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  • White Crosses (Awaiting Repress) White Crosses (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $18.99
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    White Crosses (Awaiting Repress)

    Repress of punk rockers Against Me!'s fifth studio album, and their second released on Sire Records. Produced by
    legendary producer and Garbage drummer, Butch Vig. Featuring the top tracks; I Was a Teenage Anarchist, White
    Crosses, & Because of the Shame. This 10 track version has not been available since the original release in 2010.
    The LP is heavyweight 180G black vinyl.
    1. White Crosses
    2. I Was A Teenage Anarchist
    3. Because of the Shame
    4. Suffocation
    5. We're Breaking Up
    6. High Pressure Low
    7. Ache With Me
    8. Spanish Moss
    9. Rapid Decompression
    10. Bamboo Bones
    Against Me!
    $18.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • Crosses (White Vinyl) Crosses (White Vinyl) Quick View

    $24.99
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    Crosses (White Vinyl)


    White Colored Vinyl


    † † † (Crosses) release of their eagerly anticipated eponymous full-length debut via Sumerian Records. The 15-track collection features all tracks from EP† and EP†† alongside five new songs, including brilliant new single †he epilogue which is heating up Modern Rock radio.


    The LA-based trio formed in 2011 and quickly earned acclaim following the self-release of two EPs. EP † was declared one of the Top Free Albums of 2011 by Forbes Magazine and EP †† earned similar acclaim, reaching #8 on Billboard's Top Heatseeker's chart.


    † † † are Chino Moreno (Deftones), Shaun Lopez (Far) and Chuck Doom. Chino, who is known for his distinctive screams and soothing tenor voice when singing melodically describes the project as minimal and soothing and it's sort of like the stuff I like listening to when I'm not screaming my head off. The album was produced by Shaun Lopez and † † †.

    1. This Is A Trick
    2. Telepathy
    3. Bitches Brew
    4. Thholyghst
    5. Trophy
    6. The Epilogue
    7. Bermuda Locket
    8. Frontiers
    9. Nineteen Ninety Four
    10. Option
    11. Nineteen Eighty Seven
    12. Blk Stallion
    13. Cross
    14. Prurient
    15. Death Bell
    Crosses
    $24.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Average White Band Average White Band Quick View

    $31.99
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    Average White Band

    First Time Friday Music 180 Gram Audiophile Vinyl


    Mastered Impeccably By Joe Reagoso At Friday Music & Capitol Mastering


    Their self-effacing name to the contrary, Average White Band was anything but - one of the few white groups to cross the color line and achieve success and credibility playing funk, with their tight, fiery sound also belying their Scottish heritage, evoking American R&B hotbeds like Detroit, Memphis, and Philadelphia instead. Singer/bassist Alan Gorrie, guitarists Hamish Stuart and Onnie McIntyre, tenor saxophonist Malcolm Duncan, keyboardist/saxophonist Roger Ball, and drummer Robbie McIntosh comprised the original Average White Band lineup. Veterans of numerous Scottish soul and jazz groups, they made their debut in 1973 as the opening act at Eric Clapton's Rainbow Theatre comeback gig, soon issuing their debut LP, Show Your Hand, to little notice. After adopting the abbreviated moniker AWB, a year later the band issued their self-titled sophomore effort, topping the American pop charts with the Arif Mardin-produced instrumental "Pick Up the Pieces." The record's mammoth success was nevertheless tempered by the September 23, 1974 death of McIntosh, who died at a Hollywood party after overdosing on heroin.


    Ex-Bloodstone drummer Steve Ferrone replaced McIntosh for AWB's third album, 1975's Cut the Cake, which scored a Top Ten hit with its title track as well as two other chart entries, "If I Ever Lose This Heaven" and "School Boy Crush." (Put It Where You Want It, issued later that same year, was simply a retitled and repackaged Show Your Hand.) With 1976's Soul Searching, the group reclaimed the full Average White Band name, scoring their final Top 40 hit with "Queen of My Soul." Following the live Person to Person, they issued Benny & Us, a collaboration with soul legend Ben E. King. However, after subsequent outings, including 1978's Warmer Communications, 1979's Feel No Fret, and 1980's Shine, failed to recapture the energy of AWB's peak, the group dissolved in 1982, with Ferrone later joining Duran Duran and Stuart recording with Paul McCartney. Gorrie, Ball, and McIntyre reformed Average White Band in 1989, tapping vocalist Alex Ligertwood for their comeback effort Aftershock. Oft-sampled by hip-hop producers throughout the 1990s, the group continued touring prior to releasing Soul Tattoo in 1996. The live album, Face to Face, followed three years later.

    1. You Got It
    2. Got The Love
    3. Pick Up The Pieces

    4. Person To Person

    5. Work To Do
    6. Nothing You Can Do

    7. Just Wanna Love You Tonight
    8. Keepin' It To Myself

    9. I Just Can't Give You Up

    10. There's Always Someone Waiting
    Average White Band
    $31.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP Buy Now
  • Someday My Prince Will Come Someday My Prince Will Come Quick View

    $32.99
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    Someday My Prince Will Come

    Import

    Remastered on 180 Gram Audiophile Vinyl!


    After John Coltrane and Cannonball Adderly left the 'quintet', Miles Davis was forced to search for new qualified musicians. He found them in Hank Mobley, Wynton Kelly, Jimmy Cobb and Paul Chambers. In 1961, just two years after recording Kind Of Blue, Miles and his new line up started recording energetically and finished Someday My Prince Will Come after only three days.


    This album is a cross-over from Kind Of Blue, which is known for the typical Miles Davis-tunes, to traditional pop-standards such as the eponymous title track from Snow White And The Seven Dwarfs.

    1. Someday My Prince Will Come
    2. Old Folks
    3. Pfrancing
    4. Drad-Dog
    5. Teo
    6. I Thought About You
    Miles Davis
    $32.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Someday My Prince Will Come Someday My Prince Will Come Quick View

    $24.99
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    Someday My Prince Will Come

    Remastered on 180 Gram Audiophile Vinyl!


    After John Coltrane and Cannonball Adderly left the 'quintet', Miles Davis was forced to search for new qualified musicians. He found them in Hank Mobley, Wynton Kelly, Jimmy Cobb and Paul Chambers. In 1961, just two years after recording Kind Of Blue, Miles and his new line up started recording energetically and finished Someday My Prince Will Come after only three days.


    This album is a cross-over from Kind Of Blue, which is known for the typical Miles Davis-tunes, to traditional pop-standards such as the eponymous title track from Snow White And The Seven Dwarfs.

    1. Someday My Prince Will Come
    2. Old Folks
    3. Pfrancing
    4. Drad-Dog
    5. Teo
    6. I Thought About You
    Miles Davis
    $24.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Songs Of Patience Songs Of Patience Quick View

    $17.99
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    Songs Of Patience

    The title of Alberta Cross' new studio album, Songs of Patience is, in many ways, literal. It's been three long years since the band last released a full-length album. The highs and lows of their journey raised a grander set of ideas, infusing the 10-song set's title with additional universal meaning.


    After touring extensively on their debut, Broken Side of Time, with bands like Them Crooked Vultures, Oasis, and Black Rebel Motorcycle Club, and stopping at festivals like Bonnaroo and Sasquatch, Alberta Cross headed to an old, abandoned house in the middle of nowhere near Woodstock, NY. There, they braved the freezing winter and embraced a sense of the building's haunted past to envision ideas for a new records.


    In the end, the record is the sum of three years' worth of parts, a struggle that concluded in victory. Three difference producers: Joe Chiccarelli (The White Stripes, My Morning Jacket), Mike Daly (Whiskeytown, Young the Giant) and Claudius Mittendorfer (Muse, Interpol). It opens new possibilities for the band's visceral live show, a notable facet of the group defined by their raucous, gritty onstage performances that swell the tracks into bigger, more expansive versions of themselves. Song of Patience has also, in many ways, become a decided source of inspiration for the band members, one they hope magnifies the personal battles and upsides of their fans.

    1. Magnolia
    2. Create Of Gold
    3. Lay Down
    4. Come on Maker
    5. Ophelia On My Mind
    6. Wasteland
    7. I Believe In Everything
    8. Life Without Warning
    9. Money For The Weekend
    10. Bonfires
    Alberta Cross
    $17.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Bigger and Blackerer Bigger and Blackerer Quick View

    $24.99
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    Bigger and Blackerer

    Limited Edition Vinyl LP + DVD


    Bigger and Blackerer was taped during two shows, back-to-back on the same evening in Boston, MA. Only by watching the DVD will you learn of Daivid Cross unique relationship with the deaf community, share his canny insights into the editorial machinations behind the Bible, and marvel at how well a bald, middle aged white guy can fill out a pair of jeans. Yet one must listen to the LP in order to hear about gastro-intestinal misadventures with his dog Ollie Red Sox, or sing along with The Sultans Revenge, the swinging, Vegas-style opening number composed by Cross and his good friend Mark Rivers (author of the theme to Mr. Show).


    Bigger and Blackerer is David Cross third album, preceded by Its Not Funny (2004) and Shut Up You Fucking Baby! (2002). The latter was actually nominated for a Grammy Award. Cross was also the first comedian signed to Sub Pop Records, paving the way for Eugene Mirman, Flight of the Conchords, and dozens of other hopeful comics.


    During his illustrious career, David Cross has played recurring roles on the TV programs Arrested Development and The Colbert Report, and won an Emmy Award for his contributions to The Ben Stiller Show. He has also starred in such films as Waiting for Guffman, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, the Bob Dylan fantasy Im Not There (in which he portrayed Allen Ginsberg), and Kung Fu Panda. He is currently working on the UK show The Increasingly Poor Decisions of Todd Margaret (broadcast on IFC in the USA).

    1. Opening Song (The Sultans Revenge)
    2. If You Care
    3. That One Show About Drugs and Stuff
    4. Me and Drugs
    5. Black Stuff
    6. ...Or Worse
    7. Where We Are Now Back in Sept. '09
    8. Silly Religious Crazies
    9. Really Silly Religious Crazies. I Mean, Double, Triple Crazy!
    10. Random Goofabouts
    11. I Can't Get Beer in Me...
    12. Lesson Learned
    David Cross
    $24.99
    Limited Edition Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Seven Nation Army / Good To Me (Awaiting Repress) Seven Nation Army / Good To Me (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $6.99
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    Seven Nation Army / Good To Me (Awaiting Repress)

    One of four black vinyl pressings of The White Stripes' biggest Elephant-era hits, audio remastered and artwork tidied up. This single also features the non-album b-side ''Good to Me,'' a cover by Brendan Benson and Jason Falkner. Housed in ''soft touch aqueous coating'' sleeves (yes, really), these are the best feeling 7''s that are missing from your collection and they feel like a cross between rubber and lambskin. It's nice.


    ''Seven Nation Army'' b/w ''Good To Me'' (written by Brendan Benson and Jason Falkner, originally released on Benson's 2002 album Lapulco.)

    A Seven Nation Army
    B Good To Me
    The White Stripes
    $6.99
    7 Vinyl Single AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • Pieces Of Africa Pieces Of Africa Quick View

    $29.99
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    Pieces Of Africa

    This "potent new brew of folk influences, Minimalism, and European forms by eight black, brown, and white African composers," as Time described it, became a cross-cultural and commercial landmark: the first album to top both the Classical and World Music Billboard charts. This record now comes to vinyl for the first time on 2x140gm LPs, pressed at Record Industry.
    LP 1
    1. Mai Nozipo (Mother Nozipo)
    2. Saade (I'm Happy)
    3. Tilliboyo (Sunset)
    4. Ekitundu Ekisooka (First Movement)
    5. Escalay (Waterwheel)


    LP 2
    1. Wawshishijay (Our Beginning)
    2. Kutambarara ( Spreading)
    3. I. White Man Sleeps
    4. II. White Man Sleeps
    5. III. White Man Sleeps
    6. IV. White Man Sleeps
    7. V. White Man Sleeps

    Kronos Quartet
    $29.99
    140 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Fits & Starts Fits & Starts Quick View

    $20.99
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    Fits & Starts


    LP Packaging Features Custom Adhesive Wrap & 16 Page Booklet


    For the tenth volume of FRKWYS, composer,
    percussionist and sound designer david Van
    tieghem alongside ten younger artists from
    across the avant spectrum become a bulletin
    of Fits & Starts.


    In July of 2012, RVNG Intl. was invited to participate in Bulletin Boards, a group
    exhibition at Venus over manhattan curated by White Columns' gallery director matthew
    Higgs. An extension of an ongoing project which resides in the entrance of White
    Columns' downtown New York gallery, Bulletin Boards featured 24 artists/entities, each
    given a new bulletin board as an inspirational starting point.


    In 1981, David Van Tieghem produced the experimental music video Ear To The
    Ground. The film features Van Tieghem "playing" downtown New York City, a world
    in which Van Tieghem established his rhythmic roots as a member of the love of life
    orchestra, a frequent collaborator with laurie anderson, and a player on steve reich's Music
    For 18 Musicians, robert ashley's Perfect Lives (Private Parts) / Perfect Lives and david Byrne
    and Brian eno's My Life in the Bush With Ghosts among other seminal recordings including
    his own.


    In Ear To The Ground, all city surfaces become communications-or bulletins-under
    Van Tieghem's twiddling, thwacking and thumping thumbs. Partially inspired by this and
    by our blank but physically limited canvas space, Van Tieghem agreed to take part in
    a sequence of improvised performances and creative editing to become part of our
    FRKWYS series.


    We also invited ten younger musicians to post objects to the board. A cross section of
    present day New York artists were represented by way of sam Hillmer as diamond terrifier
    (with the aid of max alper), Future shuttle, Georgia, roberto Carlos lange as Helado negro,
    darren Ho, eli keszler, Hiro kone and megafortress, alongside the regionally sympathetic
    Blanche Blanche Blanche and maxmillion dunbar.


    In place of business cards, broadsheets, and flyers, the objects/communications
    contributed were broken toasters, firecrackers, 2x4s, thunder drums and customized
    electronics, each intended as a percussive device. On opening night, the bulletin board,
    disguised as assemblage, welcomed David's dialogue.


    In the spirit of Ear To The Ground's infinite conversation, Van Tieghem returned to
    Venus Over Manhattan to "play" the bulletin board without an audience. The process
    of Van Tieghem discovering and responding to the objects/bulletins again was multitracked in high definition.


    These recordings were then presented to the ten contributing musicians for further
    translation, "remix" and interpretation. For the final sequence, the unique pieces were
    delivered to Van Tieghem to edit and embellish as the sound collages presented as Fits
    & Starts across two album length sides of our tenth volume in the FRKWYS series.

    1. Slippery Slope
    2. Cooler Heads Prevail
    David Van Tieghem x Ten
    $20.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Broken People Broken People Quick View

    $18.99
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    Broken People

    American music is a mile-wide river that beckons black and white, urban and rural, dreamer and doer alike to launch their vessels. All the streams of style and genre flow into it; its tributaries are blues and jazz, mountain and folk, rock, soul and R&B.


    The release of the debut album by Muddy Magnolias, Broken People, marks the launch of a great new vessel onto that waterway. The album showcases a confluence of style and sound as colorful as it is unlikely, steeped in that river of influence, yet bracingly fresh.


    With Broken People, Jessy Wilson and Kallie North take us on an 11-song journey with its origins in two widely divergent backgrounds that came together in a friendship and creative partnership with world-changing resonance.


    North was raised in southeast Texas and began singing with her family and studying piano at an early age. She grew to love rich vocal harmonies singing in church choirs and listening to artists like the Carpenters, Alison Krauss, James Taylor and the Eagles. By her early teens, she was singing lead parts in church and in musical theater productions at her high school. Her palette grew when a friend turned her on to the Grateful Dead, and after high school she spent every spare moment in the clubs of Austin, absorbing everything from alt-country and jam bands to New Orleans funk. She met her husband at a concert and moved with him to his native Mississippi. There, on their isolated farm, she had her awakening, starting a career as a photographer, capturing the spirited, deep history of the Mississippi Delta.


    "To me, the Delta is the most overlooked and mysterious place," she says. "It was the birthplace of America's music, and all the legends were influenced by everything that came out of it. I went on this personal exploration to learn about the Delta blues and the region's history. I picked up a camera and started taking pictures, blogging about what I was experiencing, and I tapped into all the creative energy lying dormant inside me." When her husband gave her a guitar, she began spending her days on the porch of their farm learning how to connect her first chords. From there, the songs began pouring out and she knew she had to find a way to get to Nashville and write songs professionally.


    Wilson, raised in Brooklyn, was in love with music from her earliest days. She was singing before she could talk, and was 5 when her mother recognized her passion for music. "I would cry because I couldn't hit the high notes in Whitney Houston and Mariah Carey songs," she says. Influenced by greats from Aretha and Smokey Robinson to Lauryn Hill, Mary J. Blige and The Notorious B.I.G., she began auditioning in the highly competitive New York entertainment scene and was working professionally in musical theater by the age of 10. Her mother took her to nightclubs where she experienced a variety of live performances. She attended New York's top performing arts schools, including La Guardia High School, the "Fame" school, where she discovered her love for gospel music and took part in the gospel chorus for four years. She worked at Cafe Wha? in Greenwich Village, making $500 a weekend while still in high school.


    She sang backup for Alicia Keys in her teens, then worked four years with John Legend, and through him with legends like will.i.am, Kanye West, Raphael Saadiq and Babyface. Legend mentored her in songwriting and recording before she began writing songs on her own for American Idol winner Fantasia Barrino and others. Inspired by her evolving love of songwriting, she too moved to Nashville, looking for a wider creative palette. There, while meeting with then-BMI executive Clay Bradley, her eye settled on a photograph of "a rundown juke joint piano" in his office.


    "I want to meet whoever took that photo," she said. The photographer was North-it had been taken during her creative awakening in Mississippi-and the subsequent meeting led quickly to collaboration and an epic friendship.


    "The first day we wrote together," says North, "there wasn't much thought that we were blending genres and worlds. That never came up. It was just natural. She had never written a country song and I was writing them every day. We sat down to write one but when we listened back it was a country R&B song. And we decided to become songwriting partners." Before long, they had their first cut as collaborators, and they were off and running.


    "The spirit of the Muddy Magnolias existed from the moment we met," says Wilson, "but we didn't know we were the Muddy Magnolias yet." North was toying with the idea of a solo career; Wilson had aspirations of making history as an African-American female songwriter in Nashville. Their new friendship was a game-changer.


    "We spent a whole year writing, trying to understand what our message was when we combined our stories," says Wilson. Then one day over afternoon wine at Burger Up, their favorite hangout in the 12 South section of Nashville, both admitted to be being at a crossroads. "The next thing you know," says North, "Jessy said, 'What if we made a record together?' It was like all of our dreams in one."


    "We went back to that same office on Music Row where I saw the photograph," says Wilson, "and sat down side by side in Clay's office and said, 'We've got something to tell you. We're going to make an album together.'" Bradley believed enough to sign on as their manager. They held three days of band auditions and found four best friends who had been playing together since college, primarily doing jazz. The fit was perfect, providing just the right sonic backdrop for their soulful approach and high-energy delivery.


    As they continued to write and perform, opening for the likes of The Zac Brown Band and Gary Clark, Jr., they put together a project that crosses genres effortlessly, showcasing two voices that soar together in a blending of cultures as electrifying as if Janis Joplin and Tina Turner, or Whitney Houston and Lee Ann Womack had joined forces.


    Broken People combines poetic imagery and vocal passion, with the musicianship and production of Motown or Muscle Shoals by way of the raw honesty of Sun Records. Of course it deals with love, longed for and unleashed, in songs like "I Need A Man," "Why Don't You Stay" and "Devil's Teeth," but the album soars as it reaches for bigger themes, dealing with the need for hope in "Take Me Home," for love on a societal scale in "Shine On" and "Brother What Happened," and hope for the future in "Got It Goin' On." With "Leave It To The Sky," the two, joined by John Legend on vocals and piano, make a powerful case for spiritual solutions, and few songs in the modern lexicon are as steeped in present-day reality as the gospel- and R&B-tinged title track.


    "Ultimately," says North, "this album is a result of an unlikely friendship and is a testament to what can happen when you diversify your relationships."


    "It's about getting out of your comfort zone and being rewarded with a great friendship," adds Wilson. "We've both felt the power of that."


    "Our path is so much better and our lives are so much richer because of it," says North, "and we want to bring people along on this journey."


    "We want to see what society would be like if we all reached out in ways we normally wouldn't," adds Wilson.


    And that is the magic and the message. The music of Muddy Magnolias, live and on record, comes from a place where the Mississippi meets the A-Train by way of Nashville. Whether yours is the back porch or the front stoop, Spanish moss or window box garden, dusty country lane or crowded subway car, rural honky-tonk or uptown club, this is music that beckons. Muddy Magnolias are collaboration without boundaries, musical healing in a landscape of the heart, and all of us who treasure creative energy, honest art and the possibilities of love and unity, are better for their arrival.

    1. Broken People
    2. Brother, What Happened?
    3. Got It Goin' On
    4. Why Don't You Stay
    5. Take Me Home
    6. Shine On!
    7. It Ain't Easy
    8. I Need A Man
    9. Devil's Teeth
    10. Train
    11. Leave It To The Sky (feat. John Legend)
    Muddy Magnolias
    $18.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The London Sessions The London Sessions Quick View

    $24.99
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    The London Sessions

    Mary J. Blige has once again confounded expectations and ventured into new musical territory by crossing the Atlantic to collaborate with some of this
    decade's most celebrated UK musical talent - including Disclosure, Eg White, Emile SandÉ, Jimmy Napes, Naughty Boy, SAM ROMANS and Sam Smith
    - and recorded a new studio album, The London Sessions. This extraordinary new collection will be released on Capitol Records.
    1. Therapy
    2. Doubt
    3. Not Loving You
    4. When You're Gone
    5. Right Now
    6. My Loving
    7. Long Hard Look
    8. Whole Damn Year
    9. Nobody But You
    10. Pick Me Up
    11. Follow
    12. Worth My Time

    Mary J. Blige
    $24.99
    Vinyl LP -2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Resonance Live In Basel Switzerland Volume 2 Resonance Live In Basel Switzerland Volume 2 Quick View

    $34.99
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    Resonance Live In Basel Switzerland Volume 2


    Limited Edition Double 180-Gram White Vinyl Pressing Of 2010 Live Album


    Volume 2 of 2. Recorded live in Basel, Switzerland on May 4, 2010, Resonance features the original line-up of the legendary prog rock supergroup Asia in concert during their Omega tour. This is an older but no less adept Asia -- grounded by vocalist/bassist John Wetton's still powerful vocal chops -- performing a cross-section of their ambitious songs that mix a hard rock intensity and classical virtuosity with a catchy, melodic songcraft. The band's 2010 studio album, Omega, was the second to feature the original line-up of Wetton, guitarist Steve Howe, keyboardist Geoff Downes, and drummer Carl Palmer since the group shifted personnel in 1983. As such, Resonance features a mix of newer songs off Omega, as well as the band's previous 2008 reunion album, Phoenix.

    LP 1
    1. Finger On The Trigger
    2. Time Again
    3. An Extraordinary Life
    4. End Of The World


    LP 2
    1. The Heat Goes On (inc. drum solo)
    2. Sole Survivor
    3. Go
    4. Heat Of The Moment

    Asia
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Killer Road Killer Road Quick View

    $29.99
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    Killer Road


    Double LP With Gatefold Sleeve And 16-Page Booklet


    LP 1 Is Black Vinyl, LP 2 Is White Colored Vinyl


    A shimmering ambient tone, an electronic underlay to the lulling chatter of
    crickets, makes way for the unmistakable voice of Patti Smith, quietly intoning,
    ominously, "The killer road is waiting for you / like a finger, pointing in the night."


    Behind the music and concept of Killer Road is international trio Soundwalk
    Collective - Stephan Crasneanscki, Simone Merli, and Kamran Sadeghi - who,
    alongside Patti Smith's daughter, Jesse Paris, conceived an immersive exploration
    of the tragic death of Christa PÄffgen. Better known as Nico, the Velvet
    Underground chanteuse and solo pioneer, PÄffgen died while riding her bike on
    the island of Ibiza in the summer of 1988. Ironically, she'd recently got her health
    back, after fifteen years of heroin addiction. It was Nico's body's reaction to its
    new sobriety, and the fact she was cycling at the hottest time of the day, on the
    hottest day of the year, that was to prove her undoing.


    In the years before she died, Nico had not neglected her creative muse, writing
    poetry that would never be published, or heard, until now, in the form of the
    opening title track, "Killer Road." The tracks that follow are eight interpretations
    of Nico lyrics, predominantly taken from classic albums such as Desertshore and
    Drama of Exile, arranged by fellow poet and kindred spirit Patti Smith.


    The roots of Killer Road lie in a fortuitous meeting on an airplane bound for New
    York. One passenger was Smith; the other was Soundwalk Collective founder
    Crasneanscki. Soundwalk had previously been a collaborative series of walking
    guides to cities that created an idiosyncratic and evocative understanding for the
    listener, before evolving into musical frameworks for field recordings and sight
    specific sound installations and performances using a variety of texts and themes.


    Killer Road was initially a live audio-visual experience, at the French Institute
    Alliance Francaise in New York as part of 2014's Crossing the Line festival. Finally,
    we now have the recorded version, a poignant, profound, imaginative exploration
    and tribute nearly 30 years after that fateful summer's day.

    1. Killer Road
    2. My Heart Is Empty
    3. Evening of Light
    4. Saeta
    5. Secret Side
    6. Fearfully in Danger
    7. I Will Be Seven
    8. The Sphinx
    9. My Only Child
    Soundwalk Collective and Jesse Paris Smith feat. Patti Smith
    $29.99
    Colored Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
  • Miles Davis - A Tribute To Jack Johnson (Awaiting Repress) Miles Davis - A Tribute To Jack Johnson (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $34.99
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    Miles Davis - A Tribute To Jack Johnson (Awaiting Repress)

    Audiophile Reference Sonics: Mobile Fidelity LP Presents Lean, Stripped-Back, and Open Sound With Startling Immediacy and Realism


    Soundtrack Merges Electric Fusion, Slashing Rock, and Aggressive Funk Via Astounding Lineup: Guitarist John McLaughlin and Trumpeter Davis Turn In Blistering Performances


    Powerhouse 1971 Album the Greatest Jazz-Rock Record Ever Made


    The album cover to Trust speaks volumes: Elvis Costello, bathed in shadows, his eyes nervously peering out from behind his sunglasses, his face conveying a combination of edgy noir purpose and guilt-ridden anxiety. Indeed, the tension-rich songs within largely convey the opposite meanings of the record's title, with the British icon musing on what lies beyond arrogant youth and immediate success with a jaundiced, scarred perspective informed by his country's political climate and his own experiences.


    Miles Davis' A Tribune to Jack Johnson is the best jazz-record ever made. Equally inspired by the leader's desire to assemble the "greatest rock and roll band you have ever heard" as well as his adoration of Johnson, Davis created a hard-hitting set that spills over with excitement, intensity, majesty, and power. Bridging the electric fusion he'd pursued on earlier efforts with a funkier, dirtier rhythmic approach, Davis zeroes in on concepts of spontaneity, freedom, and identity seldom achieved in the studio. Mobile Fidelity's sterling reissue brings it all to fore with unsurpassed realism.


    Mastered from the original master tapes and pressed at RTI, this collectable audiophile vinyl version of A Tribute to Jack Johnson joins the ranks of eleven other essential Davis sets given supreme sonic and packaging treatment by Mobile Fidelity. The most prominent difference longtime fans will notice is how much more aggressive and immediate the music sounds, aspects central to the composer's desires. Amazing degrees of instrumental separation and imaging allow you to focus on singular musicians and the roles they play.


    Indeed, utilizing wah-wah and distortion, guitarist John McLaughlin comes on here with a nasty edge, slashing style, and vicious streak that allows A Tribute to Jack Johnson finally cross the divide between rock and jazz. Davis puts both feet in the former camp and permanently erasing any gap. In addition to highlighting McLaughlin's ripping performances, Mobile Fidelity's 180g LP showcases the headliner's white-hot trumpet solos like never before. Bristling with exuberance, Davis' high-register passages explode with authority and commanding presence. Around him, a barrage of urgent backbeats, knifing riffs, and three-dimension bass lines emerge amidst an ink-black background.


    This title is not eligible for discount.

    1. Right Off
    2. Yesternow
    Miles Davis
    $34.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • Edendale (Discontinued) Edendale (Discontinued) Quick View

    $17.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Edendale (Discontinued)

    BigBang, Norways Greatest Live Band, have made Los Angeles their new home and have been criss-crossing the country playing intimate gigs and generating interest including from The Raconteurs Jack White and from Rolling Stone Magazines editor David Fricke: Led by singer-guitarist Oystein Greni, BigBang lit the power-pop chime and songwriting of Big Star and late-'80s R.E.M. with the power blues dynamics of Stevie Ray Vaughans Double Trouble.


    The new record has strong ties to BigBangs adopted home in California. Frontman Øystein Greni explains: The area of Los Angeles today known as Echo Park/Silverlake used to be called Edendale around the time when the silent movie industry took off. Charlie Chaplins studio, now a storage place, is on my block, and Walt Disneys first film studio was across the street from the local Trader Joes. In Europe we tend to romanticize things and people from the past; here its all about moving on to the next project. Ironically, as much as I wanted to get away from the stale museum-like atmosphere of Europe, I get here and start focusing on LAs fascinating past!


    Edendale was recorded in Los Angeles at the legendary Sound City Studios (Nirvana, Fleetwood Mac, Johnny Cash, Metallica), with an impressive list of collaborators. Producers: Øystein Greni (Bigbang) and Greg Richling (Wallflowers, Black Flag), Technician/mixer: Bryan Cook (Queens of the Stone Age, Raconteurs, The Bird and The Bee), Mastered by: Gavin Lurssen (Robert Plant/Alison Krauss, Tom Waits, Elvis Costello)

    1. Play Louder
    2. Call Me
    3. Swedish Television
    4. Isabel
    5. Freeway Flowers
    6. Bag Of Leaves
    7. To The Max
    8. Head Over Heels
    9. Now Is Not A Good Time
    10. One Step At A Time


    Bonus Tracks:


    11. Something Special
    12. Falling
    13. Wild Bird (Live)

    Bigbang
    $17.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Gratitude Gratitude Quick View

    $44.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Gratitude

    180 Gram Translucent Blue Colored Vinyl With Gatefold Cover


    Mastered Impeccably By Joe Reagoso


    Manufactured At R.T.I.


    During the 1970s, a new brand of pop music was born - one that was steeped in African and African-American styles - particularly jazz and R&B but appealed to a broader cross-section of the listening public. As founder and leader of the band Earth, Wind & Fire, Maurice White not only embraced but also helped bring about this evolution of pop, which bridged the gap that has often separated the musical tastes of black and white America. It certainly was successful, as EWF combined high-caliber musicianship, wide-ranging musical genre eclecticism, and '70s multicultural spiritualism. "I wanted to do something that hadn't been done before," Maurice explains. "Although we were basically jazz musicians, we played soul, funk, gospel, blues, jazz, rock and dance music which somehow ended up becoming pop. We were coming out of a decade of experimentation, mind expansion and cosmic awareness. I wanted our music to convey messages of universal love and harmony without force-feeding listeners' spiritual content."Maurice was born December 19, 1941, in Memphis, TN. He was immersed in a rich musical culture that spanned the boundaries between jazz, gospel, R&B, blues and early rock. All of these styles played a role in the development of Maurice's musical identity. At age six, he began singing in his church's gospel choir but soon his interest turned to percussion. He began working gigs as a drummer while still in high school. His first professional performance was with Booker T. Jones, who eventually achieved stardom as Booker T and the MGs.After graduating high school, Maurice moved to the Windy City to continue his musical education at the prestigious Chicago Conservatory Of Music. He continued picking up drumming jobs on the side, which eventually lead to a steady spot as a studio percussionist with the legendary Chicago label, Chess Records. At Chess, Maurice had the privilege of playing with such greats as Etta James, Fontella Bass, Billy Stewart, Willie Dixon, Sonny Stitt and Ramsey Lewis, whose trio he joined in 1967. He spent nearly three years as part of the Ramsey Lewis Trio. "Ramsey helped shape my musical vision beyond just the music," Maurice explains. "I learned about performance and staging." Maurice also learned about the African thumb piano, or Kalimba, an instrument whose sound would become central to much of his work over the years.In 1969, Maurice left the Ramsey Lewis Trio and joined two friends in Chicago, Wade Flemons and Don Whitehead, as a songwriting team composing songs and commercials in the Chicago area. The three friends got a recording contract with Capitol and called themselves the "Salty Peppers," and had a marginal hit in the Mid-western area called "La La Time." That band featured Maurice on vocals, percussion and Kalimba along with keyboardists/vocalists Wade Flemons and Don Whitehead.


    After relocating to Los Angeles and signing a new contract with Warner Bros., Maurice simultaneously made what may have been the smartest move of his young career. He changed the band's name to Earth, Wind & Fire (after the three elements in his astrological chart). The new name also captured Maurice's spiritual approach to music - one that transcended categories and appealed to multiple artistic principals, including composition, musicianship, production, and performance. In addition to White, Flemons and Whitehead, Maurice recruited Michael Beal on guitar, Leslie Drayton, Chester Washington and Alex Thomas on horns, Sherry Scott on vocals, percussionist Phillard Williams and his younger brother Verdine on bass.


    Earth, Wind & Fire recorded two albums for Warner Brothers: the self-titled 1970 album Earth, Wind And Fire and the 1971 album The Need Of Love. A single from this album, "I Think About Lovin' You," provided EWF with their first Top 40 R&B hit. Also in 1971, the group performed the soundtrack to the Melvin Van Peebles film 'Sweet Sweetback's Baadasssss Song'.


    In 1972, White dissolved the line-up (except he and brother Verdine White) and added Jessica Cleaves (vocals - formerly of the R&B group The Friends of Distinction), Ronnie Laws (flute, saxophone), Roland Bautista (guitar), Larry Dunn (keyboard), Ralph Johnson (percussion) and Philip Bailey (vocals, formerly of Friends & Love). Maurice became disillusioned with Warner Brothers, which had signed the group primarily as a jazz act. Maurice, in contrast, was more interested in combining elements of jazz, rock, and soul into an evolving form of fusion, a truly universal sound.


    A performance at New York's Rockefeller Center introduced EWF to Clive Davis, then President of Columbia Records. Davis loved what he saw and bought their contract from Warner Bros. With Columbia Records, debuting with the 1972 album Last Days And Time, the group slowly began to build a reputation for innovative recordings and exciting, live shows, complete with feats of magic (floating pianos, spinning drum kits, vanishing artists) engineered by Doug Henning and his then-unknown assistant David Copperfield. Their first gold album, Head To The Sky, peaked at number 27 pop in the summer of 1973, yielding a smooth tangy cover of "Evil" and the title track single. The first platinum EWF album, Open Our Eyes, whose title track was a remake of the classic originally recorded by Savoy Records group the Gospel Clefs, included "Mighty Mighty" (number four R&B) and "Kalimba Story" (number six R&B).


    Maurice once again shared a label roster with Ramsey Lewis, whose Columbia debut Sun Goddess, was issued in December 1974. The radio-aired title track was released as a single under the name Ramsey Lewis and Earth, Wind & Fire. It went to number 20 R&B in early 1975. The Sun Goddess album went gold, hitting number 12 pop in early 1975. Maurice had also played on Lewis' other high-charting album, Wade In The Water; the title track single peaked at number three R&B in the summer of 1966.


    The inspiration for "Shining Star" (one of EW&F's most beloved singles) was gleaned from thoughts Maurice had during a walk under the star-filled skies that surrounded the mountains around Caribou Ranch, CO a popular recording site and retreat during the '70s. The track was originally included in the 'That's The Way Of The World' movie that starred Harvey Keitel and was produced by Sig Shore (Superfly). "Shining Star" glittered at number one R&B for two weeks and hit number one pop in early 1975. It was included on their 1975 multi-platinum album That's The Way Of The World that held the number one pop spot for three weeks in Spring 1975 and earned them their first Grammy Award. The title track single made it to number five R&B in summer of 1975. It also yielded the classic ballad "Reasons," an extremely popular radio-aired album track.


    The multi-platinum album Gratitude held the number one pop album spot for three weeks in late 1975. On the album was "Singasong" (gold, number one R&B for two weeks, number five pop), the Skip Scarborough ballad "Can't Hide Love" (number 11 R&B), and the popular radio-aired album tracks "Celebrate," "Gratitude," and the live version of "Reasons." In 1976, Maurice decided he wanted to record a spiritual album. The multi-platinum album Spirit parked at number two pop for two weeks in fall of 1976 and boasted the gold, number one R&B single "Getaway" and "Saturday Nite." Spirit is remembered as one of EWF's best albums and sadly for also being the last project of Producer Charles Stepney. He died May 17, 1976, in Chicago, IL, at the age of 45. Charles was a former Chess Records arranger/producer/session musician/multi-instrumentalist/songwriter and Maurice's main collaborator on his EWF projects. The multi-platinum album All 'N All peaked at number three pop in late 1977, won three Grammy's, and had arrangements by Chicago soul mainstay Tom Tom Washington and Eumir Deodato. The singles were "Serpentine Fire" (number one R&B for seven weeks) and "Fantasy." The group's horn section, the legendary Phenix Horns (Don Myrick on saxophone, Louis Satterfield on trombone, Rahmlee Michael Davis and Michael Harris on trumpets) became an integral part of the Earth, Wind & Fire sound.


    During this time, Maurice produced several artists such as The Emotions (1976's Flowers and 1977's Rejoice which included the number one R&B/pop hit "Best Of My Love") and Deniece Williams (1976's This Is Niecy which included the Top Ten R&B hit "Free"). In the late seventies, in association with Columbia Records, Maurice also launched a record label, ARC.


    The multi-platinum greatest-hits set The Best Of Earth, Wind & Fire, Vol. I included a cover of the Beatles' "Got To Get You Into My Life" went to number one R&B and number nine pop in Summer 1978. The group performed the song in the 1978 Bee Gees/Peter Frampton movie 'Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band'. Another single, "September," made it to number one R&B, number eight pop in early 1978. On the flip side was the enchanting popular radio-aired album track "Love's Holiday" from All 'N All.


    Their live performances were stellar as well. Sellout crowds were spellbound by the band's bombastic performances. Their performances blasted a cosmic wave of peace, love and other happy vibrations to audiences using a combination of eye-popping costumes, lights, pyrotechnics and plain old good music. Sometimes they even threw in magic illusions. Earth, Wind & Fire's message was one of universal harmony, in both musical and cultural senses. "We live in a negative society," Maurice told Newsweek. "Most people can't see beauty and love. I see our music as medicine."


    The multi-platinum album I Am hit number three pop in Summer 1979 on the strength of the million-selling single "Boogie Wonderland" with The Emotions (number two R&B for four weeks, number six pop) and the phenomenal gold ballad "After The Love Has Gone," written by David Foster, Jay Graydon and Bill Champlin that stayed at number two R&B/pop for two weeks. Their Faces album peaked at number ten pop in late 1980 and was boosted to gold by the singles "Let Me Talk" (number eight R&B), "You" (number ten R&B), and "And Love Goes On."


    The million-selling funked-up "Let's Groove," co-written by The Emotions' Wanda Vaughn and her husband Wayne Vaughn, was the track that re-energized EWF's career, parking at number one R&B for eight weeks and number three pop, causing their Raise! album to go platinum (hitting number five pop in late 1981). Their next gold album Powerlight made it to number 12 pop in spring 1983 and included the Top Ten R&B single and Grammy-nominated "Fall In Love With Me." Their 1983 Electric Universe album stalled at number 40 pop, breaking the band's string of gold, platinum and multi-platinum albums.


    In 1983, Maurice decided he and the band needed a break. During this hiatus, Maurice recorded his self-titled solo album Maurice White and produced various artists including Neal Diamond, Barbra Streisand and Jennifer Holliday. Reuniting with the band in 1987, EWF released the album Touch The World and scored yet another number one R&B single, "System of Survival" and embarked on a corresponding nine-month world tour. This was followed by the 1988 release The Best Of Earth, Wind & Fire Vol. II.


    In 1990 the group released the album Heritage. Two years later, Earth, Wind & Fire released The Eternal Dance; a 55-track boxed set retrospective of the band's entire history. The appearance of such a project after a prolonged period of relative inactivity signaled to many listeners that the band was calling it quits but that did not turn out to be case. In 1993, EWF released the album, Millennium that included the Grammy-nominated "Sunday Morning" and "Spend The Night."


    Earth, Wind & Fire kept recording and in 1996 released Avatar and Greatest Hits Live; followed by 1997's In The Name Of Love; 2002's That's The Way Of The World: Alive In '75; Live In Rio which was recorded during their 1979 "I Am World Tour;" 2003's The Promise, which included the Grammy-nominated "Hold Me" and 2005's Illumination, which included the Grammy-nominated "Show Me The Way."


    In 2000, the nine-piece '70s edition of Earth, Wind & Fire reunited for one night only in honor of their induction into The Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame. In 2001, Eagle Rock Entertainment released the documentary 'Earth, Wind & Fire: Shining Stars', which contains rarely seen historic video footage along with in-depth interviews with the band members.


    Even though Maurice is no longer a part of the touring group, he remains the band's heart and soul from behind the scenes as composer and producer. Maurice reflects, "I wanted to create a library of music that would stand the test of time. 'Cosmic Consciousness' is the key component of our work. Expanding awareness and uplifting spirits is so important in this day. People are looking for more. I hope our music can give them some encouragement and peace."

    LP 1
    1. Introduction

    2. Africano/ Power Medley

    3. Yearnin' Learnin'

    4. Devotion

    5. Sun Goddess
    6. Reasons

    7. Sing A Message To You


    LP 2
    1. Shining Star

    2. New World Symphony
    3. Sunshine

    4. Singasong

    5. Gratitude

    6. Celebrate

    7. Can't Hide Love

    Earth, Wind & Fire
    $44.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Buy Now
  • Greatest Hits (Awaiting Repress) Greatest Hits (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $42.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Greatest Hits (Awaiting Repress)

    180 Gram Translucent Gold Colored Vinyl With Gatefold Cover


    During the 1970s, a new brand of pop music was born - one that was steeped in African and African-American styles - particularly jazz and R&B but appealed to a broader cross-section of the listening public. As founder and leader of the band Earth, Wind & Fire, Maurice White not only embraced but also helped bring about this evolution of pop, which bridged the gap that has often separated the musical tastes of black and white America. It certainly was successful, as EWF combined high-caliber musicianship, wide-ranging musical genre eclecticism, and '70s multicultural spiritualism. "I wanted to do something that hadn't been done before," Maurice explains. "Although we were basically jazz musicians, we played soul, funk, gospel, blues, jazz, rock and dance music which somehow ended up becoming pop. We were coming out of a decade of experimentation, mind expansion and cosmic awareness. I wanted our music to convey messages of universal love and harmony without force-feeding listeners' spiritual content."Maurice was born December 19, 1941, in Memphis, TN. He was immersed in a rich musical culture that spanned the boundaries between jazz, gospel, R&B, blues and early rock. All of these styles played a role in the development of Maurice's musical identity. At age six, he began singing in his church's gospel choir but soon his interest turned to percussion. He began working gigs as a drummer while still in high school. His first professional performance was with Booker T. Jones, who eventually achieved stardom as Booker T and the MGs.After graduating high school, Maurice moved to the Windy City to continue his musical education at the prestigious Chicago Conservatory Of Music. He continued picking up drumming jobs on the side, which eventually lead to a steady spot as a studio percussionist with the legendary Chicago label, Chess Records. At Chess, Maurice had the privilege of playing with such greats as Etta James, Fontella Bass, Billy Stewart, Willie Dixon, Sonny Stitt and Ramsey Lewis, whose trio he joined in 1967. He spent nearly three years as part of the Ramsey Lewis Trio. "Ramsey helped shape my musical vision beyond just the music," Maurice explains. "I learned about performance and staging." Maurice also learned about the African thumb piano, or Kalimba, an instrument whose sound would become central to much of his work over the years.In 1969, Maurice left the Ramsey Lewis Trio and joined two friends in Chicago, Wade Flemons and Don Whitehead, as a songwriting team composing songs and commercials in the Chicago area. The three friends got a recording contract with Capitol and called themselves the "Salty Peppers," and had a marginal hit in the Midwestern area called "La La Time." That band featured Maurice on vocals, percussion and Kalimba along with keyboardists/vocalists Wade Flemons and Don Whitehead.


    After relocating to Los Angeles and signing a new contract with Warner Bros., Maurice simultaneously made what may have been the smartest move of his young career. He changed the band's name to Earth, Wind & Fire (after the three elements in his astrological chart). The new name also captured Maurice's spiritual approach to music - one that transcended categories and appealed to multiple artistic principals, including composition, musicianship, production, and performance. In addition to White, Flemons and Whitehead, Maurice recruited Michael Beal on guitar, Leslie Drayton, Chester Washington and Alex Thomas on horns, Sherry Scott on vocals, percussionist Phillard Williams and his younger brother Verdine on bass.


    Earth, Wind & Fire recorded two albums for Warner Brothers: the self-titled 1970 album Earth, Wind And Fire and the 1971 album The Need Of Love. A single from this album, "I Think About Lovin' You," provided EWF with their first Top 40 R&B hit. Also in 1971, the group performed the soundtrack to the Melvin Van Peebles film 'Sweet Sweetback's Baadasssss Song'.


    In 1972, White dissolved the line-up (except he and brother Verdine White) and added Jessica Cleaves (vocals - formerly of the R&B group The Friends of Distinction), Ronnie Laws (flute, saxophone), Roland Bautista (guitar), Larry Dunn (keyboard), Ralph Johnson (percussion) and Philip Bailey (vocals, formerly of Friends & Love). Maurice became disillusioned with Warner Brothers, which had signed the group primarily as a jazz act. Maurice, in contrast, was more interested in combining elements of jazz, rock, and soul into an evolving form of fusion, a truly universal sound.


    A performance at New York's Rockefeller Center introduced EWF to Clive Davis, then President of Columbia Records. Davis loved what he saw and bought their contract from Warner Bros. With Columbia Records, debuting with the 1972 album Last Days And Time, the group slowly began to build a reputation for innovative recordings and exciting, live shows, complete with feats of magic (floating pianos, spinning drum kits, vanishing artists) engineered by Doug Henning and his then-unknown assistant David Copperfield. Their first gold album, Head To The Sky, peaked at number 27 pop in the summer of 1973, yielding a smooth tangy cover of "Evil" and the title track single. The first platinum EWF album, Open Our Eyes, whose title track was a remake of the classic originally recorded by Savoy Records group the Gospel Clefs, included "Mighty Mighty" (number four R&B) and "Kalimba Story" (number six R&B).


    Maurice once again shared a label roster with Ramsey Lewis, whose Columbia debut Sun Goddess, was issued in December 1974. The radio-aired title track was released as a single under the name Ramsey Lewis and Earth, Wind & Fire. It went to number 20 R&B in early 1975. The Sun Goddess album went gold, hitting number 12 pop in early 1975. Maurice had also played on Lewis' other high-charting album, Wade In The Water; the title track single peaked at number three R&B in the summer of 1966.


    The inspiration for "Shining Star" (one of EW&F's most beloved singles) was gleaned from thoughts Maurice had during a walk under the star-filled skies that surrounded the mountains around Caribou Ranch, CO a popular recording site and retreat during the '70s. The track was originally included in the 'That's The Way Of The World' movie that starred Harvey Keitel and was produced by Sig Shore (Superfly). "Shining Star" glittered at number one R&B for two weeks and hit number one pop in early 1975. It was included on their 1975 multi-platinum album That's The Way Of The World that held the number one pop spot for three weeks in Spring 1975 and earned them their first Grammy Award. The title track single made it to number five R&B in summer of 1975. It also yielded the classic ballad "Reasons," an extremely popular radio-aired album track.


    The multi-platinum album Gratitude held the number one pop album spot for three weeks in late 1975. On the album was "Singasong" (gold, number one R&B for two weeks, number five pop), the Skip Scarborough ballad "Can't Hide Love" (number 11 R&B), and the popular radio-aired album tracks "Celebrate," "Gratitude," and the live version of "Reasons." In 1976, Maurice decided he wanted to record a spiritual album. The multi-platinum album Spirit parked at number two pop for two weeks in fall of 1976 and boasted the gold, number one R&B single "Getaway" and "Saturday Nite." Spirit is remembered as one of EWF's best albums and sadly for also being the last project of Producer Charles Stepney. He died May 17, 1976, in Chicago, IL, at the age of 45. Charles was a former Chess Records arranger/producer/session musician/multi-instrumentalist/songwriter and Maurice's main collaborator on his EWF projects. The multi-platinum album All 'N All peaked at number three pop in late 1977, won three Grammy's, and had arrangements by Chicago soul mainstay Tom Tom Washington and Eumir Deodato. The singles were "Serpentine Fire" (number one R&B for seven weeks) and "Fantasy." The group's horn section, the legendary Phenix Horns (Don Myrick on saxophone, Louis Satterfield on trombone, Rahmlee Michael Davis and Michael Harris on trumpets) became an integral part of the Earth, Wind & Fire sound.


    During this time, Maurice produced several artists such as The Emotions (1976's Flowers and 1977's Rejoice which included the number one R&B/pop hit "Best Of My Love") and Deniece Williams (1976's This Is Niecy which included the Top Ten R&B hit "Free"). In the late seventies, in association with Columbia Records, Maurice also launched a record label, ARC.


    The multi-platinum greatest-hits set The Best Of Earth, Wind & Fire, Vol. I included a cover of the Beatles' "Got To Get You Into My Life" went to number one R&B and number nine pop in Summer 1978. The group performed the song in the 1978 Bee Gees/Peter Frampton movie 'Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band'. Another single, "September," made it to number one R&B, number eight pop in early 1978. On the flip side was the enchanting popular radio-aired album track "Love's Holiday" from All 'N All.


    Their live performances were stellar as well. Sellout crowds were spellbound by the band's bombastic performances. Their performances blasted a cosmic wave of peace, love and other happy vibrations to audiences using a combination of eye-popping costumes, lights, pyrotechnics and plain old good music. Sometimes they even threw in magic illusions. Earth, Wind & Fire's message was one of universal harmony, in both musical and cultural senses. "We live in a negative society," Maurice told Newsweek. "Most people can't see beauty and love. I see our music as medicine."


    The multi-platinum album I Am hit number three pop in Summer 1979 on the strength of the million-selling single "Boogie Wonderland" with The Emotions (number two R&B for four weeks, number six pop) and the phenomenal gold ballad "After The Love Has Gone," written by David Foster, Jay Graydon and Bill Champlin that stayed at number two R&B/pop for two weeks. Their Faces album peaked at number ten pop in late 1980 and was boosted to gold by the singles "Let Me Talk" (number eight R&B), "You" (number ten R&B), and "And Love Goes On."


    The million-selling funked-up "Let's Groove," co-written by The Emotions' Wanda Vaughn and her husband Wayne Vaughn, was the track that re-energized EWF's career, parking at number one R&B for eight weeks and number three pop, causing their Raise! album to go platinum (hitting number five pop in late 1981). Their next gold album Powerlight made it to number 12 pop in spring 1983 and included the Top Ten R&B single and Grammy-nominated "Fall In Love With Me." Their 1983 Electric Universe album stalled at number 40 pop, breaking the band's string of gold, platinum and multi-platinum albums.


    In 1983, Maurice decided he and the band needed a break. During this hiatus, Maurice recorded his self-titled solo album Maurice White and produced various artists including Neal Diamond, Barbra Streisand and Jennifer Holliday. Reuniting with the band in 1987, EWF released the album Touch The World and scored yet another number one R&B single, "System of Survival" and embarked on a corresponding nine-month world tour. This was followed by the 1988 release The Best Of Earth, Wind & Fire Vol. II.


    In 1990 the group released the album Heritage. Two years later, Earth, Wind & Fire released The Eternal Dance; a 55-track boxed set retrospective of the band's entire history. The appearance of such a project after a prolonged period of relative inactivity signaled to many listeners that the band was calling it quits but that did not turn out to be case. In 1993, EWF released the album, Millennium that included the Grammy-nominated "Sunday Morning" and "Spend The Night."


    Earth, Wind & Fire kept recording and in 1996 released Avatar and Greatest Hits Live; followed by 1997's In The Name Of Love; 2002's That's The Way Of The World: Alive In '75; Live In Rio which was recorded during their 1979 "I Am World Tour;" 2003's The Promise, which included the Grammy-nominated "Hold Me" and 2005's Illumination, which included the Grammy-nominated "Show Me The Way."


    In 2000, the nine-piece '70s edition of Earth, Wind & Fire reunited for one night only in honor of their induction into The Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame. In 2001, Eagle Rock Entertainment released the documentary 'Earth, Wind & Fire: Shining Stars', which contains rarely seen historic video footage along with in-depth interviews with the band members.


    Even though Maurice is no longer a part of the touring group, he remains the band's heart and soul from behind the scenes as composer and producer. Maurice reflects, "I wanted to create a library of music that would stand the test of time. 'Cosmic Consciousness' is the key component of our work. Expanding awareness and uplifting spirits is so important in this day. People are looking for more. I hope our music can give them some encouragement and peace."

    LP 1
    1. Shining Star

    2. That's The Way Of The World
    3. September

    4. Can't Hide Love

    5. Got To Get You Into My Life
    6. Sing A Song

    7. Gratitude

    8. Serpentine Fire

    9. Fantasy


    LP 2
    1. Kalimba Story
    2. Mighty Mighty

    3. Reasons

    4. Saturday Nite

    5. Let's Groove

    6. Boogie Wonderland ( with The Emotions)
    7. After The Love Has Gone

    8. Getaway

    Earth, Wind & Fire
    $42.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • Let Them Fall In Love Let Them Fall In Love Quick View

    $19.99
    Buy Now
    x

    Let Them Fall In Love

    The best-selling and most-awarded female gospel artist of all time, CeCe Winans has long since cemented her status as one of the most accomplished and celebrated women in modern music history. It'd be easy to look back and rest on such illustrious laurels, but Winans has always had her eyes fixed firmly on the future, so it should come as little surprise that she jumped at the opportunity when her son, Alvin Love III, proposed she record the generation-bridging new album 'Let Them Fall In Love.' Her first in nearly a decade, the record finds Winans returning to the studio with gusto, working for roughly three years to craft her most confident, adventurous collection yet.


    Recording and performing as both a solo artist and as a duo with her brother BeBe, CeCe has influenced a generation of gospel and secular vocalists over the course of her astonishing career. Her mantel today holds a staggering 10 GRAMMY Awards, 20 Dove Awards, and 7 Stellar Awards. She's been inducted into the Gospel Music Hall of Fame, the Hollywood Walk of Fame, and the Nashville Music City Walk of Fame, in addition to being named a Trailblazer of Soul by BMI and garnering multiple NAACP Image Awards, Soul Train Awards, Essence Awards, and more. She's sold in excess of 5 million albums in the US, topping the Gospel charts repeatedly while crossing over with smashes like "Count On Me," her stunning duet with Whitney Houston from the multi-platinum 'Waiting To Exhale' soundtrack, which sold 2 million copies and cracked the Top 10 on the Pop, R&B, and Adult Contemporary charts. She touched millions more with inspirational performances everywhere from Oprah to The White House, and even showed off her acting chops on television series like '7th Heaven' and 'Doc.'


    While collaborating with family is nothing new for Winans, the recording sessions for 'Let Them Fall In Love" found the Detroit native working for the very first time with her son in the producer's chair.


    "Alvin shared with me a vision that he had of a record that was bold and a little different than anything I'd ever done before," remembers Winans. "When I heard the songs he'd been writing, I got so excited. He has great ears and great style and a unique way of writing and thinking things through. It made it extra special that two generations of family were able to come together on this record."


    Bringing together generations is Winans' specialty, and she drew inspiration for the album from her extensive work with the young men and women who attend the church she and her husband founded in Nashville.


    "It's really important to me to share where I've been and to encourage young people to understand that they can go even further," reflects Winans. "I wanted to make an album that ties us together, something that young people would be able to learn from and be inspired by."


    Written primarily by Alvin and co-produced by Alvin along with Winans' long-time collaborator Tommy Sims (Garth Brooks, Michael McDonald, Bonnie Raitt), 'Let Them Fall In Love' was mixed by Dae Bennett (Tony Bennett, Amy Whinehouse, Olivia Newton John) and Jimmy Douglass (Pharrell Williams, Micheal Buble). The album, recorded both in Nashville and New York City, finds Winans more confident than ever before, merging eras and genres in a glorious blend of past and present that simultaneously recalls the heyday of Motown and still sounds undeniably modern. Big band horns meet strings from the Nashville String Machine as Winans' soaring voice hits new heights, fueled in part by the encouragement and motivation of her son.


    "Alvin was hard on me in the studio," remembers Winans. "He'd really work me during the songs, and I knew that was a good thing because it meant he was pressing me to get the best performances possible. Now I listen back and I know he was right. It was so important to get the right interpretation of each song."


    Winans is able to inhabit each song on the record so fully in part because she's lived their stories. She describes album opener "He's Never Failed Me Yet" as "my personal testimony," "Run To Him" as her frequent act of refuge, and "Marvelous" as a musical embodiment of the black church. On "Hey Devil!," she's joined by fellow gospel powerhouses The Clark Sisters for a playful rebuke of temptation, while "Peace From God" is a prayer for light in an increasingly dark world, and "Lowly" is a lesson about pride and humility aimed at the young men who might need it most. Winans' eclectic ability shines through on the pedal steel country waltz of "Why Me," a song she discovered when she was invited to perform it live with its writer, Kris Kristofferson.


    "I ended up getting sick and I couldn't perform it with him at the show, but my son heard it and knew it would be perfect for the album," explains Winans. "It's so different for me in this whole new field of country music, but it spoke to my heart and I felt like it was written just for me."


    On the album's other cover, "Dancing in The Spirit," Winans is joined by Hezekiah Walker and his choir for a jubilant celebration, while "Never Have To Be Alone" finds her taking a far more somber approach, singing to the young members of her congregation. It's the album's closer and title track, though, that seems to light Winans up more than any other.


    "That was the first song for this album and I knew right away that I wanted the record to be named 'Let Them Fall In Love,'" she explains. "I told my son that it had to be the heartbeat of the album. There's a lot of different styles and a lot of strong messages on there, but all of them are to bring us to this point. It's why I came back and recorded another album, to express my heart and my desire that people young and old can listen and fall in love with the higher power, fall in love with love, and fall in love with faith and joy and peace."

    1. He's Never Failed Me Yet
    2. Run To Him
    3. Hey Devil! (feat. The Clark Sisters)
    4. Peace From God
    5. Why Me
    6. Lowly
    7. Never Have To Be Alone
    8. Dancing In The Spirit (feat. Hezekiah Walker's Love Fellowship Choir)
    9. Marvelous
    10. Let Them Fall In Love
    Cece Winans
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Dalmak Dalmak Quick View

    $25.99
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    Dalmak

    180g LP Audiophile Pressing Includes Art Poster


    Fourth Album From Modern Contemporary / Instrumental Rock Ensemble Led By Percussionist Bruce Cawdron (Godspeed You! Black Emperor) & Cellest Rebecca Food (Silver Mr Zion, Saltland, Set Fire To Flames)


    Partly Recorded In Istanbul With Four Turkish Guest Players


    Mixed By Jace Lasek (The Besbard Lakes, Wolf Parade, Suuns)


    When Esmerine surfaced with La Lechuza in 2011, the album signaled many things: the band's first new recordings in six years, an expanded line-up, and a song cycle inspired by and dedicated to the life and untimely death of a dear friend and fellow musician. What wasn't immediately clear was whether this acclaimed record would mark the opening of a new chapter for the band, or stand alone as a singular work of eulogy and homage driven by emotion and circumstance.


    Esmerine's new album Dalmak emphatically confirms that the group has indeed continued writing, exploring and collaborating - definitively extending its horizons in this new iteration of the band's trajectory. Bruce Cawdron (marimba) resigned from his seat as drummer for Godspeed You! Black Emperor in 2012, allowing him to focus more fully on Esmerine alongside co-founder and cellist Rebecca Foon (Silver Mt. Zion, Set Fire To Flames); the two
    principals also recruited percussionist Jamie Thompson (Unicorns, Islands) and multi-instrumentalist Brian Sanderson as full-time members to solidify the group as a writing and performing quartet.


    European tours in 2011-2012 brought Esmerine to Istanbul, where the group's enthusiastic reception led to an invitation for an artist residency in the city. Dalmak is the fruit of that visit: the majority of the album was recorded in Istanbul, where compositions by the band's four Canadian musicians were augmented by a number of Turkish guest players.


    Dalmak is a Turkish verb with many connotations: to be absorbed in, to dive into, to bathe in, to contemplate, to plummet. As a title for Esmerine's new album, "dalmak refers in a literal sense to immersion in the culture and music of Istanbul but also appropriately evokes the range of music that emerged from this immersion: a collection of songs that shift between meditative pulsing and enveloping restraint to headlong flights into rhythm and groove. With Dalmak, Esmerine presents some of its most richly minimal and intimate music alongside what is surely its most explosive, energized and ornate. The album is a tour-de-force of cross-cultural music-making, emotive but unsentimental,
    deeply textured and detailed but never precious or pedantic, superbly guided throughout by a balance of DIY rock, new folk and modern classical/contemporary sensibilities.


    With initial recording by Barkin Engin and Metin Bozkurt in Istanbul, Esmerine laid down the
    live bed tracks for the up-tempo rhythmic songs at the album's core: Lost River Blues, Barn Board Fire and Translator's Clos. Marimba, cello, drums, tenor banjo, bass and trumpet are joined by bendir, darbuka, erbane, meh, barama, saz and electric guitar from local players for these centerpiece tracks, where extended melodic themes and short solos are passed around and woven through staccato grooves and polyrhythmic vamps in deeply
    satisfying fashion. The sessions continued back in MontrÉal at Breakglass, where Cawdron and Foon tracked the more studied cello and marimba songs Learning To Crawl and White Pine, and where the album's gorgeously saturated warmth, depth and propulsive grit was achieved courtesy of Breakglass head engineer Jace Lasek (The Besnard Lakes,
    Wolf Parade, Suuns) and Ian Ilavsky, who mixed the album alongside Rebecca and Bruce.


    We're thrilled to present this new album from Esmerine and to document the continued evolution of Bruce Cawdron and Rebecca Foon, two musicians with whom Constellation has enjoyed a decade-long relationship spanning multiple projects. Dalmak is a distinct and exciting highlight in their diverse and adventurous discographies.

    1. Learning To Crawl
    2. Lost River Blues I
    3. Lost River Blues II
    4. Barn Board Fire
    5. Hayale Dalmak
    6. Translator's Clos I
    7. Translator's Clos II
    8. White Pine
    9. Yavri Yavri
    Esmerine
    $25.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Satanist (Awaiting Repress) The Satanist (Awaiting Repress) Quick View

    $44.99
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    The Satanist (Awaiting Repress)


    Exclusive Bonus Track


    Double Gatefold Jacket


    24-Page LP Sized Book


    "The Satanist is magic. It's dangerous. It's adventurous, and it's organic," states Nergal, the driving force behind Behemoth since their inception in 1991, and brief exposure to the band's tenth album more than supports this statement. While instantly recognizable as the work of the Polish blackened death quartet it takes their sound in previously unimagined and riveting directions. A writhing, densely layered, brutally violent and sinister record, it is quite unlike anything ever unleashed within the canon of heavy music. As such it demands attention, offering ever greater sonic and emotional depths with every listen. "You may hear the title and think it's very primitive and one-dimensional, and yes it is, but when you look beyond that it's as primitive as it is complex and multidimensional, and that applies to everything about the record."


    It has been a rocky road leading to the realization of the album. Having dropped 2009s Evangelion to almost universal critical acclaim they saw it top the chart in their native country and dramatically expand their following around the world, and playing some of the best shows of their lives the band seemed truly unstoppable. But, in August 2010 Nergal was diagnosed with leukemia, stopping them in their tracks. Forced to abandon their ongoing tour in support of Evangelion Nergal was hospitalized, and both he and Behemoth faced an uncertain future. With the search for a bone marrow donor ultimately successful Nergal underwent a transplant, leaving the hospital after six months and beginning down the long road to rehabilitation. "I knew I was pretty much fucked and there was a battle to be won, and I had no fucking idea if it was going to take six months or twelve months or maybe four years, because with cancer you never know. I learned from being in the hospital that there are things in life that you can control and things that you can't control. The sooner you realize which is which it's going to make your life so much easier, and since then I started to focus on the right things. I could be determined, I could have discipline, I could have faith, but everything else is not under my control, and it really was a case of just crossing fingers for the best possible outcome. I was fortunate enough that that recovery period was relatively fast, and that I was really strong and very determined to get back into shape made a real difference."


    Rather than immediately getting down to working on a new album, the band - also comprised of drummer Inferno, bassist Orion, and guitarist Seth - set out to complete the abandoned touring cycle for Evangelion, hitting the road for the aptly titled Phoenix Rising Tour. Wanting to prove they were stronger than ever the first show was the only time doubts crept into Nergal's mind. "I was a fucking wreck, and I almost didn't make it to the end of the set. The venue was really smoky, and that was stuffing my nose and my lungs, and physically I felt that I couldn't pull it off. I did, but I was close to passing out on stage. I was literally shocked by this, I remember thinking while we were playing shit, what if I can't do this anymore? I'm just a human being after all. Going into the next show I had no sleep because of all the nerves and anxiety, but it was fucking amazing. With every following show I would get stronger and stronger and grow more confident, and aware of the fact that yes, we will do this."


    Having returned to full force the band were ready to once more move forward, and they began work on what would become The Satanist. While many bands might be concerned with how to follow up a record as devastatingly powerful - and successful - as Evangelion Nergal faced no such doubts. "I don't race myself, and I don't need to prove anything to anyone. Evangelion was a very important record to us, and yes, it was very successful too, but in making The Satanist it wasn't a point of beating that. The point was to do what was organic, and make a natural and honest and sincere album, and that's it. Now the record is finished I like to think of it as an album that is just so different that you can't really compare it to our previous works, which is the best outcome I could hope for." One thing is inarguable, and that is the record is the most sonically rich and complex released under the Behemoth name. With layer upon layer of sound it has great sonic density, but there is intricacy to this, and nothing is forced or contrived. "I don't have a kid but I think the process of raising one is comparable: you invest a lot of your energy and effort and wisdom and money and you educate them, but there's never a one hundred percent guarantee he's going to become a lawyer and not a serial killer. It's the same story with the records - we supply the elements but we just don't know how these elements mixed together are going to come out, and I think it's fortunate that we don't have one hundred percent control over it! It makes for something special."


    The title of the record itself is undeniable in its power, and Nergal sees it as capturing the primal wisdom that the band have always tried to maintain. "To me it's not pretentious at all. It's very straight up, very sincere, and a devastating, conquering statement. There's no compromise or bullshit or gimmicks. What I love about it is that it just speaks for itself. On one hand it's a very black and white title: The Satanist is like a fucking nail through the hand of Jesus Christ, period. No more, no less. But then again, as with everything else you put a hundred people together and ask them what the name The Satanist means to them and you're going to hear a hundred different opinions, which they can then discuss and fight over." Likewise, Nergal views the lyrical content of the record as similarly open to interpretation, encouraging this. "There's a lot of symbolism and reflections and impressions in there, and it's using millions of metaphors to express a certain very sinister and very captivating atmosphere, but there are no answers. People always like to have a deeper insight into what we do, but that's not what we want to give with this record. The way I see it is that between us we can make a huge fucking pyre and set the world on fire, but what we're doing is just giving you the matches, giving you the spark, what you want to do with it is up to you. Personally, if I sat down with the lyrics in front of me I too would probably come up with a lot of different interpretations and concepts, it's a never ending process, and that's exciting to me."


    Twenty-three years and ten albums into their career, that Behemoth is still in the ascendant is a statement to their commitment, determination and capacity for writing such powerful music. If ever a band was to go out on a high The Satanist would make for one hell of a swan song, but don't expect them to disappear any time soon. "I remember before we we had a record deal I was having a conversation with Baal, the band's original drummer, and we said okay, if one day we manage to record an album and put it out how cool would it be to split up right after that? It would be one record and no more, and there was something about that that had an appeal, but y'know what, it doesn't work like that for individuals like myself. Hunger has always driven me through life, and I can never sit in one place and relax for too long because I have the need to explore this whole universe in every possible way. Now, over two decades later it's the same story. I can tell you I have no problems with finishing my career after this record. Just say the title itself: The Satanist. How the fuck am I gonna beat that title? It sounds like the ultimate definition of our art - but then again, I remember that conversation with Baal, and I know it doesn't work like that, so I know there will probably be other incarnations of our artistic identity, one way or another. All I know is I love being here and now, and I just want to underline that I couldn't be more proud and happy with my own music. It really drives me through the day, and now I just want to sit back and hear any and all opinions of it."

    1. Blow Your Trumpets Gabriel
    2. Furor Divinus
    3. Messe Noire
    4. Ora Pro Nobis Lucifer
    5. Amen
    6. The Satanist
    7. Ben Sahar
    8. In the Absence ov Light
    9. O Father O Satan O Sun!
    Behemoth
    $44.99
    Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed AWAITING REPRESS Buy Now
  • The Grinding Wheel The Grinding Wheel Quick View

    $31.99
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    The Grinding Wheel

    Armed with pioneering pure metal proposals like "Death Rider," "The Beast Within," and "Raise The Dead" already in 1982, New Jersey's Overkill were a rock-solid part of the first clutch of bands forging in fire this music known as thrash metal. Along with Metallica, Exodus, Slayer and cross-town doppelgangers Anthrax, D.D. Verni and Bobby "Blitz" Ellsworth were helping to create a new form of metal that is still as vibrant today as when the band's first album, Feel the Fire was issued by Jonny Zazula's Megaforce Records back in the spring of '85.


    Witness Overkill's 18th album of blistering yet precise and thought-provoking thrash magic, The Grinding Wheel, a record on which thrash's ultimate team of five machined parts shows up and executes to perfection with a little punk thrown in for bad measure.


    But a life dedicated to metal can be a grind, hence the title of this sparks-a-flyin' record. "It just makes sense for us," reflects D.D. "If you've been making metal for almost 40 years like we have, it can be a grind. But we also liked the old school metal idea of referencing "Grinder," the Judas Priest song, which suits the album because it has classic metal parts on it as well as the thrash parts. There's a blue collar feel to that title too, and that's how we approach Overkill. The guitar case is basically a lunchbox and we go to work."


    "One of the principles-if not characteristics-of the band is that it's been grinding through for long, long periods of time," seconds Blitz. "Decades to this point. And not necessarily with huge gains with regards to popularity, but for sure, with huge gains in as much as we can earn a living while doing the kind of music that we want. And so the idea of grinding it out over the decades became a device for writing the album, whether it would be riffs or lyrics."


    Despite, as D.D. says, the album's classic metal references (such as Black Sabbath in "Come Heavy" and Iron Maiden in "The Long Road" and the epic and cinematic title track), when the band gets up a full head of thrash steam, they bring to the party a trademark punk aesthetic, forged from trips on the train to CBGB and Max's Kansas City to witness original punk legends such as The Damned and The Dead Boys.


    "Punk is huge for Overkill," confirms Verni. "And it's something we very specifically brought back to the band in a sort of second wave, beginning with Ironbound in 2010 and then The Electric Age and White Devil Armory. I know from my end, it came from talking to the band and talking to fans. We had some of those metal records in the middle of our career where I wasn't paying enough attention to the punk rock vibe of the band. But just before we started writing Ironbound, I was very specific about getting back into that mentality, picking up on that energy again. You're not going to hear any Green Day or Ramones in us, but the energy and the attitude of punk mixed with the New York vibe that's what Overkill is, compared to other bands. You don't hear any of that in Megadeth; you don't hear any of that in Slayer. It's more specific to what we brought to the thrash world."


    Central to that premise is the incendiary "Let's All Go to Hades" which is sure to become a pit favourite. "This one was a hell of a lot of fun," says Blitz. "You know, I've always written abstractly. I'm not the guy who says, 'I'm going to crush your skull into dust.' I like writing more so from an abstract point of view, putting a slew of thoughts together that create one idea, like a puzzle more than a specific black or white. And when I looked at all these lyrics when I was done, I said, oh my God, I'm 57 and I finally matured (laughs). Oh, this is gross! (laughs). But I do like tongue-in-cheek songs like 'Hades,' where it says, sort of let's all go to the Bataclan, you know, stand arm in arm and sing 'Killed by Death.' I kind of tied in not long ago events, specifically what happened in Paris, with losing Lemmy. After that, I'm on a train from Paris to Istanbul on the Orient express, which actually existed (laughs)-it actually went from Paris to Istanbul. So that one is mapped out a bit more."


    Adds D.D., "It's not a 'smash your face into the wall' kind of song. It got a little bit of fun in it. I know any time you talk to the really heavy thrash guys, they go, 'Oh, no, no, no-no fun allowed. It's got to be heavy and brutal every second.' But that song definitely has a bit of fun in it. And we've done that before, with things like 'Old School' and 'Fuck You.' We're not afraid to do a bit of that sometimes."


    Another favorite lyric of Blitz', which is set to a non-nonsense old school thrash track, is "Our Finest Hour." "It's about the recognition of sameness," explains Ellsworth. "I think people are comfortable when they recognize themselves in someone else. And 'Our Finest Hour' is kind of a detailed journey through that concept. It's like, 'Come on over here; I recognize you.' I've always been a firm believer in the fact that it's great to accomplish things on your own, but people are always stronger as a group-that's the basic outline of that tune."


    At the other end of the spectrum from punk is a song like "The Long Road." D.D. readily agrees that there was a Maiden influence as part of this one's crafting. "Oh yeah, for sure. The opening, along with a little section in there with the vocals, definitely feels like New Wave of British Heavy Metal.


    More evident in the band's panoramic classic metal passages, but even articulated here on "Our Finest Hour," is another storied Overkill trademark, the definition one gets in the band's bass parts. Combine this with the Mensa-like percussive wizardry of Ron Lipnicki (laid bare for all to hear at headphone levels through the smack of his gravity-defying double bass work), and The Grinding Wheel emerges as a record with a remarkable rhythm section foundation from which to rise.


    "I've had that kind of sound now for a long time," says Verni. "There are a lot of bass players that say, 'I want to feel the bass.' And it's like, I just couldn't give a shit about feeling the bass. To me that's low-end. Guitars have low-end, kick drums have low-end, bass has low-end-I want to hear the bass, not feel it. So from a long time ago, that's what I would be doing on my EQ. I would be tweaking and turning knobs until not only could I feel it, but I can hear it separate from the guitars. And as a result, the bass just got more and more aggressive. I'm not a finesse player at all, on a bass. I bang the shit out of it, and I kind of do that to get away from the guitars and give it its own identity, its own sound, its own thing, so the bass has its own personality, not just serving as a foundation for the guitars."


    This affects the writing as well, says Blitz. "Don't forget, D.D. is a guitarist. He's been playing guitar probably more so than bass in his spare time since the late '80s. This is a guy who has two-and-a-half decades of six strings under his belt. So we get more of a unique perspective; it gives this band its unique qualities when it comes to songwriting. Because it's a guy holding six strings who's got plenty of experience playing those six strings, but thinking from the other perspective. So you get a punchier thing; you don't get a lot of fluff. When you compare Overkill to some of our contemporaries, there you get a guitar player writing guitar-based songs. D.D. is writing, first and foremost, from a rhythm perspective, and that's what drives the songs. Add Dave Linsk to the picture, once there's a ten-note riff written, then you have the best of both worlds."


    Which brings us back to the aforementioned machine-like efficiency of the five guys that comprise Overkill, this idea that there are no weak links within this particular classic five-piece with two guitars lineup of metal warriors.


    "That's the strength of the band," explains Blitz. "Dave is really the one that holds the guitar reigns in this band. He's a writer at his core. You know, he's one of these guys who brushes his teeth and hears a rhythm the way the bristles are hitting the enamel (laughs). He's that dude. 'Oh wait a second, I have another idea.' He has an idea a minute, and if that's the case, some of them are going to be great. So he holds the reins. When it comes to Derek, he's more the opinionated thought later on. And so when it runs through the machine, being D.D. and myself, then Dave, Derek comes in and can change that song. It's always kind of good to have, let's say, a chief and some Indians. And it depends who's wearing the chief hat at any particular time. But I think at the end of the day, when you're looking for a clean perspective, it goes through Derek-that's usually what his contribution is, more of a finalization."


    And Ron? "He's one-of-a-kind," says Verni. "He's a great drummer. I've worked with him for a bunch of records now. This is our fifth record together and so I really understand how he plays at this point. Working with him in the studio is just a pleasure, because he's so right on it."


    After heaping all manner of praise on legendary producer Andy Sneap (brought on only for mix given Verni's proven acumen at the task), D.D. further clarifies the reason Overkill can be at the top of their game 18 records into their distinguished run.


    "I have a studio and I did most of it at my place; I've been doing it that way for a while now. And now the group of guys we have in the band has been pretty consistent for a while. So we have a nice mix; everybody kind of knows their role, and is good at their role. Everybody brings a little something to the party. And I think that's why these last couple of records people ask, 'How is it that your records get better after 25 years?' And I think part of it is that everybody has a role in the band, everybody is comfortable with their role, and they're really good at the part they have. So the records actually get better. It's like having a team, instead of having a whole bunch of chiefs and no Indians.


    But a proven people's band like Overkill-a more personable bunch you'll never meet-fully recognizes that part of the band's success in being able to survive and thrive with the grind is due to the allegiance of the band's considerable worldwide fan base.


    "For sure," says Blitz. "One of the things with regard to grind, with regard to four decades of Overkill, it's good to be here, but it's obviously earned, not just by us but by the people that support this in general. The fact is that it's not just us grinding it out. I mean, maybe it is when it comes to the studio and writing and recording songs, from that selfish perspective. But the reason something exists for decades is based on group effort. Like we had talked about earlier with 'Our Finest Hour,' people are stronger together. In that light, this band is, let's say, not just our project, but it's a project by and for all those who hold it dear."

    1. Mean, Green, Killing Machine
    2. Goddamn Trouble
    3. Our Finest Hour
    4. Shine On
    5. The Long Road
    6. Let's All Go To Hades
    7. Come Heavy
    8. Red, White And Blue
    9. The Wheel
    10. The Grinding Wheel
    11. Emerald
    Overkill
    $31.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Grinding Wheel (Yellow And Black Vinyl) The Grinding Wheel (Yellow And Black Vinyl) Quick View

    $31.99
    Buy Now
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    The Grinding Wheel (Yellow And Black Vinyl)

    Pressed On Yellow And Black Vinyl

    Armed with pioneering pure metal proposals like Death Rider, The Beast Within, and Raise The Dead already in 1982, New Jersey's Overkill were a rock-solid part of the first clutch of bands forging in fire this music known as thrash metal. Along with Metallica, Exodus, Slayer and cross-town doppelgangers Anthrax, D.D. Verni and Bobby Blitz Ellsworth were helping to create a new form of metal that is still as vibrant today as when the band's first album, Feel the Fire was issued by Jonny Zazula's Megaforce Records back in the spring of '85.

    Witness Overkill's 18th album of blistering yet precise and thought-provoking thrash magic, The Grinding Wheel, a record on which thrash's ultimate team of five machined parts shows up and executes to perfection with a little punk thrown in for bad measure.

    But a life dedicated to metal can be a grind, hence the title of this sparks-a-flyin' record. It just makes sense for us, reflects D.D. If you've been making metal for almost 40 years like we have, it can be a grind. But we also liked the old school metal idea of referencing Grinder, the Judas Priest song, which suits the album because it has classic metal parts on it as well as the thrash parts. There's a blue collar feel to that title too, and that's how we approach Overkill. The guitar case is basically a lunchbox and we go to work.

    One of the principles-if not characteristics-of the band is that it's been grinding through for long, long periods of time, seconds Blitz. Decades to this point. And not necessarily with huge gains with regards to popularity, but for sure, with huge gains in as much as we can earn a living while doing the kind of music that we want. And so the idea of grinding it out over the decades became a device for writing the album, whether it would be riffs or lyrics.

    Despite, as D.D. says, the album's classic metal references (such as Black Sabbath in Come Heavy and Iron Maiden in The Long Road and the epic and cinematic title track), when the band gets up a full head of thrash steam, they bring to the party a trademark punk aesthetic, forged from trips on the train to CBGB and Max's Kansas City to witness original punk legends such as The Damned and The Dead Boys.

    Punk is huge for Overkill, confirms Verni. And it's something we very specifically brought back to the band in a sort of second wave, beginning with Ironbound in 2010 and then The Electric Age and White Devil Armory. I know from my end, it came from talking to the band and talking to fans. We had some of those metal records in the middle of our career where I wasn't paying enough attention to the punk rock vibe of the band. But just before we started writing Ironbound, I was very specific about getting back into that mentality, picking up on that energy again. You're not going to hear any Green Day or Ramones in us, but the energy and the attitude of punk mixed with the New York vibe that's what Overkill is, compared to other bands. You don't hear any of that in Megadeth; you don't hear any of that in Slayer. It's more specific to what we brought to the thrash world.

    Central to that premise is the incendiary Let's All Go to Hades which is sure to become a pit favourite. This one was a hell of a lot of fun, says Blitz. You know, I've always written abstractly. I'm not the guy who says, 'I'm going to crush your skull into dust.' I like writing more so from an abstract point of view, putting a slew of thoughts together that create one idea, like a puzzle more than a specific black or white. And when I looked at all these lyrics when I was done, I said, oh my God, I'm 57 and I finally matured (laughs). Oh, this is gross! (laughs). But I do like tongue-in-cheek songs like 'Hades,' where it says, sort of let's all go to the Bataclan, you know, stand arm in arm and sing 'Killed by Death.' I kind of tied in not long ago events, specifically what happened in Paris, with losing Lemmy. After that, I'm on a train from Paris to Istanbul on the Orient express, which actually existed (laughs)-it actually went from Paris to Istanbul. So that one is mapped out a bit more.

    Adds D.D., It's not a 'smash your face into the wall' kind of song. It got a little bit of fun in it. I know any time you talk to the really heavy thrash guys, they go, 'Oh, no, no, no-no fun allowed. It's got to be heavy and brutal every second.' But that song definitely has a bit of fun in it. And we've done that before, with things like 'Old School' and 'Fuck You.' We're not afraid to do a bit of that sometimes.

    Another favorite lyric of Blitz', which is set to a non-nonsense old school thrash track, is Our Finest Hour. It's about the recognition of sameness, explains Ellsworth. I think people are comfortable when they recognize themselves in someone else. And 'Our Finest Hour' is kind of a detailed journey through that concept. It's like, 'Come on over here; I recognize you.' I've always been a firm believer in the fact that it's great to accomplish things on your own, but people are always stronger as a group-that's the basic outline of that tune.

    At the other end of the spectrum from punk is a song like The Long Road. D.D. readily agrees that there was a Maiden influence as part of this one's crafting. Oh yeah, for sure. The opening, along with a little section in there with the vocals, definitely feels like New Wave of British Heavy Metal.

    More evident in the band's panoramic classic metal passages, but even articulated here on Our Finest Hour, is another storied Overkill trademark, the definition one gets in the band's bass parts. Combine this with the Mensa-like percussive wizardry of Ron Lipnicki (laid bare for all to hear at headphone levels through the smack of his gravity-defying double bass work), and The Grinding Wheel emerges as a record with a remarkable rhythm section foundation from which to rise.

    I've had that kind of sound now for a long time, says Verni. There are a lot of bass players that say, 'I want to feel the bass.' And it's like, I just couldn't give a shit about feeling the bass. To me that's low-end. Guitars have low-end, kick drums have low-end, bass has low-end-I want to hear the bass, not feel it. So from a long time ago, that's what I would be doing on my EQ. I would be tweaking and turning knobs until not only could I feel it, but I can hear it separate from the guitars. And as a result, the bass just got more and more aggressive. I'm not a finesse player at all, on a bass. I bang the shit out of it, and I kind of do that to get away from the guitars and give it its own identity, its own sound, its own thing, so the bass has its own personality, not just serving as a foundation for the guitars.

    This affects the writing as well, says Blitz. Don't forget, D.D. is a guitarist. He's been playing guitar probably more so than bass in his spare time since the late '80s. This is a guy who has two-and-a-half decades of six strings under his belt. So we get more of a unique perspective; it gives this band its unique qualities when it comes to songwriting. Because it's a guy holding six strings who's got plenty of experience playing those six strings, but thinking from the other perspective. So you get a punchier thing; you don't get a lot of fluff. When you compare Overkill to some of our contemporaries, there you get a guitar player writing guitar-based songs. D.D. is writing, first and foremost, from a rhythm perspective, and that's what drives the songs. Add Dave Linsk to the picture, once there's a ten-note riff written, then you have the best of both worlds.

    Which brings us back to the aforementioned machine-like efficiency of the five guys that comprise Overkill, this idea that there are no weak links within this particular classic five-piece with two guitars lineup of metal warriors.

    That's the strength of the band, explains Blitz. Dave is really the one that holds the guitar reigns in this band. He's a writer at his core. You know, he's one of these guys who brushes his teeth and hears a rhythm the way the bristles are hitting the enamel (laughs). He's that dude. 'Oh wait a second, I have another idea.' He has an idea a minute, and if that's the case, some of them are going to be great. So he holds the reins. When it comes to Derek, he's more the opinionated thought later on. And so when it runs through the machine, being D.D. and myself, then Dave, Derek comes in and can change that song. It's always kind of good to have, let's say, a chief and some Indians. And it depends who's wearing the chief hat at any particular time. But I think at the end of the day, when you're looking for a clean perspective, it goes through Derek-that's usually what his contribution is, more of a finalization.

    And Ron? He's one-of-a-kind, says Verni. He's a great drummer. I've worked with him for a bunch of records now. This is our fifth record together and so I really understand how he plays at this point. Working with him in the studio is just a pleasure, because he's so right on it.

    After heaping all manner of praise on legendary producer Andy Sneap (brought on only for mix given Verni's proven acumen at the task), D.D. further clarifies the reason Overkill can be at the top of their game 18 records into their distinguished run.

    I have a studio and I did most of it at my place; I've been doing it that way for a while now. And now the group of guys we have in the band has been pretty consistent for a while. So we have a nice mix; everybody kind of knows their role, and is good at their role. Everybody brings a little something to the party. And I think that's why these last couple of records people ask, 'How is it that your records get better after 25 years?' And I think part of it is that everybody has a role in the band, everybody is comfortable with their role, and they're really good at the part they have. So the records actually get better. It's like having a team, instead of having a whole bunch of chiefs and no Indians.

    But a proven people's band like Overkill-a more personable bunch you'll never meet-fully recognizes that part of the band's success in being able to survive and thrive with the grind is due to the allegiance of the band's considerable worldwide fan base.

    For sure, says Blitz. One of the things with regard to grind, with regard to four decades of Overkill, it's good to be here, but it's obviously earned, not just by us but by the people that support this in general. The fact is that it's not just us grinding it out. I mean, maybe it is when it comes to the studio and writing and recording songs, from that selfish perspective. But the reason something exists for decades is based on group effort. Like we had talked about earlier with 'Our Finest Hour,' people are stronger together. In that light, this band is, let's say, not just our project, but it's a project by and for all those who hold it dear.

    1. Mean, Green, Killing Machine
    2. Goddamn Trouble
    3. Our Finest Hour
    4. Shine On
    5. The Long Road
    6. Let's All Go To Hades
    7. Come Heavy
    8. Red, White And Blue
    9. The Wheel
    10. The Grinding Wheel
    11. Emerald
    Overkill
    $31.99
    Colored Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • What A Way To Die What A Way To Die Quick View

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    What A Way To Die

    The archetype for the '60s-era girl group was etched indelibly into stone, like a commandment: three pretty girls with matching outfits and bouffant hairdos would sing, with musical backing supplied by a bunch of guys standing in the shadows. The Quatro sisters shattered that archetype forever with the Pleasure Seekers, an all-girl teenage rock & roll group who played all the instruments themselves and were fully capable of wiping the stage with any male band that crossed their path.


    The Quatro girls had been brought up in a musically-minded family, nurtured with classical piano and vocal lessons. As Patti recalls, "By 1964, I had been taking guitar lessons, hanging with musicians in the local music scene. We had seen a Beatles concert, and I was quite dazed and focused at the event, watching the audience cry and scream out of control. It was my epiphany moment, and I was determined to start an all-girl band."
    Shortly thereafter, the first lineup of the Pleasure Seekers fell into place with Patti Quatro (lead guitar), Marylou Ball (rhythm guitar), Suzi Quatro (bass), Diane Baker (keyboards), Nan Ball (drums) and vocal duties shared by all. Around the fall of 1965 the girls dared local teen club manager Dave Leone to give them a slot at his popular Hideout Club, claiming they were better than most of the other live bands there. "You're on," responded Leone, "in two weeks. Three songs!"


    The Pleasure Seekers were soon a popular feature at the club, honing their skills alongside the likes of the Rationals, the Amboy Dukes and Bob Seger & the Last Heard. "In the beginning, there was a lot of skepticism," remembers Patti, "especially the first night. The boys crowded the stage, the girlfriends pulled them away with laughter, as if 'Girls playing?! Yeah, right!' It was always satisfying to see them be silenced quickly when we began playing. We grew used to seeing slack jaws open in surprise." Next they were asked by Leone to record and release a single on his Hideout label.


    That March 1966 release is now regarded as the greatest "girl garage" single of the era: "Never Thought You'd Leave Me" b/w "What a Way to Die." "Dave brought lyrics, and we put the songs together quickly," remembers Patti. "We felt very legit in making this record at a small local studio. Nan was the sexy voice on 'Never Thought You'd Leave Me,' and there was lots of laughter as Marylou added the screams on 'What a Way to Die.'" Suzi Quatro remembers the recording as "very important and memorable."


    The Pleasure Seekers were soon in demand in the region, playing teen clubs, parties, colleges and local TV shows. After a series of lineup changes, the band brought in older Quatro sister Arlene (keyboards) and Darline Arnone (drums), the first female drummer sponsored by Slingerland Drums. A short time later, Pami Benford joined-up on guitar and bass (that lineup lasting through most of 1968). "It was a very versatile group," remembers Patti, "with Pami and Suzi sharing bass, and Pami and I sharing lead and rhythm guitars."


    "The gender bias was my hot button," recalls Arlene, "along with confidence in our musical abilities. With women musicians dismissed as a novelty, I delighted in watching the audience go from skepticism/ridicule, to shock/cheers." For Suzi, though, this period was where she learned her craft: "I considered myself a musician, and didn't really think about gender too much." Two tracks recorded in 1967, but unissued at the time, "Elevator Express" and "Gotta Get Away," highlight the band's growing musical maturity since their Hideout debut. "Detroit was the best learning ground in the world for musicians," recalls Suzi, "with an amazing energy and creativity that is in every successful artist that has come out of the city." "We were actually one of the earliest Detroit bands traveling the country," adds Patti. "Everyone wanted this unusual all girl band who rocked an entire Motown revue (changing instruments and singers throughout) and an entire Sgt. Pepper/Magical Mystery Tour revue, as well as covering English bands, acid rock and everything in between."


    Signing up with Associated Booking Corporation, the group began making the transition from local to national act. Producer Dick Corby caught the Pleasure Seekers at Trude Heller's in New York's Greenwich Village and signed them to a Mercury Records deal in early 1968. To keep rein on their finances in NYC, Patti recalls, "We booked Arthur's nightclub for a month, staying at the infamous rock Gorham Hotel, recording by day-playing by night." Also in residence were the Who, the Blues Magoos and an assortment of other bands. "Hitting NYC as young teens, it was exciting, scary, fun-all emotions churning," she continues. "We felt we had hit the big time, going from the tiny local Hideout session to the huge Mercury professional studio facility, complete with session people adding strings and other elements."


    A single pairing "Good Kind of Hurt" and "Light of Love" was released in April 1968, while a third song, "Locked in Your Love," remained in the can. The group then headed out to the Northwest for a lengthy tour. "The Northwest tour was awesome," remembers Patti. "We were billed with Canned Heat, Boyce & Hart and Merilee Rush, and were held over six weeks to tour with Eric Burdon and the Animals. The Mercury single was out, momentum was surging." Both sides of the single were getting airplay, but ultimately it failed to gain any traction. "Really neither song reflected our own sound," admits Patti. "We rearranged 'Light of Love' for live performance, feeling disconnected to the record, yet realizing we had to play ball with the executives to keep us rolling."


    Ultimately Mercury's vision for the Pleasure Seekers clashed rather sharply with the band's vision. "The suits wanted tits and ass," recalls Darline, "wowing Vegas crowds, playing tinkly tunes in lavish costumes." "In that male-dominated music era, we were strictly a novelty, and a high-risk endeavor," adds Patti. "The record executives felt women musicians would fall in love or get pregnant so were not worth investing the time and money. We had to kick down many doors. We were serious musicians, and in it for the right reasons. In the end, we were not happy with a forced direction that Mercury Records had in mind, and ended up leaving the label to rock our music in our own fashion."


    After a memorable 1968 Far East tour, playing for wounded returning American soldiers from Vietnam, the Pleasure Seekers (with new drummer Nancy Rogers) returned to a Detroit that was now, in Patti's words, "exploding with heavier sounds. That sparked us to change direction with new ideas we had been exploring. Arlene left the band and we brought in our youngest sister Nancy (vocals). With Suzi's Joplinesque vocals combined with Nancy's wailing 'female Robert Plant' style, we enjoyed a harder edged, 'double-punch' effect."


    The last four songs on the album, "White Pig Blues," "Brain Confusion," "Where Have You Gone?" and the atmospheric psychedelic mover "Mr. Power," all date from this 1968-69 period when the Pleasure Seekers were playing the Grande Ballroom alongside the MC5, Alice Cooper, the Stooges, the Amboy Dukes and SRC. With this change in musical direction and the departure of Arlene and Pami, the band forged on as Cradle. Suzi Quatro departed for England in 1971, launching a successful solo career. Patti and Nancy continued with Cradle until 1973 when Patti joined another pioneering female rock group, Fanny.


    The Pleasure Seekers reunited recently in April 2012 (minus Suzi) for a well-received show in their hometown, where they were inducted into Detroit's Hall of Fame. "I think all of us Quatro girls are extremely proud of our pioneering days" reflects Patti. "In a renaissance-era of music, we kicked down doors for women to rock heavy. There were key times in our lives of making decisions that may have turned us towards larger fame, but less happiness-depending on your philosophy of such things. The Pleasure Seekers could have been a Las Vegas show act bringing in buckets of money or on Motown, turned very formulaic girlie-soul. But we stayed true to our goals, and I don't think any of us have any regrets of staying our course and playing the music that moved us. It's all been a thrilling ride with great memories."


    - Mike & Anja Stax (Ugly Things magazine)

    1. Intro By DJ The Lord
    2. Gotta Get Away
    3. Never Thought You'd Leave Me
    4. Light Of Love
    5. Good Kind Of Hurt
    6. What A Way To Die
    7. Elevator Express
    8. Locked In Your Love
    9. White Pig Blues
    10. Brain Confusion
    11. Where Have You Gone
    12. Mr. Power
    The Pleasure Seekers
    $24.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
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