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Yeah It'S That Easy

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  • Yeah It's That Easy (Expanded) (Pre-Order) Yeah It's That Easy (Expanded) (Pre-Order) Quick View

    $38.99
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    Yeah It's That Easy (Expanded) (Pre-Order)

    G. Love & Special Sauce is an alternative hip hop band from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. They are known for their unique, sloppy, and laid back blues sound that encompasses classic R&B.


    Yeah, It's That Easy is the third album by G. Love & Special Sauce, originally released in 1997. The album includes collaborations with several other bands and musicians, including All Fellas Band, Philly Cartel, King's Court, and Dr. John.


    The album features two singles; Stepping Stones and I-76.


    This expanded edition of Yeah, It's That Easy is available for the first time and includes 5 hard to find bonus tracks; Ma Mere, All The People, Nadine, Maxin' and Relaxin' and My Mom Can Surf (Live at WPLY).


    The package also includes a 4 page booklet with lyrics, pics and credits.

    LP 1
    1. Stepping Stones
    2. I-76
    3. Lay Down The Law
    4. Slipped Away (The Ballad Of Lauretha Vaird)
    5. You Shall See
    6. Take You There
    7. Willow Tree
    8. Yeah, It's That Easy
    9. Recipe


    LP 2
    1. 200 Years
    2. Making Amends
    3. Pull The Wool
    4. When We Meet Again
    5. Ma Mere
    6. All The People
    7. Nadine
    8. Maxin' And Relaxin'
    9. My Mom Can Surf (Live At Wply)

    G. Love & Special Sauce
    $38.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed PRE-ORDER Buy Now
  • Indoor Living Indoor Living Quick View

    $21.99
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    Indoor Living

    With a lot of Superchunk products, it's easy to think there's a simple message because
    the music is so direct. But on Indoor Living, typically unfussy guitar hooks and
    shout-sung tag lines that beg for an audience to croon along-"Let's burn last
    Sunday"-are just the overarching structure of a record that moons over details:
    "Marquee" drapes a lazy sonic arm over the seat, pulling you in for a story about egos
    twisting apart ("The arc of lights / above your head / is not to be believed").
    "Martinis on the Roof " puts a slightly manic, rueful smile on the loss of a friend, a
    search for that emotion that lurks in a mix of anger and nostalgia: "Well the wasted
    space is mine / Yeah I hardly have the right to sing about it."


    Indoor Living is about domestication: The taming and training of human beings to inhabit each others' lives, during which a certain amount of blood is spilled. But anyone
    can write a break-up record, anyone can color in a broken heart all black. It takes a
    more sophisticated eye to find the light and perfect moments that happen even when
    we wish they didn't, and Indoor Living is a scrapbook of those moments. A request
    for mercy comes across like an in-joke ("We both know that I've got bad knees") in
    "Watery Hands." "European Medicine" is a lively travelog that's by turns amusingly
    fatalistic ("All our wine just froze, so much for your sunny coast") and achingly needy
    ("Hold my hand steady while I write / Look over my shoulder all night"). Even "The
    Popular Music," the record's angriest slice of heartache, has a protagonist that can't
    quite pull off a fully punk rock tantrum: "I'm smashing not washing the china you left
    me to use," but "making mosaics of scenes from the parts of my life that you left me
    to lose."


    Angst is easy, hope is hard. Thinking you're going to die from a broken heart is easy,
    knowing you won't is hard. Adulthood is about forsaking the black and white
    resolutions of youth for a more complicated, and resonant, resilience: From "Burn
    Last Sunday," one of the saddest lines in indie rock: "The branches you thought you'd
    break / Well, they just bend." In music and with people, maturity happens when the
    sharp edges and jangly rhythms of angst and outrage give over to fuller conversations.
    Indoor Living shows that you don't have to lose a single joule of energy in becoming a
    little more self-reflective. You just have to be willing to take it all in.


    Trying to hear Indoor Living the way I heard it sixteen years ago was easier than I
    wanted it to be. Though of course-of course!-I've listened to the record on and
    off in the intervening time, I had forgotten how familiar this record is to me. I had
    forgotten I knew all the words to every song, could anticipate every hesitant drop in
    rhythm and wavering chorus. This record was the soundtrack of being 25 and because
    of that, it does remind me of a really specific time; but that time is not so much the
    late '90s as the turning point between adolescence and adulthood, which happens later
    and later to me every year.


    -Ana Marie Cox, 2013

    1. Unbelievable Things
    2. Burn Last Sunday
    3. Marquee
    4. Watery Hands
    5. Nu Bruises
    6. Every Single Instinct
    7. Song for Marion Brown
    8. The Popular Music
    9. Under Our Feet
    10. European Medicine
    11. Martinis on the Roof
    Superchunk
    $21.99
    180 Gram Audiophile Virgin Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • Stiff Stiff Quick View

    $19.99
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    Stiff

    Three years on from their critically acclaimed "barbeque" record Corsicana Lemonade, White Denim are back with more than just a new album to commemorate. Their sixth record, Stiff - out 25 March 2016 via Downtown/Sony Red - is a return to the Austin quartet's frenetic rock band roots, and is both a jubilant thrill ride and joyous celebration of their past ten years. Heading into the studio with an external producer to oversee a whole album for the first time - and even writing a tune with Cass McCombs ('Thank You') - the band teamed up with the legendary Ethan Johns (Paul McCartney, Laura Marling, The Staves) to produce their first truly live record, one teeming with a cool '70s undertow, tumultuous riffs and a feverish energy that's resulted in arguably some of their biggest and brawniest songs to date.


    With drummer Joshua Block and guitarist Austin Jenkins now pursuing other production ventures, vocalist/guitarist James Petralli and bassist Steve Terebecki spent a long time reassessing exactly what White Denim meant to them. "The big thing for Steve and I was trying to define what made us want to keep going," Petralli explains of the album's early days. "What's our partnership about? What's cool about this? We learnt a lot making D and Corsicana Lemonade. We wanted to take some of those lessons and apply it back to our original mission statement. We were trying to get back to some of the things that made us excited about the band in the first place."


    Opener 'Had 2 Know (Personal)' is the embodiment of that mission statement. Described by Petralli as "a reassertion of our initial intent to make songs that satisfy our urge to play fast", it sets the tone brilliantly for the bulk of Stiff, right from its idiosyncratic, Red Krayola-sampling beginning to its huge, golden era chorus. While it remains distinctively White Denim, there's a reinvigoration permeating through its riffs via new guitarist Jonathan Horne and a beefed-up rhythm section thanks to the work of new drummer Jeffrey Olson. Every single high octane turn - from the tremendously fun 'Ha Ha Ha Ha (Yeah)' to the outrageously shredding 'Holda You (I'm Psycho)' - sounds like a band re-energised and revitalised, resulting in what Petralli describes as a "high heat, high energy, good times record". Having previously sold out Shepherd's Bush Empire and having toured with Tame Impala and Arctic Monkeys, Stiff is full to the brim with songs that sound ready to now lift White Denim to similar heights.


    For the most part, Stiff is an album crammed with adrenaline-fuelled sing-alongs that show off the band's staple technical abilities. But it's also one that sees some new shades that they've developed along the way, too. Citing new wave and the razor-sharp pop punk of Buzzcocks as influences this time round, there's an addictive Elvis Costello circa This Year's Model quality to 'Real Deal Momma', a tune that highlights the band's love for hummable synthesisers and curious, affecting oddities. Then there's the cow bell calm and backing vocals laden brilliance of 'I'm The One (Big Big Fun)', that along with 'Take It Easy (Ever After Lasting Love)' (a song Petralli says "wants to be on a collection of doo wop songs written in 2016") shows a softer and more intricate side to the band while fully emphasising Petralli's vocal excellence.


    Of the artwork - which was created by collagist Eugenia Loli - was inspired and worked from the band's previous album covers and videos as a visual template. Ultimately, it's a fleeting visit to a place the band have been before, with the covers of Workout Holiday and D being collages too. Stiff was even originally stylised 'Stif', which when spelt backwards spells out the title of their second full-length Fits. Then there's 'Mirrored In Reverse', a nod to the Fits track 'Mirrored And Reverse'. "I mean, we're ten!" Petralli says in disbelief while explaining all of the record's throwbacks. "We did think about naming this record Ten and referencing the Pearl Jam cover!"


    Recorded with nothing but equipment that Petralli describes as being "past a certain point in the '70s", he explains that Stiff is an album made "entirely the old way". "It was tracked live to 16-track tape with very little overdubs," he says. "It was very hardcore record making - traditional in every aspect." Recorded with Ethan Johns in Asheville, North Carolina over a twenty-day period, Petralli and the band had an intense but deeply educational time with Johns. "It was really cool. The guy had these stories that were just unbelievable. He started talking about playing with Jimmy Page when he was a kid, and he lived in the studio where The Rolling Stones and The Faces would just hang out. Having Ethan in the room pushing us really made it more of an 'in the moment' and a visual thing. Capturing live performances is what he does really well."


    To make things even more celebratory, there was an extra ten day stint spent with go-to White Denim man Jim Vollentine, who Petralli describes as "my guy, man". He continues: "we've made a lot of records together now. When we left the studio in Asheville with Ethan, we thought we gotta work on this record some more, you know? Though it was really just mixing, which we did with respect to Ethan's arrangements and his recording. I feel like I really haven't made anything like this before."


    Ultimately, Stiff is the sound of a band finding their feet again and having the time of their lives. It's a record that refuses to buckle under the pressures of life, instead offering up a soundtrack to sing, dance, shout and scream along to. As a White Denim album, it's a joyride through the past ten years of the band's idiosyncratic catalogue while simultaneously pushing things further forward into new territories. "It's similar to our first record [Workout Holiday] in that we found the initial energy and just went with that," Petralli says of the initial studio spark that started it all. "We thought, what's the fundamental thing that made us want to get into a van and quit our terrible jobs and start this whole thing in the first place? And it was loud, fast-playing, rock and roll."

    1. Had 2 Know (Personal)
    2. Ha Ha Ha Ha (Yeah)
    3. Holda You (I'm Psycho)
    4. There's a Brain in My Head
    5. Take It Easy (Ever After Lasting Love)
    6. (I'm the One) Big Big Fun
    7. Real Deal Momma
    8. Mirrored in Reverse
    9. Thank You
    White Denim
    $19.99
    Vinyl LP - Sealed Buy Now
  • The Violent Sleep Of Reason The Violent Sleep Of Reason Quick View

    $27.99
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    The Violent Sleep Of Reason

    Pressed On Grey / Black Splatter


    Limited To 1000 Copies


    The Violent Sleep of Reason, the band's eighth full-length studio album, finds MESHUGGAH building upon their legacy for fearless metal sculpting within the context of extreme metal, but also recapturing some of the magic and excitement specifically within the aspect of performance, finding flow and groove that would be a challenge for any lesser band to locate, given such technical geometric madness at mischievous hand.


    "There's a distinct methodology", says drummer, writer and spokesman for the band Tomas Haake, that was put into motion to help the band achieve the level of "intensity" the attentive fan will feel as he/she makes their way through The Violent Sleep of Reason.


    For this one, it's all live takes, with either 3 or 4 of the band members recording their respective instruments simultaneously - which is a way of recording they haven't used in many years. And that definitely goes against the stream of what you see in most technical metal nowadays, where editing, drum programming, the use of "beat detectives" etc. is a way more common approach to recording. So on this one, MESHUGGAH went back towards a more old-school approach, properly rehearsing the songs as a whole band before going into studio to record them. Jens was in one room, guitarists were in one room, bass player Dick was sitting right next to the drum set with an amplifier/cab in the next room. So in that sense this is more "old school"; the methodology is in that sense more like what bands were doing in the '80s and 90s. "And that vibrancy comes out", says Haake; "it's a very audible difference, sloppier sounding if you will, but at the same time it brings a different energy than the last few albums - this is "less perfect", but in that sense, also more alive."


    The personal challenge taken on by the band produced fortunate byproducts as well, or, rather, it inspired them to "de-machine" other aspects of the technical MESHUGGAH juggernaut.


    "Yes, for this one we also changed our approach toward the guitar recording/sounds," explains Haake, who nonetheless confirms that the band is still using eight-string axes, and for the most part, tuning down half a step to achieve that torrid MESHUGGAH guitar grunt. "The last few albums have been mostly digital, guitar sounds-wise, using all digital guitar gear as opposed to analog tube amps and regular cabs. The upside of using all digital like we did previous, is you can re-amp it afterwards, as it's basically a clean signal so you can pick, choose, and tweak things at a later point. But with this album, it was six speakers, all separately miked in one (super-loud) room, each cabinet with a different head -Marshall, Orange, Mesa Boogie etc-and then mixing it up a little bit depending on the song. If there was a song that was a little slower and sludgier, we might add more of the Orange amp to get a tad more of that stoner sound. And if it's a bit more metal, we'd maybe use the Marshall head or the Mesa head a little more in the mix. So we did have the opportunity, to mix and match for each song so the guitar sound is not exactly the same for every song. And that's a difference from Koloss and obZen, for example, where pretty much every song had the same drum and guitar sound."


    But the end result is still a relentless onslaught of MESHUGGAH -patented ideas, save for one gorgeous and atmospheric respite, at the close of "Stifled."


    Framing the pacing and contours of record, Tomas says, "None of the songs stick out quite like, for example, the way "Bleed" did on obZen. To me, it doesn't really have hits-it just has really cool songs! Not that we ever really had "hits" though (laughs). They're just maybe a little "wilder" sounding on this album, much due also to the live recording approach. Dick and I wrote about half of the material, and the rest was either me and Mårten working together or Mårten writing on his own. We were kind of going for something nuts as is the case with all our writing/recording albums - We wanted to hear something that we hadn't heard ourselves do before." Fredrik was not part of the songwriting for this one, as he's been hard at work on his next solo album, but as always he was still very involved with every aspect of the recording, from recording rhythm guitars, guitar solos etc . "And that's also a completely new thing," continues Tomas. "Dick was never involved in the songwriting prior to this album, whereas Fredrik always was. And that, of course, creates a difference in the way the album as a whole came out."


    At the lyrical end, highlights include the title track, which, set to a massively heavy arch-djent rhythm, speaks of "the violent outcome of not dealing with what is going on, the violent implications of being asleep. "The title is actually inspired by a Goya painting called 'The Sleep of Reason Produces Monsters.'"


    A second highlight is strident opener and longest song on the album, "Clockworks," which is strafed by a typically super-human drum performance from Haake. "That's more about looking to yourself and who you are and things you want to change about yourself. And then in the context of how your mind works, as a clockwork. It's the idea of taking out all the little pins, wheels, and springs and kind of rebuilding it to make you function in a different fashion. So lyrics for that song is a look in on self, at things that you wish that you could change about yourself."


    Listen to tracks like the vertigo-inducing "Nostrum" and the slower if equally circular and note-dense "By the Ton," and it's easy to understand why it's been four years since a MESHUGGAH album. But mind-numbing complexity of the material is not the only reason, explains Haake.


    "No, well, I would say first of all, it takes us a lot of time to write. And we're very bad at focusing; we're very bad at multitasking. I don't think we ever wrote one single riff on a tour bus or in a hotel room. So if you have a touring cycle of two, two-and-a-half, three years, there's not going to be anything written in that time period. And that's just how we all function. We need to have a break, like, okay, time out now-nothing else for a year. We need to write for one year. But you also want to tour as much as possible for an album. Koloss, for example, we toured for like two-and-a-half years. And then you write. And when we do finally write, we scrutinize those songs, riffs, structures over and over and over, and change things as we go. So in a lot of the songs, maybe only one riff was actually there originally. So writing for us does take a long time, no doubt."


    As a result, the band's erudite and intelligent fan base "get something that they don't really hear in any other bands". On the first album you still hear a lot of Metallica and Anthrax and Bay Area kind of thrash metal influence. "We knew that we sounded a bit like that, but we were aiming for something we hadn't heard in any other band. And that's still the main fuel. We're not trying to write your average metal song. We're not trying to write catchy songs. We're not trying to write hit songs (laughs). We're just trying to write something that is cool, that we haven't heard before, and hopefully our fans haven't heard before. And that also gets harder and harder though, because by now, there are so many awesome musicians and bands and so much great music out there. But it would seem like the followers that we do have, the people that have kept buying our albums and stayed with us for a lot of years, are not necessarily the typical metal fans. The crowd we have is diverse. We have a lot of geeks and nerds and weirdos, and they are beautiful ones, you know? We have a lot of people with talent, and a lot of people that are also interested in music as art, and not just an event."


    But it's not lost on Tomas that MESHUGGAH is making daunting progressive music, music where melody is subservient to jackhammer rhythm, as evidenced by the way that even his lead singer, Jens Kidman, is situated within the maelstrom that is MESHUGGAH


    "He's the perfect tool for the job. Just like most people, we all, of course, like music where there's "proper singing", and we all love a great singer. Personally, I think the voice is the most empathic instrument. You hear someone sing and you're like, oh my God, that's the coolest instrument in the world. But at the same time, what we're trying to do is not that. Just like the guitars and me as a drummer, Jens also is a rhythmic tool, one that adds aggression, as well as words to back up that aggression if you will."


    So would Tomas then acquiesce to the idea of MESHUGGAH as metal's reigning enemies of melody?


    "In a sense, yeah. I mean, there is definitely melody and a lot of melodic thought put into tonalities, harmonies between bass and guitars and things like that, but at the same time, we're not often going for anything pretty. Sometimes there's a little bit, where we go, 'Awww, that's beautiful," but then we usually immediately mess it up again. You give it a little bit of something "nice" sometimes, but basically we're not going for niceness (laughs)."


    Produced by Meshuggah; engineered by Tue Madsen, Puk Studios, Kaerby, Denmark.

    1. Clockworks
    2. Born In Dissonance
    3. MonstroCity
    4. By The Ton
    5. Violent Sleep Of Reason
    6. Ivory Tower
    7. Stifled
    8. Nostrum
    9. Our Rage Won't Die
    10. Into Decay
    Meshuggah
    $27.99
    Colored Vinyl LP - 2 LPs Sealed Buy Now
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