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  • Love Power Peace Love Power Peace Quick View

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    Love Power Peace

    First Release Of 3 LP Set As Envisioned By James Brown


    Includes Deluxe Jacket With Rare Photos And Liner Notes By Alan Leeds


    Mastered From Brown's 1971 Mixdown Reels, Unused Until Now


    James Brown's magnum opus! Love Power Peace is the sound of the Godfather and his youngblood J.B.'s (including Bootsy and Catfish Collins) electrifying a crazed Parisian audience on March 8, 1971. Sequenced and mixed by Brown himself for a planned triple album, the set was shelved when key band members departed before it could be issued. Here, for the first time, are the sides as intended, exactly as delivered by James Brown Productions to his label in 1971-a 3-LP set with each disc mastered from the original mixdown reels, and each with a unique name, Love, Power and Peace! Brown and band rip through recent singles like "Sex Machine," "Super Bad," "Give It Up or Turnit a Loose" and "Get Up, Get Into It, Get Involved" with a metronomic precision laid down by bassist Bootsy Collins and drummer Jabo Starks. "Ain't It Funky Now" - formerly a slow, simmering groove - is transformed into a fast, funky tour de force in which newbie Catfish Collins unleashes one of the most badass guitar solos ever, while a medley of three other Brown standards ("Papa's Got a Brand New Bag"/"I Got You (I Feel Good)"/"I Got the Feelin' ") blazes by faster than the Godfather of Soul's personal Learjet. Interspersed with just the right amount of slow numbers like "Georgia on My Mind," and including tracks from the show's supporting acts that were not included on the 1992 CD (which was a remixed, incomplete show), this document of the funk revolution features rare photos and liner notes by tour director Alan Leeds. The way to jump on board for a trip through James' world at the height of his career!

    LP1
    1. Introduction
    2. Brother Rapp
    3. Ain't It Funky Now
    4. Georgia On My Mind - Part 1
    5. Georgia On My Mind - Part 2
    6. Sunny
    7. Intro: Bobby Byrd
    8. Signed, Sealed, Delivered I'm Yours
    9. I Need Help (I Can't Do It Alone)


    LP2
    1. Introduction: Vicki Anderson
    2. Don't Play That Song (You Lied)
    3. Yesterday
    4. Break & Intro Announcement

    5. Dance & It's A New Day
    6. Bewildered - Part 1
    7. Bewildered - Part 2
    8. There Was A Time

    9. Sex Machine
    10. Try Me - Part 1


    LP3
    1. Try Me - Part 2
    2. Papa's Got A Brand New Bag/I Got You/I Got The Feelin'
    3. Give It Up Or Turnit A Loose
    4. It's A Man's Man's Man's World
    5. Who Am I
    6. Please Please Please
    7. Sex Machine (Reprise)
    8. Super Bad
    9. Get Up, Get Into It, Get Involved
    10. Soul Power
    11. Get Up, Get Into It, Get Involved (Reprise)
    12. Finale

    James Brown
    $49.99
    Vinyl LP - 3 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Doin' It To Death Doin' It To Death Quick View

    $19.99
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    Doin' It To Death

    For starters, this platter begins with one of the great intros of all time: "Ladies and gentlemen, there are seven acknowledged wonders of the
    world. You are about to witness the eighth "


    Lodged in a deep groove between the JB's' debut LP Food For Thought (1972) and the more complex and at-times political Damn Right, I Am
    Somebody (from 1974) sits the ridiculously vampy and infectious classic, Doing It To Death. First moving hips and making heads nod in 1973,
    the James Brown-produced, 5-song album is one big funk lick, broken up into many delicious moving parts.


    As with pretty much everything produced by the JB's - led by Fred Wesley with heavy help from a supporting cast that included saxophonist
    Maceo Parker, guitarists Jimmy Nolen and Hearlon "Cheese" Martin and drummer John "Jabo" Starks - all songs began and revolved around
    a devastating riff. The title track is most certainly guilty-as-charged, as it starts strutting right out of the gate and continues for just over 10
    minutes, driven by a guitar lick and MCed by the inimitable James Brown, with soloists stepping up and out while the song chugs on.


    The other centerpiece of the album is the 8-minute "You Can Have Watergate Just Gimme Some Bucks And I'll Be Straight," whose groove is
    interestingly teased two times before it arrives in full form. The song title itself is provocative, and the music keeps a stone-cold groove despite
    the less than cheery undertones. Again driven by an infectious guitar morsel, the breakdowns in this song gave sampling producers and DJs
    sweet dreams in the '80s, and Fred Wesley's trombone solo rides beautifully over the group's cries of "We need some money."


    Beyond the aforementioned sure-shots, the twitchy "More Peas," "La Di Da La Di Day" and the much jazzier, solo-heavy "Sucker" round out
    this incredible album. It's just another perfect example of how James Brown's funk machine could stop the world when they hit a groove.

    1. Introduction To The J.B.'s
    2. Doing It To Death - Part 1 & 2
    3. You Can Have Watergate Just Gimme Some Bucks And I'll Be Straight
    4. More Peas
    5. La Di Da La Di Day
    6. You Can Have Watergate Just Gimme Some Bucks And I'll Be Straight
    7. Sucker
    8. You Can Have Watergate Just Gimme Some Bucks And I'll Be Straight
    The J.B.'s
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • These Are The JBs These Are The JBs Quick View

    $24.99
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    These Are The JBs

    The Unreleased Album By James Brown's Backing Band: The Bootsy Collins-lead JB's


    Never-before-heard James Brown and J.B.'s originals and covers of Jimi Hendrix, Kool & the Gang, the Meters. Contains a 12-page booklet with full annotation, liner notes by Brown historian Alan Leeds and never-before-published photos.


    This album is the Rosetta Stone of funk's dominant idioms, yet its existence has barely been a rumor. In 1970 James Brown perfectly captured a definitive moment in modern music when he ordered Bootsy Collins into the studio to record the tracks that would be test pressed on King Records as These Are The J.B.'s. This album is the epitome of funk music, Brown's innovation that influenced everything that came after it, from Afro-beat to disco to hip-hop. And if there is any funk ensemble as influential as Brown's, in the post-"Cold Sweat" musical landscape, it's the Parliament/Funkadelic contingent. Those two streams, as Grammy Winning James Brown historian Alan Leeds details in this album's liner notes, converged for the first time here.


    This link between Brown's funk and all that followed features Bootsy and his young band running through twelve-minute instrumental take of Marva Whitney's "It's My Thing," replete with blues chord changes, alongside interpretations of the Meters, Kool and the Gang and none other than Jimi Hendrix. This is a young band's James Brown-turned-on-his-head style of funk that they nail in a one-minute vamp that pre-dates their obscure but important work as the Houseguests ensemble and embodies the essence of the psychedelic-flavored music that would propel them into the orbit of
    George Clinton and his mothership, where they poked cosmic holes in funk's polyrhythmic ozone layer in the mid-1970s.


    There are only two extant copies of the original King Records test press LP of These Are The J.B.'s. This, the first commercial issue of this album, was overseen by Now-Again's Egon alongside Leeds and Universal Music Group's James Brown expert Harry Weinger. It was mastered specifically for vinyl by Elysian Master's Dave Cooley from the original two-track stereo master that James Brown and his engineer Ron Lenhoff delivered to production forty-four years ago. It comes with a 12-page booklet with liner notes by Leeds and Egon and many unpublished photographs and ephemera.

    1. These Are The JBs (Part 1 & 2)
    2. I'll Ze
    3. The Grunt (Part 1 & 2)
    4. When You Feel It, Grunt If You Can
    The J.B.'s
    $24.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • It Takes A Nation Of Millions To Hold Us Back It Takes A Nation Of Millions To Hold Us Back Quick View

    $24.99
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    It Takes A Nation Of Millions To Hold Us Back

    Ranked 78/500 On Rolling Stone Magazine's 500 Greatest Albums Of All Time.


    25th Anniversary


    I hated that record, said Public Enemy's Chuck D. Believe it or not, he's referring to Bring the Noise, the frenetic first track of It Takes a Nation of Millions to Hold Us Back, the group's 1988 agit-rap masterpiece and breakthrough album. Public Enemy had recorded the song in October 1987 for the soundtrack of the forgettable Less Than Zero. When Chuck (a.k.a. Carlton Ridenhour) first heard the final version, he said, I practically threw it out the window.


    He changed his mind later that year when Public Enemy were on tour in England. I kept hearing people ask, 'What's this record you've got out? People are going crazy over it,' he remembered. I was like 'OK, pull that acetate out, and let's play it [in concert].' People went berserk.


    Bring the Noise, along with Rebel Without a Pause and Don't Believe the Hype - all conceived in 1987 at the group's Hempstead, Long Island, studio, Spectrum City - would become the foundation of It Takes a Nation of Millions, an album that's loud, obnoxious, funky, avant-garde, political, uncompromising and hilarious all at once. Chuck may have been disgruntled over Bring the Noise, but he always liked Rebel Without a Pause, the track that introduced Public Enemy's trademark sirenlike horn squeals. Hank Shocklee of PE's production team, the Bomb Squad, says that Rebel started out as a response to Eric B. and Rakim's I Know You Got Soul. We were going for something that had the same feel but with more aggression, Shocklee said. Because we were angry.


    For Rebel, PE coupled piercing squeals (a snippet from the J.B.'s' The Grunt played backward) with James Brown's Funky Drummer (Because that song was my milk, said Shocklee). Then it fell on Chuck to write the lyrics. I remember locking myself in the house for 24 hours, Chuck said. He emerged with verses that emulated Rakim's off-the-rhythm flow but stayed true to his own booming-baritone persona (Soul, rock & roll, comin' like a rhino); Chuck also dropped the name of black activist Joanne Chesimard, hinting at the political direction that his rhymes would soon take.


    Don't Believe the Hype, recorded just before Bring the Noise, was Chuck's first foray into full-fledged polemics, in this case against the media. The lyrics were inspired by a slight against Chuck by New York-area radio DJ Mr. Magic. PE had serious doubts about that song, too. We thought 'Hype' was just garbage, said Shocklee. Again, they saw the response the song got when DMC (of the group Run-DMC) blasted the track out of his Bronco in Harlem on a Saturday night. The whole block was grooving to it, says Shocklee.


    In January 1988, it all fit together. You had the combination of the noise from 'Rebel,' says Chuck, the tempo of 'Bring the Noise' and the subject matter of 'Don't Believe the Hype.' It set off Takes a Nation pretty nice.


    - Rolling Stone

    LP 1
    1. Countdown To Armageddon
    2. Bring The Noise
    3. Don't Believe The Hype
    4. Cold Lampin' With Flavor
    5. Terminator X To The Edge Of Panic
    6. Mind Terrorist
    7. Louder Than A Bomb
    8. Caught, Can We Get A Witness?


    LP 2
    1. Show 'Em Whatcha Got
    2. She Watch Channel Zero?!
    3. Night Of The Living Baseheads
    4. Black Steel In The Hour Of Chaos
    5. Security Of The First World
    6. Rebel Without A Pause
    7. Prophets Of Rage
    8. Party For Your Right To Fight

    Public Enemy
    $24.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Us Us Quick View

    $29.99
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    Us

    Bundled With A 22"x 22" Poster Of The Cover Art


    Maceo Parker was one of the most revered and loved members of James Brown's famed J.B.'s band from the late '60s to the mid-1970s. Alongside his instantly-recognizable alto saxophone solos, he occasionally performed as comedian before James Brown shows, in addition to playing MC.


    He was a true renaissance man. And while other members of The Godfather of Soul's inner circle - most notably trombonist Fred Wesley - had solo albums at the advent of Brown's People Records, Maceo had to wait his turn for a couple years. By the time 1974 rolled around, this talented musician and personality could not be denied, and he burst onto the scene as a group leader with one of the most impressive albums in the People catalog: the simply titled, but deeply felt, Us.


    Maceo's group (occasionally called The Macks) and Fred Wesley's J.B.'s were essentially the same unit - including guitarists Jimmy Nolen and Hearlon "Cheese" Martin, drummer John "Jabo" Starks, saxophonist St. Clair Pinckney and of course Fred Wesley on trombone. Unsurprisingly, the material here is never-endingly funky. But as shown in the song selection (presumably by Parker, with heavy-handy assistance from the
    Godfather himself), there are as many ballads and soul groovers as there are straight-up funk workouts.
    Cases in point include the mellow, Gamble & Huff-penned "Drowning In The Sea Of Love" (with organ, most likely played by James Brown, slithering in the background) and the syrupy "Show and Tell." The album's closer is also on the slower side, going very deep and striking a chord, as Maceo and Brown talk about conditions in the Black American landscape of the day over the course of 10-plus minutes.


    And there is, of course, plenty of diesel funk here as well: singles like "Soul Power 74" and "Parrty" are downright nasty grooves, known well by James Brown fans old and new. "Soul Power 74" additionally features very early proto-sampling, with a baby's cry as well as Martin Luther King Jr.'s famous "I Have Been To The Mountain Top" speech. And Maceo's take on the J.B.'s classic "Doing It To Death" is a unique version, more muted and of course featuring Maceo's gorgeous horn front and center.


    Appearing at the apex of both James Brown's and People Records' power, Us is a treasured jewel in the J.B. catalog, and rightfully so. This 150 gram vinyl LP comes in a Stoughton Jacket, housed in a custom People Records poly bag, and includes 24" x 24" poster.

    1. Soul Power '74
    2. Parrty
    3. Show And Tell
    4. Drowning In The Sea Of Love
    5. I Can Play For (Just You & Me)
    6. Doing It To Death
    7. The Soul Of A Black Man
    Maceo Parker
    $29.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • James Brown's Funky People Part 1 (Out Of Stock) James Brown's Funky People Part 1 (Out Of Stock) Quick View

    $29.99
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    James Brown's Funky People Part 1 (Out Of Stock)

    Some have made the claim that Get On Down may love James Brown just a little too much. To which the label replies, it's not possible to love James Brown too much. The label's welcome obsession with Mr. Brown and the incredible line-up of talent found on his People Record imprint continues with the reissue of Funky People Part 1.


    Long out of print on vinyl, Funky People Part 1 features the top tier of artists from Brown's People Records label, including The J.B.'s, Lyn Collins, Fred Wesley and Maceo Parker. Some of the James Brown organization's all-time best material is collected here, including The J.B.'s "Pass The Peas" and "Hot Pants Road," Fred Wesley's in your face politics through funk statement "Damn Right, I Am Somebody," Lyn Collins smash hit "Think (About It)" and many more.


    Newcomers and diehard fans alike continue to dig into the James Brown and People Records vaults, and the more they do so, the more they realize that it's a nearly never ending source of truly next-level funk and soul music. And you can be sure this aural goodness will keep flowing to the public, thanks to the exhaustive efforts of Get On Down.

    1. Gimme Some More (The J.B.'s)
    2. Pass The Peas (The J.B.'s)
    3. Lyn Collins Think (About It)
    4. Givin' Up Food For Funk (Part 1) [The J.B.'s]
    5. Mama Feelgood (Lyn Collins)
    6. Hot Pants Road (The J.B.'s)
    7. Rock Me Again & Again & Again & Again & Again & Again (Lyn Collins)
    8. Damn Right, I Am Somebody (Parts 1 & 2) [Fred Wesley & The J.B.'s]
    9. Take Me Just As I Am (Lyn Collins)
    10. If You Don't Get It The First Time, Back Up And Try Again (Party Fred Wesley & The J.B.'s)
    11. Parrty (Part 1) [Maceo & The Macks]
    12. (It's Not The Express) It's The JB's Monaurail (Part 1) [Fred & The New J.B.'s]
    Various Artists
    $29.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Temporarily out of stock
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