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  • Beck, Bogert & Appice (Speakers Corner) Beck, Bogert & Appice (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Beck, Bogert & Appice (Speakers Corner)

    On the whole, the supergroups of the Seventies didn't last very long, but for that - all the more notably. This certainly applies to the Anglo-American trio made up of the extremely talented though narcissistic guitarist Jeff Beck, the bass-player Tim Bogert, and the drummer Carmine Appice. As early as 1970, the British Beck wanted to engage the two American musicians for a joint project. This plan however had to be postponed for two years because the speed-mad Beck had had a serious car accident and needed time to recover. 1973 saw the release of the trio's first and only studio album, which not only demonstrated Beck's powerful-hectic style of guitar playing but also allowed his musical companions to show off their prowess. The trio applied their musical talents to all facets of rock 'n' roll, right from the bluesy first number (Black Cat Moan), via the agile rock sound of Lady, ending up with the moans of a vocal love ballad (Oh To Love You), followed by a really convincing gospel song (Sweet And Surrender) and the super funky beat of Lose Myself With You.
    The trio seemed to lust for more - but this was not to be. For the very next year, during the intense preparations for their next studio album, the moody Jeff Beck dissolved the group on the spur of the moment.



    Musicians:



    • Jeff Beck (guitar, vocal)

    • Jimmy Greenspoon (piano)

    • Duane Hitchings (keyboards,melophone, piano)

    • Tim Bogert (bass)

    • Carmine Appice (drums, vocal)

    • Danny Hutton (background vocal)




    Recording: 1973 by Baker Bigsby and Gray Starr

    Production: Don Nix and The Boys




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Black Cat Moan
    2. Lady
    3. Oh To Love You
    4. Superstition
    5. Sweet Surrender
    6. Why Should I Care
    7. Lose Myself With You
    8. Livin' Alone
    9. I'm So Alone
    Jeff Beck, Tim Bogert & Carmine Appice
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Gershwin: Rhapsody In Blue, An American In Paris (Speakers Corner) Gershwin: Rhapsody In Blue, An American In Paris (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Gershwin: Rhapsody In Blue, An American In Paris (Speakers Corner)

    This fast and furious orchestral work with piano, which begins with what must surely be the most famous clarinet glissando of modern times, was composed with the intention of presenting as many facets as possible of music from the New World in the short space of around 15 minutes. In his Rhapsody In Blue Gershwin wanted to »paint a musical kaleidoscope of America - our enormous melting pot, our typical national traits, our blues, our seething city life«. With this in mind, Leonard Bernstein made a number of recordings of the work and among the many excellent recordings that he made as a conductor or as a soloist, this present version with the Columbia Orchestra, from 1959, is especially of note. Bernstein takes on a double function as conductor and soloist and manoeuvres his way safely and surely through the highly diversified score to create a well-rounded picture filled with hefty orchestral dynamics and finely chiselled solo playing. In Gershwin's freely composed work the soloist and orchestra do not resort to bombastic shock effects or egomaniac keyboard acrobatics, and so this the work can be described as rhapsodic in the very best sense of the word.
    Most fittingly, on the B side there is another freely composed work - the autobiographical sketch entitled An American In Paris. The superb New York musicians paint the impressions of a visitor to the hectic French capital city - that too is the sound of America.


    Musicians:



    • The Columbia Symphony Orchestra

    • New York Philharmonic Orchestra

    • George Gershwin (composer)

    • Leonard Bernstein (conductor)




    Recording: June 1959 and December 1958 at St George Hotel, Brooklyn, New York, by Fred Plaut and Frank Bruno

    Production: John McClure



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. Rhapsody In Blue
    2. An American In Paris
    Leonard Bernstein
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Captain And Me (Speakers Corner) The Captain And Me (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    The Captain And Me (Speakers Corner)

    The Doobie Brothers weren't brothers, nor were they called Doobie. The band started life as Pud in 1969 in Chateau LibertÉ, a club in the mountains of California. The group took on the slang name for marihuana cigarettes (doobie) one year later. The Doobies' music, however, never sounded like that of befuddled, half-stoned junkies. Heavy metal hard rock was their thing which made their record company Warner target the bikers of the rocker scene. The idea backfired, though, because the band had far more to offer than explosive hard rock.



    The album The Captain And Me is considered to be the group's most concentrated and versatile production since it contrasts aggressive, hard numbers with gentle ones full of melodiousness. The very first number, Natural Thing, shows how winsome vocal folk music and electric guitar riffs can be amalgamated into rock music. Amongst these titles, decidedly angry numbers such as Without You and Evil Woman became real trailblazers. Now and then, an extensive harp solo or nonchalant licks from the acoustic guitar remind one of the pungent bluegrass style emanating from the South. That even the sweet wailing of the steel guitar (South City Midnight Lady) finds room for expression seems quite logical in this well-thought-out musical concept.



    Musicians:



    • Tom Johnston (guitar, harmonica, synthesizer, vocals)

    • Patrick Simmons (guitar, synthesizer, vocals)

    • John Hartman (percussion, drums, vocals)

    • Tiran Porter (bass, vocals)

    • Michael Hossack (drums, conga, percussion)



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. Natural Thing
    2. Long Train Runnin'
    3. China Grove
    4. Dark Eyed Cajun Woman
    5. Clear As The Driven Snow
    6. Without You
    7. South City Midnight Lady
    8. Evil Woman
    9. Ukiah
    10. The Captain And Me
    The Doobie Brothers
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Exclusively for My Friends - The Lost Tapes (Speakers Corner) Exclusively for My Friends - The Lost Tapes (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Exclusively for My Friends - The Lost Tapes (Speakers Corner)

    Tears of sorrow mingled with tears of joy as Oscar Peterson fans realized that the keyboard genius who had just recovered his health was still capable of amazing them all, although he had obviously forfeited some of his past vitality. This may well have induced MPS - the label with whom Oscar Petersen himself claimed to have made his best recordings - to search their archives for lost tapes from Peterson's heydey. And lo and behold, a number of previously unreleased recordings were discovered which had been taped "exclusively for my friends" in the private studio in Villingen in 1965-1968.
    The electric atmosphere of these live sessions before a mere handful of listeners proves once again just how at home the musicians felt in the Black Forest villa - as is borne out by the fact that Peterson's usual trio formation alternated with his stand-in musicians of Sam Jones on the bass and Bobby Durham on the drums.



    And now, exclusively for all jazz fans, these amazing tracks are available for the very first time on an LP filled with glorious sound. Whether long-time collector or jazz newcomer, one thing is certain: this album belongs in every collection!



    Musicians:



    • Oscar Peterson (piano)

    • Ray Brown, Sam Jones (bass)

    • Ed Thigpen, Bobby Durham (drums)




    Recording: May 1965, November 1967 and October 1968 at H.G. Brunner-Schwer's private studio's in Villingen/ Germany by H.-G. Brunner-Schwer

    Production: H.-G. Brunner-Schwer





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Gravy Waltz
    2. Three O'Clock in the Morning
    3. Squeaky's Blues
    4. Tenderly
    5. I Will Wait for You
    6. Let's Fall in Love
    7. Put on a Happy Face
    8. Stella by Starlight
    9. Moanin' 10. Never Say Yes
    11. It's Impossible
    12. My Romance
    Oscar Peterson
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Miles Smiles (Speakers Corner) Miles Smiles (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    x

    Miles Smiles (Speakers Corner)

    Except for the taping of a live performance at the Portland Festival, Miles Davis's discography for 1966 only lists the recordings made for the LP Miles Smiles! How strange when one considers the usual large output of Miles and his ensembles for Columbia Records in the Sixties.



    The bass player Ron Carter was best suited for the complicated rhythm part and remained Miles's 'number one' in a quintet which gave a new interpretation to compositions by Wayne Shorter and jazz hits such as Freedom Jazz Dance by Eddie Harris and Jimmy Heath's Gingerbread Boy.



    Every second of the nine-minute-long Footprints by Shorter is an absolute highlight, while the drumming of the young Tony Williams in Freedom Jazz Dance is full of vitality, with a quick pulse, and even described as threatening in the liner notes. This music is neither 'new stream' nor 'old guard' but good modern jazz according to Anthony Tuttle. That's exactly what Miles Smiles was upon its release 40 years ago - and that's what it is to this day! And that Miles Davis smiled for once thanks to the great musical relationship between the five individualists is certainly no mere rumour.



    Musicians:



    • Miles Davis

    • Wayne Shorter (tenor saxophone)

    • Herbie Hancock (piano)

    • Ron Carter (bass)

    • Tony Williams (drums)




    Recording: October 1966 at Columbia RecordsStudios, New York, by Frank Laico

    Production: Teo Macero




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Orbits
    2. Circle
    3. Footprints
    4. Dolores
    5. Freedom Jazz Dance
    6. Ginger Bread Boy
    Miles Davis
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Two Of A Mind (Speakers Corner) Two Of A Mind (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Two Of A Mind (Speakers Corner)

    Although the beautiful sound, mutual understanding and harmonic balance mostly predominate, the music of alto saxophonist Paul Desmond performing together with baritone saxophonist Gerry Mulligan is far from what one calls 'easy listening'. For many, it is even difficult to identify the melody of evergreens such as Stardust and The Way You Look Tonight. (And what theme is tucked away in Two Of A Mind????)
    The recording in the RCA Victor Studio took place over several days in 1962, and this is why different bass players and percussionists are heard - Wendell Marshall, Joe Benjamin and John Beal each take their turn on the bass, while Connie Kay and Mel Lewis change places behind the drum set. These musicians form a brilliant team, and that there is no piano is both deliberate and inevitable for Gerry Mulligan recordings of the day. By the way, the second saxophonist in The Way You Look Tonight is Paul Desmond - by means of over-dubbing in the middle of the stereo recording!
    The present LP could certainly take a rightful place in a 'Best Of' collection alongside the other recordings by Gerry Mulligan with Ben Webster and Stan Getz.



    Musicians:



    • Gerry Mulligan (bassoon)

    • Paul Desmond (alto saxophone)

    • Joe Benjamin, John Beal, Wendell Marshall (bass)

    • Connie Kay, Mel Lewis (drums)




    Recording: 1962 at RCA Victor's Studio A, New York City by Ray Hall, Bob Simpson and Mickey Crofford

    Production: Bob Prince and George Avakian





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    1. All the Things You Are
    2. Stardust

    3. Two of a Mind
    4. Blight of the Fumble Bee
    5. The Way You Look Tonight
    6. Out of Nowhere
    Paul Desmond & Gerry Mulligan
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Burgers (Speakers Corner) Burgers (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    x

    Burgers (Speakers Corner)

    The exploration of psychedelic depths did not appear to suffice the founders of Jefferson Airplane - Jorma Kaukonen and Jack Casady - when searching for their musical salvation. So why not amalgamate their hippy-like simple lifestyle and folksy music with the formation of a second band called Hot Tuna, emotional yet not so synthetically hotted-up? Even in the very first number, True Religion, whose airy, bubbling folksy finger-picking soars up into powerful waves of rock, the message of this first studio album comes over loud and clear. Growling bass melodies and the representation of a life on the road (Keep On Truckin') conjure up a down-to-earth country feeling, with an off-key fiddle tune (Let Us Get Together Right Down Here) accentuating the rough yet cordial get-together. The purely instrumental Water Song is a stroke of genius - this humming, buzzing guitar mix doesn't only demonstrate the players' instrumental dexterity but also their keen sense of melody and ear for sound colouring. No matter whether gruff Hillbilly, cool blues rocker, or square and nostalgic former hippy - they'll all love this album. Just think: for whom else does Hot Tuna still go on tour ...?

    Musicians:



    • Jorma Kaukonen (guitar, vocal)

    • Jack Casady (bass, vocal)

    • Papa John Creach (violin, vocal)

    • Sammy Piazza (drums, percussion, vocal)

    • Nikki Buck (organ, piano)

    • Richmond Talbott (vocal, guitar)

    • David Crosby (vocal)




    Recording: 1972 by 'The Unknown Engineer' at Wally Heider Studios, San Francisco

    Production: Fisohobay Production



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. True Religion
    2. Highway Song
    3. 99 Year blues
    4. Sea Child
    5. Keep on Truckin'
    6. Water Song
    7. Ode for Billy Dean
    8. Let Us Get Together Right Down Here
    9. Sunny Day Strut
    Hot Tuna
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Seductive Reasoning (Speakers Corner) Seductive Reasoning (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Seductive Reasoning (Speakers Corner)

    Thanks to their undeniable musical talent, which allowed them to be taken seriously in the folk scene, the industrious Roche sisters' career began when they were young. The duo began by singing Christmas carols, doo-wop song syllable puzzles, and tricky barbershop harmonies. They finally caught the attention of Paul Simon, who brought the gifted girls in as backup singers on his LP There Goes Rhymin' Simon, and was primarily responsible for the birth of their first recording. The lavishly produced album achieved high critical acclaim. Although it was a worthy professional debut, the public was hesitant to buy the album. The specialist magazine Rolling Stone commented drily and somewhat at a loss that the Roches weren't everyone's cup of tea.



    Maggie and Terre Roche are a well-rehearsed vocal team however: with a range from hazy, finely balanced voices singing as one, right up to pearly, radiant brilliance, the Roche sisters enthusiastically penned a songbook which is almost without exception their very own creation. Mechanical bluegrass music (Wigglin' Man), a steam-train character (If You Emptied ...) and a somewhat crude and unrefined country aura make the subtle lyrics easily accessible to all, but the LP also offers the listener wonderfully ill-humoured verse (The Mountain People) and story-like prose (West Virginia). This is a truly exceptional album, and well worth being discovered!



    Musicians:



    • Maggie Roche (piano, guitar)

    • Terre Roche (guitar)

    • Paul Simon (guitar)

    • Pete Carr (guitar)

    • Jimmy Johnson (guitar)

    • Barry Beckett (keyboard)

    • David Hood (bass)

    • Roger Hawkins(drums)



    Recording: 1973 in the Morgan Studios, London, and 1974 in the Muscle Shoals Studios, Sheffield, Alabama

    Production: Paul Simon, Paul Samwell-Smith, David Hood and Jimmy Johnson




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Underneath the Moon
    2. Down the Dream
    3. Wigglin' Man
    4. West Virginia
    5. If You Empty Out All Your Pockets You Could Not Make the Change
    6. Telephone Bill
    7. Malachy's
    8. Burden of Proof
    9. The Mountain People
    10. Jill of All Trades
    Maggie & Terre Roche
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • In Hollywood (Speakers Corner) In Hollywood (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    In Hollywood (Speakers Corner)

    When stringed instruments are employed, it is often an indication that the protagonist is somewhat mature. It is an unwritten law that sooner or later every rock, jazz or folk musician will bathe in soft tones for once. Chet Atkins, however, was light years away from his artistic zenith, came up with a wealth of ideas and was in a great position with regards to recording facilities when he set down his Hollywood album in 1959. Two years earlier, "Mister Guitar" had become boss of the newly founded RCA Studio in Nashville. Here he recorded several records, which reflected his ideas of an appealing, catchy Nashville Sound as an answer to the declining rock and roll.


    The Hollywood numbers were by no means dynamite movie tracks or showstoppers. Dennis Farnon's delicate, lush arrangements rather more pay homage to the maestro with his no-frills art of playing. The gentle Italo evergreen Santa Lucia, Chaplin's beautiful Limelight with its violins and the time-honoured Greensleeves - all of them flawlessly performed - are a real pleasure for the ears. Atkins greatly admired the superb string orchestra and two years later he re-recorded the album using the tapes from the Hollywood session to create this new version.

    Musicians:



    • Chet Atkins (guitar)
    • Howard Roberts (guitar)
    • Jethro Burns (mandolin)
    • Clifford Hils (bass)
    • George Callender (bass)
    • Larry Bunker (drum & strings)
    • Jack Sperling(drum & strings)


    Recording: October 1958 in Hollywood

    Production: Chet Atkins




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Armen's Theme
    2. Let It Be Me
    3. Theme From Picnic
    4. Theme From A Dream
    5. Estrelita
    6. Jitterbug Waltz
    7. Little Old Lady
    8. Limelight
    9. The Three Bells
    10. Santa Lucia
    11. Greensleeves
    12. Meet Mr. Callaghan
    Chet Atkins
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Swiss Movement (Speakers Corner) Swiss Movement (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Swiss Movement (Speakers Corner)

    Les McCann had already been playing his way through the clubs and record studios on the US west coast for ten years when his appearance on 21 June 1969 at the relatively new and jazz-soaked festival in Montreux on Lake Geneva changed all that. There, he celebrated his greatest musical success, his number one hit. Half ironically, but proudly in later concerts, when the piano stool could hardly bear him due to his size and weight, he stressed that Swiss Movement had supported him, his wife, children and grandchildren.


    Compared To What is a catchy melody that is heard on the radio, again and again, all around the world, today, tomorrow and the day after It is unmistakable, still groovy, full of soul, humorous, stirring. And Cold Duck Time is no way inferior: Eddie Harris blows for all he is worth. Everyone can hear that Benny Bailey was challenged by the unknown themes, but this maestro still managed to capture the audience's ear and attention.


    Swiss Movement is, and will remain forever, a highlight among all the jazz LPs that have been recorded live and it shouldn't be missing from any collector's shelf. Along with Benny Goodman's Carnegie Hall Concert from 1938, Charlie Parker & Co.'s Massey Hall concert from 1953, and Ella Fitzgerald's Berlin concert from 1960 - and very few others


    Musicians:


    • Eddie Harris (tenor saxophone)
    • Benny Bailey (trumpet)
    • Les McCann (piano, violin)
    • Leroy Vinnegar (bass)
    • Donald Dean (drums)


    Recording: June 1969 live at Montreux Jazz Festival

    Production: Joel Dorn & Nesuhi Ertegun


    About Speakers Corner


    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. Compared To What
    2. Cold Duck Time
    3. Kathleen's Theme
    4. You Got It In Your Soulness
    5. The Generation Gap
    Les McCann & Eddie Harris
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Solitude On Guitar (Speakers Corner) Solitude On Guitar (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Solitude On Guitar (Speakers Corner)

    The acoustic guitar shares the same destiny as so many music companies: almost all of them dabble with the six strings at some point, many attempt to play entertaining harmonic roulette with it, but only a few really make the grade. Baden Powell belongs to the small circle of guitarists whose early virtuosity is perfectly combined with a keen sense of harmony. Powell demonstrates this special talent in his slow numbers in particular, in which broken chords are developed like a bud opening out to a blossom. He guides the listener cautiously through his melodies in that he makes a tiny pause before a harmonic change. Full timbre and lightness are not a question of what is written down on the manuscript but result from a powerful performance, as is shown by the totally un-Brazilian, gentle major-minor key version of the children's song Kommt Ein Vogel Geflogen.



    Naturally, the wonderfully crafted, animated and bouncy bossas flow along easily. As befits the album's title, the guitar is in the limelight here, driven on, held back, and then propelled forward by the rhythm group. The ballad Se Todos Fossem Iguais A Voce is strongly recommended to whet your appetite for the bossa Na Gafieira Do Vidigal.



    Musicians:



    • Baden Powell (arranger, guitar, vocal)

    • Joaquim Paes Henriques (drums)

    • Eberhard Weber (bass)




    Recording: December 1971 by Torsten Wintermeir at Studio Walldorf, Germany

    Production: Joachim Ernst Berendt





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    Baden Powell
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • At Carnegie Hall (Speakers Corner) (Awaiting Repress) At Carnegie Hall (Speakers Corner) (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $69.99
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    x

    At Carnegie Hall (Speakers Corner) (Awaiting Repress)

    Many critics regard Dave Brubeck's Carnegie Hall concert from February 1963 as his greatest ever live appearance. But who can really determine that? For no one - apart from Brubeck himself - would have seen and heard his conservatively estimated 12,000 concerts.



    Although the twelve titles had already been released on LPs that had been recorded in the studio, these records were certainly not known to all those in the audience. In between the numbers on each LP, Brubeck made little 'advertising spots' in short comments, but with such charm and wit that one really cannot be angry with him.



    The concert programme begins with St. Louis Blues and ends with Take Five. Luckily, the solos are distributed among all the musicians, so that Paul Desmond and Joe Morello - whose prowess on this evening can only be called 'amazingly good' - justifiably received enthusiastic applause from both the audience and us alike. Castilian Drums demonstrates Morello's wealth of ideas and his grandiose feeling for rhythm; though short, Paul Desmond's solos (Southern Scene is a good example!) are compelling, highly melodic, lyrical and possess a unique tone - as such they are immediately recognisable.



    How fortunate that the twelve brilliantly improvised numbers are now available once again on vinyl, having been recorded live at the legendary Carnegie Hall 60 years ago.



    Musicians:



    • Dave Brubeck (piano)

    • Paul Desmond (alto saxophone)

    • Eugene Wright (bass)

    • Joe Morello (drums)


    Recording: February 1963 Carnegie Hall, New York

    Production: Teo Macero



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    St. Louis Blues
    Bossa Nova U.S.A.
    For All We Know
    Pennies From Heaven
    Southern Scene
    Three To Get Ready
    Eleven Four
    King For A Day
    Castillian Drums
    It's A Raggy Waltz
    Blue Rondo A La Turk
    Take Five
    Dave Brubeck
    $69.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • Tchaikovsky - 1812 Overture (Speakers Corner) Tchaikovsky - 1812 Overture (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    x

    Tchaikovsky - 1812 Overture (Speakers Corner)

    The 1812 Overture, Tchaikovsky's musical tribute to celebrate victory over Napoleon's army, is one of those 19th-century works which is seldom performed in the concert hall due to the enormous number of instruments it requires. This programmatic symphonic work with its battlefield participants - male-voice choir, bell chimes, percussion, and cannon-fire - requires the utmost from everyone involved, from the tutti strings right up to the balance engineer.



    The gratifying result of a production made with only the very best ingredients can now be enjoyed once again with this re-release of a DECCA recording. The London Symphony Orchestra, led by Kenneth Alwyn, has achieved a remarkable feat, their rich timbre enhancing every nuance of this closely-knit score. Sonorous strings and polished brass wind passages ensure that the listener's attention will be riveted right to the very last bar.
    Less nerve-racking but certainly no less riveting in its beauty and lightness are the well-known Capriccio italien and the popular Marche slave. The purchaser of this LP can congratulate himself that he now possesses three of Tchaikovsky's greatest showpieces.





    Musicians:



    • London Symphony Orchestra

    • Kenneth Alwyn (conductor)




    Recording: May 1958 at Kingsway Hall, London by Kenneth E. Wilkinson

    Production: Michael Williamson




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. 1812 Overture, Op. 49
    2. Capriccio Italien, Op. 45
    3. Marche Slave, Op. 31
    Pyotr Ilich Tchaikovsky
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Unforgettable: A Tribute To Dinah Washington (Speakers Corner) Unforgettable: A Tribute To Dinah Washington (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $44.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Unforgettable: A Tribute To Dinah Washington (Speakers Corner)

    These recordings were made before Aretha Franklin was honoured with such names as 'Lady Soul' or 'Soul Sister No. 1'. That the young, talented singer already possessed one of the most outstanding voices was confirmed by the great Dinah Washington who stated concisely but decisively: The girl has got soul.



    The present tribute album was recorded just a few months after Washington's death and presents her most important and successful numbers, sung by her 23-year-old successor, who obviously feels quite comfortable when treading in the great singer's footsteps. In Unforgettable, a laid-back number with a string background, Aretha captivates the listener with her ever-changing vocal colouring and gospel-like ballad feeling. In the second number, Cold, Cold Heart, there is already evidence of a shimmering, subliminal blues nuance which is shot through with pointed harp phrases and the 'sucking' sound of the Hammond organ. While an old-fashioned bluesy style supported by a powerful bigband is characteristic of Evil Gal Blues, unconventional arrangements using obbligato trombone (Don't Say You're Sorry Again) are also found in this fascinating and highly varied line-up of numbers. Now, more than 40 years after its release, this album pays tribute to two unforgettable interpreters of black music.



    Musicians:



    • Aretha Franklin (piano, vocals)

    • Buddy Lucas (harmonica, tenor saxophone)

    • Ernie Royal (trumpet)

    • Bob Asher

    • Teddy Charles (vibraphone)

    • Ernie Hayes (organ, piano)

    • Paul Griffin (organ)

    • George Duvivier (bass)

    • Gary Chester (drums)




    Recording: August 1964 in New York

    Production: Robert Mersey




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Unforgettable
    2. Cold, Cold Heart
    3. What a Diff'rence a Day Made
    4. Drinking Again
    5. Nobody Knows the Way I Feel This Morning
    6. Evil Gal Blues
    7. Don't Say You're Sorry Again
    8. This Bitter Earth
    9. If I Should Lose You
    10. Soulville
    Aretha Franklin
    $44.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Toto IV (Speakers Corner) Toto IV (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Toto IV (Speakers Corner)

    Anyone who gives the dull name "Four" to their rock album must either be very sure of success or already have resigned. The group Toto may well have experienced such extremes as there was an enormous cleft between their amazing financial success and the crushing negative opinions voiced by the critics. Billboard criticised the superficial lyrics as being void of any sort of emotional weight while the Los Angeles Times aimed their fire at the musicians themselves, slamming them as dubious artists with a commercialised mentality.



    To this Toto struck back with their fourth album, which was an unparalleled success and brought them six Grammy awards. For a whole ten months Africa reigned at Number 1 on the charts and together with the super-hit Rosanna the two smash hits were a constant presence, backed up by a collection of impressive rock classics. A trip to the record shop is all that is needed to prove that this is unlikely to change in the near future. The bright red cover with its depiction of a sword will catch your eye, as though saying: It's got to be the Fourth!



    Musicians:



    • Steve Porcaro, David Paich (keyboard, vocal)

    • Steve Lukather (guitar, vocal)

    • Bobby Kimball (vocal)

    • David Hungate (bass)

    • Jeff Porcaro (drums, percussion)





    Recording: 1982 at Sunset Sound, Los Angeles, by David Leonard, Peggy McCreary & Terry Christian and Record One, Los Angeles, by Jamie Ledner, Niko Bolas & Lon LeMaster

    Production: Toto




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Rosanna
    2. Make Believe
    3. I Won't Hold You Back
    4. Good For You
    5. It's a Feeling
    6. Afraid Of Love
    7. Lovers In The Night
    8. We Made It
    9. Waiting For Your Love
    10. Africa

    Toto
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Berlioz: Symphonie Fantastique (Speakers Corner) Berlioz: Symphonie Fantastique (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Berlioz: Symphonie Fantastique (Speakers Corner)

    Beethoven had just finished writing his symphonies when - in 1830 - a young Frenchman created a sensation with his completely novel and exuberant orchestral music. Based on classical music form, Berlioz composed his »massive instrumental composition« as a five-movement musical drama. Such a stroke of genius, in which the ego and grief thereof are described, had never been heard before in the French Romantic period.


    Berlioz employs a very large orchestra with a big timpani section, four bassoons and military brass to present the young artist - an autobiographically motivated character - who dreams his way through the various episodes, hallucinating and frenzied. Here it is clear that it is Berlioz' declared intention to express the artist's visions radically and unmistakably in music - beginning with the ever-recurring delusional 'idÉe fixe' via a terrifying opium intoxication and ending up with the nightmare of his own burial.


    Of the many high-quality, often highly impassioned performances, this particular one by Dimitri Mitropoulos is certainly a benchmark recording. The great conductor makes the rhythms pulsate; he skilfully mixes the wealth of sound colouring, and blends the orchestral instruments so subtly that one notices previously unheard details with every listening.


    This Speakers Corner LP was remastered using pure analogue components only, from the master tapes through to the cutting head. All royalties and mechanical rights have been paid.

    Musicians:



    • Hector Berlioz (composer)
    • The New York Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Dimitri Mitropoulos



    Recording: February 1957 in New York




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    1. I - Reveries; Passions
    2. II - Un Bal
    3. III - ScÉne Aux Champs
    4. IV - Marche Au Supplice
    5. V Songe D'Une Nuit Du Sabbat
    Hector Berlioz
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Stravinsky: Symphonies (Speakers Corner) Stravinsky: Symphonies (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
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    Stravinsky: Symphonies (Speakers Corner)

    It is well known that the mature Stravinsky was candidly scathing about some of his early compositions. However, he did subscribe a measure of academic value to his very first symphony, if only to show how one should not compose. In the following decades he wrote his so-called neo-classical symphonies, but these too found no mercy in the eyes and ears of avant-garde extremists, and are thus among the most underestimated orchestral compositions of the 20th century.



    The new aspiration to write with clarity and simplicity, and so turning away from late-romantic and impressionistic expression, is already found in the key of C major, which has no accidentals. But the compositional technique is tricky: sharp polytonal melodies grow out of tonal islands, which, however never result in pleasant-sounding cadences even after numerous attempts to do so.



    The Symphony in Three Movements, too, breaks with tradition as regards its formal structure, which Stravinsky himself regarded as naïve. All the more intricate, however, is the ingenious melodiousness, which is unfolded with ballet-like rhythms by the whole orchestra.



    This fresh, bold music definitely needs to be performed by an astute and dauntless ensemble - such as West-Swiss Orchestre de la Suisse Romande conducted by Ernest Ansermet, an ardent champion of modern works.




    Recording: April 1960 at Victoria Hall, Geneva (Switzerland), by Roy Wallace

    Production: Ray Minshull



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    Igor Stravinsky: Symphony In C (1940)
    Symphony In Three Movements (1945) - Orchestre de la Suisse Romande conducted Ernest Ansermet
    Stravinsky
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Chuck Mangione Quartet (Speakers Corner) The Chuck Mangione Quartet (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    The Chuck Mangione Quartet (Speakers Corner)

    Now - in which pigeonhole that the innumerable self-proclaimed jazz critics like to create does this release from 1971 fit? Jazz-rock, jazz-fusion, soul-jazz-rock-fusion, electro-fusion-pop? Perhaps we can all agree that we should just enjoy these quartet recordings!


    These recordings, all of them absolutely fantastic numbers, have been made by flugelhornist Chuck Mangione with his marvellous quartet without a piano in a sort of 'jam session'. The band members are absolutely top notch with Ron Davis on drums, Joel DiBartolo on the double bass, and Gerry Niewood (still underestimated and mostly known as a sideman) on the soprano saxophone and flute (which is his foremost instrument although the more hushed one). On this LP, which has long been out of print, Chuck Mangione comes into the limelight in wonderfully melodic and mellow solos such as Land Of Make Believe and Little Sunflower - and the latter certainly needs not fear a comparison with the original by Freddie Hubbard! And Manha De Carnival, composed by guitarist Luis Bonfá is especially worth listening to for the amazing improvisations which have been set down for all times. Mercury's recording technology was of the very best in the Seventies, and that makes itself heard when listening to this recording on a new high-end vinyl LP instead of the original pressing.

    Musicians:



    • Chuck Mangione (fluegel horn, electric piano, percussion)

    • Gerry Niewood (flute, soprano saxophone, tuba, guiro)

    • Joel Di Bartolo (bass)

    • Ron Davis (drums, conga, percussion)




    Recording: 1971 at Mercury Sound Studio, New York, by Chuck Irwin

    Production: Chuck Mangione




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    .
    1. Land of Make Believe
    2. Self Portrait
    3. Little Sunflower
    4. Floating
    5. Manha de Carnival
    Chuck Mangione
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Beat Of My Heart (Speakers Corner) The Beat Of My Heart (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    x

    The Beat Of My Heart (Speakers Corner)

    The crooner Tony Bennett fulfilled a lifetime dream with this percussion jazz formation: At last he could go into the studio with the greatest drummers and top-notch jazz musicians and just swing to his heart's content.


    Chico Hamilton, Jo Jones, Art Blakey, Candido and Sabu were responsible for the beat while Kai Winding, Herbie Mann, Nat Adderley and Al Cohn took care of the background among other things, and such great musicians as Milt Hinton and Eddie Safranski and John Pisano tied the whole thing together.


    The 12 numbers, recorded in four sessions, were arranged by pianist Ralph Sharon in a laid-back and diversified manner and allowed Tony Bennett plenty of room to swing along serenely. Should one recommend a particular title? If the answer is yes, then the 'pure' numbers with Chico Hamilton. And the rest? Yes, the good old jazz evergreens - which, however, sound quite new here. Really one could practically recommend all of them!


    To be sure: this is no LP for narrow-minded jazz purists, and certainly not for lovers of the soothing crooner - but why not one for both camps?

    Musicians:



    • Tony Bennett (vocal)

    • Ralph Sharon (piano, arranger, conductor)

    • Kai Winding (trombone)

    • Al Cohn (tenor saxophone)

    • Nat Adderley (trumpet)

    • Herbie Mann (flute)

    • John Pisano (guitar)

    • James Bond, Eddie Safranski (bass)

    • Eddie Costa (vibraphone)

    • Jo Jones, Chico Hamilton, Art Blakey (drums)

    • Sabu (drums, percussion)




    Recording: October 1957 at CBS 30th Street Studio, New York in mono

    Production: Mitch Miller



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.

    1. Let's Begin

    2. Lullaby Of Broadway

    3. Let There Be Love

    4. Love For Sale
    5. Army Air Corps Song
    6. Crazy Rhythm
    7. The Beat Of My Heart

    8. So Beats My Heart For You

    9. Blues In The Night
    10. Lazy Afternoon

    11. Let's Face The Music And Dance

    12. Just One Of Those Things
    Tony Bennett
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Round About Midnight (Speakers Corner) Round About Midnight (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    x

    Round About Midnight (Speakers Corner)

    At long last these early recordings, which Miles Davis set down for the Columbia label in 1955 and 1956, are available on LP again. And what is more, they were made without any alternate takes or second attempts, as is the custom these days.



    You can sit back and enjoy the six numbers in the order which the producer, probably in conjunction with Davis, decided upon. To be sure, all of the titles are well known and have been played a thousand times over in many different versions. But what this Quintet (and here each and every individual musician is meant!) produces as regards inventiveness, thrilling improvisations and artistry is absolutely top notch. Davis's vibrato-less sound is taken over seamlessly by John Coltrane - wonderfully demonstrated in the middle of Bye, Bye Blackbird, while Paul Chambers' showpiece is Ack VÄrmeland du sköna (aka Dear Old Stockholm). In the years 1955/56, bebop was the talk of the day, born witness to by the classics Tadd's Delight by Tadd Dameron and Ah-Leu-Cha by Charlie Parker. Here, however, the improvised melodic strands are more moderate, pointing the way to the style that later became known as modal jazz.



    Although 'Round About Midnight as an album does not enjoy the reputation of Kind Of Blue, this Columbia recording contains many gems which are well worth hearing.



    Musicians:



    • Miles Davis

    • John Coltrane (tenor saxophone)

    • Red Garland (piano)

    • Paul Chambers (bass)

    • Philly Joe Jones (drums)




    Recording: October 1955, June and September 1956 at Columbia's 30th Street Studio, New York

    Production: George Avakian




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. Round Midnight
    2. Ah-Leu-Cha
    3. All Of You
    4. Bye Bye Blackbird
    5. Tadds Delight

    6. Dear Old Stockholm
    Miles Davis
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Pithecanthropus Erectus (Speakers Corner) Pithecanthropus Erectus (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Pithecanthropus Erectus (Speakers Corner)

    It was a fairly ordinary quintet that entered the Audio-Video Studios in New York City on 30 January 1956: one tenor saxophone, one alto saxophone, a pianist, a drummer and ... you guessed: an extraordinary man on the double bass! Not just an instrumentalist, but also an imaginative composer, wayfarer between all kinds of jazz, arranger and enfant terrible.


    The Suite Pithecanthropus Erectus is - among other things - programme music. Having learned to walk upright, having achieved alleged superiority over animals, and having caused devastation, the destruction of mankind's natural resources follows. The composer Mingus gives his fellow mankind/musicians the widest possible freedom, which all exploit to the full both in interplay and in the solos. Bedded down in noise and sound collages, the piece is the result of an experimental workshop. The Gershwin classic A Foggy Day takes on the role of intermediary between the jazz styles of the 1930s and free jazz. And in Profile Of Jackie and Love Chant the arranger calls for his soloists to go to the very limits of their artistic improvisation.


    Charles Mingus was certainly not an easy person to deal with for his family, friends and fellow musicians. But that fades into the background when it comes to such outstanding music. Luckily, we outsiders can once again enjoy the music of this genius 60 years after the studio recording, in its original format.


    Musicians:


    • Jackie McLean (alto saxophone)
    • J.R. Monterose (tenor saxophone)
    • Mal Waldron (piano)
    • Charlie Mingus (bass)
    • Willie Jones (drums)


    Recording: January 1956 at Audio-Video Studios, New York City by Tom Dowd & Hal Lustig in mono

    Production: Nesuhi Ertegun


    About Speakers Corner


    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. Pithecanthropus Erectus
    2. A Foggy Day
    3. Profile Of Jackie
    4. Love Chant
    Charles Mingus
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP Mono - Sealed Buy Now
  • Rodrigo - Concierto Andaluz / Marriner - Academy of St. Martin in the Fields (Speakers Corner) Rodrigo - Concierto Andaluz / Marriner - Academy of St. Martin in the Fields (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    x

    Rodrigo - Concierto Andaluz / Marriner - Academy of St. Martin in the Fields (Speakers Corner)

    The frenetic applause with which both the public and the experts greeted the Concierto de Aranjuez for guitar and orchestra, composed in 1940, is certainly astounding - one would have thought that 20th-century music was dominated chiefly by composers of twelve-tone music and the avantguardists. Rodrigo, however, remained faithful to the Classical three-movement form, employed a late-Romantic orchestral colouring, and followed in the tradition of Spanish composers who, perhaps more than any others, won their inspiration from the folkmusic of their native country.



    The whole work is full of the exotic magic of Spanish folkmusic, whereby the rhythmic drive of the first movement - reminiscent of clicking castanets - is particularly fascinating. Fortunately not only the composer but also the conductor and orchestra have taken care that the gentle tones produced by the world famous guitarist Pepe Romero are clearly to be heard.



    In addition, the listener is treated to a performance of the rarely recorded Concierto Andaluz for four guitars, composed in 1967. Once again the Romeros demonstrate that they are not only amazingly virtuosic musicians but are also worthy dedicatees of this unique work.



    Last but not least, PHILIPS balance engineers have produced a superb recording: Rodrigo himself was absolutely delighted with it - and this opinion one can well endorse.




    Recording: July / August 1978 by Wilhelm Hellweg

    Production: Wilhelm Hellweg




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    Rodrigo: Concierto de Aranjuez, Concierto Andaluz - Pepe Romero and the Academy of St. Martin-in-the-Fields conducted by Sir Neville Marriner
    Neville Marriner with Rodrigo
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • La Folia De La Spagna (Speakers Corner) La Folia De La Spagna (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    La Folia De La Spagna (Speakers Corner)

    First mentioned around 1500 in Portugal, no forms or melodies have come down to us for the Folia. Described by historians as a noisy dance which was performed by masked and disguised figures who leapt about as though they had lost their reason, a tranquil, sarabande-like form asserted itself in Europe in the early 17th century.



    GrÉgorio Paniagua, director of the Atrium Musicae de Madrid, demonstrates once again his virtuosity in his treatment of historical material. His arrangements are not confined to medieval and baroque instruments but also employ a whole arsenal of percussion, such as various small drums, triangle, tambourine, castanets and xylophone. As the title of the LP suggests, the ensemble adds spice to the airy variety of timbres with a small touch of madness here and there. Unbelievably, a jazz solo is heard which recalls the Pink Panther Theme, and the Orient is conjured up by two Indian tunes (ragas) in which the sitar chirps passionately to the powerful plop-plop-plop of tabla rhythms.



    With its high resolution sound which places a high demand on hi-fi equipment in order to get the best reproduction, this record is both cult and legend.




    Musicians:



    • The Atrium Musicae de Madrid conducted by Dr. Don GrÉgorio Paniagua Rodriguez




    Recording: June 1980 by Jean-François Pontefract

    Production: Eva Coutaz




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Fons vitae/Dementia praecox angelorum Supra solmamirevt

    2. Extravagans/Laurea minima/In vitro
    3. Oratio pro-folia/Fama volat Citrus - Hesperides
    4. Principalis. Fermescens/Inica exacta Adverso flumine
    5. Parsimonia aristocraciae
    6. Subtilis/De profundis - Extra muros
    7. Vulgaris - Sine populi notione Vagula et blandula
    8. Nordica et desolata/Aurea mediocritas
    9. Nobilissima/Degradans et corruptae
    10. De pastoribus/Mathematica dies irae /Crepuscularis/Sine nomine/Tristis est anima mea/Equites fortis armaturae/Audaces fortuna juvat/Sine praeputium/Ecclesiastica
    11. Theatralis et hipocritae/Ruralis Alter indica perfecta
    12. De Tolerentia aetherea/Fuga ficta et carrus triumphalis
    Various Artists
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Paradise & Lunch (Speakers Corner) Paradise & Lunch (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Paradise & Lunch (Speakers Corner)

    A good 20 years have passed since a band with ancient musicians from Cuba - the Buena Vista Social Club - took the world by storm. Behind the project, in the wings yet right in the midst of this unheard-of music, was Ry Cooder, who regarded this encounter as the greatest musical event of his entire life. The bottleneck guitar hero had always been very interested in the music from the other Americas ever since the solo albums he made in his early years, in which he told the story of the American folk and blues in a multitude of styles. The LP Paradise And Lunch is no exception and begins with gospel-like grooves that smell of native soil. The faint smell of a wooden church from pioneering days wafts out of the processional antiphonal song Jesus On The Mainline and a healthy 12-bar blues paints a picture of what silent witnesses could tell if they could (If Walls Could Talk). Cooder and his sidemen felt themselves perfectly at home when adventuring further afield and this is testified to in the laid-back calypso rhythm of It's All Over Now and the clip-clop of Mexican Divorce.


    This wonderful album is highly recommended for each and every number, but if you want a tip for a very special track, then just listen to the ragtime piano rolls in Bo Diddley's Ditty Wah Ditty.


    Musicians:



    • Ry Cooder (guitar, mandolin, bass, vocal)

    • Ronnie Barron (piano, organ)

    • Earl Hines (piano)

    • Plas Johnson (alto saxophone)

    • Oscar Brashear (cornet)

    • Red Callender (bass)

    • John Duke (bass)

    • Russ Titelman (electric bass)

    • Chris Ethridge (electric bass)

    • Milt Holland (drums, percussion)

    • Jim Keltner (drums)




    Recording: 1974 at the Warner Brothers Studios in North Hollywood and Burbank (USA), by Lee Herschberg

    Production: Lenny Waronker & Russ Titelman




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Tamp 'Em Up Solid
    2. Tattler
    3. Married Man's a Fool
    4. Jesus on the Mainline
    5. It's All Over Now
    6. Fool for a Cigarette/Feelin' Good
    7. If Walls Could Talk
    8. Mexican Divorce
    9. Ditty Wah Ditty
    Ry Cooder
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
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