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  • The Pious Bird of Good Omen (Speakers Corner) The Pious Bird of Good Omen (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    The Pious Bird of Good Omen (Speakers Corner)

    After the break-up of John Mayall's Bluesbreakers in the summer of 1967, the time seemed ripe for Peter Green, John McVie and Mick Fleetwood to take their leave from raw British rock 'n' roll. The newly established band Fleetwood Mac first turned to black blues, and their art of playing was so similar to that of other groups that the magazine Eye criticised them for their »almost ridiculous mimicry«. However, their choice of performance style took them in the right direction and in 1969, the year in which The Pious Bird Of Good Omen appeared, they landed at the top end of the pop charts, even ahead of The Beatles and Stevie Wonder.



    Of course, in the cover version of Little Willie John's Need Your Love So Bad, which is treated with a velvety string sound, and other bluesy songs, the American influence still makes itself heard, but not without success! The highly individual sound of the group comes best through in the now legendary numbers such as the weightless, gliding Albatross and Black Magic Woman with its Latin and blues elements. Judged the best British blues ever to be played (allmusic.com), one can now sit back and enjoy this great album.



    Musicians:



    • Peter Green (guitar, vocal)

    • Jeremy Spencer (guitar, piano, vocal)

    • Danny Kirwan (guitar)

    • Eddie Boyd (piano, vocal)

    • Big Walter Horton (harmonica)

    • John McVie (bass)

    • Mick Fleetwood (drums)




    Recorded between September 1967 and October 1968 by Mike Ross

    Production: Mike Vernon





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.




    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Need Your Love So Bad
    2. Comin' Home
    3. Rambling Pony
    4. The Big Boat
    5. I Believe My Time Ain't Long
    6. The Sun Is Shining
    7. Albatross
    8. Black Magic Woman
    9. Just The Blues
    10. Jigsaw Puzzle Blues
    11. Looking For Somebody
    12. Stop Messin' Round

    Fleetwood Mac
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Inner Mounting Flame (Speakers Corner) The Inner Mounting Flame (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    x

    The Inner Mounting Flame (Speakers Corner)

    The liner notes for The Inner Mounting Flame were written by the guru Sri Chinmoy - now that's a real sales point! The music too burns right from the very first note to the last as though it were licked by the flames of hell fire.



    The wealth of ideas, sheer vitality and supreme soloistic virtuosity of the five top-notch musicians from four different countries is absolutely first class. In addition there is their truly dreamlike interplay; one could say they were born and grew up with the same 'spirit'. Meeting Of The Spirit, The Dance Of Maya and You Know You Know are the highlights of this first Mahavishnu Orchestra.



    Aspiration - struggle, hope and desire - is seen as an inner mounting flame which takes man towards 'divine perfection'. Well, opinions differ of course. But what is certain is that this music from 1971 is still amazingly fresh and creative even 36 years later - and luckily it is available once again in the form of a vinyl disc.



    Musicians:



    • John McLaughlin (guitar)

    • Jan Hammer (piano)

    • Jerry Goodman (violin)

    • Rick Laird (bass)

    • Billy Cobham (drums)




    Recording: August 1971 in New York City by Don Puluse

    Production: John McLaughlin





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.




    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Meeting of the Spirits
    2. Dawn
    3. Noonward Race, The
    4. A Lotus on Irish Streams
    5. Vital Transformation
    6. Dance of Maya, The
    7. You Know You Know
    8. Awakening
    Mahavishnu Orchestra
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Sound Of Wilson Pickett (Speakers Corner) The Sound Of Wilson Pickett (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    x

    The Sound Of Wilson Pickett (Speakers Corner)

    Wilson Pickett's best years were those when he recorded for Atlantic Records, and he remained convinced of this even after changing to other labels in his later career. Atlantic boss Jerry Wexler took the promising young Gospel singer under his wing and launched him on his rapidly developing career as an unruly soul man. Pickett's aggressiveness, which in his mature years occasionally resulted in him having backstage fights with musicians and managers, are expressed here in strong words and are given further bite by his antagonistic band. Although he lashed out to the full in his emotional, crackling vocal attacks, he never lost control and even his strongest outbursts remained highly musical. His unique, breathless sound and his ferocious efforts to express himself succinctly do not make for easy listening on this superb hit record and for white people, who according to Pickett would never understand soul music anyway, could well present a real challenge. Is this such fascinating music that you become dumbstruck? Very possibly, as critic Joachim von Mengershausen writes: »His voice is hard, aggressive and strained; it hardly binds the tones together, chops up the phrases, blurts out the essentials - Pickett has eliminated all the Uncle-Tom warmth in soul and has virtually rocked it away.«

    Musicians:



    • Wilson Pickett (vocal)

    • Spooner Oldham (piano, organ)

    • Andrew Love (tenor saxophone)

    • Floyd Newman (bassoon)

    • Gene Miller, Wayne Jackson (trumpet)

    • Jimmy R. Johnson, Chips Moman (guitar)

    • Junior Lowe (bass)

    • Roger Hawkins (drums)





    Recording: 1967 at Fame Recording Studios, Muscle Shoals (Alabama, USA), by Rick Hall & Tom Dowd

    Production: Jerry Wexler





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Soul Dance Number Three

    2. Funky Broadway
    3. I Need A Lot Of Loving Every Day
    4. I Found A Love, Part 1
    5. I Found A Love, Part 2
    6. You Can't Stand Alone
    7. Mojo Mamma
    8. I Found The One
    9. Something Within Me
    10. I'm Sorry About That
    11. Love Is A Beautiful Thing
    Wilson Pickett
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Holst: The Planets (Speakers Corner) Holst: The Planets (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Holst: The Planets (Speakers Corner)

    Earth was not created in a day. And the same applies to Gustav Holst's interplanetary symphony which took him about three years to write. The composer employs a massive orchestra and rich orchestral colouring to portray each planet in his musical psychogram.



    Mars, the Bringer of War, rages with mechanical brutality, while Venus brings peace and an acceptance of life. Mercury, the Winged Messenger, darts here and there with quicksilver speed, while powerful and sovereign Jupiter brings jollity and reassurance. Saturn plods by with heavy tread, while Uranus with its contrasting changes in tempo remains enigmatic and extrovert. And because Pluto, the most distant planet had not yet been discovered, it is Neptune, the great unknown, which is lost in time and space in an endless ostinato of female voices.
    Zubin Mehta and the Los Angeles Philharmonic present this astronomical journey with precision and exhilaration, leaving neither time nor space for astrological speculation. As always, the excellent DECCA recording quality guarantees an unimpeded view of this musical galaxy.



    Recording: April 1971 at Royce Hall, Los Angeles by James Lock and Colin Moorfoot

    Production: John Mordler




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.




    This title is not eligible for discount.

    Holst: The Planets
    Zubin Mehta
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Tale Spinnin' (Speakers Corner) Tale Spinnin' (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Tale Spinnin' (Speakers Corner)

    We played music that people listened to every day just as they watch the news every evening, music which changed constantly - just like the weather, reminisced Joe Zawinul when talking about coming up with a name for the group. This would probably frighten off listeners in today's mass market. But back in those days CBS was satisfied with the group's sound being somewhat similar to the Miles Davis Combo and offered them a recording contract without carrying out the usual sound check. The magic potion Bitches Brew, which Zawinul and Wayne Shorter had conjured up with Miles Davis, was promising of exhilarating new things to come.



    The heart-stopping mix of motivic fixed points and exciting improvisations, »the sketchy melodies, all that a synthesizer and other similar electronic devices could offer, combined with a Milky Way of rhythms« (Der Spiegel) was the pathway down which the group went - without ever becoming pure routine. The fifth album, Tale Spinnin', is captivating for its wealth of distinctive, often warm, synthesized sounds, which are further enhanced by Wayne Shorter's bright, twangy soprano saxophone, lending it a jazzy aura. To be sure, this gripping jazz fusion never progresses steadily all the time, but takes up snatchy, though seemingly familiar, melodic ingredients and combines them to produce a new mixture. Badia, however, is completely different: a quietly flowing and totally rhythmic ethnic work, which today would be classified as World Music.



    Musicians:



    • Joe Zawinul (keyboards, percussion, vocals)

    • Wayne Shorter (tenor saxophone, soprano saxophone)

    • Alphonso Johnson (bass)

    • Alyrio Lima (percussion)

    • Leon Ndugu Chandler (drums)




    Recording: 1975 in den Wally Heider Recording Studios, San Francisco, von Bruce Botnick

    Production: Josef Zawinul und Wayne Shorter





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.




    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Man In the Green Shirt
    2. Lusitanos
    3. Between the Thighs
    4. Badia
    5. Freezing Fire
    6. Five Short Stories
    Weather Report
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Captain And Me (Speakers Corner) The Captain And Me (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    The Captain And Me (Speakers Corner)

    The Doobie Brothers weren't brothers, nor were they called Doobie. The band started life as Pud in 1969 in Chateau LibertÉ, a club in the mountains of California. The group took on the slang name for marihuana cigarettes (doobie) one year later. The Doobies' music, however, never sounded like that of befuddled, half-stoned junkies. Heavy metal hard rock was their thing which made their record company Warner target the bikers of the rocker scene. The idea backfired, though, because the band had far more to offer than explosive hard rock.



    The album The Captain And Me is considered to be the group's most concentrated and versatile production since it contrasts aggressive, hard numbers with gentle ones full of melodiousness. The very first number, Natural Thing, shows how winsome vocal folk music and electric guitar riffs can be amalgamated into rock music. Amongst these titles, decidedly angry numbers such as Without You and Evil Woman became real trailblazers. Now and then, an extensive harp solo or nonchalant licks from the acoustic guitar remind one of the pungent bluegrass style emanating from the South. That even the sweet wailing of the steel guitar (South City Midnight Lady) finds room for expression seems quite logical in this well-thought-out musical concept.



    Musicians:



    • Tom Johnston (guitar, harmonica, synthesizer, vocals)

    • Patrick Simmons (guitar, synthesizer, vocals)

    • John Hartman (percussion, drums, vocals)

    • Tiran Porter (bass, vocals)

    • Michael Hossack (drums, conga, percussion)



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Natural Thing
    2. Long Train Runnin'
    3. China Grove
    4. Dark Eyed Cajun Woman
    5. Clear As The Driven Snow
    6. Without You
    7. South City Midnight Lady
    8. Evil Woman
    9. Ukiah
    10. The Captain And Me
    The Doobie Brothers
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Elvis Is Back! (Speakers Corner) Elvis Is Back! (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Elvis Is Back! (Speakers Corner)

    During the King's artistically unproductive period of military service, no costs or efforts were spared (e.g. A Date With Elvis, RCA LPM-2011), and no consolatory promises of things to come were left unsaid by the management in order to keep Elvis alive and well in the minds of his vast circle of fans. At last the great coup was landed: Elvis Is Back was what everyone was waiting to hear and American radio and television broadcasting stations made a gigantic medial feast of it.



    With the ink scarcely dry on his demobilization papers, Elvis entered the studio in March 1960 and recorded a whole series of numbers which later became worldwide hits, such as Are You Lonesome Tonight and It's Now Or Never. Released as singles, these tender ballads created a sensation, while the LP with numbers such as Dirty, Dirty Feeling, Like A Baby and The Thrill Of Your Love underlined Elvis's enhanced qualities as a rock, blues and gospel singer. That his voice - despite everyone's fears - had lost nothing of its erotic thrill is more than amply demonstrated in his rendering of Fever alone, which is accompanied merely by bass and percussion.



    With its amazing array of varying styles, this must surely be one of Elvis's most genial albums and was unrivaled right up until his great comeback in 1968 (From Elvis In Memphis, RCA LSP-4155).





    Musicians:



    • Elvis Presley (guitar, vocal)

    • Floyd Cramer(piano)

    • Scotty Moore (guitar)

    • Boots Randolph (saxophone)

    • Hank Garland (bass, guitar)

    • Charlie Hodge (harmony)

    • Bob Moore (bass)

    • D.J. Fontana (drums)

    • Hoyt Hawkins, Neal Matthews, Gordon Stoker, Ray C. Walker (vocal)




    March 1960 at RCA Studios, Hollywood, CA. and April 1960 in Nashville, TS., USA,
    by Bill Porter

    Production: Chet Atkins





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Make Me Know
    2. Fever
    3. The Girl of My Best Friend
    4. I Will Be Home Again
    5. Dirty, Dirty Feeling
    6. The Thrill of Your Love
    7. Soldier Boy
    8. Such a Night
    9. It Feels So Right
    10. The Girl Next Door
    11. Like a Baby

    12. Reconsider Baby
    Elvis Presley
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Blood, Sweat, & Tears: 3 (Speakers Corner) Blood, Sweat, & Tears: 3 (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Blood, Sweat, & Tears: 3 (Speakers Corner)

    1970 was a really good year for Blood, Sweat & Tears. The colourful, distinguished group was awarded a Grammy® in the categories "Album of the Year", "Best Contemporary Instrumental Performance", and "Best Arrangement Accompanying Vocalist(s)".



    The concept of merging jazz, blues and arrangements of classical themes worked well, with music journalist Leonard Feather commenting that »it brought music into rock«.
    Everything seemed to be allowed - as long as it sounded good: almost spontaneously, it seems, the musicians develop a somewhat boozy, cheery Hi-De-Ho happening out of synthetically created chivalric fanfares, or conjure up a medieval scenario (The Battle) with the archaic sound of a harpsichord and solo voice. That caustic big-band soul (Lucrezia MacEvil) and seemingly familiar rock songs (Fire And Rain) find their niche here fits in with the free spirit of this third album, which boasts no otherwise specified title. One listens to this disc, wondering what surprise is in store in the next beat, the next phrase, the next number. And there is a wonderfully liberating feeling in knowing that nothing is a 'must' but all is allowed.



    Musicians:



    • David Clayton Thomas (vocal)

    • Fred Lipsius (alto saxophone, piano, vocal)

    • Lew Soloff (trumpet, fluegel horn)

    • Jerry Hyman (trombone)

    • Steve Katz (guitar, harmonica, vocal)

    • Dick Halligan (organ, piano, harmonica, trombone, flute, vocal)

    • Jim Fielder (bass)

    • Bobby Colomby (drums, percussion, vocal)




    Recording: 1970 by Roy Halee

    Production: Bobby Colomby and Roy Halee





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.




    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Hi-De-Ho
    2. The Battle
    3. Lucretia MacEvil
    4. Lucretia's Reprise
    5. Fire and Rain
    6. Lonesome Suzie
    7. Symphony For the Devil
    8. He's a Runner
    9. Somethin' Comin' On
    10. Forty Thousand Headmen
    Blood, Sweat And Tears
    $34.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • From Elvis in Memphis (Speakers Corner) From Elvis in Memphis (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    From Elvis in Memphis (Speakers Corner)

    Ranked 190/500 on Rolling Stone Magazine's 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.

    A record by Elvis, produced in Tennessee. What's so special about that? Surely everyone knows that the lorry driver from the Southern State sobbed his early songs into the local radio microphones. But Elvis in Memphis is far more than just one of around 40 albums which the King of Rock' n' Roll produced during the course of 35 years. »This marks what is probably the most impressive comeback in the entire history of pop music«, enthused the normally reticent New York Times.



    What had happened? In 1969, after a 14-year meteoric career in show business and movies, and an exemplary PR campaign, Elvis returned to his hometown to record these songs which, in their style, are reminiscent of those recorded in the Fifties for Sun Records. Alongside the lavishly mixed pop and blues numbers (Power Of My Love) and country sound (I'm Movin' On), there is also one of the greatest chart-busters and heart-breakers of a whole generation: In The Ghetto.



    There is certainly no room for discussion about the value of this collectors' item - the astronomical price for a good secondhand copy speaks for itself!



    Musicians:



    • Elvis Presley (vocal, guitar, piano)

    • Ronnie Milsap (piano)

    • Bobby Emmons (organ)

    • Reggie Young (guitar, electric-guitar)

    • Tommy Cogbill, Mike Leech (bass)

    • Gene Chrisman (drums)

    • The Memphis Horns and background vocals




    Recording: 1969 by Al Pachucki

    Production: Felton Jarvis and Chips Moman





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.




    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Wearin' that Loved Look
    2. Only the Strong Survive
    3. I'll Hold You in My Heart
    4. Long Black Limousine
    5. It Keeps Right On A-Hurtin'
    6. I'm Movin On
    7. Power of My Love
    8. Gentle on My Mind
    9. After Loving You
    10. True Love Travels on a Gravel Road
    11. Any Day Now
    12. In the Ghetto
    Elvis Presley
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Nina Simone and Piano! (Speakers Corner) Nina Simone and Piano! (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Nina Simone and Piano! (Speakers Corner)

    Musicians certainly don't have it easy with record companies. First of all they must struggle to even get a contract. Then, when their debut release has proved a success, they are bandied around from one arranger to another in all the recording studios imaginable. But having been treated with such sounds as a snappy combo, meaty bigband, and smoochy string orchestra, there at last comes an opportunity for some artists to be themselves again.



    This album wholly concentrates on Nina Simone and demonstrates that she does not need help from anyone else in order to bring her strikingly expressive voice into the limelight. Accompanying her in her songs about loneliness, identity crises, and desires is her faithful friend, the piano, which she masters equally as well as her voice. The piano parts are far more than just casual accompaniments. Varying from number to number, they range from a classical, bluesy sound, to late-Romantic fervour, right up to avantgarde aggression. And yet all these pieces have something in common: filled with bizarre beauty, they portray a complex personality with all its ups and downs.



    Musicians:



    • Nina Simone (piano, vocals)




    Recording: 1969 in RCA Victor's Studio B, New York City, by Ray Hall

    Production: Stroud Productions, Inc.




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.




    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Seems I'm Never Tired Lovin' You
    2. Nobody's Fault But Mine
    3. I Think It's Going To Rain Today
    4. Everyone's Gone To The Moon
    5. Compensation
    6. Who Am I
    7. Another Spring
    8. The Human Touch
    9. I Get Along Without You Very Well (Except Sometimes)

    10. The Desperate Ones
    Nina Simone
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Burgers (Speakers Corner) Burgers (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Burgers (Speakers Corner)

    The exploration of psychedelic depths did not appear to suffice the founders of Jefferson Airplane - Jorma Kaukonen and Jack Casady - when searching for their musical salvation. So why not amalgamate their hippy-like simple lifestyle and folksy music with the formation of a second band called Hot Tuna, emotional yet not so synthetically hotted-up? Even in the very first number, True Religion, whose airy, bubbling folksy finger-picking soars up into powerful waves of rock, the message of this first studio album comes over loud and clear. Growling bass melodies and the representation of a life on the road (Keep On Truckin') conjure up a down-to-earth country feeling, with an off-key fiddle tune (Let Us Get Together Right Down Here) accentuating the rough yet cordial get-together. The purely instrumental Water Song is a stroke of genius - this humming, buzzing guitar mix doesn't only demonstrate the players' instrumental dexterity but also their keen sense of melody and ear for sound colouring. No matter whether gruff Hillbilly, cool blues rocker, or square and nostalgic former hippy - they'll all love this album. Just think: for whom else does Hot Tuna still go on tour ...?

    Musicians:



    • Jorma Kaukonen (guitar, vocal)

    • Jack Casady (bass, vocal)

    • Papa John Creach (violin, vocal)

    • Sammy Piazza (drums, percussion, vocal)

    • Nikki Buck (organ, piano)

    • Richmond Talbott (vocal, guitar)

    • David Crosby (vocal)




    Recording: 1972 by 'The Unknown Engineer' at Wally Heider Studios, San Francisco

    Production: Fisohobay Production



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. True Religion
    2. Highway Song
    3. 99 Year blues
    4. Sea Child
    5. Keep on Truckin'
    6. Water Song
    7. Ode for Billy Dean
    8. Let Us Get Together Right Down Here
    9. Sunny Day Strut
    Hot Tuna
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Gerry Mulligan & Chet Baker: Carnegie Hall Concert (Speakers Corner) Gerry Mulligan & Chet Baker: Carnegie Hall Concert (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $69.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Gerry Mulligan & Chet Baker: Carnegie Hall Concert (Speakers Corner)

    The third encounter of the cool, swinging art of Gerry Mulligan and Chet Baker took place in New York's Carnegie Hall on a cold November day in 1974. So-called Cool Jazz had long since arrived and become popular on the East Coast with the result that the concert hall must have been filled to the last seat. The two hadn't performed together on stage for ten years, rivalry and who knows what else had put an end to the highly successful pianoless quartet.



    In spite of the enormously high expectations - the Carnegie Hall fills all musicians with awe due to the echoes of concerts given by such classical and jazz great as Artur Rubinstein, George Gershwin and their successors over many generations - every melody is wonderfully relaxed from the very first note on. This is surely due to the excellent rhythm group (with piano!). This is made up of musicians from the 'new generation' - musicians who were sucking on dummies in their prams when the two veterans came together for the first time in 1952.
    Oldies such as Bernie's Tune, My Funny Valentine and Line For Lyons, and new compositions like Song For Strayhorn and Song For An Unfinished Woman constitute a successful blend both for the two performers on stage and the audience alike. And there is no experimenting - no one wants to play or hear that - however the high level of communication is tangible everywhere.



    It makes sense to release the two individual LPs as a double album. What's more: the cover photo is exactly the same for both releases and you get almost 80 minutes of West Coast cool-hot jazz at its very best!



    Musicians:



    • Gerry Mulligan (bassoon)

    • Chet Baker (trumpet)

    • Ed Byrne (trombone)

    • Bob James (piano, electric piano)

    • John Scofield (guitar)

    • Dave Samuels (vibraphone)

    • Ron Carter (bass)

    • Harvey Mason (drums)




    Recording: November 1974 at Carnegie Hall, New York, by Dave Hewitt and John Venable

    Production: Creed Taylor





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Line for Lyons
    2. For an Unfinished Woman
    3. My Funny Valentine
    4. Song for Strayhorn
    5. It's Sandy at the Beach
    6. K-4 Pacific
    7. There Will Never Be Another You
    8. Bernie's Tune
    Gerry Mulligan
    $69.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • The Jazz Workshop (Speakers Corner) The Jazz Workshop (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $37.99
    Buy Now
    x

    The Jazz Workshop (Speakers Corner)

    As a soloist, Al Cohn was not such an inspired tenor sax player as his colleague Zoot Sims. But he was a superb arranger, an unprofitable yet highly important function when it comes to such workshops. And though Manny Albam also played the baritone sax, his real instrument was the pen. He arranged not only jazz, but also film music and musicals. His arrangements were multi-faceted and tailor-made to suit the accomplishments of the individual instrumentalists.

    For this particular Jazz Workshop, the record company RCA-Victor could afford the services of excellent session musicians: Joe Newman and Freddie Green came from the Basie Band, Al Cohn, Bernie Glow, and Nick Travis from the Woody Herman Band, and the studio musicians Dick Katz, Buddy Jones, and Osie Johnson were present at all times of day and night anyway.

    As long as you don't expect fierce battles between five tenors, or six tweeters on the trumpet, then you will enjoy this LP with its swinging, relaxed improvisations on such works as Rosetta, Linger Awhile, and I'm Coming Virginia - and you will realise that Lester Young's sound has been heard, cultivated and further developed by these musicians.

    Four trumpets, a tenor sax, and then a piano, guitar, bass, and drums into the bargain - that's certainly no common ensemble, but it certainly is a good reason to purchase this LP. And for certain, this album has been missing in your collection to this day.

    This Speakers Corner LP was remastered using pure analogue components only, from the master tapes through to the cutting head. All royalties and mechanical rights have been paid.

    Musicians:
    Al Cohn (tenor saxophone, arranger)
    Manny Albam (arranger)
    Joe Newman, Bart Valve, Bernie Glow, Joe Wilder, Phil Sunkel (trumpet)
    Nick Travis (trumper, trombone)
    Dick Katz (piano)
    Freddie Green (guitar)
    Buddy Jones (bass)
    Osie Johnson (drums)

    Recording: May 1955 in Webster Hall, New York City, in mono
    Production: Jack Lewis

    About Speakers Corner

    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.

    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.

    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.

    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.

    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.

    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    1. Rosetta
    2. The Song Is Ended
    3. Linger Awhile
    4. Every Time
    5. Haroosh
    6. Just Plain Sam
    7. I'm Coming Virginia
    8. Cohn Not Cohen
    9. Foggy Water
    11. Sugar Cohn
    12. Alone Together
    Al Cohn
    $37.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP Mono - Sealed Buy Now
  • Straight From The Heart (Speakers Corner) Straight From The Heart (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Straight From The Heart (Speakers Corner)

    Ann Peebles' climb up the career ladder was rather more conventional than spectacular in the tough, rough days of rhythm and blues. She was first discovered when she appeared in Memphis nightclubs, was given a break by the big-band leader Gene 'Bowlegs' Miller, and landed her first top hit with the celebrated song I Can't Stand The Rain.



    Towards the end of the Seventies she made a well-timed retreat just before the outbreak of the highly commercialised disco wave, only to return many years later with a revival of her old songs.
    Her album from 1972 has certainly not mellowed with age. Her singing is sharp and soulful, and comes right from the heart (Slipped, Tripped And Fell In Love). The beat is powerful, throbbing, young and fresh (What You Laid On Me) or surging and groovy (How Strong Is A Woman?). The arrangements come across as sophisticated and well balanced, yet do not baulk at harsh attacks from the winds nor from the use of Hammond and Hohner keyboards, which were so popular at that time. Melody, singers and big band are airy and finely interwoven (Somebody's On Your Case), while a fusion of soft swing and snappy acerbity (I Pity The Fool) rounds off this album which is filled with pure emotion, heart and soul.



    Musicians:



    • Ann Peebles (vocal)

    • James Mitchell (bassoon)

    • Jack Hale (trombone)

    • Andrew Love, Ed Logan (tenor saxophone, vocals)

    • Charles Hodges (organ, piano)

    • Wayne Jackson (trumpet)

    • Teenie Hodges (guitar)

    • Leroy Hodges (bass)

    • Howard Grimes (drums)



    Recording: August 1971 at Royal Recording Studios, Memphis, TN, by Willie Mitchell

    Production: Willie Mitchell





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Slipped, Tripped and Fell In Love
    2. Trouble, Heartaches & Sadness
    3. What You Laid On Me
    4. How Strong Is A Woman
    5. Somebody's On Your Case
    6. I Feel Like Breaking Up Somebody's Home Tonight
    7. I've Been There Before
    8. I Pity The Fool
    9. 99 Pounds
    10. I Take What I Want
    Ann Peebles
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Transformer (Speakers Corner) Transformer (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Transformer (Speakers Corner)

    Ranked 194/500 on Rolling Stone Magazine's 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.

    It is well known that comparisons seldom get to the root of the matter, but in the case of Lou Reed, for example, they certainly reveal the unassuredness of those people who made them. Is he or isn't he the Chuck Berry or Sergeant Pepper of the Seventies, or is he deliberately building up an image of himself as an ultra-sensitive Frankenstein, who lived out his neuroses and drug trips in horrific sound? Some records are so unbelievably repulsive, raged the magazine Rolling Stone, that one would best like to take physical revenge on the artists who commit such offences.



    The album Transformer, however, can by no means be classified as a case of 'acoustic bodily harm'. It appeared just a few months after the somewhat unsuccessful appearance of Lou Reed's fairly underground first release and rocketed straight into the charts. This production had two British guardian angels to help it on its way, namely David Bowie and Mick Ronson, both of whom obviously knew how to steer Reed's songwriting qualities into safe waters, without watering down his biting sarcasm and humorous provocation.
    And that's why grating guitar rock (Vicious) is found alongside a bittersweet, tender ballad (Perfect Day) and even an old-time jazz parody (Goodnight Ladies) which is sung with a tongue a heavy as lead. Why then compare this highly original music mix with others, when it's so much easier to hear this record for what it is - a truly cult album?



    Musicians:



    • Lou Reed (vocal, guitar, arranger)

    • Mick Ronson (vocal, guitar, piano, arranger)

    • David Bowie (vocal, arranger)

    • Ronnie Ross (saxophone)

    • Klaus Voorman (bass)

    • Herbie Flowers (tuba, bass)

    • John Halzey, Barry Desouza; Ritchie Dharma (drums)




    Recording: 1972 by Arun Chakranerty

    Production: David Bowie and Mick Ronson





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.




    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Vicious
    2. Andy's Chest
    3. Perfect Day
    4. Hangin' Round
    5. Walk on the Wild Side
    6. Make Up
    7. Satellite of Love
    8. Wagon Wheel
    9. New York Telephone Conversation
    10. I'm So Free
    11. Goodnight Ladies

    Lou Reed
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Johnny Cash At San Quentin (Speakers Corner) Johnny Cash At San Quentin (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Johnny Cash At San Quentin (Speakers Corner)

    Johnny Cash was a country legend even during his lifetime, although, or perhaps because, he was very different from the numerous country singers with chequered shirts. When performing he chose to wear black as a symbol of solidarity with the oppressed and those who had no rights. His chosen outlaw image was just as convincing as the train-like boom-tiddy-boom sound of his rhythm group who lent their typical sound to many of his 500 songs.



    At the very zenith of his career, Cash (who himself had committed a few minor offenses) had the idea of singing and playing for the bad guys behind the prison walls for nothing. Initially his suggestion to market the live recording was rejected, but finally his record company decided to release the album At Folsom Prison. Fired by the success of his jailhouse recording, Columbia Records released At San Quentin shortly afterwards. The recording, in which Cash and his combo were frenetically applauded more or less at the end of each verse, exceeded all expectations. Today it is still considered by Cash fans to be the best live recording by the 'man in black'.



    Musicians:



    • Johnny Cash (vocals, guitar)

    • June Carter Cash, Carter Family (voc)

    • Bob Wootton (electric guitar)

    • Marshall Grant (bass)

    • W.S. Holland (drums)




    Recording: 24 February 1969 live at San Quentin State Prison, USA, by Neil Wilburn and Bob Breault

    Production: Bob Johnston




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Wanted Man
    2. Wreck Of The Old 97
    3. I Walk The Line
    4. Darlin' Companion
    5. Starkville City Jail
    6. San Quentin
    7. San Quentin
    8. A Boy Named Sue
    9. Peace In The Valley
    10. Folsom Prison Blues

    Johnny Cash
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Caravanserai (Speakers Corner) Caravanserai (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Caravanserai (Speakers Corner)

    To attempt to categorise Carlos Santana's music is, for the prophets of rock music, rather like dancing on the edge of a volcano. While the New York Times acclaimed the band as a reincarnation of Dizzy Gillespie's Cuban-jazz bigband from the end of the Forties, the specialist magazine Rolling Stone spoke of a »methadrine trip without visions«. Organ-player Gregg Rolie offered a very simple explanation of the origins of the highly differentiated sound colouring and the throb and chirp of the Afro-Cuban polyrhythms: he succinctly remarked that each member of the multi-cultural band just played the music which he had grown up with.



    Just how thrilling this sounds is already evident from the first number on the disc, with its sounds of nature, twisted rhythms, and little snatches of melody, which - as in several other titles - remains spellbinding even without the fascinating drive of Santana's lead-sound. Of course there is plenty of solo material on the guitar which manifests itself in exuberant improvisations with a fusion of rock, salsa and jazz elements. When listening to this well-oiled rhythm machine, one quite rightly gets the impression that this unique band has stretched itself to its limits, and it is not by mere coincidence that they split up shortly afterwards. What has remained is one of the most powerful Santana records ever made.



    Musicians:



    • Carlos Santana (guitar, percussion)

    • Hadley Caliman (saxophone)

    • Gregg Rolie (organ, piano)

    • Wendy Haas (piano)

    • Tom Coster (electric piano)

    • Neal Schon (guitar)

    • Douglas Rauch (guitar, bass)

    • Tom Rutley (bass)

    • Mike Shrieve (drums)

    • Jose Chepito Areas, Armando Peraza (percussion)



    Recording: February and May 1972

    Production: Carlos Santana and Michael Shrieve



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.




    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Eternal Caravan Of Reincarnation
    2. Waves Within
    3. Look Up (To See What's Coming Down)
    4. Just In Time To See The Sun
    5. Song Of The Wind
    6. All The Love Of The Universe
    7. Future Primitive
    8. Stone Flower
    9. La Fuente Del Ritmo
    10. Every Step Of The Way


    Santana
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Bach: 1-6 Solo Cello Suites (Speakers Corner) Bach: 1-6 Solo Cello Suites (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $95.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Bach: 1-6 Solo Cello Suites (Speakers Corner)

    Today it is difficult to understand that despite the tremendous Bach renaissance that took place in the 19th century many compositions by the Cantor of St. Thomas's Church in Leipzig had been underrated. The Cello Suites, for example, have been regarded for almost 300 years as purely a set of tricky etudes that every virtuoso in the making simply must tackle. What recording engineers and their equipment can bring to the ears is quite astounding. So it was back in the Thirties with Pablo Casal's legendary recording against which every cellist is measured today and to whose perfection he aspires.



    Janos Starker's recording of the Suites from 1965 makes a lasting impression on the listener, even when compared with other recordings from the digital era, and even record producers who are well used to recorded excellence have been highly impressed. For Charlotte Gilbert of the Mercury record label, these recording sessions were one of five truly great events in all her 20 years of recording experience.



    Without a doubt, Starker allows his instrument to resound freely but without forcing the tone. Starker's full-bodied sound and technical brilliance are complemented by his finely chiselled interpretation that lends immense expression to Bach's thrilling harmony and verve to the strict rhythmic construction of the movements. Just listen to his organ-like double-stopped passages, the eloquent dialogues, and the pure excitement created by his highly individual treatment of tempo. Then you will surely agree with the often-quoted paradox that Bach's Cello Suites are 'polyphony for a solo instrument'.



    Musicians:



    • Janos Starker (cello)




    Recording: April 1963, September and December 1965 at ballroom Studio A at Fine Recording Studios, New York, by C. Robert Fine and Robert Eberenz

    Production: Wilma Cozart



    Format: 3LPs 33rpm / Box, booklet



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    This title is not eligible for discount.

    Janos Starker
    $95.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 3 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • The Pink Panther (Speakers Corner) The Pink Panther (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    The Pink Panther (Speakers Corner)

    The film director Blake Edwards brought into existence what is probably the best opening sequence to his comic crime film when he commissioned a young enterprising company to produce an animated Pink Panther cartoon film. The creative team came up with the idea of giving the cold, glittering diamond the guise of a cool, pink panther, which leads a bungling detective on a merry dance to the slinky sound of the Panther theme.



    Mancini would not be Mancini if he did not bathe the film location - the skiing resort Cortina d'Ampezzo -in highly varied musical colours and genres. His well-known love for dance music finds itself in the samba (It Had Better Be Tonight), the shuffle (Champagne And Quail), and the cha-cha (Something For Sellers). But also the ballad, sung by a muted trumpet and saxophone (Royal Blue), or the simple combination of keyboard and strings (Piano And Strings) are all woven into the story. One of the most memorable and delightful sounds is that of the accordion, whose melodies evoke an atmosphere that is filled with the Bohème, Paris and the sound of the musette. This music is never gaudy, but subtle, just like a panther padding quietly along. And if your appetite is now whetted for more, there is an extra portion of Mancini to be found in Breakfast At Tiffany's (RCA LSP 2362).



    Musicians:



    • Henry Mancini (arranger, conductor, p) & orchestra



    Recording: September 1963 at RCA Victor's Music Center of the World, Hollywood, by Jim Malloy

    Production: Joe Reisman



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.




    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. The Pink Panther Theme
    2. It Had Better Be Tonight (Instrumental)
    3. Royal Blue
    4. Champagne and Quail
    5. The Village Inn
    6. The Tiber Twist
    7. It Had Better Be Tonight
    8. Cortina
    9. The Lonely Princess
    10. Something for Sellers
    11. Piano and Strings
    12. Shades of Sennett
    Henry Mancini
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Lovely And Alive (Speakers Corner) Lovely And Alive (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Lovely And Alive (Speakers Corner)

    Singing actors and actresses do not always cut a good figure on the silver screen; play-acting singers, however, are all the better when they draw attention to themselves with great vocals. As did Lena Horne in the days of the black-and-white film, who, with her sultry, versatile voice, was constantly employed by Hollywood. Although she occasionally ventured into the world of jazz, and made music with Teddy Wilson and Benny Carter, she never forayed into the wide world of improvisation. Her musical home was in the American Songbook, which she approached with a natural and entertaining manner. A good example of this is the first number here - the Cole Porter classic I Concentrate On You, which swings along to the perfectly recorded big-band sound of the Marty Paich Orchestra. A surprise element is the extensive palette of vocal sound-colouring with which the diva enhances her voice to achieve the drama of a Shirley Bassey or the dusky depths of a Dinah Washington. Each and every number on this Grammy-worthy album has been thought out in great detail and guarantees sophisticated entertainment, and a hint of West Coast jazz is perceptible when Jack Sheldon treats us to the sound of his warm and dark trumpet solos.



    Recording: 1962

    Production: Dick Peirce



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. I Concentrate On You
    2. I Get The Blues When It Rains
    3. I've Grown Accustomed To His Face
    4. I Got Rhythm
    5. I'm Confessin' (That I Love You)
    6. I Want To Be Happy
    7. I Surrender, Dear
    8. I Found A New Baby
    9. I Understand
    10. I Let A Song Go Out Of My Head
    11. I Ain't Got Nobody (And Nobody Cares For Me)
    12. I Only Have Eyes For You
    Lena Horne
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl - Sealed Buy Now
  • Mozart - Eine Kleine Nachtmusik (Speakers Corner) Mozart - Eine Kleine Nachtmusik (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Mozart - Eine Kleine Nachtmusik (Speakers Corner)

    Mozart wrote the Divertimento No. 1 at the age of six, while A Musical Joke and Eine kleine Nachtmusik were composed shortly before his death.



    From what one hears, apparently only a few music lovers enjoy listening to Eine kleine Nachtmusik. Far too often has it been performed routinely rather than being filled with life. This recording is quite different: living up to his reputation, Karl MÜnchinger proves that this favourite can be imbued with significance.



    The historical roote of the serenade lie in the suite which consists of varied contrasting dance movements. In the spirit of this tradition, MÜnchinger offers a clear and unfussed interpretation which is absolutely credible and has a freshness rarely heard. The ensemble plays both cheerfully and and wittily. In A Musical Joke, Mozart parodies amateurish composers of his own era, and the orchestra quite obviously participates in the fun.
    This LP is distinguished by its musical and tonal balance and is one of DECCA's best sound recordings.





    Musicians:



    • Stuttgart Chamber Orchestra

    • Karl MÜnchinger (conductor)




    Recording: November 1960, Victoria Hall at Geneva by Roy Wallace

    Production: James Walker





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    This title is not eligible for discount.

    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Bach Keyboard Concertos (Speakers Corner) The Bach Keyboard Concertos (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $95.99
    Buy Now
    x

    The Bach Keyboard Concertos (Speakers Corner)

    The attempts that have been made to describe Glenn Gould's complex personality are endless in number, as are his surprising and often eccentric interpretations. Whether he is considered to be a sensitive maniac, neurotic individualist or uncompromising genius - Gould polarises, provokes and fascinates us long after his death in 1982. As early as 1964 the Canadian pianist ceased to give concerts, since he found appearing before an audience completely unacceptable and preferred to concentrate on studio recordings.



    Way in front of composers of the Viennese Classical era, which he did not take particularly seriously - although his performances keenly reflect Beethoven's rhythmicity - comes his personal deity: Bach. Gould's notorious strictness gives form to the minutest of figure in the score. He weaves his way through Bach's music and thereby articulates its tightly knit and multi-facetted depths. No lecturing keyboard proponent this, but a creative co-composer who imbues the spirit of the music with life and sonority. Upon the release in 1980 of the 80th Birthday Edition with its wealth of visual and tonal material, the music journalist Werner Theurich wrote that »no one had ever played more raptly, or more intensively. That Gould's performances are nothing but heavenly can be seen and felt. The rest is pure music.«




    Recording: April 1957, May 1967 and February 1969 at Columbia 30th Street Studio, New York City, by Fred Plaut

    Production: Andrew Kazdin




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    The Bach Keyboard Concertos J. S. Bach: Keyboard Concertos Nos. 1-5 and 7
    L. v. Beethoven: Piano Concerto No. 1 - Glenn Gould, the Columbia Symphony Orchestra conducted by Vladimir Golschmann and Leonard Bernstein
    Glenn Gould
    $95.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP Box Set - 3 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Bashin' (Speakers Corner) Bashin' (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Bashin' (Speakers Corner)

    Right up until today rumour has it that Creed Taylor enticed the organist Jimmy Smith to leave Blue Note and change to the Verve label by means of a very large fistful of dollars. One things is clear, however: that Jimmy Smith never revealed a single word about this delicate matter; but it is also clear that the whole concept of his music took on new dimensions when he changed over to his new backer. Recordings with Wes Montgomery were just the beginning; large ensembles, superb arrangements by Oliver Nelson, and fine contributions by his soloists created a magnificent background for the 'new' Jimmy Smith on this and subsequent LPs.



    Despite its title, Bashin', there is absolutely nothing to criticise on this LP. The A side presents the new concept: a wonderful, swinging background against which Jimmy Smith can develop his full potential. Oliver Nelson's light and airy arrangements further enhance the standard themes: soloists are never confined within set limits but are gently guided; the riffs are presently precisely and cleanly, without ever sounding overloaded.



    The use of the organ is also quite fascinating: beautifully relaxed in Beggar For The Blues which is arranged for a trio; swinging in the title number Bashin', and cheerful in the style of an old cowboy song - I'm An Old Cowhand, whereby this version has no need to stand in the shadow of Sonny Rollins's almost classical version.



    The old Hammond B3 organ has experienced a revival over the past few years. Jimmy Smith, on the other hand, can look back on a great musical and commercial success story ever since the Fifties - as with Bashin'!



    Musicians:



    • Jimmy Smith (organ)

    • Phil Woods (saxophone)

    • Ernie Royal, Doc Severinsen (trumpet)

    • Jimmy Cleveland, Urbie Green (trombone)

    • Barry Galbraith (guitar)

    • George Duvivier (bass)

    • Ed Shaughnessy, Don Bailey (drums)




    Recording: March 1962 in New York by Rudy Van Gelder

    Production: Creed Taylor





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Walk on the Wild Side

    2. Ol' Man River

    3. In A Mellow Tone

    4. Step Right Up
    5. Beggar for the Blues
    6. Bashin'
    7. I'm an Old Cow Hand (From the Rio Grande)
    Jimmy Smith
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Stitt Plays Bird (Speakers Corner) Stitt Plays Bird (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Stitt Plays Bird (Speakers Corner)

    It is widely known that Sonny Stitt didn't want to be taken for Charlie 'Bird' Parker and changed from playing the alto to the tenor saxophone. Although false rumours pop up every now and then, the truth is that at the beginning of the 1940s Stitt independently developed the same be-bop licks as Parker without ever having heard him.
    For Stitt Plays Bird Sonny had to unearth his old instrument and insert a new mouthpiece because Atlantic Records and their entrepreneurial president Ahmet Ertegun hoped for big sales figures. Which actually proved true.


    One half of the modern jazz quartet provided the melodic and rhythmic basis for improvisations on eight 'hits' by Charlie Parker and one composition by his first employer Jay McShann. Added to this are the subtle, sensitive scatterings from Jim Hall and the emphatic beat from Richard Davis, both of which lend delicacy and pulse to the numbers. It's hard to recommend a special track, but Scrapple From The Apple is just awesome! All the numbers are based on standards - just which they are can be found in the informative liner notes by the be-bop expert Ira Gitler. Atlantic's logo "Full Dynamic Frequency Spectrum" is no longer a swindle in this new pressing and at last one can enjoy all nine titles in all their sonic glory.


    This Speakers Corner LP was remastered using pure analogue components only, from the master tapes through to the cutting head. All royalties and mechanical rights have been paid.

    Musicians:



    • Sonny Stitt (alto saxophone)
    • John Lewis (piano)
    • Jim Hall (guitar)
    • Richard Davis (bass)
    • Connie Kay (drums)



    Recording: January 1963 at Atlantic Studios, New York City, by Tom Dowd

    Production: Nesuhi Ertegun




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Ornithology
    2. Scrapple From The Apple
    3. My Little Suede Shoes
    4. Parker's Mood
    5. Au Privave
    6. Ko-Ko
    7. Confirmation
    8. Hootie Blues
    9. Constellation
    Sonny Stitt
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
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