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  • Uncle Drew (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack) (Pre-Order) Uncle Drew (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack) (Pre-Order) Quick View

    $24.99
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    Uncle Drew (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack) (Pre-Order)

    The 16-song soundtrack to the 2018 film Uncle Drew is packed with big guest appearances. It features artists such as G-Eazy, Yo Gotti, YBN Nahmir, A$AP Rocky, Gucci Mane, 21 Savage, London On Da Track, Khalid, A$AP Ferg, Tone Stith, 2 Chainz, GoldLink, Logic, French Montana, Remy Ma, Wiz Khalifa, Leikeli47, Cousin Stizz, Dipset, H.E.R., Nao, Grace, and even the film's star, NBA all-star Kyrie Irving, who recorded his first song ever.
    LP 1
    1. Harlem Anthem - A$AP Ferg
    2. 1942 - G-Eazy feat. Yo Gotti & YBN Nahmir
    3. New Thang (From the Original Motion Picture Soundtrack 'Uncle Drew') - French Montana & Remy Ma
    4. Cocky - A$AP Rocky x Gucci Mane x 21 Savage feat. London On Da Track
    5. I Can Feel It - GoldLink feat. H.E.R.
    6. Light Flex (From the Original Motion Picture Soundtrack 'Uncle Drew') - Tone Stith feat. 2 Chainz
    7. Chain Gang - Leikeli47 feat. Clyde Guevara
    8. Ballin - Logic


    LP 2
    1. Records - Cousin Stizz
    2. Stronger - Dipset feat. Drama
    3. I Need Your Lovin' - Nao
    4. Stay - Khalid
    5. Us - Kid Ink feat. Elley DuhÉ
    6. What's the Play - Wiz Khalifa
    7. Clap Your Hands - Grace
    8. Ridiculous - Kyrie Irving feat. LunchMoney Lewis

    Various Artists
    $24.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed PRE-ORDER Buy Now
  • Sweetenings (Pure Pleasure) Sweetenings (Pure Pleasure) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Sweetenings (Pure Pleasure)

    Harry 'Sweets' Edison, a smooth and suave trumpeter, was a cohort of orchestra leader Count Basie, a favourite of bandleader Nelson Riddle, and a noted backup artist for the most prominent vocalists of his time. Edison, with his energetic yet reticent blowing style, bridged a genre gap between the early classic jazz sound of Louis Armstrong and modern bebop modes. Edison, who played equally well in both styles, had a special talent for sustaining his trumpet notes and injecting each single tone with expression and soul never heard before or after.


    The special quality of his trumpet playing earned him the nickname 'Sweets' because of the sweetness of the tones. Likewise his ability to control the tone of his trumpet brought him to the forefront as a session musician, playing accompaniments for the most respected vocalists of his time.


    Edison was a true pioneer of jazz. An old-time homespun boy, born in Columbus, Ohio, he never knew with certainty even the year of his birth. According to his best knowledge, he was born in 1919, although some sources list the date as early as 1915. Edison knew even less about his own father, a Native American of the Hopi (Apache) tribe and a drifter who stayed only a few weeks with Edison's mother before taking to the road and was rarely heard from afterward. Edison spent his early years with an uncle, who was a coal miner and a farmer, in Louisville, Kentucky. It was Edison's uncle who taught the boy to play the pump organ and to play scales on an old cornet. Edison, who also listened to his uncle's records, was especially inspired by the music of Louis Armstrong and Bessie Smith.


    Harry Sweets Edison added something special to any date in which he took part, but these 1958 sessions he led for Roulette are especially enjoyable. Joined by either Jimmy Jones or Kenny Drew on piano and Joe Benjamin or John Simmons on bass, along with tenor saxophonist Jimmy Forrest and drummer Charlie Persip, Edison's trumpet swings effortlessly through a batch of standards and originals.


    The loping blues Centerpiece became a classic jazz composition, recorded by numerous jazz artists, but this was its debut appearance on LP. Jive at Five dates from his years with Count Basie and finds the band sticking to an accompanying role in this swinging but brief arrangement. Edison utilizes a mute in the gently swinging Louisiana, while he showboats just a bit in a brief take of It Happened in Monterey. While this record might have offered a little more variety by giving solo space to some of the talented sidemen present, this long out of print LP is well worth acquiring.



    Musicians:



    • Harry Edison (trumpet)

    • Jimmy Forrest (tenor saxophone)

    • Jimmy Jones (piano)

    • Joe Benjamint (bass)

    • John Simmons (bass)

    • Charlie Persip (drums)



    Recording: November 1958 in New York
    Production: Teddy Reig




    About Pure Pleasure



    At the beginning of the 90s, in the early days of audiophile vinyl re-releases, the situation was fairly straightforward. Companies such as DCC, Mobile Fidelity, Classic Records and, of course, Pure Pleasure all maintained a mutual, unwritten ethical code: we would only use analogue tapes to manufacture records.



    During the course of the present vinyl hype, many others have jumped on the bandwagon in the hope of securing a corner of the market. Very often they are not so ethical and use every imaginable source to master from: CDs, LPs, digital files, MP3s - or employed existent tools from the 80s and 90s for manufacturing.



    A digital delay is gladly used when cutting a lacquer disc because tape machines with an analogue delay have become quite rare and are therefore expensive. When cutting the lacquer, the audio signal is delayed by one LP revolution against the signal, which controls the cutter head, and for this a digital delay is very often employed. Of course, the resultant sound signal is completely digital and thus only as good as this delay.



    We should like to emphasize that Pure Pleasure Records on principle only uses the original master tape as the basis for the entirely analogue cutting of lacquer discs. In addition, the pressing tool is newly manufactured as a matter of principle.



    We only employ existing tools for manufacturing if an improved result is not forthcoming, e.g. the title Elvis Is Back, which was mastered by Steve Hoffman and Kevin Gray, or several titles from our Philips Classics series, which in any case Willem Makkee cut from the original masters at the Emil Berliner Studios in the 90s. It goes without saying that we only used the mother and that new tools were made for our production.



    To put it in a nutshell: we can ensure you that our releases are free from any kind of digital effects and that the lacquer discs are newly cut.



    1. Centerpiece
    2. Candy
    3. Jive At Five
    4. Imagination
    5. Louisana
    6. Harriet
    7. It Happened In Monterey
    8. If I Had You
    9. Paradise
    10. Indiana
    11. Pussy Willow
    12. Sweetenings
    Harry Sweets Edison
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Hug Of Thunder Hug Of Thunder Quick View

    $25.99
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    Hug Of Thunder

    "I don't want to go out there being presumptuous," Kevin Drew says, "because, I've worn those presumptuous shoes before, and you don't want it to feel like, 'Oh, what a let-down.'" That's the fear when you bring back one of music's most beloved names seven years after their last album. But with Hug of Thunder, the fifth Broken Social Scene album, Drew and his bandmates have a right to feel presumptuous.

    They have that right because they have created one of 2017's most sparkling, multi-faceted albums. On Hug of Thunder the 15 members of Broken Social Scene - well, the 15 who play on the record, including returnees Leslie Feist and Emily Haines - refract their varying emotions, methods, and techniques into something that doesn't just equal their other albums, but surpasses them. It is righteous but warm, angry but loving, melodic but uncompromising. The title track on its own might just be the best thing you will hear all year - a song that will become as beloved as "Anthems For a Seventeen-Year-Old Girl" from their breakthrough album, You Forgot It In People.

    Its title, Drew says, captured what he wanted people to feel about the group's comeback, and how they sound playing together again: "It's just such a wonderful sentiment about us, coming in like a hug of thunder."

    Broken Social Scene had reconvened, in varying forms, several times over the past four years - the odd festival show here and there, preferably ones that involved the least possible traveling. But the idea that they might turn their hand to something more than greatest-hits sets had been stirring since November 2014, when producer Joe Chiccarelli told Drew the group needed to make a new album.

    "He started showing up at our label, asking if we were going to make an album," Drew recalls. "He just didn't give up; he just kept saying, 'You've got to strike, you've got to do this, the time is now,' and so finally we agreed."

    As might be expected to be the case with a many-headed hydra of a group, getting all the principals to agree wasn't easy. Drew's co-founder Brendan Canning was keen, but Drew and fellow BSS lifer Charles Spearin took more persuading. A turning point for Drew came with the Paris terror attacks of November 2015, which made him feel the world needed an injection of positivity: "It just sort of made us want to go out there and play. Because I think we've always been a band that's been a celebration."

    Canning picks up the story: "By autumn of 2015 we had started getting together and trying some ideas out, just getting back in that jam space, in Charles' garage. Then we set up shop in my living room and we were starting to come together in a very familiar kind of way, jamming in the living room, eating meals in the kitchen together, because that's what the band is about: 'Hey, let's all get on the same page and get the energies flowing in the same direction.'"

    Recording finally began in April 2016 at The Bathouse studio on the shores of Lake Ontario, with later sessions in Toronto and Montreal, before the group went right back to basics. "It was very beautiful the way that it ended in Charlie's little rehearsal garage space," Drew says, "after going to all these studios. We just worked there, doing backup vocals and handclaps and all the shit we used to do when we were younger." And then it was to Los Angeles, where the album was mixed.

    The result is a panoramic, expansive album, 53 minutes that manages to be both epic and intimate. In troubled times it offers a serotonin rush of positivity: "Stay Happy" lives up to its title, with huge surges of brass that sound like sunshine bursting through clouds. "Gonna Get Better" makes a promise that the album is determined to deliver. That's not to say it's an escapist record: Broken Social Scene is completely engaged, wholly focussed, and not ignoring the darkness that lurks outside. But there is no hectoring, no lecturing, but a recognition of the confusion and ambiguity of the world. As the title track closes with Leslie Feist murmuring "There was a military base across the street," the listener is caught in the division between the national security provided by national defense, and the menace of the same thing.

    The gestation of Hug of Thunder was no idyll. When You Forgot It in People made their name, Broken Social Scene were young men and women. Fifteen years on, they were adults in or on the cusp of middle age, and - as Drew puts it - "all the adult problems in the world were happening around us individually, whether it was divorce or cancer". Three members of the band lost their fathers while the album was being recorded, "and it seemed like the days of going in the studio, getting stoned, drinking five beers and saying, 'Who gives a fuck?' were over".

    Then there's the fact of the size of the ensemble, and the number of competing voices. "You don't always get the final say with Broken Social Scene," Canning says, with a certain degree of understatement. He compares the process of getting everyone to agree on a song to party politics: "It's like you're trying to get a bill passed through the House - you have to be really committed to wanting to win."

    But, still, if they were to return, it had to be with everybody, no matter if that meant things might get unwieldy. "I'd like to believe that Broken Social Scene can be whatever it can be," Canning says, "but I think the fact we'd gone away for so long meant we really, we really couldn't have done the same thing without everyone involved, you know?" The story of Broken Social Scene, he insists, was built on the involvement of everyone, and so if the story was to be continued, those same people had to return.

    "The thing that has changed is that the relationships between us are established," Drew suggests. "And in a family, you ebb and flow and you come and you go and you're in love and then you're annoyed - but it's established now, the relationships aren't going anywhere, you know? And I think through time, because we've been through so much together, personally and professionally, when we're all on stage, everybody knows what they're doing, everybody has a melody to back up someone else, you feel supported, you're a crew, there's nothing but protection all around you."

    Canning picks up the theme: "Before we were making this record, I said to everyone: 'We all basically want the same thing, we might just have slightly different roadmaps on how to get there. So how do we stray off on certain country roads but get back onto the main thoroughfare?'"

    That Broken Social Scene was a family again, driving along the same main road, became apparent to UK fans in September 2016, when the group - with Ariel Engle the latest woman to assume the role of co-lead vocalist - came over for less than a handful of festival shows, to test the waters. Their Sunday teatime appearance at End Of The Road - an ecstatic hour of maximalist music, physically and emotionally overwhelming - ended up being one of the biggest hits of the festival. It achieved what Drew has always felt music needed to do: it created transcendence, a pocket of time where everyone present was living only in the moment.

    "My 11-year-old nephew asked me, 'Uncle Kev, why do adults get drunk?' and I looked at him and thought, 'OK, brilliant question, I'm going to give a brilliant answer,'" Drew recalls. "And I looked at him for about 10 seconds and I said, 'Because they want to feel like you. Because they want to feel like a kid again, they want to forget everything, they want to be innocent.' We are built in a way now where you can't do that because you're walking around with the anti-transcendence box in your pocket, and in your hand, and in your home, and on your bedside table: it's the anti-transcendence. It's called your phone! And we're getting killed, we're getting killed!"

    So what do Broken Social Scene want listeners to take from Hug of Thunder? Canning wants it to make them "pause for the cause and maybe just leave things in your life alone for 53 minutes". For Drew, it's about what it's always been about: making the connection. "I just hope they understand that there's others out there, that they're not alone," he says. "I know that's silly! But you'd be surprised how many times I've had to tell people, 'Hey, you're not alone on this, you're not alone thinking these things.' I mean, with the title Hug of Thunder, I want to hold people. I want to fucking hold them. And when we do shows, I'm not: 'Look at me, I'm elevated up on the stage,' It's: 'We're here with you, this is us together.' Broken Social Scene is about the people, and it's always been about the people."

    1. Sol Luna
    2. Halfway Home
    3. Protest Song
    4. Skyline
    5. Stay Happy
    6. Vanity Pail Kids
    7. Hug of Thunder
    8. Towers and Masons
    9. Victim Lover
    10. Please Take Me With You
    11. Gonna Get Better
    12. Mouth Guards of the Apocalypse
    Broken Social Scene
    $25.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Workingman's Dead (Awaiting Repress) Workingman's Dead (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $49.99
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    Workingman's Dead (Awaiting Repress)

    Sublime, Stripped-Down 1970 Americana Classic Steeped in Country, Blues, and Folk


    You've Never Heard This Roots-Based Marvel Sound Better: Mastered from the Original Master Tapes and Given Extra-Wide Grooves on 45RPM LP


    Ranked #264 on Rolling Stone's List of the 500 Greatest Albums of All Time: Airy Harmonies, Simple Structures, Concise Arrangements, and Burnished Tones Anchor Songs


    Workingman's Dead defies the erroneous belief that the Grateful Dead never attained brilliance in the recording studio. Forever prized for natural sonics, Workingman's Dead attains audiophile reference status courtesy of this first-ever 45RPM version. As flawless as any rustic album ever released, the 1970 set now brims with soaring harmonies, organic execution, intertwined textures, and uncomplicated structures that furnish the songs a transcendence associated with timeless American music. Colorful, relatable characters seemingly torn from working-class histories and old-time fables inhabit the narratives.


    Mastered from the original master tapes and pressed on 180g LPs at RTI, Mobile Fidelity's numbered limited edition of this period-defining recording renders the stripped-down fare with immense detail, rich airiness, and reach-out-and-touch-it realism. Longtime Deadheads and newcomers alike will hear significantly more information, experience wider and deeper soundstages, and become swept away by incredible tonal and vocal balances-traits made possible by the format's wider grooves. Instrumental melds and refined accents, such as guest David Nelson's nimble fills on "Cumberland Blues," are part of a larger whole that gives the impression you are witness to the world's coziest campfire session. Frontier tales and refined performances further this feeling.


    The first Grateful Dead album to eschew cosmic jams and complex signatures, Workingman's Dead stakes its existence to great songs, homespun warmth, and bare essentials. Its wistful, relaxed state-immediately apparent via the innocent album-opening invitation "Will you come with me?" on "Uncle John's Band"-owes to the circumstances and conditions surrounding its creation. At the time, the Dead owed a considerable financial debt to Warner Bros. and were hobbled by a recent drug bust and financial scandal. Most significantly, the band was recovering from-and reacting to-the tragic events of the Altamont Music Festival and symbolic end of the peace and love era.


    As such, Workingman's Dead acts as a retreat from chaos and uncertainty, its songs emblems of simpler times and pleas for compassion in the face of hardship. Lyricist Robert Hunter said he aimed to capture the vintage elements of late 1940s country-and-western jukebox singles as well as old blues classics. In that vein, fare such as the Bakersfield-leaning "Cumberland Blues," pastoral ballad "Dire Wolf," and bluesy "Easy Wind" hit the mark. Leader Jerry Garcia's occasional pedal-steel underpinnings arrive as a bonus.


    Of course, aside from the economical concision and thematic consistency, the genius of Workingman's Dead resides in the group's expressive harmonies. Taught by Crosby, Stills and Nash, the Dead produce live "air blends" of multi-part vocal harmonies that provide the foundations of nearly every track. "Uncle John's Band," "High Time," "New Speedway Boogie" (with the iconic refrain "One way or another/This darkness has got to give" referencing the ill wind that greeted the new decade), and the radio favorite "Casey Jones" practically float on the ensemble's communal vocal beds.


    Mobile Fidelity's 45RPM edition renders these invigorating, refreshing, and engaging characteristics in three-dimensional sound that transports you to the event. Recordings don't get more lifelike. Workingman's Dead-an iconic, ageless record that drew countless listeners to the band's unique style because of its accessibility and charm-deserves nothing less. Neither do you.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Uncle John's Band
    2. High Time
    3. Dire Wolf
    4. New Speedway
    5. Cumberland Blues
    6. Black Peter
    7. Easy Wind
    8. Casey Jones
    Grateful Dead
    $49.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP 45RPM - 2 LPs Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
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