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  • The Impossible Kid The Impossible Kid Quick View

    $28.99
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    The Impossible Kid

    Green & Pink Neon Colored Vinyl


    Custom Die Cut Jacket


    3' x 4' Double Sided Fold Out Poster


    Two Illustrated Record Sleeves


    Indie-rap mainstay Aesop Rock has announced his new album, The Impossible Kid, dropping April 29th on Rhymesayers Entertainment, marking his first solo venture since 2012's Skelethon. On the new album, Aesop continues finding new ways to improve on the skills that have made him one of the kings of indie hip-hop. His creative process now includes a newfound willingness to open up about his personal life, going deep on topics like depression, his sometimes rocky relationship with his family, and the turbulent handful of years that culminated in Aesop leaving his adopted home of San Francisco to live in a barn out in the woods, where he recorded the foundations of The Impossible Kid. There's also moments of levity though, as Aesop taps into the funny side of his persona that he suppressed during the period where being taken as a serious lyricist was more of a priority. Like Skelethon, Aesop exercised complete creative control over every aspect of the album, from the production (which he handled himself, with instrumental help from Philly's Grimace Federation) to conceptualizing the cover art by his friend Alex Pardee.


    Though it's been four years since his last solo album, Aesop has maintained an impressive creative streak, releasing collaborative albums with Kimya Dawson (The Uncluded's Hokey Fright in 2013), with Rob Sonic (Hail Mary Mallon's Bestiary in 2014), and with Homeboy Sandman (LICE's self-titled EP in 2015). He's also been actively crafting beats. Recent projects include producing the 32+ minute instrumental mix, The Blob, working together with Nike to provide the music for a series of their skateboarding videos, and producing the soundtrack for the upcoming film Bushwick, starring Dave Bautista and Brittany Snow.


    He's also started skateboarding and drawing again, which were his big passions before his hobby of making rap songs turned into a paying gig that evolved into an accidental 20-year long career, taking him from making beats in his bedroom to playing for crowds thousands deep. Going back to his roots has proven useful in processing everything that's happened in his life over the past couple decades, and maybe to figure out the person he's become: The Impossible Kid, a person who's spent his life doing things that seemed unthinkable before he just went and did them, blazing a visionary trail all his own. Two decades in, he's still out there pushing it forward.

    1. Mystery Fish
    2. Rings
    3. Lotta Years
    4. Dorks
    5. Rabies
    6. Supercell
    7. Blood Sandwich
    8. Get Out of the Car
    9. Shrunk
    10. Kirby
    11. TUFF
    12. Lazy Eye
    13. Defender
    14. Water Tower
    15. Molecules
    Aesop Rock
    $28.99
    Colored Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Weezer (Blue Album) (Blue Vinyl) Weezer (Blue Album) (Blue Vinyl) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Weezer (Blue Album) (Blue Vinyl)

    Ranked 297/500 on Rolling Stone Magazine's 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.


    Limited Edition Numbered Blue Colored Vinyl LP


    Mastered From The Original Master Tapes


    Features Superb Room-Filling Sonics


    1990s' Ultimate Geek-Rock Record: Includes Buddy Holly, Undone (The Sweater Song), & Say It Ain't So


    Weezer doesn't look like rock stars, its amusing name doesn't evoke stadium-heights glories, and the group's lyrics don't exude confidence or flash. For precisely these reasons, and the fact that the band's songs on its self-titled debut are the stuff of air-guitar dreams and shout-it-out choruses, the quartet became ironic arena-rock stars equally celebrated by in-the-know hipsters and mainstream radio listeners. Replete with urgent melodies, quirky confessional narratives, wry humor, and gargantuan hooks, Weezer (Blue Album) remains the best geek-rock record ever made.


    Mastered from the original master tapes and pressed on 180g blue-colored vinyl at RTI, Mobile Fidelity's analog version of the 1994 release Rolling Stone named the 297th greatest album ever recorded finally possesses the grand-scale sonics that the music's bunker-busting hooks deserve. Cars frontman Ric Ocasek's polished production is now both free of artificial ceilings that squashed the explosive dynamics and rid of the compression that saddled the frequency range. Instrumental separation is vastly improved, and the amount of midrange energy seemingly doubled. This reissue is guaranteed to help you rock out.


    Underdogs and misfits, Weezer emerged from Los Angeles as nerdy kids that eschewed traditional party-hard ways in favor of studying Kiss records, engaging in conversations about old LPs, and playing Dungeons and Dragons. The band's awkwardness joyfully translates in its songs on its 1994 debut, largely concerned with jealous insecurities, pop culture, true-to-life heartbreak, common accidents, youthful misconceptions, and daydreaming. Unlike many of their indie-rock peers, Weezer finds no need to conceal feelings in obscurities, snark, or impossibly impenetrable quirkiness.


    While every song on Weezer is a delight, In the Garage, the ultimate ode to a heavy-metal practice space and private musical retreat, best spells out the album's appeal and the band's intent. I've got an electric guitar/I play my stupid songs/I write these stupid words/And I love every one/Waiting there for me/Yes I do, I do/In the garage/No one cares about my ways/In the garage where I belong sings leader Rivers Cuomo, his voice often meshing with that of Matt Sharp, and giving the material a barbershop-quartet harmonic boost in line with the catchiness of the guitar-driven bridges and rhythmic foundations.


    More than three-times platinum, the Blue Album, as it's often called, also claims an iconic cover that pays tribute to that of the Feelies' Crazy Rhythms. The picture - as well as the bubblegum-inspired content within - has become an indelible part of modern culture. Weezer graces must-have lists from Rolling Stone, Pitchfork, Guitar World, and more. And needless to say, My Name Is Jonas, Say It Ain't So, Buddy Holly, and Undone (The Sweater Song) are all modern classics.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. My Name Is Jonas
    2. No One Else
    3. The World Has Turned and Left Me Here
    4. Buddy Holly
    5. Undone (The Sweater Song)
    6. Surf Wax America
    7. Say It Ain't So
    8. In the Garage
    9. Holiday
    10. Only in Dreams
    Weezer
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Kid A Kid A Quick View

    $26.99
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    Kid A

    Ranked 428/500 on Rolling Stone Magazine's 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.


    With the near impossible task of following up their critically acclaimed masterpiece OK Computer, Radiohead took another bold leap with Kid A, an experimental album built largely around the union of electronica and mood. Musically, Kid A is as accomplished as anything Radiohead has ever produced and its overflowing with eye-opening musical mosaics which are absolutely stunning in their insight and beauty.

    LP 1
    1. Everything In Its Right Place

    2. Kid A
    3. The National Anthem
    4. How To Disappear Completely
    5. Treefingers


    LP 2
    1. Optimistic
    2. In Limbo
    3. Idioteque

    4. Morning Bell
    5. Motion Picture Soundtrack
    6. Untitled

    Radiohead
    $26.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • U-Men U-Men Quick View

    $44.99
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    U-Men

    This 3xLP Box Set Collects The Entire Studio-Recorded Output Of The U-Men


    Remastered


    Plus 5 Unreleased Songs


    With 16 Pages Of Photos, Liner Notes & Interviews With The Band


    Executive Produced By Jack Endino


    The U-Men are one of the best bands I've ever seen. They were
    hypnotic, frenetic, powerful and compelling. It was impossible to
    resist getting sucked into their weird, darkly absurd world. They
    effortlessly blended The Sonics, Link Wray, Pere Ubu, and
    Captain Beefheart. Their shows were loose-limbed, drunken
    dance parties and no two shows were alike. The U-Men were
    avant-garage explorers and, most importantly, they fucking
    rocked. I was lucky enough to live in their hometown and I saw
    them every chance I could.


    From 1983 to 1987, the U-Men were the undisputed kings of
    the Seattle Underground. No one else came close. They ruled a
    bleak backwater landscape populated by maybe 200 people.
    They were the only band that could unify the disparate
    sub-subcultures and get all 200 of those people to fill a room.
    Anglophilic, dress-dark Goths; neo-psych MDA acolytes; skate
    punks who shit in bathtubs at parties; Mod vigilantes who
    tormented the homeless with pellet guns; college kids who
    thought college kids were lame; Industrial Artistes; some random
    guy with a moustache; and eccentrics who insisted that they
    couldn't be pigeonholed: all coalesced around the U-Men.


    Sub Pop co-founder, Bruce Pavitt released the first record by the
    U-Men, a 4-song 12" EP on Bombshelter Records. By the time
    they had recorded songs for another record, Bruce was too broke
    to release it on his proto-Sub Pop label, so he hooked them up
    with Gerard Cosloy at Homestead Records. This was a big deal.
    Homestead had a heavy rep at the time with recent releases by
    Foetus, Nick Cave, Sonic Youth, and Big Black. I was sure that
    the release of their second 12", Stop Spinning, would propel the
    U-Men into the ranks of those Homestead acts and the
    worldwide underground would get hip to Seattle's finest.
    Following the departure of bassist Jim Tillman (replaced by Tom
    Hazelmyer of Amphetamine Reptile Records, and then Tony
    Ransome), the band recorded two fantastic singles, and recorded
    their one full-length album, Step on a Bug, for Black Label,
    which was run out of Fallout Records. They became increasingly
    disenchanted with the direction the Seattle underground was
    heading and called it quits in 1989.


    The U-Men had nothing to do with Grunge. They were their own
    unique thing. I loved them and I still miss them. I remember
    thinking at the time that most of their recordings were a little
    soft and didn't capture the power of the band live. Now, thirty
    years later, their records sound great to me and we are lucky that
    they exist. I'm stoked that Sub Pop complied these long
    out-of-print records and scrounged up some unreleased songs so
    that everyone has a chance to take a trip back to old weird
    Seattle.


    - Mark Arm, Seattle, August 2017

    LP 1
    1. Blight
    2. The Fumes
    3. Flowers DGIH
    4. Shoot 'em Down
    5. Gila
    6. Trouble Under Water
    7. Mystery Pain
    8. Last Lunch


    LP 2
    1. Clubs
    2. Cow Rock
    3. Green Trumpet
    4. A Year and a Day
    5. Ten After One
    6. They!
    7. U-Men Stomp
    8. Solid Action
    9. Dig It a Hole


    LP 3
    1. Whistlin' Pete
    2. 2 x 4
    3. A Three Year Old Could Do That
    4. Juice Party
    5. Flea Circus
    6. Too Good to Be Food
    7. Willie Dong Hurts Dogs
    8. Papa Doesn't Love His Children Anymore
    9. Pay the Bubba
    10. Freezebomb
    11. That's Wild About Jack
    12. Bad Little Woman
    13. Selfish

    U-Men
    $44.99
    Vinyl LP Box Set - 3 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Melbourne Melbourne Quick View

    $16.99
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    Melbourne

    It's the original rock n' roll fantasy: to be genius, aloof, deserving. To be instantaneously swept from the wings of obscurity into the arms of acclaim. Well, that's what I've heard at least.


    But who does this really happen to? Most successful musicians will tell you it's not enough to make brilliant music. You've got to work it constantly, clawing and hustling to get people to the next show, to finance the next record. How pedestrian. How droll. Why can't it just happen?


    No, it would seem there are no rock n' roll fairytales anymore. Or are there?


    Ladies and gentlemen, meet Jackson Scott, indie's newest prince charming. At the tender age of 20, Scott is already receiving more attention for his forthcoming debut, Melbourne than many musicians get in a lifetime.


    When an artist blows up this quickly it's hard to hear their music from an unbiased position. Questions unfailingly arise: What's the deal? Is he really that f-in' good? Did Daddy pay the promo man (remember The Strokes)? Is this guy for real?


    So, before we go on, let me just say, this record is good. Like, really good. Like, "I'm kinda freaked out that a kid who's been making music for a year did this by himself on a 4-track" good.


    So, let's ignore the hype for a while.


    First, the strength of Scott's songwriting is undeniable. Yea, there are some instrumentals here... but overall these songs stick with you. They have power, and with most of them clocking in at around the two minute mark, you won't get bored. Lyrically, Scott both flirts with and repudiates the kind of adolescent moodiness associated with the mopey 90's. Conversely, his musings also betray a connection to the well-fed and perpetually distracted iPhone generation.


    Melbourne also offers plenty of rewards in its production. Scott has the hissy, tape, psych-pop thing down. He's experimental where he needs to be and hooky where it counts. These homespun recordings sound like early Ty Segall as produced by The Elephant 6 Recording Co. While Scott acknowledges Segall as an influence, he claims ignorance of the famed recording collective. That said, his misanthropic use of sped-up vocals suggests otherwise.


    Melbourne opens with "Only Eternal", a wash of ambient guitar. This brooding intro slyly transitions into "Evie", with its sludgy, driving rhythm, Twilight Zone guitar hooks, and wavering harmonies. Peppy and short, "Sandy" is a druggy acoustic-pop highlight.


    "That Awful Sound" is the song that gained Scott so much attention in the first place. Nothing if not a solid single, its strummed acoustics, booming rhythm, and pseudo-Chipmunk vocals are impossible to hear without thinking of Elephant 6. It's not surprising that the crew at Pitchfork (no doubt approaching middle age and feeling a little nostalgic) picked this track to be "the song". This kind of thing ruled all hell in 1998. If not the best track on the record, it is at least the most classifiable, and by extension the most marketable.


    "Any Way"... is the high-water mark for Scott's pitch-shifted vocals. It's the kind of song Jackson Scott really sells. It's quick, melody driven, and vaguely flippant. With its toy marimba solo, it also exposes the childlike undercurrent running throughout this record.


    "Together Forever" is one of my favorite songs on Melbourne. If you listen closely you can hear the famous background vocals from "Where is My Mind?" at the beginning. To me this is Jackson Scott playing it straight. His voice sounds like a real person and his noisy guitar swells are just as mind-bending as anything coming out of the current psych-revival.


    "In The Sun" is reminiscent of the late Scott Miller's more stripped-down moments with Game Theory. The song's chorus reminds us of how much an inspiration Kurt Cobain is to Scott.


    Notwithstanding the strength, charisma, and raw talent exhibited on Melbourne, it feels like Jackson Scott has skipped a few levels. Although Cinderella sometimes does well in sports and American Idol, Jackson Scott is going for something much weightier, much deeper. Dare we call it, legitimacy?


    -Jacob Sides

    1. Only Eternal

    2. Evie

    3. Never Ever

    4. Sandy

    5. That Awful Sound

    6. Tomorrow

    7. Wish Upon

    8. Any Way

    9. Together Forever

    10. In the Sun

    11. Doctor Mad

    12. Sweet Nothing
    Scott Jackson
    $16.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Dancing at the Blue Lagoon Dancing at the Blue Lagoon Quick View

    $18.99
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    Dancing at the Blue Lagoon

    On their last album, Bigfoot, Cayucas debuted in a way that defied their namesake, the sleepy seaside town
    of Cayucos, CA. They grew from bedroom strumming to a band that toured the world and whose songs
    raced across the radio. But as Zach Yudin and his twin brother and bandmate, Ben, went in to create what
    would become their new album, what it all came back to was something more personal. While they now call
    Los Angeles home, they drew from the nostalgia of their childhood growing up in Davis, CA; the nostalgia
    in their music that is as much about a place they've never been (that maybe no one's been to) as any actual
    experience. It was a freedom to imagine, to explore ideas. And it was that wandering imagination and
    a punchy California dream that eventually grew to become Dancing at the Blue Lagoon.


    While their sun-drenched, jangly, sometimes melancholic sound is quintessentially Californian, the album
    very much their California. It's the sound of kids from the suburbs who fantasize in Technicolor, whose view
    of the Golden State is its own form of idealism. You can hear it loud and clear in the easygoing confidence
    throughout on the crisp, backbeat-driven "Hella" or as "Moony Eyed Walrus" takes surf guitar into
    fragmented, unpredictable places. The impossibly catchy and heartbreaking "Backstroke" is a Murakamiinspired detective story, neo-noir that is equal parts stylization and gut-level emotion.


    That said, Dancing at the Blue Lagoon is all about a band testing its comfort zone and asking us to do the
    same. "Big Winter Jacket" is a world away from sun-kissed pop, with acoustic guitars that build
    into something grand and expansive. The after-hours piano ballad "Ditches," like much of Dancing at the
    Blue Lagoon, takes pop conventions and digs into them. Like the Beach Boys of Sunflower or Surf's Up,
    it reminds us that sadness and uncertainty are never far from the surface, even in Cayucas's most carefree
    moments. It casts some like the title track "Dancing at the Blue Lagoon"-a lilting tropical fantasia-in
    an entirely different light.


    As the primary songwriter, Zach depends on this kind of versatility. "I write on a song-by-song basis," he
    says. It's been that way ever since he started taking music more seriously in college. Zach and Ben would
    "create bands that were more like a musical idea," record a few songs, and then move on. Cayucas grew out
    of this period of experimentation.


    The real core of the record is the almost harrowing "Blue Lagoon (Theme Song)." Accompanied by a lone
    guitar, Zach's performance is emotionally raw and technically precise, the kind of statement that
    gives Dancing at the Blue Lagoon real substance. Like a great actor whose art rings true because of an honest, human streak, Cayucas has taken sound we thought we knew and turned in into something personal and complex.

    1. Big Winter Jacket
    2. Moony Eyed Walrus
    3. Hella
    4. Champion
    5. Ditches
    6. Dancing at the Blue Lagoon
    7. Backstroke
    8. A Shadow in the Dark
    9. Blue Lagoon (Theme Song)
    Cayucas
    $18.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Freedom Freedom Quick View

    $19.99
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    Freedom

    SpiralArms rose from the ashes of millennial bands Systematic, Forbidden and Man Made God.
    This sextet has one mission. That mission is to save today's music scene by bringing true heavy
    melodic rock to the forefront. Mission impossible? NO! Their last record titled "Highest Society"
    (2010) already made clear that there can be no doubt that SpiralArms are able to fulfill this
    mission. Their new album "Freedom" is packed with tunes that will take the hearts of the fans by
    storm.


    Friends since the age of 15, Tim Narducci (Lead Vocals) and Craig Locicero(Lead Guitar) bonded
    over their love of heavy metal and hard rock music. Looking back at that time period Craig reflected, they were "Probably the youngest kids in the East Bay metal scene that were drinking beer
    out in the parking lot after seeing bands like Testament and Exodus play." Although the two remained friends throughout the years, they both went their separate ways and started bands of their
    own. After years of playing with their respective bands, the two friends contacted each other and
    decided it was time to start playing music together again, and in 2004 SpiralArms was born. After
    a few personnel changes, the band solidified their lineup. Rounding out SpiralArms is Cornbread
    (Bass/Vocals), who had recorded and toured the US.and Europe extensively with the band Vicious
    Rumors, Brad Barth (Keyboards) owner of the studio where Highest Society was recorded, Greg
    Narducci (Guitars) who fronted Sacramento's own After The Silence and Ron Reeden (Drums) who
    plays in Steve Smyth's Esseness project.

    1. Dropping Like Flies
    2. Hold Me To The Sky
    3. Exit 63
    4. Blackmoon Morning
    5. Drugs & Alcohol
    6. Dealer
    7. Lovers Leap
    8. Tomorrow's Dream
    9. Freedom
    10. I Lay Low *
    11. Low Country Girl *


    * Vinyl Only Bonus Track

    SpiralArms
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP + CD - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Journey Man The Journey Man Quick View

    $35.99
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    The Journey Man

    "In my music," says Goldie, "is everything I've learned, everyone I've met, everything I've experienced." And it's been an incredible trip. The maverick innovator - who rewrote the future of the jungle scene with landmark releases that still sound like they were kidnapped from tomorrow - has a unique story to tell. From children's homes in the West Midlands through stints in New York and Miami as one of the UK's most celebrated exponents of graffiti art to rubbing shoulders with an exceptional list of musical collaborators including David Bowie, Noel Gallagher and KRS-One, Goldie has defiantly, definitively, done it his own way. "I'm an alchemist," he likes to insist. "I practice the dark arts of messing with the form of something solid."


    Though marriage and his passion for bikram yoga have, he says, proved a calming influence, these days he's just as full of inspired, out-there ideas as he was back in 1993 when he did his first cover interview for the rave magazine Generator. "My music is about fallout," he said then, "about the damage that has been done to the system." Today, in the office of one of his London-based contacts, the ideas are still sparking. "Drum'n'bass has done to electronic music what graffiti has done to the art world," he muses, before launching into a rapid-fire synthesis of art history, dancefloor evolution and his own hyperactive brand of self-actualization, which loosely translates as: "Why do something ordinary when you can do something extraordinary?"


    It sums up the reason why, in 1994, music critic Simon Reynolds famously observed: "Goldie revolutionized jungle not once but three times. First, there was Terminator (pioneering the use of time stretching), then Angel (fusing Diane Charlemagne's live vocal with David Byrne/Brian Eno samples to prove that hardcore could be more conventionally musical), now there's Timeless, a 22-minute hardcore symphony." Each of these were moments that shaped the musical fabric of the decade and beyond, presaging Goldie's transition from the underground rave scene into the world of bona fide A- list superstars.


    But it didn't start out like that. The boy who would become Goldie was born Clifford Price on 19 September 1965, just as The Rolling Stones hit the top of the charts with Satisfaction. His dad Clement, originally from Jamaica, had been plying his trade as a foundryman in Leeds. His mum Margaret, who had been born in Glasgow, was a popular singer in the pubs and clubs of the West Midlands. Barely more than a toddler, Goldie was just three when she placed him into foster care (though she kept his younger brother Melvin). He still remembers, he says, the day the social workers came to take him away.


    Over the next 15 years, he bounced between a series of foster homes and local government institutions around the Walsall area. His eclectic musical taste was forged, he reckons, in those same local authority homes listening to the sonic tangle of other teenagers' record collections. "In one room," he says, "a kid would be playing Steel Pulse while through the wall someone else had a Japan record on and another guy would be spinning Human League." On rare visits to see his dad, he'd lie sprawled over the living room couch, listening to Jazz FM, marveling at the lavishly-tooled '80s productions of Miles Davis, Pat Metheny, David Sanborn and Michael Franks, adding further layers to his complex musicography.


    Already developing the irresistible urge to excel that has marked his inimitable musical career, Goldie's first love was roller-hockey. He earned a place as goalkeeper in England's national squad before the lure of music overtook the lure of sport. After discovering electro and hip hop, he grew his hair - the "goldilocks" that won him his nickname - and joined a breakdance crew called the B-Boys in nearby Wolverhampton. He also discovered graffiti. "They called me 'the spray can king of the Midlands'," he says proudly. His talent was undeniable, bringing him to the attention not only of Britain's Arts Council but to Dick Fontaine, producer of a Channel 4 TV documentary on graffiti. Fontaine's 1987 film Bombin' captured a visit to the UK by New York artist Brim Fuentes. Brim met Goldie and his B-Boys crew in Wolverhampton's Heathtown before heading a dozen miles away to Birmingham's Handsworth, where the producer filmed the aftermath of rioting that had left four dead, 35 injured and dozens of stores burned out. Several months later, Fontaine reversed the process and took Goldie to New York, introducing him to hip-hop pioneer Afrika Bambaataa. For Goldie, on his first trip abroad, never mind his first trip over the Atlantic, the Big Apple was love at first sight. Back in Britain, he begged, borrowed and saved until he had enough to fund a return trip to the Bronx.


    "I started painting the trains and getting involved on the streets," he says, remembering his total immersion in what was still, at that point, an emerging culture. Art and music as symbiotic technologies. Rubbing shoulders with the Big Apple's best graffiti artists, his own distinctive style was accelerated and enriched. A move to Miami followed. He worked in the flea markets, he says, "painting trucks for drug dealers" and developing a sideline in gold jewelry that included the distinctive grills that became a trademark on his return to the UK. The magical properties of shaping, working and bending precious metals to his will - as close to alchemy as the modern world gets - became an analogue for the way he prefers to operate in the studio, chasing quicksilver dreams, mercury-fast rivulets of imagination into impossibly lush, breakbeat concertos. Back in Britain, Goldie found himself seduced by the sweetheart of the rave. Though it took him eight attempts to get entry into the club, at London's Rage in 1991 he marveled at the alternate sonic worlds being forged by Fabio and Grooverider behind the decks. "It really flipped me out," he remembers. Soon he found himself in the orbit of Dego McFarlane and Mark Clair. Their label Reinforced was in the vanguard of breakbeat, issuing astonishing records that stripped out boundaries and limits while setting the tone for the scene's sense of adventure. At first, he helped out doing artwork and a bit of A&R. But soon he was in Reinforced's Internal Affairs studio watching intently as Mark and Dego recorded tracks like Cookin' Up Ya Brain and Journey From The Light. "I was watching what they could do," says Goldie, "trying to gauge the possibilities of the technology." Soon he was getting involved. "I remember one session we did that lasted over three days," he says, "just experimenting, pushing the technology to its limits. We'd come up with mad ideas and then try to create them. We were sampling from ourselves and then resampling, twisting sounds around and pushing them into all sorts of places."


    What followed was a series of inspired break-driven releases such as Killa Muffin, Dark Rider and Menace. Then Terminator, with its writhing drum loop, dropped and suddenly Goldie's name was on everyone's lips. He followed up with the equally revolutionary Angel, tilting the axis towards the lush, trippy textures that made 1995's debut album Timeless the drum'n'bass scene's first platinum album. Incredibly, given what was happening elsewhere in the scene at the time, the recording of the album's epic title track began as far back as 1993, when most other producers were still focused on the original sonic tropes of hardcore rave.


    Timeless was a masterpiece - of production, of songwriting, of sonic perfection and breakbeat futurism. Even today, it still sounds as astonishingly new and inspired as it did back on those early pre-release cassettes circulated by London Records in the early months of 1995 when Goldie was still living on the 18th floor of a North London tower block.


    By then, Goldie had already set up his own record label - Metalheadz - with his friends the DJ duo Kemistry and Storm. Along with studio collaborator, Rob Playford's Moving Shadow and LTJ Bukem's Looking Good imprint, Metalheadz helped to define drum'n'bass as a distinct musical format with singles by J Majik, Asylum and Goldie himself. Still bursting with energy, he then launched a legendary club night, Metalheadz Sunday Sessions, at London's Blue Note. The scene's best producers - among them revolutionary artists like Photek, Source Direct, Peshay and Dillinja - would compete to have their latest recordings debuted at the club and the scene's faithful came from far and wide to hear the best tunes before anyone else. "Those nights at the Blue Note were magical," he recalls. "It was an underground phenomenon that became an institution." David Bowie, who was making the drum'n'bass-influenced album Earthling at the time, fell in love with the place. "I remember popping out to take a break from all the madness inside the club," says Goldie. "He was outside having a cigarette, a bit of a breather. We chatted for a bit, looked at each other, grinned and then plunged back into it all. It was just that kind of place."


    Goldie is one of only a handful of artists ever to co-write with Bowie - on the track Truth from the drum'n'bass pioneer's second album Saturnz Return. Released in 1998, the album also saw his vision become more expansive (the opening track, Mother, clocked in at just over an hour). The album's collaborative approach included guest spots from rap legend KRS-One, Sex Pistols manager and all-around provocateur Malcolm McLaren, super-producer Trevor Horn and Oasis main man Noel Gallagher (on the single Temper Temper).


    Fuelled by the limitless creativity that has been the hallmark of his career to date, Goldie next turned to acting. He reunited with Bowie in Andrew Goth's 1999 thriller Everybody Loves Sunshine then took the part of Bullion in the 1999 James Bond movie The World Is Not Enough. Other box office smashes - including Guy Ritchie's crime heist caper Snatch - followed before he joined the cast of BBC1 soap opera EastEnders, playing the gangster Angel Hudson.


    A series of blockbuster TV appearances - on shows such as Maestro (where he learned to conduct an orchestra), Classic Goldie (which saw him perform his own orchestral composition at the Royal Albert Hall in the summer of 2009) and Goldie's Band: By Royal Appointment.


    The orchestral training proved useful. In 2014, he translated his original vision for Timeless into the stunning Timeless (Sine Tempore). Performed live with the Heritage Orchestra at the Wilderness Festival to suitably rapturous acclaim, the performance was repeated the following year as part of the Meltdown Festival at London's Royal Festival Hall. In between, he found time to unveil Fragments Of Gold, a piece inspired by medieval chants that he performed live in Glasgow Cathedral.


    Drum'n'bass, of course, has remained a consistent passion, both through his Metalheadz label and his releases under the Rufige Kru moniker (2007's Malice In Wonderland and 2009's Memoirs Of An Afterlife). "Technologically," he says, "breakbeat has managed to surpass all other forms of music to date. There isn't a recording engineer alive who can tell me there's any other form of music that is more complex than the music we make." Goldie has also recently announced he will be releasing a brand new double album 'The Journey Man' this year. The album comprises two parts, 16 brand new tracks in total, all written and produced by Goldie. It also features a host of collaborators handpicked by Goldie to help realize his vision for the album.


    "I often look at music not so much as a producer but like a director. You're drawing together engineers, performers and arrangers to create something special, something magical. It's like alchemy. The notes, the music, the lyrics, they're all in my head and each element has to be communicated and brought to life to create the finished track. I'm always inspired by great movie directors - people like Stanley Kubrick and PT Anderson - and, if you think about it, it's quite a similar approach. They start off with a vision and then they use that vision to deploy the actors and the cameramen and the editors in order to create the finished film."


    Collaborators on 'The Journey Man' album include vocalist and songwriter Natalie Duncan, who was discovered when chosen in the three-part BBC series 'Goldie's Band By Royal Appointment' and later provided the vocals for Goldie's 2012 single 'Freedom'. Other featured vocalists on the album include Terri Walker, Tyler Lee Daly, Natalie Williams, JosÉ James, Naomi Pryor as well as Goldie's wife, Mika Wassenaar Price.


    'The Journey Man' will be released through Cooking Vinyl and Goldie's own record label, Metalheadz.


    Goldie's love affair with painting has remained consistent too and he continues to exhibit visual work that's just as dazzling as his sonic output. Beginning with Night Writers, the 1986 exhibition at Wolverhampton's art gallery that introduced Goldie and his Supreme Graffiti Team to the British Arts Council, his shows have defined a unique aesthetic that's all his own. And through them all, from 1987's Rockin' The City in Birmingham (where he exhibited alongside Massive Attack's Robert Del Naja) and the 1988 Crucial Creators exhibition in Walsall to more recent gallery events like 2007's Love Over Gold and 2012's Athleticizm collection (including portraits of London Olympics stars such as Victoria Pendleton, Tom Daley and Jessica Ennis), runs a consistent thread of energy, experimentalism and boundary-pushing. His 2013 collection, Lost Tribes, an innovative series of pieces fusing Goldie's style with the artistic expression of the ancient peoples of Africa, Asia and America was, he says, "my most important breakthrough".


    And for the kid who lay awake, gazing at the stars, through the window of a children's home, growing up has brought some surprises. In 2012, he was selected as one of the BBC's New Elizabethans, 60 people - ranging from David Hockney to Roald Dahl, David Bowie and Tim Berners-Lee - who have helped shape British culture during the reign of Elizabeth II. Four years later, he was awarded the MBE in the Queen's New Year Honours. It's acceptance, of course, on a grand scale. But at heart, he's still the gatecrasher, amped-up on ideas, buzzing on nothing but love, hope and the certainty that, while his way might not be the easy way, it's very definitely the path of a true artist.


    - Tim Barr, 2017

    LP 1
    1. Horizons (feat. Terri Walker & Swindle)
    2. Prism
    3. Mountains
    4. Castaway
    5. The Mirrored River


    LP 2
    1. I Adore You (w/ Ulterior Motive)
    2. I Think of You
    3. Truth (feat. Jose James)
    4. Redemption


    LP 3
    1. Tu Viens Avec Moi?
    2. The Ballad Celeste
    3. This Is Not A Love Song
    4. The River Mirrored (feat. Terri Walker)
    5. Triangle
    6. Tomorrow's Not Today
    7. Run Run Run

    Goldie
    $35.99
    Vinyl LP - 3 LPs Sealed Buy Now
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