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Speakers Corner Brahms

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  • Chopin - Scherzo No. 3 / Brahms -  Rhapsodies (Speakers Corner) Chopin - Scherzo No. 3 / Brahms - Rhapsodies (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Chopin - Scherzo No. 3 / Brahms - Rhapsodies (Speakers Corner)

    The debut recording by the Argentinian pianist Martha Argerich took the public by the storm all over the world - and the applause has still not subsided! A mere glance at the repertoire shows that she was reaching for the stars. To bring five composers together on an LP of roughly 45 minutes length means nothing other than speaking five different musical languages - and Martha Argerich proves herself a master of them all! The demonic opening of the Scherzo in C sharp minor gives way to an iridiscent dialogue which sings and sparkles beyond compare. The Barcarolle rocks gently along; Prokofiev's Toccata is filled with dynamic force and nervous agitation; Ravel's Jeux d'eau is pensive and introverted, with the water rippling in a circular motion. As a contrast, the two famous Brahms Rhapsodies are performed with passion, impetuosity and occasionally the required heaviness.



    This recording is surely one of the brightest candles to burn anew on Deutsche Grammophon's birthday cake.



    This record was part of the 3-LP Set "The Conductors" and is now available again.



    Musicians:



    • Martha Argerich (piano)




    Recording: July 1960 at Beethoven-Saal, Hannover by Heinz Wildhagen

    Production: Prof. Elsa Schiller





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. No. 3 C Sharp Minor, Op.39: Scherzo No. 3 In C Sharp
    2. Minor, Op.39
    3. Rhapsody, Op.79: No.1 Agitato In B Minor
    4. Rhapsody, Op. 79: No. 2 Molto passionato, ma non troppo allegro In G Minor
    5. Toccata, Op. 11
    6. Jeux D'Eau: Tres doux
    7. Barcarole In F Sharp Major, Op. 60
    8. Hungarian Rhapsody No.6:
    Johannes Brahms
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Brahms: Alto Rhapsody (Speakers Corner) Brahms: Alto Rhapsody (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Brahms: Alto Rhapsody (Speakers Corner)

    Johannes Brahms: Alto Rhapsody, Song Of Destiny / Gustav Mahler: Songs Of A Wayfarer


    The Alto Rhapsody, Song Of Destiny and Song Of A Wayfarer. Each of these three vocal compositions is unique in its expression and construction, yet the frayed emotional worlds of all three works are connected by a multitude of fine threads. The Alto Rhapsody, which Brahms wrote as a wedding gift for Clara Schumann's daughter Julie, in whom he was himself in love, demonstrates with almost Wagnerian weight the anger that the disappointed Brahms must have felt while composing. The Song Of Destiny too, with its sonorous E major waves of harmony, soon announces in C minor the finiteness of existence as Hölderin's poem demands. That finally a hopeful, conciliatory - though unsure - moment lingers is reflected in the musical means. Many emotions and vagaries are emulated in Mahler's song cycle. The journeyman sets off on his wanderings in order to forget his unhappy liaison and strides through the ups and downs of mixed emotions and painful heartache. Drumrolls and march rhythms reflect the real world and sounds of nature, dissonances and a change between major and minor keys show the way from dreams, reality and feelings. The recording with Mildred Miller and the Columbia Symphony Orchestra under Bruno Walter has achieved reference status and is sure of a place in the TAS Super LP List given out by The Absolute Sound.

    Musicians:


      Mildred Miller (vocals)
    • The Occidential College Concert Choir and the Columbia Symphony Orchestra
    • Bruno Walter (conductor)



    Recording: June 1960 and January 1961 at Columbia Studios, Hollywood

    Production: John McClure



    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    Brahms: Alto Rhapsody, Op. 53
    Brahms: Song Of Destiny, Op. 54
    Songs Of A Wayfarer (Leider Eines Fahrenden Gesellen)
    I. Wenn Mein Schatz Hochzeit
    II. Ging Heut' Morgen Über's Feld
    III. Ich Hab' Ein GlÜhend' Messer
    IV. Die Zwei Blauen Augen
    Bruno Walter
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Brahms - Hungarian Dances (Speakers Corner) Brahms - Hungarian Dances (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    x

    Brahms - Hungarian Dances (Speakers Corner)

    Fritz Reiner dedicated himself to the interpretation of works by modern composers such as Richard Wagner, Richard Strauss and BÉla Bartók, and it suited him well to tackle works such as Brahms's Hungarian Dances and Dvorák's Slavonic Dances. These lively compositions require a conductor whose interaction with the orchestra is vivacious and animated. Reiner always demanded utmost concentration and perfection from his ensemble. Under his baton, the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra plays with enthusiasm and without restaint; no trace of a sterile concert atmosphere is found in this recording.



    Reiner's penchant for effects is not irritating, but rather adds highlights which support his highly musical interpretation, indeed one even forgets this trait when listening to the brilliant music.



    From a tonal point of view, the sound is beautifully balanced and reaches the highest standards despite its recording date of 1960 - or maybe just for that reason? The recording is characterized by its brilliance, warmth and vivacity with the result that listening becomes a true musical pleasure.





    Musicians:



    • Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra

    • Fritz Reiner (conductor)




    Recording: June 1960 at Sofiensaal, Vienna by James Brown

    Production: Erik Smith





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    Johannes Brahms
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Brahms - Piano Concerto 1 (Speakers Corner) Brahms - Piano Concerto 1 (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Brahms - Piano Concerto 1 (Speakers Corner)

    Brahms originally intended his Piano Concerto No. 1 as a symphony and he extensively reworked his ideas before setting down the work in the form as we know it today. The composer's original intentions still shimmer through however, for the work goes far beyond mere concertante playing and a display of virtuoso brilliance by the soloist. The first movement in particular, with its relentless, threatening main theme, embodies Brahms's dramatic symphonic writing and even a conciliatory secondary theme offers no relief for it too must give way to the heavy, fateful initial theme.



    The passionate and grandiose opening movement is followed by an Adagio full of tranquillity and quiet devotion; the solemn atmosphere is taken to exalted heights by the soloist and orchestra only to fade out pianissimo.
    Although the forceful, belligerent Finale occasionally conjures up the dark powers of the first movement, the work ends in a confident and cheerful vein.
    It is amazing how the sheer presence of the emotions in this composition have been captured on the present DECCA recording from 1962. This is not only true of the gripping interpretation but also of the recording itself which remains transparent and brilliant throughout.



    Musicians:



    • Sir Clifford Curzon (piano)

    • London Symphony Orchestra

    • George Szell (conductor)




    Recording: May/ June 1962 at Kingsway Hall, London by Kenneth E. Wilkinson
    Production: John Culshaw





    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. Brahms: Piano Concerto No. 1 in D minor Op. 15

    2. Maestoso

    3. Adagio

    4. Rondo: Allegro non troppo

    Johannes Brahms
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Brahms: 10 Intermezzi For Piano (Speakers Corner) Brahms: 10 Intermezzi For Piano (Speakers Corner) Quick View

    $34.99
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    x

    Brahms: 10 Intermezzi For Piano (Speakers Corner)

    Johannes Brahms: Intermezzi op. 76 no. 6 in A major, no. 7 in A minor; op. 116 No. 4 in E major; op. 117 no. 1 in B-flat major, no. 2 in B-flat minor, no. 3 in C-sharp minor; op. 118 no. 1 in A minor, no. 2 in A major, no. 6 in E-flat minor; op. 119 no. 1 in B minor


    If you mainly connect the name Brahms with opulent symphonies, passionate concertos and weighty piano music, you will be in for a big surprise when you listen to the Intermezzi op. 117. The music critic Eduard Hanslick talks of a more restrained, detached style and clearly means the calm, simple and immensely expressive flowing melodies, which characterize the late piano music of this Romantic composer. Just how sensitively the performer must tackle these precious miniatures is described by Clara Schumann with the words » the intellectual technique in them demands a fine comprehension and one must be very familiar with Brahms to play them as Brahms had imagined them«.


    When it comes to Brahms, Glenn Gould - famous for his analytically strict and emphatic interpretation of Bach's keyboard works - proves himself to be a true poet and thinker at the keyboard. Driven by the melancholy force, his thoughts find their way, sometimes hesitantly, then moving on with a deep breath, as it were, to the next deceleration.
    In op. 118 no. 1 the Canadian pianist begins with a passion that wrests expansive cascades of sound from the keyboard, then finds his way back to introvert mellifluous tones (op. 118 no. 2) and increases the drama in the will-o'-the-wispish and futile attempts to come to a redemptory final cadence (op. 118 no. 6). It would be hard to find a more closely-knit and intense rendering than on the present recording.


    Musicians:


    • Glenn Gould (piano)


    Recording: September and November 1960 at Columbia's 30th Street Studio, New York

    Production: J. Scianni


    About Speakers Corner


    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. Intermezzo In E-Flat Major, Op. 117, No. 1
    2. Intermezzo In B-Flat Minor, Op. 117, No. 2
    3. Intermezzo In C-Sharp Minor, Op. 117, No. 3
    4. Intermezzo In E-Flat Minor, Op. 118, No. 6
    5. Intermezzo In E Major, Op. 116, No. 4
    6. Intermezzo In A Minor, Op. 76, No. 7
    7. Intermezzo In A Major, Op. 76, No. 6
    8. Intermezzo In B Minor, Op. 119, No. 1
    9. Intermezzo In A Minor, Op. 118, No. 1
    10. Intermezzo In A Major, Op. 118, No. 2
    Glenn Gould
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Brahms - Sonata for Cello and Piano (Speakers Corner) (Awaiting Repress) Brahms - Sonata for Cello and Piano (Speakers Corner) (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $34.99
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    x

    Brahms - Sonata for Cello and Piano (Speakers Corner) (Awaiting Repress)

    The original pressing just doesn't hold a candle to this re-issue! Lovingly re-mastered from the original Mercury Living Presence analog tapes, Speakers Corner has done an astounding job on this album. Hear Starkers bold and natural cello and Seboks piano reproduced with perfect clarity and tonality. The performances are exceptional; lively and heartfelt. The sound quality is purely first rate. Outstanding music, impeccably performed, and the sound quality is the best youll hear! It just doesnt get better than this!



    Brahms' Cello and Piano Sonatas could well be described as 'romantic expression dressed in classical garb,' filled as they are with the same musical philosophy that is to be found in many of his instrumental works. Although 21 years lay between the two compositions, Brahms remained true to the formal musical language of the Viennese masters, and this brought him and other composers of his time the reproach of imitating Beethoven.



    The unmistakable personal style of Brahms is reflected in the sweeping first movement which is in the manner of a serious song and calls for sensitive but by no means feeble bowing. Starker's wiry, austere playing keeps a check on any excessive emotion and instead brings the music to life in great detail.



    Musicians:



    • Janos Starker (cello)

    • Gyorgy Sebok (piano)




    Recording: June 1964 at Watford Town Hall, London, by C.R.Fine and Robert Eberenz

    Production: Harold Lawrence




    About Speakers Corner



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Speakers Corner all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existant tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasise that Speakers Corner Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle. We have one digital recording in our catalogue (Alan Parsons / Eye In The Sky"), but even in this particular case we used the analogue tapes for cutting.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects - excluding the exception above - and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.


    1. Sonata for Cello and Piano No. 1 in E minor, op. 38

    2. Allegro Non Troppo

    3. Allegretto Quasi Minuetto

    4. Allegro


    5. Sonata for Cello and Piano No. 2 in F major, op. 99

    6. Allegro Vivace

    7. Adagio Affetuoso

    8. Allegro Passionato

    9. Allegro Molto

    Johannes Brahms
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
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