing will certainly contribute to the popularity of Dave Brubeck and Gerry Mulligan long after their demise.



    Musicians:



    • Dave Brubeck (piano)

    • Gerry Mulligan (bassoon)

    • Jack Six (bass)

    • Alan Dawson (drums)




    Recording: 1968 live in Mexico by John Guerriere and Russ Payne

    Production: Teo Macero



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Jumping Bean
    2. Adios Mariquita Linda
    3. Indian Song
    4. Tender Woman
    5. Amapola
    6. Lullaby De Mexico
    7. Sapito
    8. Recuerdo
    Dave Brubeck
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Liza with A Z (Speakers Corner) Liza with A Z (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Liza with A Z (Speakers Corner)

    Liza With A 'Z' is a multi-media production that has been showered with superlatives. It won numerous awards, including those for Choreography and Direction. However, a further award for the music composed by John Kander and Fred Ebb is probably the main reason for the show being released on a record, i.e. just for the ears. But the plan bore fruit, and the LP rocketed onto the Billboard 200. It was to be Liza Minnelli's best chart hit ever - and it could even be called the soundtrack of her life.
    Great favourites such as Ring Them Bells and Bye Bye Blackbird are set alongside sharp rhythm and blues numbers (Son Of A Preacher Man, I Gotcha). Taking centre stage is a 10-minute medley from the film adaptation of the musical Cabaret that was shown in the cinemas also in 1972 and which brought Minnelli her international breakthrough.
    All that remains of this costly and glamorous television event, which was only broadcast a few times on US television after the premiere, is the original music on record. Here it is once again in all its glory and with a new freshness.



    Recording: 1972 at Lyceum Theater, New York, by Phil Ramone & Arthur Kendy

    Production: Andrew Kazdin





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Yes
    2. God Bless the Child
    3. Say Liza (Liza With a "Z")
    4. It Was a Good Time
    5. I Gotcha
    6. Ring Them Bells
    7. Son of a Preacher Man
    8. Bye Bye Blackbird
    9. You've Let Yourself Go
    10. My Mammy
    11. Medley of Tunes from "Cabaret"
    12. Bows (Liza)
    Liza Minnelli
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Mozart - Clarinet Concerto - Horn Concerto (Speakers Corner) Mozart - Clarinet Concerto - Horn Concerto (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Mozart - Clarinet Concerto - Horn Concerto (Speakers Corner)

    The amazing skill of two great virtuosos, Joseph Leutgeb and Anton Stadler, inspired Mozart to compose the concertos heard here. Made in 1959, this DECCA recording gives us an excellent idea of how the concertos would have sounded in Mozart's day, thanks to two of today's very best instrumentalists - the clarinettist Gervase de Peyer and the horn player Barry Tuckwell.



    Amazing lightness, warmth of tone and perfect intonation are the hallmarks of the soloist and London Symphony Orchestra conducted by Peter Maag in the clarinet concerto, which Mozart completed only a few weeks before his death. The two horn concertos heard here were also written during Mozart's final creative period in Vienna. Just one hearing is enough to let them be remembered for all time - for these concertos employ to the full the horn's rich and widely varied range of expression. Broad arching melodies, tripping runs and merry hunting calls in the final movements guarantee musical enjoyment, and for this we owe our thanks to both the past and present masters of their instruments in this delightful recording.





    Musicians:



    • Gervase de Peyer (clarinet)

    • Barry Tuckwell (horn)

    • London Symphony Orchestra

    • Peter Maag (conductor)




    Recording: November 1959 at Kingsway Hall, London by Kenneth E. Wilkinson
    Production: Ray Minshull





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.




    This title is not eligible for discount.

    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Blood, Sweat, & Tears: 3 (Speakers Corner) Blood, Sweat, & Tears: 3 (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Blood, Sweat, & Tears: 3 (Speakers Corner)

    1970 was a really good year for Blood, Sweat & Tears. The colourful, distinguished group was awarded a Grammy® in the categories "Album of the Year", "Best Contemporary Instrumental Performance", and "Best Arrangement Accompanying Vocalist(s)".



    The concept of merging jazz, blues and arrangements of classical themes worked well, with music journalist Leonard Feather commenting that »it brought music into rock«.
    Everything seemed to be allowed - as long as it sounded good: almost spontaneously, it seems, the musicians develop a somewhat boozy, cheery Hi-De-Ho happening out of synthetically created chivalric fanfares, or conjure up a medieval scenario (The Battle) with the archaic sound of a harpsichord and solo voice. That caustic big-band soul (Lucrezia MacEvil) and seemingly familiar rock songs (Fire And Rain) find their niche here fits in with the free spirit of this third album, which boasts no otherwise specified title. One listens to this disc, wondering what surprise is in store in the next beat, the next phrase, the next number. And there is a wonderfully liberating feeling in knowing that nothing is a 'must' but all is allowed.



    Musicians:



    • David Clayton Thomas (vocal)

    • Fred Lipsius (alto saxophone, piano, vocal)

    • Lew Soloff (trumpet, fluegel horn)

    • Jerry Hyman (trombone)

    • Steve Katz (guitar, harmonica, vocal)

    • Dick Halligan (organ, piano, harmonica, trombone, flute, vocal)

    • Jim Fielder (bass)

    • Bobby Colomby (drums, percussion, vocal)




    Recording: 1970 by Roy Halee

    Production: Bobby Colomby and Roy Halee





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.




    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Hi-De-Ho
    2. The Battle
    3. Lucretia MacEvil
    4. Lucretia's Reprise
    5. Fire and Rain
    6. Lonesome Suzie
    7. Symphony For the Devil
    8. He's a Runner
    9. Somethin' Comin' On
    10. Forty Thousand Headmen
    Blood, Sweat And Tears
    $34.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Captain And Me (Speakers Corner) The Captain And Me (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    The Captain And Me (Speakers Corner)

    The Doobie Brothers weren't brothers, nor were they called Doobie. The band started life as Pud in 1969 in Chateau LibertÉ, a club in the mountains of California. The group took on the slang name for marihuana cigarettes (doobie) one year later. The Doobies' music, however, never sounded like that of befuddled, half-stoned junkies. Heavy metal hard rock was their thing which made their record company Warner target the bikers of the rocker scene. The idea backfired, though, because the band had far more to offer than explosive hard rock.



    The album The Captain And Me is considered to be the group's most concentrated and versatile production since it contrasts aggressive, hard numbers with gentle ones full of melodiousness. The very first number, Natural Thing, shows how winsome vocal folk music and electric guitar riffs can be amalgamated into rock music. Amongst these titles, decidedly angry numbers such as Without You and Evil Woman became real trailblazers. Now and then, an extensive harp solo or nonchalant licks from the acoustic guitar remind one of the pungent bluegrass style emanating from the South. That even the sweet wailing of the steel guitar (South City Midnight Lady) finds room for expression seems quite logical in this well-thought-out musical concept.



    Musicians:



    • Tom Johnston (guitar, harmonica, synthesizer, vocals)

    • Patrick Simmons (guitar, synthesizer, vocals)

    • John Hartman (percussion, drums, vocals)

    • Tiran Porter (bass, vocals)

    • Michael Hossack (drums, conga, percussion)



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Natural Thing
    2. Long Train Runnin'
    3. China Grove
    4. Dark Eyed Cajun Woman
    5. Clear As The Driven Snow
    6. Without You
    7. South City Midnight Lady
    8. Evil Woman
    9. Ukiah
    10. The Captain And Me
    The Doobie Brothers
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • From Elvis in Memphis (Speakers Corner) From Elvis in Memphis (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    From Elvis in Memphis (Speakers Corner)

    Ranked 190/500 on Rolling Stone Magazine's 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.

    A record by Elvis, produced in Tennessee. What's so special about that? Surely everyone knows that the lorry driver from the Southern State sobbed his early songs into the local radio microphones. But Elvis in Memphis is far more than just one of around 40 albums which the King of Rock' n' Roll produced during the course of 35 years. »This marks what is probably the most impressive comeback in the entire history of pop music«, enthused the normally reticent New York Times.



    What had happened? In 1969, after a 14-year meteoric career in show business and movies, and an exemplary PR campaign, Elvis returned to his hometown to record these songs which, in their style, are reminiscent of those recorded in the Fifties for Sun Records. Alongside the lavishly mixed pop and blues numbers (Power Of My Love) and country sound (I'm Movin' On), there is also one of the greatest chart-busters and heart-breakers of a whole generation: In The Ghetto.



    There is certainly no room for discussion about the value of this collectors' item - the astronomical price for a good secondhand copy speaks for itself!



    Musicians:



    • Elvis Presley (vocal, guitar, piano)

    • Ronnie Milsap (piano)

    • Bobby Emmons (organ)

    • Reggie Young (guitar, electric-guitar)

    • Tommy Cogbill, Mike Leech (bass)

    • Gene Chrisman (drums)

    • The Memphis Horns and background vocals




    Recording: 1969 by Al Pachucki

    Production: Felton Jarvis and Chips Moman





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.




    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Wearin' that Loved Look
    2. Only the Strong Survive
    3. I'll Hold You in My Heart
    4. Long Black Limousine
    5. It Keeps Right On A-Hurtin'
    6. I'm Movin On
    7. Power of My Love
    8. Gentle on My Mind
    9. After Loving You
    10. True Love Travels on a Gravel Road
    11. Any Day Now
    12. In the Ghetto
    Elvis Presley
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Swiss Movement (Speakers Corner) Swiss Movement (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Swiss Movement (Speakers Corner)

    Les McCann had already been playing his way through the clubs and record studios on the US west coast for ten years when his appearance on 21 June 1969 at the relatively new and jazz-soaked festival in Montreux on Lake Geneva changed all that. There, he celebrated his greatest musical success, his number one hit. Half ironically, but proudly in later concerts, when the piano stool could hardly bear him due to his size and weight, he stressed that Swiss Movement had supported him, his wife, children and grandchildren.


    Compared To What is a catchy melody that is heard on the radio, again and again, all around the world, today, tomorrow and the day after It is unmistakable, still groovy, full of soul, humorous, stirring. And Cold Duck Time is no way inferior: Eddie Harris blows for all he is worth. Everyone can hear that Benny Bailey was challenged by the unknown themes, but this maestro still managed to capture the audience's ear and attention.


    Swiss Movement is, and will remain forever, a highlight among all the jazz LPs that have been recorded live and it shouldn't be missing from any collector's shelf. Along with Benny Goodman's Carnegie Hall Concert from 1938, Charlie Parker & Co.'s Massey Hall concert from 1953, and Ella Fitzgerald's Berlin concert from 1960 - and very few others


    Musicians:


    • Eddie Harris (tenor saxophone)
    • Benny Bailey (trumpet)
    • Les McCann (piano, violin)
    • Leroy Vinnegar (bass)
    • Donald Dean (drums)


    Recording: June 1969 live at Montreux Jazz Festival

    Production: Joel Dorn & Nesuhi Ertegun


    About Speakers Corner


    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Compared To What
    2. Cold Duck Time
    3. Kathleen's Theme
    4. You Got It In Your Soulness
    5. The Generation Gap
    Les McCann & Eddie Harris
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Flood (Speakers Corner) Flood (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $64.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Flood (Speakers Corner)

    In the summer of 1975, the Herbie Hancock Sextet made a hugely successful tour of Japan, which made people aware of a 'new' Hancock. The last LP that the keyboard virtuoso had recorded, Thrust, was already one year old, and the film music for the Charles Bronson classic Death Wish was received negatively by his fans. At his concerts in Tokyo, Herbie Hancock reached back to his hits: Maiden Voyage, Chameleon, and the famous, soulful Watermelon Man made the fans at his concert hall and open-air appearances go wild with enthusiasm. Forty years later I have the courage to confess that I couldn't have cared less about this music at the time; in Europe there was enough that was new and exciting to see and listen to. However, this re-release in its original format has given me the opportunity to check out whether this music has withstood the test of time. And I must say: it has passed the test! Just listen to Herbie at his best!
    Dr. Michael Frohne



    Musicians:



    • Herbie Hancock (keyboard)

    • Bennie Maupin (saxophone, clarinet, flute, percussion)

    • Blackbird McKnight (guitar)

    • Paul Jackson (bass)

    • Mike Clark (drums)

    • Bill Summers (conga, percussion)




    Recording: June and July 1975 at Shibuja Kohkaido and Nakano Sun Plaza, Tokyo, by Tomoo Suzuki
    Production: David Rubinson




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    Herbie Hancock
    $64.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Berlioz: Symphonie Fantastique - Argenta (Speakers Corner) Berlioz: Symphonie Fantastique - Argenta (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Berlioz: Symphonie Fantastique - Argenta (Speakers Corner)

    Behind the mysterious title Symphonie fantastique is to be found what was undoubtedly one of the most powerful musical compositions of its day. The highly controversial discussions which this autobiographical, extraordinary work provoked are quite understandable when one considers that Beethoven and Schubert had just put down their quills for the last time and that Wagner had only just left his childhood behind him. In commenting upon the daring cyclical structure of the work, one French music critic said, "In Berlioz's Symphony we believe that we have seen the prelude to a revolution in instrumental music".



    In spite of being acknowledged and praised as a composer, Berlioz was never given the professorship he coveted at the Paris Conservatoire, and it might appear as if the renowned Conservatoire Orchestra was making its apologies for this in the present excellent recording. The various scenes of the intoxicating programme music are approached with daring; dreadful, macabre ideas are presented in a low, gloomy and dark timbre until finally a heroic attitude comes to the fore, accompanied by thundering drum rolls, when the death sentence is pronounced. Fantastique!





    Musicians:



    • Paris Conservatoire Orchestra

    • Ataúlfo Argenta (conductor)




    Recording: November 1957 at Maison de la MutualitÉ, Paris by Ken Cress

    Production: James Walker




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. First Movement: Reveries, Passions

    2. Second Movement: Un Bal
    3. Third Movement: (Sceneaux Champs)
    4. Third Movement: (Sceneaux Champs)
    5. Fourth Movement: Marche Au Supplice
    6. Fifth Movement Song D'Une Nuit De Sabbat
    Ataulfo Argenta
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
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